I think that a good EQ in the loop is awesome. If you find an amp that has a great overall sound, but you wish that it was a bit brighter, darker, etc, but you find that you loose the character of the distortion when you get the tone you like you can play with both EQs to have a lot of controll over the final sound. It won't make up for a crap amp, but it can make a great amp a whole world of awesome.
Primarily, people also use Mahogany wood to construct the guitar neck. Since it’s able to prevent the neck from warping, you’ll never have to worry about any impact that can deteriorate the quality of sound. Furthermore, the body ends up with a spruce top. In comparison with cedar, spruce is much brighter and provides better echoes through the instrument.
Your guitar is equipped with a volume knob – but that doesn’t mean you won’t benefit from a volume pedal. Very useful for various applications, the volume pedal can act – as you imagine – as a pure volume for your guitar signal (placed right before the amp) and also as a master volume if placed after your amp. By using a stereo volume pedal you can further expand the tonal possibilities of your setup. Ernie Ball makes a variety of volume pedals with different specifications (in order to match your guitar, amplifier or musical needs). Mooer offers a very compact and stylish pedal, the Expline – while Boss still sells to this day the FV-500-H, a pedal that passed the test of time and still performs amazingly well.

This is the main component that separates acoustic guitars from electric guitars. A pickup senses the vibration from a string, transfers it to the guitar amplifier which then transfers it to the loudspeaker. There are many pickups but we’ll cover the four basic ones. The single coil pickup has a single coil of wire with two horseshoe-shaped magnets. They produce a bright, cutting sound and are quite noisy. The P90 pickup is a single coil pickup with one wide coil that increases the surface area of the strings, producing a bigger yet less bright sound. Humbucker pickups were designed with twin coils. They produce richer, warmer, more powerful sounds but roll back some higher frequency sound. Active-passive pickups use a battery-powered circuit to produce a powerful yet balanced tone across a range of frequencies. It outputs a balanced, clean tone.
Thinking out loud... what defines electronics then? I've always assumed that the pickups, caps, pots, etc. inside an electric guitar constituted an electronic system. The "guitar's electronics" facilitate a deliberate flow of electrons through a circuit with semi-conductors, etc. Heck, with coils and magnets (and sometimes battery packs), they also provide the electricity that's conducted through the system.
Taylors have a "happier" sound and I like the feel of them. I am a novice but from what I have seen for a beginner with an acoustic guitar, they felt and sounded warmer and less tinny than the laminated wood ones. A good rosewood taylor isn't on the cheap side of things but it feels like you can play better than you can. And the model I looked at had strings that were nice and close to the frets so you didn't feel like you were pushing in deep like the keys of an old typerwriter. Go into a Guitar Center or somewhere you can actually feel what you are getting before you buy anything. I got a cheap Gibson online less than a month ago and got what I paid for when it came with the bridge completely missing and a brassy sound when it was played. Buy your stuff in person. I think that Gibson is probably still a good brand, but the quality control of the cheaper models they put their name on is something I might question from my first experience with them...
In the 1980s, when shred metal was at its peak, Ibanez took a big share of the market with models that were geared towards the fastest, loudest players – thin necks, floating double-locking tremolos and high-output pickups. These guitars were endorsed by modern day virtuosos such as Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, with many artists designing their own custom Ibanez models.

If you wanted to wire a 4 conductor Dimarzio or Seymour Duncan in this way, just look at the diagram. Solder the 2 "middle wires" together, tape the connection, then solder the outer wires to the output. Be very careful when working with 4 conductor wiring. The colors and polarity are very important. You could easily make a mistake and wire an "out-of-phase" arrangement which would have low output, a squawky, thin sound AND the humbucker would NOT be hum canceling.
It was shortly after the debut of the first Supros that National Dobro entered a period of major transition. By 1935, at least, the company had decided to abandon the sunny beaches of L.A. for the freezing winters of Chicago, then the principal home of America’s instrument makers, and not coincidentally, America’s giant mass merchandisers Montgomery Ward and Sears. Both Wards and Sears had been offering National and Dobro resonator guitars since the late ’20s. Being in Chicago had the obvious advantages of proximity to the resources surrounding the business and being next door to the world’s two largest retailers of the day. The move to the Midwest began early 1936 and took almost a year and a half. Throughout most of ’36, the majority of production continued in L.A.
Here we have a Faithful Recreation of the classic Martin D-18 that was well crafted in Japan over 33 years ago. This is an excellent vintage Japanese guitar as it has been well taken care of all these years And has spent its years in California in the perfect climate to preserve the guitars original structural and cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still JVG rated at very good to excellent with no cracks or finish checking none – clean and still shines like glass….. its 1-11/16ths at the nut neck is a nice comfortable medium slim profile, neck is straight with correct amount of slight relief, action is good medium low and plays with ease and sound is clear and volume is good, tone is vintage sweet from its Aged tone woods. This is a true Lawsuit model as it has the direct image shape & size of the vintage Martin it copies is is a very cool D-18 guitar, its 33 years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. .
Chorus: Since this is still a repeating effect that has a tempo component, the chorus of a song tends to be a tough fit.Verse: The lower intensity and high emotion of most verses in Christian worship leaves room for some tremolo effect, depending on what the guitar is doing.Bridge: Short solos during the bridge are an ideal place for the tremolo effect, particularly if it hasn’t been used in other parts of the song.
The Thunderbird IV was first introduced in 1963 and instantly became one of rock's most recognizable bass guitar designs. For almost five decades, the Thunderbird has powered artists as varied as Nikki Sixx, The Who, Kings of Leon, Cheap Trick, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Steely Dan and The Silversun Pickups. Turn on your radio and you'll hear a Thunderbird bass. Now, Epiphone takes all the vintage mojo of the original Thunderbird IV and sends it flying into the future with Gibson TB Plus humbuckers with ceramic magnets and all the 'Bird's original styling and features intact.
A selection of makers within the high-end, hand-built crowd of today do offer variations on the opamp-based template discussed above. Blackstone Appliances bases its Mosfet Overdrive on a discrete transistorized circuit centered around, yes, mosfets, and Klon’s Centaur pedal uses… well, who the hell knows? They cover the entire circuit board in epoxy goop to keep the cloners at bay, but this expensive overdrive certainly sounds different. Other popular boutique overdrives are found in the Barber Electronics LTD pedal, the Crowther Audio Hot Cake, and the Fulltone OCD.
{ "thumbImageID": "LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-White/H11149000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "Rogue LX205B 5-String Series III Electric Bass Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Pearl White", "sku": "sku:site51278002525864", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "159.99", "msrpPrice": "319.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-White-1278002525864.gc", "skuImageId": "LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-White/H11149000001000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-White/H11149000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Metallic Blue", "sku": "sku:site51278002525867", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "159.99", "msrpPrice": "319.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Metallic-Blue-1278002525867.gc", "skuImageId": "LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Metallic-Blue/H11149000003000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Metallic-Blue/H11149000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Candy Apple Red", "sku": "sku:site51278002525866", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "159.99", "msrpPrice": "319.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red-1278002525866.gc", "skuImageId": "LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red/H11149000002000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red/H11149000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Pearl Black", "sku": "sku:site51278002525878", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "159.99", "msrpPrice": "319.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-Black-1278002525878.gc", "skuImageId": "LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-Black/H11149000004000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LX205B-5-String-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-Black/H11149000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }

I only dealt with them directly on my SX Mahogany Strat w P90s. For $119 I got a really nice beginner guitar. I added cheap grover tuners, I filed a few frets and polished them, shimmed the neck, sanded (more scuffed really) the sticky finish on the back of the neck, and I've got a nice little beater that sounds awesome (to me at least), and has nice low action. I'm a relative newbie, but got some good experience with guitar setup and didn't risk trashing a expensive guitar.

The Fender Deluxe Players Stratocaster Electric Guitar gives you classic Strat sound and feel in a beautiful package. This luxurious model is upgraded with American-made Vintage Noiseless pickups, medium-jumbo frets, and a 12" neck radius. As a result, it sounds fantastic and plays easy. It also is equipped with a push-button pickup switch (in addition to the usual toggle) that gives you 7 pickup combinations. Other deluxe features include a vintage-style synchronized tremolo, vintage-style tuners and gold-plated hardware throughout.


Marty is another player who’s built up his videos and YouTube Channels over a number of years and it’s become a vast resource for lessons at all levels. There’s a lot of stuff about how to play particular songs or how to mimic a certain musician’s style, but mixed up with these are plenty of absolute beginners’ lessons that teach the basics. There are some guest artists explaining different techniques, but mostly Marty’s The Man. The good thing about Marty is his great patience during the videos—he takes plenty of time to explain things and demonstrates them nice and slow, so you hardly ever have to stop and rewind the videos. Marty has a quirky sense of humour, too. It takes the hassle out of the harder lessons to master. He has a good website linked from his YouTube channel and a few cool, free giveaways. Check that out at www.guitarjamz.com
Speaking of versatility, pedals aren't the only type of multi effects units that you'll find here. There are also rack-mounted models like the Rocktron VooDu Valve Online Guitar Multi Effects Processor and the Line 6 POD HD PRO X Guitar Multi Effects. Looking for a case to store your multi effects pedal when it's time to pack up after the show? Check out the Gator G-MULTIFX - Medium Guitar Effects Pedal Bag and the Boss BOSS Bag L2 for starters. There's lots to see here, and it's worth taking the time to have a close look!
Unfortunately this guitar does not come with a solid top, but for its price you really can't expect much. Still, it is much better than what guitarists of old had to start out with! If you are looking for a beginner's guitar to test the water or if budget is limited, then you should check out the Epiphone DR-100. It currently comes in 3 colors - Ebony, Natural, and Vintage Sunburst (my personal favorite among the three). The MSRP is 182.00 but most online guitar shops sell it for $109.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Muelle principal Tope Bloque del trémolo Varilla de tope Con la guitarra afinada correctamente, ajuste el muelle principal y verifique que la varilla de tope toque el bloque del trémolo y el tope. Si la varilla de tope no toca el bloque del tremolo y el tope, gire el tornillo de ajuste del muelle principal hasta que lo haga.
Tremolo – Not to be confused with a tremolo bar (which is closer to the Whammy pedal), this effect works on volume. You can think of tremolo pedals as being like strumming a note, and then wiggling the volume knob on the amp while it’s ringing. Usually, the pedal will have controls for speed (equivalent to how fast the volume is “wiggled”) and depth (equivalent to how far the knob would be turned).
If you want to access some resources that will help dealing with a specific tonal pursuit, piece of gear or other questions related to your rig, I’d recommend giving Guitar Tricks 14-day free trial a test run - there’s no obligations and you’ve got nothing to lose - except two free weeks of one of the most comprehensive and thorough guitar education websites in existence.
: Decca's flat-top acoustic guitars seem to usually sell for $50-75. They're not highly regarded because (a) acoustic guitars don't have the collecto-mania of electric guitars, except for certain brands (Martin, Gibson, etc.), and (b) the tonewoods Decca used were inferior to solid spruce as used by the aforementioned makers. Indeed, Decca often used plywood, which doesn't yield very good tone in an acoustic.
At some point, possibly in 1967 – please forgive the fuzzy chronology, – Unicord was purchased by Gulf + Western, the big oil/hospitality conglomerate. This was part the corporate acquisition mania rage of the mid-’60s which included deals for Fender (CBS), Gretsch (Baldwin), Valco (Seeburg), Kay (Valco) and Gibson (Norlin). Either just before or just after the Gulf + Western purchase of Unicord, Unicord was merged with Merson. It was probably then Merson moved from New York City to Westbury.
• Guitar : ELECTRIC SUNBURST captures the sound of a classic guitar, chosen with its rich, warm and versatile sound. The continuous signal path has been retained throughout, including high-quality cables, vintage tube preamps and high-resolution transducers to ensure that every nuance of this legendary instrument was accurately fixed. Since the string holder and neck were recorded separately, you can fully control the balance of the mix. Moreover, a condenser microphone was installed above the strings to capture subtle sound nuances and add punch and realism.
Most of the better machine heads on the market these days use a standard .375" headstock hole, so swapping tuners isn’t that hard to do. The problem comes with the mounting at the rear of the peghead. Luckily, if you use the type that screw down from the front side with a nut and washer, you can swap and test before you drill additional mounting-screw holes.

Gibson announced the new 2012 Les Paul Standard at Winter NAMM 2012. The new Standard features two Burstbucker Pro humbuckers with coil splitting, and Pure Bypass. Pure Bypass gives the option of bypassing the volume and tone potentiometers, sending the signal directly from the bridge pickup to the output jack. The 2012 Standard also features Gibson’s “modern weight relief” as opposed to the chambered body of previous Standards. Other changes include a phase switch and compound fretboard radius.
So, you want a guitar that's absolutely packed with tone? One that has the vibe that it's been pulled straight out of the 1950s, but has all the playability, comfort, and stability of a brand-new instrument? Then get your hands on the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. This stylish archtop smolders with personality. And with the P90 pickup onboard at neck position, you have an unbelievable vintage/atittude tonal combination working in your favor. You'll notice right away that the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin has plenty of projection and volume, and moreso in the low/mids than traditional archtop guitars. You'll love it for that. Why does the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin sound so good? Sure, it's that P90 working with the hollowbody design that gets things going. But the primary tonewoods here are pure North American perfection, including a Canadian Wild Cherry archtop, back, and sides. The finish here is a custom polish that gives each and every Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin a satin sheen that recalls French 19th century craftsmanship. Whatever your musical style, you'll have a friend on your side in the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. It is, plain and simple, a great guitar. Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin Archtop Guitar Features at a Glance: Finish: Cognac Burst Archtop hollowbody electric guitar Canadian Wild Cherry archtop Canadian Wild cherry back and sides Silver Leaf maple neck Contoured high-gloss black headstock Custom Polished finish Rosewood Fingerboard Adjustable Tusq Bridge by Graphtech Cream Binding 1 x Godin Kingpin P90 single-coil pickup 1 x Volume, 1 x Tone 16" fingerboard radius 24.84" scale 1.72" nut width
Pictured is a tremolo arm or vibrato tailpiece style bridge and tailpiece system, often called a whammy bar or trem. It uses a lever ("vibrato arm") attached to the bridge that can temporarily slacken or tighten the strings to alter the pitch. A player can use this to create a vibrato or a portamento effect. Early vibrato systems were often unreliable and made the guitar go out of tune easily. They also had a limited pitch range. Later Fender designs were better, but Fender held the patent on these, so other companies used older designs for many years.

Practical - These sessions will involve exercising your fingers. For example, fingering chords would fall under this category, as the focus will be on getting physically comfortable with positioning and changing between chords, or experimenting with new strumming patterns. With lead guitar, the physical side covers techniques such as legato (you'll learn what that means soon enough!), string bends, speed drills and anything that involves the physical side of playing guitar.
Zappa – would have liked to hear him play with Hendrix – as a compliment not competition. Zappa, a classically trained musician, playing in a rock and roll world,had such depth of experience from without – as much as Hendrix had from within – too bad the intensity killed him; Zappa tamed it and had fun with it. Hendrix was driven by it. Great guitarist? Who cares! My picks are artists, something a machine, human or otherwise can not approach let alone touch, and that is what it is all about, touching the soul through music. One trick ponies are a dime a dozen – some of them are at the right place at the right time and their ego does the rest. Who will be remembered a hundred years from now – it will not be the "best".

Most guitar especially for those which have more than 1 pickup have selector switch. Attached on the body and normally below the 1st E string on the body of a stratocaster guitar. And on the top shoulder for Les Paul. Its a basic things to understand the switches on which pickups its toggling. First, you need to understand what is the switch for???


I wish I knew what goes on in there. I'm told it is a simple cut of the laminated neck and then the tone block is glued to the back. I hope it is that simple as I am about to perform some major surgery on my 9 ply neck to acomidate this construction technique . If any body out there can lend some advise on this , please do so I don't turn my bass into a clock!

I have an old Zoom 505 all in one pedal plugged into the clean channel of my Peavy Scorpion 2-12 amp. I’m using the distortion, chorus, reverb, delay, etc. programmed from my pedal. I want to add my Crybaby wah so it’s just a matter of easily just switching the order of both pedals and see what works best. Until I upgrade, it should be simple. Here we go. Thanks.

Fender is an American company founded by Clarence Leonidas Fender in the year 1946. The company headquarter is located in Scottsdale, Arizona, United States. The company provides a wide range of guitars to customers at an attractive price range. The company is best manufacturer of amplifiers and stringed instruments and has become the leading guitar brand in India too. - Musical-instruments-Online
Since treble frequencies pass through a capacitor, what would happen if you routed the positive lead THROUGH the capacitor rather than having it ground out frequencies?  The answer: just the opposite - the signal from you pickups would pass through the capacitor and only treble frequencies would get through.  Aha!  A new type of tone control.  The illustration below shows this type of wiring in a bit of an advanced concept.
The Ovation Guitar Company founded by Charles Kaman based in the USA. The company primarily manufactures nylon-string acoustic guitars & steel-string acoustic guitars.These are the kind of electric guitars that are ideal for a recording in a studio and also great for stage performance. Their design incorporates, a wood top with a rounded, synthetic bowl shape instead of the traditional back and sides. CE44-RR is one of the most popular series of acoustic guitars produced by this brand. This is an expensive brand of guitars whose starting price is 31,555 INR approximately.

Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, an unforgettable journey, slideshow. This optimistic and festive track can perfectly fit for any corporate media projects. Featuring muted electric guitar, electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.


In music, a guitar chord is a set of notes played on a guitar. A chord's notes are often played simultaneously, but they can be played sequentially in an arpeggio. The implementation of guitar chords depends on the guitar tuning. Most guitars used in popular music have six strings with the "standard" tuning of the Spanish classical-guitar, namely E-A-D-G-B-E' (from the lowest pitched string to the highest); in standard tuning, the intervals present among adjacent strings are perfect fourths except for the major third (G,B). Standard tuning requires four chord-shapes for the major triads.

Of all the positions GC interviews for, tech has the highest standards and is arguably more demanding in terms of hours worked and product knowledge required than store manager. The tech for the store I worked at frequently worked 60+ hours a week to keep turn-around time to a week or less and his set-ups were so good and in such high demand that the store got an exception to the chain-wide $35 set-up price to charge $50 in hopes of lightening his load/keeping his overtime down, but he still got just as much work as he did before. If you're unsure about the reputation of your local GC's tech, don't be afraid to call the other stores and ask them who the best tech in their district is, because they'll usually be pretty straight forward with you. Most GC sales people have had their instruments set up by their in-store tech at least once and if their tech isn't very good, they'll tell you who you should go to if you want good work done because it's an absolute pain in the ass dealing with a customer whose instrument wasn't set up right when the tech is gone for the day and having to deal with the tech's fuck-up.


“Perhaps the weakest block, and the only one I spend time trying to dial in a decent tone. Lots of high gain fizz options with loss of body and character. Boost is decent, Tscreamer isn't, but for me the Blues choice with drive=1pm, tone=noon and output=11am gave a nice breakup tone without losing bottom end. If you have an overdrive pedal you like..you may still be using it.”

However, unlike a boost pedal, the overdrive effect is not dependent on the amplifier to have a distorted sound. The overdrive pedal will internally boost the input signal so much that the top of the signal wave will be forced to naturally shrink itself. This is called soft clipping and it simulates amplifier like clipping as though an amplifier was being overly driven, hence the name overdrive. The distortion pedal will also boost the input signal but will then add resistors within the circuitry to not just shrink or soft clip the wave form but completely flatten the wave peaks. This is called hard clipping. For more understanding on the differences between soft clipping and hard clipping see the illustration below.
Rounding out our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars, the Yamaha L-Series LL6 is a functional, reliable and great-sounding guitar. The LL6 features a solid Engelmann spruce top that’s treated with Yamaha’s ARE (Acoustic Resonance Enhancement) technology. This gives the guitar the rich tone that you’ll only find on guitars that have aged for many years.
Gibson thought it was a good idea to label the switches to make using them more intuitive, the problem is that they don't really correspond to their use in praxis. The Rhythm label was justified back in the rock 'n' roll era (that of Guitar Slim not Boyz II Men), but the times have changed and nothing stops you now from playing a rhythm guitar in Treble position (metalheads love it).
{ "thumbImageID": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Vintage-Sunburst-Black-Pickguard/L01028000003002", "defaultDisplayName": "Sterling by Music Man S.U.B. StingRay Maple Fingerboard Electric Bass", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Black Black Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000209679", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Black-Black-Pickguard-1500000209679.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Black-Black-Pickguard/L01028000002002", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Black-Black-Pickguard/L01028000002002-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Satin Vintage Sunburst Black Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000209681", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Vintage-Sunburst-Black-Pickguard-1500000209681.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Vintage-Sunburst-Black-Pickguard/L01028000003002", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Vintage-Sunburst-Black-Pickguard/L01028000003002-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Mint Green White Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000207686", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Mint-Green-White-Pickguard-1500000207686.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Mint-Green-White-Pickguard/L01028000001001", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Mint-Green-White-Pickguard/L01028000001001-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Another factor that may need to be considered is the length of the speaker cable. Very long speaker cable runs may affect the performance of the system, either by causing line loss of power or by affecting the impedance. For best performance and highest wattage output with bass stacks or combos with extension speakers, bassists typically use the shortest possible speaker cable.
Gibson’s offerings also differ from Fender in that they largely employ scale lengths of 24.75, resulting in a warmer, more rounded out sound that has come to characterize the brand’s output (3). Playability is also affected by the shorter scale length size, with reduced tension making string bending a bit easier. Gibson’s generally utilize mahogany in their construction, which contributes to a darker tone with increased sustain and warmth.

It has a solid poplar body with a maple neck and rosewood fingerboard, and based on the early reviews of the Epiphone Les Paul SL, the fit, finish and general playability are all pretty good. It’s loaded up with Epiphone’s reliable tune-o-matic bridge, a volume and tone knob, as well as a three-way selector switch to toggle your pickups and dial in tone. The hardware does feel admittedly cheap, but the general consensus is that this guitar ships well-made, well-setup and more than appropriate for a first-time player.


Guitar combo amplifiers were at first used with bass guitars and electric pianos, but these instruments produce a wider frequency range and need a full-range speaker system. Much more amplifier power is required to reproduce low-frequency sound, especially at high volume. Reproducing low frequencies also requires a suitable woofer or subwoofer speaker and enclosure, with bass cabinets often being larger in size than a cabinet for mid-range or high-range sounds. As well, the open-back cabinets used on many electric guitar amps, while effective for electric guitar, do not have good bass reproduction.


If you’re one of those “I plug directly into the amp and don’t need no stinkin’ guitar effects pedals” kinda dude, then godspeed and thanks for stopping by. On the other hand, if you own a pedal board upon which you trip the light fantastic, stick around — this list of guitar effects pedals you must have will validate what you might know, illuminate what you don’t know, and quickly help you generate a massive and highly versatile sound palette.
There have been several changes in the amplifier world since we last took a look at this mega amp article, spurring us to refresh a lot of content. We have replaced some models in our top ten chart, such as the Bugera Trirec and the Vox AV15, with a host of new additions. These include classic combos like the Fender Champion 100 and the Vox AC15C2, with some awesome heads such as the EVH 5150III and the Boss Katana, as well as the super portable Roland Cube Street.
ANYBODY, OF EVERY ABILITY, CAN PLAY – Designed for every type of learner, ChordBuddy includes modifications that allow individuals of every ability to successfully learn a new instrument. Perfect for use in the music therapy, home, or school setting, ChordBuddy can help individuals learn to play the guitar flat or with two people at a time, making for what is an all-around therapeutic experience.

Stacking the C-major scale with thirds creates a chord progression  Play (help·info), traditionally enumerated with the Roman numerals I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viio. Its major-key sub-progression C-F-G (I-IV-V) is conventional in popular music. In this progression, the minor triads ii-iii-vi appear in the relative minor key (Am)'s corresponding chord progression.
Tremolo is the gentle art of making your signal subtly cut in and out of volume. Think of all those old surf records. Phase and flange are quite similar in essence; phase emulates the sweeping of the frequency band, alternating between cutting the bass and treble frequencies, while flange does a similar thing but with a slightly more extreme sound. Wah is perhaps more well known; the Jim Dunlop Cry Baby wah pedal has been used for decades by players of all genres. Adding a highly distinctive wah-wah sound can elevate a solo into something infinitely more interesting. Or it can add a bit of that classic wakka-wakka sound you hear on classic funk records.
The truth is that I've never known what it's like to not want to play music of my own because I come from an Irish family that all played instruments. Luckily for me, my parents were very young when I was born -- they were like sixteen, seventeen -- and they were from a tradition of people playing instruments, accordions, pennywhistles, guitars, harmonicas and things like that -- cheap little instruments. But because they were young and moved over to Manchester, they liked rock and roll and pop music of the day.
Once CNC (computer numeric control) equipment was introduced into guitar factories starting in the late 1980s and continuing on into the 1990s, it became far less of an issue where a guitar was made. Many of the CNC machines were made in Japan. In some cases the difference between an American-made guitar versus a Japanese-made guitar versus a Korean-made guitar was little more than where the machine was located. To make a guitar in the USA involved putting a Japanese-made CNC machine on a boat and sending it to the US whereupon it could be programmed in the USA and then American or other wood could be fed into the machine, which would spit out components made to tolerances within a few thousandths of an inch of the programming. By contrast a Japanese-made guitar would be produced by leaving the CNC machine in Japan, programming it with a disc done in the USA, and then importing wood to be put into the machine which would spit out components to the same specifications as those which would be made by a similar machine in the USA. A Korean-made guitar could be remarkably similar since the Japanese-made CNC machine could be sent to Korea whereupon the same process could be done there. By 1990 the quantity of guitars made in Japan was nowhere near what it had been earlier, but Korean production was in high gear. While some Japanese instruments have come to be viewed as quite desirable and collectible, I have seen little evidence of such activity with respect to Korean instruments, but the fact remains that the better-quality Korean guitars are remarkably good and most certainly are suitable for use on stage or in the studio.
It has been stated repeatedly that the CEO is a challenge, toxic whatever and yes, all of it is true. Many if not most people who take a management position here don't last a year. This is especially true at Corporate where at any given time half of the positions are open because employee turnover is off the charts and they are horrible at recruiting talent to get replacements hired. That's a really bad combination to have in a company. So the first question you have to ask yourself is: do you want to show a job that only lasted six to twelve months on your resume with a company that has a positive, almost cult like global brand image? Or another way, how will you explain your short tenure to the next company you interview with and make them believe you weren't the problem? When I was outside Nashville and told people I worked for Gibson 100% of them said "that's a great company" even though they had no clue. It's highly likely your next potential employer will think that way as well.
Bassists can put an incorrect (that is too low) impedance load on their amplifiers even if they connect multiple speakers that are at the correct impedance rating. For example, if a bassist has a combo amp in which the power amp is rated at 4 ohms, and she/he plugs in a second 4 ohm speaker cabinet in parallel, this will drop the impedance ("load") on the amplifier down to 2 ohms, which is too low for the amplifier. When speakers of different impedance are wired up together (e.g., an 8 ohm speaker cabinet and a 4 ohm speaker cab, the impedance is calculated differently). In most applications, when bass speakers are plugged into an amplifier, they are wired in parallel. The parallel "input/output" speaker jacks on the rear of most bass cabinets, when plugged into additional speakers in a "daisy chain" approach, will cause the speakers to be connected in parallel. More rarely, bass speaker cabs may be wired up in series, which means that the impedance is calculated differently. Series wiring is much more complicated and in cases where a bassist is using series wiring, a custom-made cabling system is typically used. Some bass manufacturers that build large speaker cabinets with multiple speakers may wire some of the speakers in series and some in parallel to achieve a certain impedance rating for the entire speaker cabinet (e.g., in 8x10" speaker cabinets, the speakers inside the cabinet may be all wired up in series, but the overall cabinet's "input/output" jacks are in parallel). Professional bass technicians and speaker designers setting up custom-made bass speaker systems for bass players from major bands may use an electronic meter to test the impedance of the speaker cabinets they design.

As we mentioned before, the first mass-produced solid body electric guitar was introduced in the early ‘50s as a way for guitar players to avoid getting that unwanted feedback that amplified hollow body electric guitars were infamous for. Today, there are countless solid body guitars to accommodate any type of player and price range—from beginner guitar players to seasoned pros playing genres spanning hard rock, country, blues, heavy metal, jazz, and more! Some of the most popular solid body electric guitars include the Fender Telecaster, the Fender Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson SG, the Ibanez RG, and the ESP Eclipse.
×