First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful.  My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do.  Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff.  Can't rave enough!  Definitely found my guitar store for life!  Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)
A variety of labels are used for level attenuation potentiometers (knobs) in a guitar amplifier and other guitar equipment. Electric guitars and basses have a volume control on the instrument that attenuates the signal from selected pickups. There may be two volume controls on an electric guitar or bass, wired in parallel to mix the signal levels from the neck and bridge pickups. Rolling back the guitar's volume control also changes the pickup's equalization or frequency response, which can provide pre-distortion equalization.
Mahogany is a very dense, strong wood used in all parts of guitar manufacture except fretboards and bridges, which require harder wood. A mahogany neck and back are often found on short-scale guitars with maple tops. Another common combination is an all-mahogany body and neck (excluding the fretboard). Because mahogany is not very hard, it emphasizes the midrange and bass frequencies for a mellower guitar tone. Mahogany is a very resonant wood which enhances a guitar's sustain. It is generally a uniform rich brown color.
The greatest all time innovative guitarist to come out of the UK. Such a distinctive style and sound which is most important. Many guitarists have a similar sound and tone to others. This guy got me hooked on the sound of the guitar from a young age and I have tried to find others in a similar vein to no avail and I own over 2000 rock/metal CD's and have followed the scene since the mid 80's. A totally under estimated guitarist in my opinion. Long live The Cult.
The first recording of an electric guitar west of the Mississippi was in Dallas, in September 1935, during a session with Roy Newman and His Boys, an early Western swing dance band. Their guitarist, Jim Boyd, used his electrically-amplified guitar during the recording of three songs, Hot Dog Stomp, Shine On, Harvest Moon, and Corrine, Corrina.. An even earlier Chicago recording of an electrically amplified lap steel guitar was during a series of sessions by Milton Brown and His Brownies (another early Western swing band) that took place January 27-28, 1935, when Bob Dunn played his amplified Hawaiian guitar.
This is definitely the coolest music store in the Pacific Northwest. If you are a high end guitar lover, you need to go. If you are a pedal nerd, you NEED to go. James, the owner, has relationships built with the coolest vendors in the country, and manages to collect the coolest gear. Earthquaker Devices makes a custom line of pedals just for this store, for christ's sake. I've never seen so many pedals in my life, and that's really neat because not many stores focus on that. The staff makes you feel right at home. They are so knowledgable and pleasant to be around. No highbrow guitar store attitude to be found here. So all in all, you need to go check it out. It's a super fun place to play some quality instruments. Plus, their logo is a monkey in a cowboy hat, named "Monk Williams". I'm not sure how it could get any better than that.

Play with it, see what happens. Worst case; you’ll set it, forget it or use it as a means to dial out some hum. Best case, you’ll find the guitar in your hands is far more versatile than advertised and use the tone knob to wield it like a musical samurai and leave everyone wondering…”how the hell do they get so many sounds without a guitar change?!”
Although Gibson guitars are expensive, they are the highest quality guitars out there. The guitar is made of high quality wood that makes your guitar create rich and smooth tunes. One of the most famous guitars created by Gibson is the Les Paul. The Les Paul is used by multiple celebrated musicians all over the world and it has been used many different times in musical history, meaning this guitar has survived for ages. Gibson is one of the most popular and praiseworthy guitar names on the market. Investing in a Gibson will be like carrying an award in your hands.
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With that said, it’s important to make a distinction between reverb pedals and echo pedals. These two are often time a source of major confusion. Here’s the deal. Reverb is similar to an echo in a sense that you are hearing the sound as it bounces off a surface. However, reverb is fairly quick and happens almost instantly. Echo effect, on the other hand, takes much longer to reach back to the user. One way to understand the difference is to yell in a smaller room, and then go out and yell in a canyon. Similar goes for delays. If you want to learn more about delay pedals, check out our dedicated guide here.

The Epiphone Dove Pro is such a good guitar that it’s going to be a contender for a top pick in pretty much any list, but in this one we’ve given it the title of best value electric acoustic. You can spend a lot more money and not get much more guitar, and you can even spend more money and not get a guitar as good. The Dove Pro is that accomplished.
The history of signal modification isn’t just one of pleasing the ear through unconventional methods. It works both ways: Guitar effects have modified their users, just as much as their users and engineers have modified their sound. New effects can change a guitarist’s playing ability completely, concealing their technique as well as embellishing it. U2’s The Edge, for example, is known for his restraint of technique by embedding different rhythms within delay settings.

And therein is the VST guitar's edge, as it continues to improve in quality, not matching that of performances by the late Jimmy or the long-standing Carlos or whomever one adopts as their personal guitar deity, but bringing in new qualities of its own. In computer science terms, improved controllers are providing ever more interesting views of ever more detailed models to listeners attuned to the particular environment augmented by the virtual model. The guitar VST is not your daddy, but it might be the little sibling with your daddy's eyes. In the long run.. well... forget that. We love you pops. My little sisters, brothers and I hope you live forever, or at least as long was we do.
Shreddage 2: Absolute Electric Guitar is our answer to the challenge of total guitar sampling. It is a complete instrument with elegant scripting, intuitive mapping, and incredible depth. This virtual guitar for Kontakt is the ultimate weapon for rock & metal music, built from the ground up for realistic playing in any hi-gain style. All samples were recorded on a 7-string guitar and are provided clean/DI so you can use your own custom amp tone - or use the included Peavey ReValver HPse.

Get ready to rock! This kid's electric guitar set has everything little rockstars need to jam out in style and foster a growing passion for music. Whether a child is just learning the basics or has mastered every chord, this guitar is the perfect practice tool to lift them to the next level. Hook it up to the included 5-watt amplifier and let your kid experience music like never before!
If you love the sound of both acoustic and electric guitars, but you want to play both at the same time without draping one of each over your shoulder, then an Acoustic simulator pedal is ideal. These pedals take your guitar signal – regardless of what electric guitar you’re playing and make it sound like it’s an acoustic. These are often used by guitarists on stage who want to switch between an acoustic and electric guitar sound during a set or even the same song. The Boss AC-3 Acoustic Simulator is a great option.
I just noticed that no-one has mentioned Robben Ford – another master of both technique and taste and a certain contender for my top ten list, fighting for a place in the same space as Larry Carlton and John Scofield. (John Mayer can certainly play, but for me, any of those three offers at least as much technique, and a wider range of accomplishments, than JM – check out their various versions of “I don’t need no doctor”).
The original National and Dobro companies produced the most popular and most imitated acoustic Hawaiian guitars ever made, and Valco was no slouch when it came to their electric successors. Indeed, lap steels are among the most highly regarded of Valco’s products, regardless of the brand name on the headstock. The more affordable steels still command a respectable price considering their ubiquity, and the higher-end models usually match the equivalent Fenders and Gibsons in appraisal. This is particularly true of the National Grand Console, one of the staple steels of the 1950s.
PRS SE Standard 24 Electric Guitar The PRS SE Standard 24 is a great first or backup electric guitar. This is a reliable workhorse that more than delivers in design, build, playing comfort and overall sonic performance. It can also be your only electric guitar, but chances are you’ll want another one along the way and give in to another model - or another SE Standard 24.
Description: Body: Maple - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearl & Abalone Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Vintage Yellow Sunburst - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
That is, if the tone caps in parallel filtered from within th 1k-2k and 3k-5k frequency band with the pot determining how much of those ranges are filtered off, then moving the 2nd cap parallel to the pot should shift the 2k window of the bigger cap so it would be filtering less of the 3-5k at one end of it’s sweep, and more of the 1k-3k filtered at the other end of it’s sweep. (my frequency selection and math here are conceptual only, and not to be taken as accurate measurements).
Recently I was in the market for a low watt 1x12 amp. My local music store had a good selection. I grouped an old Vox AC15, Fender Deluxe, Orange, and a PV around me. I used a PRS Custom 22 to try them out. After about an hour I decided on the Fender. The sales guy suggested I try one more amp. It was an Egater Rebel 20 head with an Egnater 1x12 cab. My reaction was instant! If you have not played one of these you owe it to yourself to check them out! I bought it and also a Rebel 30 1x12 Combo a few weeks later! They SING!
Bassists can put an incorrect (that is too low) impedance load on their amplifiers even if they connect multiple speakers that are at the correct impedance rating. For example, if a bassist has a combo amp in which the power amp is rated at 4 ohms, and she/he plugs in a second 4 ohm speaker cabinet in parallel, this will drop the impedance ("load") on the amplifier down to 2 ohms, which is too low for the amplifier. When speakers of different impedance are wired up together (e.g., an 8 ohm speaker cabinet and a 4 ohm speaker cab, the impedance is calculated differently). In most applications, when bass speakers are plugged into an amplifier, they are wired in parallel. The parallel "input/output" speaker jacks on the rear of most bass cabinets, when plugged into additional speakers in a "daisy chain" approach, will cause the speakers to be connected in parallel. More rarely, bass speaker cabs may be wired up in series, which means that the impedance is calculated differently. Series wiring is much more complicated and in cases where a bassist is using series wiring, a custom-made cabling system is typically used. Some bass manufacturers that build large speaker cabinets with multiple speakers may wire some of the speakers in series and some in parallel to achieve a certain impedance rating for the entire speaker cabinet (e.g., in 8x10" speaker cabinets, the speakers inside the cabinet may be all wired up in series, but the overall cabinet's "input/output" jacks are in parallel). Professional bass technicians and speaker designers setting up custom-made bass speaker systems for bass players from major bands may use an electronic meter to test the impedance of the speaker cabinets they design.
I spoke with Matt “M@” Picone, of Fractal Audio, about the increasing use of modelers for today’s biggest acts. Their flagship modeler, the Axe-FX II XL+, is used by bands as diverse as U2, King Crimson, and Taylor Swift. Increasing numbers of top-level guitarists are discovering Fractal’s dozens of effects/amps/cab/microphone models and the obsessive tweakability inherent in their designs. In the credits of Fractal’s products, Matt Picone is listed alongside Cliff Chase, the company’s founder, president and DSP/Hardware engineer, as contributing to “everything else.” He says that title suits him because it spans a range of duties including support, artist relations, brand development, sales, marketing, PR, sound design, docs & manuals, e-commerce, business development, infrastructure and much more. Their products are not just for ultra rock stars, as Matt explains:
Eric Clapton was in a bad mood during the photoshoot for Blues Breakers. The 1966 Clapton/John Mayall collaboration sees Clapton on the album art reading a copy of UK comic book the Beano. He was so aghast and bored by the idea of a photoshoot that day that he refused to make eye contact with the photographer, therefore settling on staring at a comic instead. Nicknamed “The Beano Album”, it’s often considered to be one of the most important guitar recordings ever made.

Guitar amplifier modeling: Amplifier modeling is a digital effect that replicates the sound of various amplifiers, most often vintage analog "tube" amps and famous brands of speaker cabinets (e.g., the Ampeg SVT 8x10" bass cabinet). Sophisticated modeling effects can simulate different types of speaker cabinets (e.g., the sound of an 8x10" cabinet) and miking techniques. A rotary speaker simulator mimics the doppler and chorus effect sound of a vintage Leslie speaker system by replicating its volume and pitch modulations, overdrive capacity and phase shifts.[95]

During the late 1930s and through the 1940s—the heyday of big band jazz and swing music—the guitar was an important rhythm section instrument. Some guitarists, such as Freddie Green of Count Basie’s band, developed a guitar-specific style of accompaniment. Few of the big bands, however, featured amplified guitar solos, which were done instead in the small combo context. The most important jazz guitar soloists of this period included the Manouche virtuoso Django Reinhardt, Oscar Moore who was featured with Nat “King” Cole’s trio, and Charlie Christian of Benny Goodman's band and sextet, who was a major influence despite his early death at 25.


Our first impression of this guitar was that something must be wrong. Surely this guitar is way more expensive than we thought? We doublechecked and the truth is that it’s just incredible value for money. Both the design and the sound are wonderfully good and we understand why Schecter describe their Schecter Hellraiser guitars as having “raised the bar on sight, sound, quality and affordability”- we totally agree!
But no all are created equal, and I don’t really do this — I have live performance gear for anything I do, actually, way more than I need at this point. But a good friend of mine does the whole live-thing-throug-PC and has completely sold his soul to Ableton Live (Music production with Live and Push). You can find Ableton Live Intro online for about $99. It’s not just a live performance tool but also a DAW, you can use it for recording, composing, etc. Again, not one I use, but probably what you want if you’re going for live playing.
DR Strings makes strings that were specifically designed for drop d tuning, other alternate tunings, and even standard tuning. Known as DDT strings, DR spent over two years perfecting them. DR created a new patent pending method for constructing these strings to ensure great performance with lower pitches. Because of the amazing construction, and their ability to quickly lock into tune so quickly, DR calls their DDT's "Superstrings". Why not try a set? DDT's are available for electric guitar or bass guitar.
Also in 1952, Kay introduced the matching K-162 "Electronic" Bass, which was the first commercially available thinline-hollowbody electric bass guitar, and the second production electric bass guitar after the Fender Precision Bass debuted in 1951. Due to the use of K-162 by a bassist of Howlin' Wolf, Andrew "Blueblood" McMahon, it is commonly known as the "Howlin Wolf" bass. These instruments[clarification needed] are believed to be the first semi-hollow electrics[citation needed] (i.e., thinline-hollowbody electric with solid center-block), predating the Gibson ES-335 by six years. Their unique design[clarification needed] featured a flat top with no f-holes, a free-floating arched back, and two braces running along the top. The result was a semi-acoustic instrument that was feedback-resistant while retaining natural acoustic resonances. In 1954, Kay added the K-160 bass to its catalog with baritone tuning, according to the catalog,[citation needed] "tuned like the first four guitar strings but one octave lower." Structurally this bass was basically same as K-162 bass, except for the higher pitched tuning and the addition of a white pickguard.
And on that (low) note, I’ll wrap up. While many bass parts nowadays are probably laid down with samples and synths, by keyboard players and guitarists, what you’ll get from a real bassist is more than just his sound, it’s the magic in his fingers, and his bass-players’ sense of just what to play to perfectly complement the song—it’s certainly worth a little extra effect to take advantage of what the true masters of the low-end have to offer.
Throughout the 40’s, racial segregation was still in force across America, however within the music community, (both listeners and musicians) race boundaries were beginning to disappear. African American music (a.k.a ‘Race Music’) was popular with white communities too and with the vast melting pot of musical styles by that point including Folk, Country, Jazz and Delta blues, something exciting started to take shape.
Makers of the Elk badged guitar from the early to mid 1960s to 1975, although other sources indicate that the Elk brand did not stop production until the early 1980s. Elk badged guitars came in clear acrylics in addition to colors in the early 1970s, which was an attempt to copy clear acrylics designed by the legendary Dan Armstrong in the late 1960s.

Guitar wiring refers to the electrical components, and interconnections thereof, inside an electric guitar (and, by extension, other electric instruments like the bass guitar or mandolin). It most commonly consists of pickups, potentiometers to adjust volume and tone, a switch to select between different pickups (if the instrument has more than one), and the output socket. There may be additional controls for specific functions; the most common of these are described below.
Without going into technical details, the amp's power rating is directly correlated to its loudness. This means that the higher the power rating is, the louder the amp can go. But loud is not always better, especially when considering space and noise level restrictions, this is why even those with big wall of amps have a humble practice amp to play quietly with. Low power amps also let you crank the gain at lower volumes, so you can get to your amp's sweet spot without being a noise nuisance. Thankfully, some big amps now come with built-in power attenuators, which give you the option to lower the power rating when needed. Also note that many tube amps are louder than similarly rated solid-state amplifiers.
First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.
The Marine Band 365 Steve Baker Special (365/28 SBS) possesses the same construction as the original 365, but with low pitched tuning to their natural major keys, available in C, D, G, A, and F. It is named for, and was developed in part by noted harmonicist Steve Baker, who resides in Germany and has contributed to the design of several other Hohner harmonica models, including the Marine Bands Deluxe and Crossover.[18]
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Another cool place I just found was Madison Guitar Repair out of Fridley. I went there a couple weeks ago. It's a little hole in the wall place where they just work on guitars and have tons of parts. Really nice guys that seem like they know their stuff pretty dang well. Never used them but considering that all they do is luthier work I'd give them a shot.

  	AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!

With the ME-80, Boss has made a unit that’s slightly different than a traditional multi-fx unit. Instead of trying to simplify the interface and make it sparse and clean, it’s immediately evident that there are a LOT of knobs on the front of this unit. The ME-80 is trying to mimic the feel of having a pedalboard full of pedals at your fingertips. This is good, because us guitar players love pedals for exactly that reason - you can just look down at them, twist some knobs, and your tone changes. Instant gratification! Not many guitarists we know like to scroll through endless menus and read text on a tiny screen, much less have to read the user manual cover to cover to understand how to work our gear. We want to twist a knob or two, and we want to play!
Launch price: $1,499 / £1,419 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood/maple (dependent on finish) | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 3x V-Mod Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, neck tone, bridge and middle tone, 5-way selector | Hardware: 2-Point Synchronized vibrato, Fender standard staggered tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Antique Olive, 3-Color Sunburst, Black, Candy Apple Red, Natural, Olympic White, Sienna Sunburst, Sonic Gray
I like...So fun...I am a big fan of the call of duty games - this one is a step above my son loves it and I do to but he is a lot better at it than I am - it is a challange for someone new to playstation...Well first starters died about ten times just beginning in campaign and yea even though I have it on regular mode it still is a challenge for me signs of I'm getting to old for this lol but there snippers on story mode when you concentrate it slows down all the enemies but give it a shot your self I like it
The exciting thing about the Kemper is that you can use it to capture the sound of your JTM45, right where it hits that sweet spot, with the microphone you prefer and that mic preamp that just adds a certain something. Then you can refine the 'profile' you've made while A/B-ing the digital signal with the original using the Kemper's onboard EQ, and save the sound alongside the library of 200 or so profiles that comes pre-loaded, with access to hundreds more via the Rig Exchange section of the Kemper website. If you fancy a little more spice you can clean up or crank the KPA's onboard gain control to go way beyond the level of drive available on your original amp, adjust sag, tweak the audible effects of pick attack and even, thanks to what Kemper claims is "digital alchemy", alter the size of your virtual cabinet from a huge stack right down to a cigarette packet, while there's also a fully loaded set of effects. We've heard various approaches to digital modelling sound good in the studio before but this is as close to a 'real' mic'd valve amp sound as to be indistinguishable. If you're the type of guitarist who records regularly, or a producer who wants 24/7 access to a personal library of refined and tested guitar sounds wherever you happen to be on the planet at any given time, the Kemper Profiling Amp is the product of the decade so far.
Could be a couple of things. Either it's hitting off a high fret, or more likely the saddle is killing the string's vibration (that can be caused by the string sitting in a slot that does not have a sudden enough drop-off, for example). Try slackening the string and lifting it to the side slightly on the saddle (like 1 or 2 mm), then tune it up again. If that sorts out your problem, at least you've identified the cause.
So there you have it. An absolute workhorse with fantastic sounds, and just about a must-have pedal no matter what type of guitarist you are and no matter your skill level. Equally a perfect first pedal to buy as it is a perfect last pedal in your collection. The biggest downside is that it probably can’t be your only pedal, since you can only use one effect at the same time. Famous users include Russel Lissack of Bloc Party, James Edward Bagshaw of Temples, and Dave Knudson of Minus the Bear. At the “too good to be true” price that it sells for (seriously, we’re not just saying that, one of our writers immediately sold his DL4 and bought the M5), this is without a doubt the Best Bang for your Buck.
Does anyone know anything about Palmer based Magnum Series PGA-65 guitar amps? I live in Costa Rica and bought one new from a music shop but with the amount of moisture here the original box was destroyed along with any manuals, paperwork, etc.. The amp says it is manufactured in China and is solid state. It is supposedly 65 watts with 2 channels, clean and dirty with EQ sections on both channels. It also has send and returns and a spot to plug in your Cd player, etc.. It has a big badge on the front saying Magnum Series, Palmer Guitar Company, Fl Usa. I didn't pay alot for it and for the price it is a decent sounding amp although I probably will replace the speaker with a Celestion.
The Electro-Spanish Ken Roberts was additionally, the first instrument to feature a hand operated vibrato, as a standard appointment found on every model.[12] The vibrato device was called the "Vibrola" and was invented by Doc Kauffman.[12] [13] It is estimated that fewer than 50 Electro-Spanish Ken Roberts were constructed between 1933 and 1937; fewer than 10 are known to survive today.[7][8][9][10]
Here we have a well aged Vintage Washburn D12/br from 1989 its a D-18 type with a cedar top and man does this cedar top sound great…it was surprisingly sound and deep for a late 80s it has a mature balanced tone…I like it with its pretty good bass response and all. Its structurally great no cracks and no playability issues what so ever its neck and alignment integrity is also excellent as the action is good and the guitar is as a result easy to play. Cosmetically this guitar has been around the block its no sissy its stood the test of time and its previous owner and still all in all with all its obvious nicks and scratches and various doinks man it looks pretty darn vintage COOL and I loved it I thought you might like it too just take a good look for yourself if your the type that likes a well warn in vintage guitar and you don't really mind that it has some extra character and soul this just may be a guitar you might appreciate….. its own beauty from life playing and enjoying the music experience this guitar has been well loved and played yet it is no where near warn out it has years of life left in her she just wants to really sing for someone and in my assessment she’s ready to be enjoyed for another 30 years or more! Very cool vintage Washburn Dreadnought guitar. Its neck is straight and has the proper relief its Tuners are real good sealed gears and doing an excellent job to this day, This one has the medium slim taper neck with the Diamond volute like the old Martin style…nice touch Washburn. Mahogany Back and sides and neck with rosewood fingerboard its neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut. This a a well built good player folks if you don’t mind it not being exactly mint cosmetically its actually beautiful in its own vintage appeal. Any questions or to make the purchase you can contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
Martin & Co is without a doubt one of the most reputable acoustic guitar makers in the world, so if you or someone you know is planning to spend a lot of dough on an acoustic guitar - it best be a Martin. One of the more recent releases from Martin that deserve special mention here is the 00-42SC John Mayer, a signature guitar inspired by the classic Stage Coach(SC) design, which were prevalent in an era where small bodied parlor guitars were highly favored.

The version of the instrument that is best known today is the solid body electric guitar. Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker, did, however, offer a cast aluminum electric steel guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1931. This guitar is reported to have sounded quite modern. Audiovox built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as the mid-1930s.


As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.
I’m not sure if you’re right about Joe being wrong. My memory of exactly how tone controls are usually wired is kind of failing me, but I think I remember that what you’re saying would be true if the output was taken from the node connected to the capacitor, but it’s not–the output node is the node on the opposite end of the tone pot from the capacitor, unless I’m remembering wrong. I think that filter-characteristics of guitar tone circuits are easier to visualize if you imagine them as reacting to a current source. Meaning “a big resistor in series with a capacitor” reacts the same way that “a big resistor” does. Basically, current above the cutoff frequency is shunted to ground through the tone pot–so if the tone pot is high, very little percentage (compared to if it was just a capacitor) of this current gets shunted, whereas if the tone pot is low, a high percentage gets shunted.

Here we have e very nice example of a great sounding and beautiful Vintage Martin D28 style copy acoustic guitars made by the master luthiers at Yamaha Japan Nippon Gakki. This is a high quality example folks not to be confused with the Taiwan China made versions.. this is the top of the line made famous from the last 1960's... The workmanship is excellent as is the woods chose he fit & finish is still 90% or better which translates to very good to excellent used vintage condition all-round .. The guitar plays with ease and has been upgraded here at JVG with a bone nut & saddle and a new set of Martin strings for its new owner who is going to love this classic no nonsense full sounding Boomer!... Here is a link to more pics of this fine Japanese crafted Yamaha: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/80sYamahaFG200TanLable4?authkey=Gv1sRgCO-azJ2orZPeLw#slideshow/5617864934522537362.
when I started playing, if you wanted distortion, you "cranked up" the volume on the guitar and the amp. my old Gibson amp had reverb and tremolo. I used to play without reverb or tremolo. nowadays, in my old age, I use a little reverb for flavoring. I have pedals, but it's too much hassle to set everything up. so, I just plug into the amp with a little reverb. I'm happy and that's all that really counts. isn't it ?
If you're new to distortion and overdrive pedals, you might be wondering what the difference is between them. For the most part, they do the same thing and are both often referred to as gain pedals. How they differ is that distortion pedals usually provide a harsher, grittier tone with increased sustain. When it comes to distortion, think of genres like grunge and death metal. On the other hand, overdrive pedals are designed to emulate the sound of a tube amp when you increase their volume. The result is a warm yet crunchy sound that's ideal for playing blues and classic rock. Of course, one is not better than the other, and the right distortion or overdrive pedal for you will be a matter of personal preference.

Three full steps from standard tuning. Used by Dream Theater, Adema, Asking Alexandria on From Death to Destiny and The Black, Boris, Cannibal Corpse, Morbid Angel (on several songs starting with their album Covenant), Father Befouled, Sepultura, Jeff Hanneman of Slayer (on "War Zone" and "Here Comes the Pain" from God Hates Us All and "Not Of This God" from World Painted Blood. Kerry King used a 7-string for those songs), Mutoid Man (Stephen Brodsky started using the tuning during the recording of the Helium Head EP to fill in the low end of the sound, in an attempt to make up for their lack of a bassist at the time), American Head Charge, Nickelback (on "This Means War" and "Gotta Get Me Some" from " Here and Now" and Nevermore (when band switched to 7 strings).

What a Beauty! This is a beautiful example of a RARE Vintage Japanese Alvarez 5053 made on 1/11/74. This one is Rare folks with its Old style script logo in mother of pearl inlay check that out...The first thing you can't help but notice on this guitar is how beautiful this guitar looks amazing fit & finish apperance is top shelf..its as good or pretter then others including the Martin ... its not just pretty guitar to look at and admire either it is really well build to play built using some very EXOTIC and beautiful looking tone WOODS as well very high end feel to this one ...as seen in the pics ( new better pics soon to come )It was built using a beautiful grained Sitka spruce top and the gorgeous Back is vivid book matched Brazilian Rosewood as is the sides BR and this examle overall is truly a stunning example, along with the backs center flamed maple section in contrast of the Brazilian Rosewood side sections WoW!, and the beautiful vintage hexagonal cellulloid inlays. modeled after the Martin D41, this guitar is in excellent used vintage collectible condition with only a few finish checks to this guitars glass like finish that one has that warm natural patina only a real 37 year old guitar can earn. Overall very good - excellent vintage condition! It's bound body is masterfully ornately - multi bound, as is the Honduran Mahogany neck & headstock is bound. Action is excellentt and can be easily adjusted up or down to meet your preference by way of an easily adjustable bridge . Truly is a great playing & sounding highly collectible Japanese vintage guitar in its own right. Its Very rare and it has old Alvarez Script Logo! Who cool is that....This is a super rare guitar that tend to go quickly that is getting harder and harder to find! in any condition let alone like this baby it both plays beautifully but it sounds fantastic! Let me know if interested Thanks for looking! Joe.

This multi effects pedals brings all that shine of the studio in a single compact device. Now you have state of the art processors like flanger (click here for flange pedals), chorus, a phaser pedal, delay, a vocal effects processing device, and tremolo and pitch shifter in your bare hands. Apart from such features, you also get a mind-blowing back up of 24-bit/40 kHz resolution that turns your jamming into a soulful experience.


Before taking the plunge, make sure that you have the necessary tools to build the guitar of your dreams. Most kits will require you to have screwdrivers, pliers and soldering iron for the assembly process. While others require more, like wood glue, bandsaw and other wood routing tools. Once you've decided on the finish, you'll also have to get finishing tools like sandpaper, wood sealant, primer, paint and more. It is also recommended to have a dedicated room or space for you to work on, a nice working table would also make work a bit more easier.

John McLaughlin was invited to record with Miles Davis while still in his twenties, co-parenting jazz fusion on Bitches Brew and other Davis LPs. But he achieved guitar-god status with his own Mahavishnu Orchestra, where he made his Gibson spit fire like a many-headed dragon. A breakneck stylist, McLaughlin was peerless, mixing psychedelic rock, R&B, gypsy jazz, flamenco and Indian raga techniques. That polyglot mastery earned him huge respect from jazz and rock peers alike: Jeff Beck called him "the best guitarist alive."


Similar to five-string bass guitar tuning, seven-string tuning allows for the extra string a fourth lower than the original sixth string. This allows for the note range of B standard tuning without transposing E standard guitar chords down two and a half steps down. Baritone 7-string guitars are available which features a longer scale-length allowing it to be tuned to a lower range.
Guitar Center Albuquerque provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Albuquerque area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Albuquerque can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
Now if this house is rocking, don’t bother knockin. Famous words by Stevie. Many people perhaps know him for Hendrix covers, but where Jimi left off Stevie continued, and continued he did. The elements of Hendrix were alive and plain to see in SRV, but with it, he also mixed in his own influences such as Albert King and his own soul to make it his sound a trademark spot on his songs. I vaguely remember a car commercial where I spotted Stevie’s playing (Pride and Joy) in a Nissan ad. That was much before I really got into Vaughan’s work. SRV was an artist who could play while absolutely stoned face. And when he did sober up, he actually played better. His newfound health and love for life and music are showcased on In Step his last album before his death a year later. Stevie’s footprints will always be in the air and in our hearts.
Featuring a comfortable neck and solid spruce top, the Epiphone Dove Pro Acoustic-Electric Guitar rings out with full, rich sound. Based on a design going back to 1962, the Dove Pro is equipped with a Fishman Sonicore pickup system that accurately reproduces its acoustic tone when you plug the guitar into an amplifier or PA system to play with amplified instruments. A terrific value.
Italiano: Leggere Tablature per Chitarra, Español: leer los acordes de una guitarra, Deutsch: Gitarren Tabs lesen, Português: Ler Tablaturas de Guitarra, Français: lire une tablature de guitare, Русский: читать гитарную табулатуру, Nederlands: Gitaartabs leren lezen en spelen, Bahasa Indonesia: Membaca Tab Gitar, 中文: 看懂吉他谱, العربية: قراءة تابات الجيتار
In 1944 Gibson was purchased by Chicago Musical Instruments. The ES-175 was introduced in 1949. Gibson hired Ted McCarty in 1948, who became President in 1950. He led an expansion of the guitar line with new guitars such as the "Les Paul" guitar introduced in 1952 and designed by Les Paul, a popular musician in the 1950s and also a pioneer in music technology. The Les Paul was offered in Custom, Standard, Special, and Junior models.[15] In the mid-50s, the Thinline series was produced, which included a line of thinner guitars like the Byrdland. The first Byrdlands were slim, custom built, L-5 models for guitarists Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Later, a shorter neck was added. Other models such as the ES-350T and the ES-225T were introduced as less costly alternatives.[16] In 1958, Gibson introduced the ES-335T model. Similar in size to the hollow-body Thinlines, the ES-335 family had a solid center, giving the string tone a longer sustain.
GuitarPCB.com – designs and sells printed circuit boards (PCBs) with a boutique look for classic and boutique pedal designs. Their active forum provides support for builders using the PCBs. A theme throughout their site is that you expensive boutique pedals are simply classic older designs with little or no modification, and you can easily build your own.
Guitar straps may be small, but they play a big role in your performance and comfort level during gigs or practice sessions. A top quality strap keeps your axe securely in place while you're shredding on stage, and reduces stress on the arm and shoulder. More than simply functional, guitar straps add a decorative look to your stage presence to complement your own personal vibe. To that end, El Dorado offers a variety of stylish, durable guitar straps to add to your accessory collection, allowing you to spend less time wrangling straps and more time focusing on the more important task of making awesome music.
3) The pedal switch. Placed on the top of the pedal, pressing it with your foot turns the effect on and off. This is where the name “stomp boxes” comes from – you “stomp” the box to turn on the effect. Pedals are most commonly placed on the floor next to each other so they can be toggled with your feet while you play with your hands, but larger units are often placed in large racks on top of one another, as otherwise they would take up too much floor space.

Japanese classical guitarist Shiro Arai founded the Arai Co. in the 1950s as an international importing company, which expanded to manufacturing in the 1960s adopting the "Aria" brand name. The explosion in popularity of the electric guitar in the 1960s led them to begin manufacturing and distributing several different brands, Lyle being one of them. Arai attended the NAMM trade show and saw many of the American guitar designs that had attained popularity in the U.S. This greatly influenced Arai to produce similar models.

In a way, guitars are a lot like cars — spending more money can get you more performance through different specs and trims. The extra money usually goes into paying for better parts rather than more options; there aren’t a whole lot of places to add to a guitar (unless you want the ZZ Top spinner installed). Big bucks can get you better quality wood, a nicer finish, higher-end hardware, and fancier inlays. Some of these upgrades can alter the sound or simply make help playability. For example, the same guitar cut from poplar won’t sound as good as one cut from alder wood. Better tuners mean your axe will go out of tune less often. That said, some guitars will offer features that others don’t, such as tremolos and automatic tuning. Do your research and, as always, know what you need versus what you simply want.
The sounds of the electric guitar made it to outer space. In 1977, both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were launched into space with remnants of international life and culture onboard. On each vessel was a gold-plated phonograph record with 115 sounds and images curated by a team led by astronomer Carl Sagan. Along with selections that included the likes of Bach and Beethoven, Sagan decided to throw in – however controversial it was at the time – Johnny B Goode by Chuck Berry, an American rock’n’roll anthem defined by its rollicking electric guitar lick.

In 1931, Martin reintroduced the dreadnought with X-bracing and two years later gave it a modified body shape to accommodate a 14-fret neck, and it quickly became their best-selling guitar. The rest of the industry soon followed[citation needed], and today the “dreadnought” size and shape is considered one of the “standard” acoustic guitar shapes, iconic for its use in a wide variety of musical genres.
Gibson now restricts the use of the name Dobro to its own product line, but care should be taken in interpreting documents written before 1993 or from outside the US. In these cases, the terms “Dobro” and “dobroist” may not necessarily refer to a Gibson Dobro. For example, consider the references to the use of a Dobro guitar on songs like “The Ballad of Curtis Loew” by Lynyrd Skynyrd, “Valium Waltz” by the Old 97’s, “When Papa Played the Dobro” by Johnny Cashon the Ride This Train album, or “Gold Dust Woman“, a song by Fleetwood Macfrom the album Rumours which features a Dobro. Mark Knopfler of Dire Straitsis famous for his guitar of this style, featured on the cover of the album Brothers in Arms.[2]
Here's some net info you may find interesting. Some of the first Kents to have been imported into the U.S. were made in Sweden by Hagstrom. (They may have actually been Czech-made and sold by Hagstrom.) The Hagstrom HI, HII, and HIII (those are the letter H with roman numerals representing the number of pickups the guitar had) were branded Kent for sale in the U.S. and as Futurama for the U.K. They had the Kent name on the headstock and sometimes the upper bout. They were similar to Fender Stratocasters. They also made some Strat-shaped basses. According to an article in Vintage Guitar Magazine, importation of Hagstrom-made Kents began in 1962. Another story is that Hagstrom sold Kent-branded guitars through distributors other than Buegeleisen & Jacobson in the U.S. without permission from J&B and were forced to withdraw them after a short time. By then Hagstrom had become better-known and could sell them under their own name, anyway. At first, the idea was to keep ’em cheap and sell to the beginners and students. Later, as Japanese manufacturers proliferated and competition became hot and heavy, some of them began to copy the Fenders and Gibsons of the time. As quality began to improve, some manufacturers again began issuing thier own designs. One of the “beginners” who got a start with a Kent Polaris I was Bruce Springsteen. Alex Lifeson of Rush got started with a Kent acoustic. One of Gene Simmons first guitars was also a Kent. The BBC series “The Seven Ages of Rock”, episode 2, showed Lou Reed (R.I.P) with the Velvet Underground playing a Kent 532 Copa at Andy Warhol’s hangout. Kent created a vib then and they're still doin it today.
Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
I've spent years playing only my Gibson Les Paul. Right out of the box the Hummingbird blew me away. It came tuned perfectly to E flat. Tuned it up to E and continue to be blown away. It's warm and mellow where it should be, and bright and crisp as well where it should be. I've found it very easy to switch from my butter smooth LP to this acoustic, and it's beautiful sound has inspired me to get writing again. Then...I plugged it into my Epi Blues Custom 30W tube amp on the clean channel, and fell in love with the guitar all over again. Brilliant, full, radiant, crisp, warm and so much more. I don't use a pick, and this thing still rocks. I couldn't say enough good things about it! Far better quality than I'd ever expect for $300.
SG Special is pretty much the same thing as the Les Paul 100. The most obvious difference is the body style. Other than that, you get very similar electronics and overall build quality. A lot of people learned their first chords on this guitar, still keeping it as one of their favorite axes. I’ve played this thing a few times and it definitely has some juice.
Reverb is one of the earliest effects for guitar players, originally built into the amp itself like the Fender Deluxe Reverb and Super Reverb. Traditional spring reverbs actually send the guitar signal into the springs causing them to vibrate and simulating reverb. With the advent of digital technology reverb units pedals made their way onto the market but mostly as rack units, but as technology improved and shrank many of those units can fit into a pedal now.
The DI approach most likely to capture the spirit of the original sound is to take a DI feed from the speaker output of a conventional guitar amplifier and feed this into the type of speaker simulator that also includes a dummy load to keep the amplifier happy (valve amplifiers can be damaged by running them into an open circuit). Emulators with a built-in load are generally very much larger than the regular DI box-size emulator-only products. Some of the emulator-only devices can be run from a speaker output, but you still need to plug in either a separate dummy load (usually an 8Ω resistor rated at over 100 Watts on a heat sink) or the original speaker to protect the amplifier from possible damage. Apart from the dummy load, which is passive, the circuitry may either be passive or active.

A better way to get distortion, of course, is to use guitar effect pedals. Got your hands on some pedals and starting to play around with the sounds you can make? Well, you can still use these tips to further enhance your distorted tone, since the same theory applies. Most distortion pedals have a volume, gain, and distortion knob in addition to whatever additional controls they give you. If you're simply not satisfied with your pedal's guitar distortion, you can turn the gain up and adjust the other settings, just like you'd do on your amp.


With 24 amp models including a digital chromatic tuner, 9 stomps boxes, 4 amps, 5 cabs, 3 mics, and 2 rack effects; AmpliTube Custom Shop is a great way to get your hands on IK Multimedia's great guitar simulation software. As the name suggests, in addition to the free units you can purchase more effects units from right inside the plugin to build your own custom guitar shop.
In 1883, a german immigrant named Frederic Gretsch started a small instrument manufacturing company in Brooklyn, New York. On a trip to visit home in 1895, he died unexpectedly, leaving the company in the hands of his 15-year-old son, Fred. The company flourished for generations, especially due to the popularity of their hollow body guitars with rockabilly, blues, and jazz musicians. In 1967, however, the brand began to falter after the Gretsch family sold to then music industry giant Baldwin. In 1985, Fred W. Gretsch bought the company back from Baldwin and began restoring it to its former glory – coinciding with the rise of one of their most prolific artists, Brian Setzer of the Stray Cats. Today, their guitars, like the USA Custom Shop White Falcon pictured above, are used by a wide array of musicians from all walks of life, including Billy F. Gibbons of ZZ Top, Tim Armstrong of Rancid, Band of Skulls, and Portugal. the Man.
Continuing to look at the well-known Fender brand, the Stratocaster American Standard is a higher-priced option with necessary features for the seasoned guitarist. This is another one of the most popular electric guitars ever. In terms of build, the body is a mix of ash and alder, creating a balanced tone for both the sharpness of the upper range chords and the dense resonance of the lower range progressions. The modern bridge has an upgrade of utilizing a block infused with copper and steel saddles for strong intonation and an ease in adjusting pitch. The tuners are placed at varying degrees and heights, with this staggered design creating a decreased in reverberation and excess hum so as to focus in on the clarity of the sound. This electric guitar also has a custom designed single-coil strat known as the “Fat ‘50s”, which is intended to create a fuller sound compared to other guitars. With a comfortable ‘C’ shaped design and durable finish, this 22 fret guitar offers desirable features for the guitar enthusiast. If you’re unsure whether to grab this or our previous Fender pick, read this Telecaster vs. Stratocaster sound article for some more info.
But what about the Les Paul devotees like Jimmy Page, Zakk Wylde and Bob Marley? Is it possible that the Les Paul is as enduring and adaptable as the Strat? Um… Yes! Each guitar style has its own rich history of players and possibilities, and with a powerful imagination, anything is possible. Solid body guitars are truly the dominant species of electric guitars for their overall versatility, ability to interact with pedals and amps, and general lack of fussiness.
Tempo guitars and amps offered in 1971 included three nylon-stringed guitars, three steel-stringed guitars, and two solidstate amplifiers. These were pretty low-end beginner guitars probably imported from Japan, though the heads have a Harmony look to them. The N-5 Folk Guitar ($31.90) was standard-sized with spruce top and mahogany body (presumably laminates), slothead, tie bridge, no markers. The GM-62 Steel String Guitar ($29) was also standard size, “light” top and “dark” back with dots, moveable bridge with saddle and stamped metal tailpiece. The GM-300 Convertible Guitar Outfit ($33.90) was a spruce and mahogany slothead with dots and a glued/bolted bridge which could be used for either nylon or steel strings. It came with nylons and an extra set of steel strings. Harmony made guitars like this for Sears in the early ’60s. The N-48 Nylon String Guitar Outfit ($82.50) was a grand concert classical with amber spruce top, maple body, marquetry strip on the slothead and gold hardware, hardshell case included. The N-40 Nylon String Guitar ($45) was grand concert-sized with amber spruce top and “dark brown” body. The F-34 Steel String Guitar was also grand concert-sized with spruce top, “dark brown” body, belly pin bridge, block inlays, and engraved hummingbird pickguard.
Paramount: Around 1930 Martin made about 36 guitars with strange construction. A style 2 size body mounted into a larger rim and back of rosewood, small round soundholes around a "lip" that joins the outer rims to the inner rims, no soundhole in the top, 14 frets clear, dot fingerboard inlays to the 15th fret, rounded peak peghead with standard Paramount banjo peghead inlay, banjo-style tuners, four or six strings.

During the NSF grant cycles, the STEM Guitar Project has exceeded initial estimates of faculty impacted by recruiting over 450 STEM educators, with an additional 500 faculty exposed via national education conferences. Thus far, this effort is impacting over 20,000 students nationally over the 8 years because of faculty members adopting or adapting the curriculum developed through the project.
As I commented above, my go to method for quiet practice is a PocketPod with Shure headphones. But, who doesn't like plugging in to an amp every once in a while? I live in a house, but the neighbors are close. The amp I use is a Fender Super Champ XD, which is a 15w tube amp with some digital effects. It seemed quiet enough at low volumes, but your mileage may vary. If I were you, I would at least give one a listen at a music store and see if it can do what you need.
While it might seem unnecessary, an EQ pedal is a very handy effect to have. Many amps have very specific voicing that can only be adjusted so far with their tone stack. Also, many small amps have limited on board tone-shaping options. For example, the popular Fender Champ 600 or the Blackstar HT-1, which only have one knob for tone shaping. With an EQ in your chain, you can fine-tune the amp to your liking, or you can perfectly dial in a distortion or fuzz that normally won't cooperate.
When Schecter was first founded in 1976, the company’s original purpose was to produce replacement parts for other guitar manufacturers. In 1979, they produced their first guitar and it all took off from there. Today, Schecter is one of the highest rated guitar brands. If you’re looking for a guitar to play metal in particular, Schecter could be the brand for you. Schecter is well-known for their brutal heavy metal sounds. They have a decent range of models, including basses. Schecter’s arguably most famous guitars are the Hellraiser series. They are usually closer to $1000, but it could be worth it for you. When played correctly, the heavy metal distortions and gains that blast out of the amp is fantastic and if you’re a bit more gentle you can even get some softer sounds out of it. The same can be said with most Schecter models, but they favour heavy metal, so if you’re not looking to play heavy metal, you might want to look elsewhere.

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