This guitar has a maple neck which is coated with a thin satin finish and has a C-design which is easy for beginners to handle. It features an alder solid body. The vibrato design is enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding firmness to the tone. They also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Speaking of pickups, the PAC 112v is equipped with a 5-way blade pickup selector. There are master tone and volume controls for the neatest output. This guitar is available in seven finishes, natural satin, old violin sunburst, raspberry red, sonic blue, black, and silver metal.
If ever there was a candidate for compression, bass is it. This instrument has a wide dynamic range (even more so when slap techniques are employed), but it usually needs to sit at a very steady level in the mix. But should compression be applied during recording, to control the levels going down, or later, during the mix, to insure the best blend in the track? Well, the answer is probably both, but with potentially different approaches to squashing the signal. During recording, a Limiter might be the ticket, to control transient peaks that might overload ADCs, producing pops and spikes that can ruin a take. A classic fast VCA compressor/limiter (like the dbx 160) could be employed to handle peaks, without really reducing the player’s dynamics at this early stage. Then when mixdown rolls around, more gentle compression can be introduced (like the smooth squash of an optical compressor like the LA-2A), to tighten up the dynamics, as needed for that particular mix. Applying the right kind, and amount, of compression/limiting at all stages will assure you get nice clean recordings, that can be properly squeezed into the mix when the time comes. 
Just SOLD OUT: here is a great sounding wonderful 43 year old Vintage Japanese OOO guitar in excellent vintage condition. We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle and action is dialed in to Martin specs. We also upgraded the original plastic bridge Pins to SOLID Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from wods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic 000 style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. .
Stop tailpieces are usually paired with two types of bridges. The most basic is simply a wooden or metal bar with grooves that strings pass through. Most Gibson guitars come with another of the company’s early electric era innovations, the tune-o-matic bridge. Tune-o-matics have adjustable individual saddles for each string and are therefore more desirable for most players looking to control their instrument’s action and intonation.
That’s what this book is about and it delivers in spades. It sharpens your will to learn and how to set goals rather than your actual technique. If you need to reinvigorate your desire to learn and find the importance of why you are learning in the first place, this book that will apply Zen lessons to the art of learning guitar in a way that is very motivational (but not in a shove spiritual dogma in your face kind of way). If that is what you are looking for in a guitar book, it is hard to beat Zen Guitar.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
If you know how to play an E major chord, then you know how to play an A minor chord—just move the chord whole shape over a string. Make sure your first finger is curled, so the open first string rings clearly. Avoid playing the open sixth string when strumming the A minor chord. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the A minor chord.
The models in this list of best acoustic guitars have their own visual charm that appeals to different people. For example, the Blueridge BR-160 has those ornate inlays on the headstock. Some guitarists love those kinds of design elements, while others may find them a bit over the top and would much rather prefer the fretboard inlays on the PRS Angelus, or the simple but classic cutaway design of the Taylor 110ce.
The Thunderbird IV was first introduced in 1963 and instantly became one of rock's most recognizable bass guitar designs. For almost five decades, the Thunderbird has powered artists as varied as Nikki Sixx, The Who, Kings of Leon, Cheap Trick, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Steely Dan and The Silversun Pickups. Turn on your radio and you'll hear a Thunderbird bass. Now, Epiphone takes all the vintage mojo of the original Thunderbird IV and sends it flying into the future with Gibson TB Plus humbuckers with ceramic magnets and all the 'Bird's original styling and features intact.

The Fender Stratocaster features cutaway horns that give musicians access to higher frets. The back of the body is designed for comfort for longer performances. These guitars have three single coil pickups which transfer the string vibrations to the amplifier. They can all be turned on at once to produce a wide range of sounds. It also features a tremolo bar which allows you to lower or raise the pitch, much like tremolo pedals themselves, by pulling up or down on the bar to produce different effects. Stratocasters are the best option if you like to dabble in different playing styles and music genres.

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Welcome to OvationGallery.com.  This is my personal website for displaying photos of my various Ovation guitars.  I have been a player and collector of these fine instruments for over 30 years.  Although I don't profess to be an expert on all things Ovation, I do have a passion for their artistic and sonic beauty which I hope you will share.  My collection is always evolving, at one point  numbering over 50 guitars.  At one time or another I've been lucky enough to own almost every type of Ovation and Adamas guitar as well as some one-of-a-kind and truly collectable specimens.  All of these guitars are wonderful and it is my pleasure to share them with you on this website.     Dave   
Tube amps are appreciated for their high fidelity, which allows for the player’s ability and the quality of the guitar to be put to full fruition, and for their equally natural overdrive, which is achieved easier than with most solid state amps. However, besides being more expensive as an initial purchase, tube amps will also prove harder to maintain since lamps have a tendency of blowing up and are themselves quite expensive.
Players who wish to self-appraise their own instruments have a number of options for finding a guitar blue book online. A number of websites that perform the same function as Kelley Blue Book for cars exist for guitars. You may just be interested in knowing how much your prized ax is worth, or you may be looking to buy. Either way, the internet can help you determine the fair-market value of nearly any guitar.
I have tried many different wiring schemes as well, with 3-way switching, 3-way with coil taps, and even bypassed the tone control (since I never dial back the tone in my playing anyway). I have played this guitar through high-gain amps (Carvin V3, all three channels, Carvin Vai Legacy), through VOX AC15, Vox AC30 (both with Greenbacks and with Celestion Blues speakers), and an Orange 2x12 combo. In all of these excellent amps where my Carvin SC90 guitar sings and sparkles and does whatever I want it to, this Frankenstrat with Duncans or with Carvin P'ups sounds like a fart after 12 glasses of cheap Charles Shaw wine.
There are a few things to look for in modestly priced amplifiers: at least a 3-band equalizer or EQ ( low, mid, and high), a clean channel and an "overdrive" channel, reverb, and possibly some sort of "presence" control. There are two types of amplifiers: tube and transistor. Many playes prefer tube-style amps, but they can be problematic technically. Just be aware of that.
The Ibanez pickup sound is great and solidly diverse throughout the 5-options, providing lots of versatility for a variety of different music styles.The tuning is nice and extremely stable, and you can even dive-bomb on the whammy without throwing it out of whack. The frets are perfect, and the action is almost perfect, with that quality feel to it.
There is also a niche market for modifying or "modding" effects.[citation needed] Typically,[according to whom?] vendors provide either custom modification services or sell new effects pedals they have already modified.[citation needed] The Ibanez Tube Screamer, Boss DS-1, Pro Co RAT and DigiTech Whammy are some of the most often-modified effects.[101][102] Common modifications include value changes in capacitors or resistors, adding true-bypass so that the effect's circuitry is no longer in the signal path, substituting higher-quality components, replacing the unit's original operational amplifiers (op-amps), or adding functions to the device, such as allowing additional control of some factor or adding another output jack.[101][103][104]
Learning guitar chords is often one of the first things beginner guitarists do. You only need to know a few popular chords in order to be able to play a huge amount of songs. This beginner’s guitar chords article will provide you with the necessary chords you’ll want to learn for both beginner and intermediate players. Before jumping into learning the chords provided in the guitar chords chart below, I wanted to first explain what a guitar chord actually is. What Is a Guitar Chord? As wikipedia defines it, “a guitar chord is a set of notes played on a guitar”. Although a

Tuning Instabily: Problems with tuning stability are almost always cuased by improper tuning technique (always tune UP to the note) or a binding nut. (There are RARE occasions where the string isn't seating correctly at the bridge, and we're not considering problems with set up regarding a tremolo) Even the cheapest geared tuners don't "slip" as a rule. If a geared tuner is failing it will make a "poping" type of sound as the gear jumps teeth. If the gears are loose, it is possible to pull a string flat with extensive (excessive?) use of a tremolo. If notes are going sharp it is due to the nut binding. What happens is excessive tension builds up between the tuner and the nut in order to overcome the binding. Then as you play the vibration of the string allows it to wiggle through the slot equalizing the tension, and making the string sharp. See above for info on a binding nut. If a fretted note is sharp it is an indication that the nut slots are not deep enough (or excessive presure with high frets/ scalloped or worn fretboard). If a string is going flat, it is always bridge related. Either a problem with the string seating fully (common w/ trapeeze tailpieces and ball ends in vintage tremolos (the reason they came up w/ bullet ends)) or binding on a rough saddle/ the edge of the trem block. Again, it is possible to cause a tuner to back off with extream tremolo, but rare.
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These guys are great! I took my Martin in for a refret, and it might have been the cleanest I have ever seen it done. Played better than it did when I got it. So after that show of quality work I took... my old Guild to them. It had developed a little belly bulge and warped top. Mark got that thing sounding and playing like brand new. They are priced honest and fair, and do work in a very timely manner. I am done looking for my guitar shop. I highly recommend these gentlemen. See More
Then, one weekend his combo got the biggest gig of its career – opening for Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra. Charlie was hot that night, and Dorsey took notice. In one of those rare coincidences, Dorsey’s guitar player had just quit, and the next day Kaman was offered the job. Which path does the son of a construction foreman pursue? The uncertain, fleeting glory of the entertainment industry, or the unknown possibilities of putting craft in the air?
Heck, if you decide to pay for a setup when you buy a guitar they'll set it up right then and there. They're not gonna have you buy a guitar and have you wait a week or two to take it home just for a setup. Everyone else has brought in personal guitars that weren't just purchased and most times not purchased there, and they have their own waitlist. But they make more money prioritizing a setup to make a sale rather than doing a stand alone setup.
If you're a fan of the Grateful Dead, check out the D'Angelico Premier Series DC Grateful Dead Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar. In the acoustic department, the Alvarez Artist Series AD60 dreadnought acoustic guitar comes highly rated, thanks to its hand-selected spruce top, mahogany back and sides, and powerful tone. Singer-songwriters and fans of acoustic-driven music must check out the latest Ed Sheeran Martin guitar, the comfortable, easy-to-play Divide Signature Edition Little Martin acoustic-electric.
It is useful to know the fundamental relationship between voltage, current and resistance known as Ohm's Law when understanding how electric guitar circuits work. The guitar pickups provide the voltage and current source, while the potentiometers provide the resistance. From Ohm's Law we can see how increasing resistance decreases the flow of current through a circuit, while decreasing the resistance increases the current flow. If two circuit paths are provided from a common voltage source, more current will flow through the path of least resistance.
Clarence White helped shape two genres: His acoustic flatpicking, first displayed as a teenager when he and his brother formed the Kentucky Colonels band, was key in making the guitar a lead instrument in bluegrass. Later, he set the stage for country rock and transferred that dynamic precision and melodic symmetry to the electric guitar. A top session man in the Sixties, he played on the Byrds' 1968 landmark, Sweetheart of the Rodeo. After he joined the band later that year, White brought a full-bodied rock elation to his California-inflected Nashville chops. "He never played anything that sounded vaguely weak," said the Byrds' leader, Roger McGuinn. "He was always driving… into the music." White had returned to bluegrass with the acclaimed Muleskinner album when he was killed by a drunk driver in 1973. He was 29. "Clarence was immersed in hard country and bluegrass," said Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. "He incorporated those elements into rock & roll, and it totally blew people's minds."
In 2008, Gibson USA released the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, an authentic replica of one of two Les Pauls Slash received from Gibson in 1988. It has an Antique Vintage Sunburst finish over a solid mahogany body with a maple top. Production was limited to 1600.[35] The Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash “Inspired By” Les Paul Standard. This guitar is a replica of the 1988 Les Paul Standard and it features a carved three-piece maple top, one-piece mahogany back, and rosewood fingerboard, with a Heritage Cherry Sunburst finish. Two versions were made available—the “Aged by Tom Murphy,” aged to resemble the original guitar (a limited number of these were signed by Slash in gold marker on the back of the headstock), and the “Vintage Original Spec,” created to resemble the guitar as it was when Slash first received it.[32][36]
In 1950, Leo Fender introduced the single-pickup Esquire, and a few months later released a dual-pickup version called the Broadcaster that, due to trademark issues, was later renamed the Telecaster. The Tele® would go on to become the world's first successfully mass-produced solidbody electric guitar. Simple yet elegant, it has been a show-stopper and session magnet since its debut. It’s the go-to guitar for twangy chicken pickin’ solos, which is why the iconic axe has appeared on the majority of country records over the past six-plus decades.
The top is made from spruce and features X-bracing, while the back and sides are made from basswood. The FA-100 also sports a very playable maple neck, with a rosewood fretboard and 20 frets. It would work very well for beginners, as it provides a defined, crisp sound that’s well suited to plucking or strumming, and good for everything from rock to country.
If you want to test the waters, here are the some of the best free guitar effects software packages. Aside from the limited freeware software, there are Lite or Trial versions of commercial programs which you can get for free, but with limited in features. The good thing though is that even when they lack features, they work and sound just as nice.
Mastering guitars isn’t a piece of cake, mainly if you are a greenhorn. You get lost in the labyrinth of types of guitars, each having different size, shapes, and price values. Most of these especially hunt your wallet, burdening down your pockets with hefty price tags. As an amateur, you find no other option but to pay the said amount hoping to get something useful. Indeed, the best electric guitar brands are usually inclined towards the more pricey side. If you have background knowledge about the best brands, who knows you may get your desired guitar in an affordable range. Through this article, you will learn what different types of guitar brands are available in the market.
It features a solid mahogany top, supported by laminate mahogany back and sides, which gives a warmer tonality and a very earthy vibe. It also comes with Graphtech NuBone nut and saddle, a premium feature that you normally have to pay extra to add into your guitar. Giving this guitar its amplified voice is a Fishman Presys II 301T electronic pickup/preamp system that comes with a built-in tuner. On top of all that, the Washburn WL012SE does not skimp on ornamentation, which includes the Washburn Parquet rosette and rosewood bindings.
Sorry it has sold: Here we have a rather nice rare vintage 1970 Yairi & Son Classical acoustic guitar It's Label reads... Hand Crafted in Japan by Yairi & Son Model # 300 Serial # 177 Pretty darn low serial number 1970 remember she's 45 years old! Condition overall is very good - excellent used / vintage Not new or mint of course... Regarding its build quality She exhibits beautiful workmanship and superior materials Aged woods of over 30+ years old in 1970 when it was built! Tone-Woods now are in the 75 year range on this example looks like a Vintage masterpiece with its patina and look and feel I love these oldies funny thing is It still shines like glass to, amazing really when you think about it. This guitar has very good deep base tone and excellent volume and plays easily and comfortably the neck is nice and big 2" at the nut nice and wide feel to it. The neck is made of a high grade mahogany see pics, back and sides are also beautiful mahogany, with black or very dark brown bindings for a very classic look, the on the business end she has a wonderful quality solid spruce top with lots of bear claw figuring a really nice sound box it projects very well in deed... As you look at its back side in its entirety top to bottom it's hard to find a blemish I'm sure there are a few minors but it's really looking very clean and with a surprisingly shiny original finish... The front the headstock is pretty clean as well!...notice a bone nut has been fit, frets show little to no wear what so ever more than 90% remaining fret life, the fingerboard shows a little play action remember it's a 1970! ... The top as several chips and drinks and I have addressed them a touch up lacquer pen and just dabbed the tiny chip to prevent further chipping there it as a result after I polished it up turned out pretty darn good looking too, This guitar came to us as a partial trade with its bridge pulled nearly off by a ding dong previous owner that put regular gauge dred heavy gauge strings on it for long term and it lifted off in time, I removed all that cleaned up the woods & prepped it for a new vintage period correct Jacaranda rosewood classical bridge and glued it with hide glue clamping it up for 2 weeks & set her up with a bone nut & saddle and a new set of Dean Markley strings... This beauty comes with its original hard shell case black Tolex with a plush Marigold lining one bad latch but still functions well good hinges and handle so it's still ok. This is rock solid now as the Yairi & Son label says use only nylon strings. If you just use what Yairi suggested this would have never happened not Yairi's fault just the wild eyed idea gone wrong. Anyways she's back in action and sounding better than ever so if you like these old Yairi & Son classical guitars this may be a good consideration for you.... Let me know if you likeeee. Email Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
The guitar is hand-made by Martin's top luthiers, using exotic cocobolo wood for the back and sides, mixed with a more conventional solid sitka spruce top. As expected from a high-end instrument, this guitar features impressive visual appointments, most notable of which is its ivoroid binding, beautiful rosette and fretboard inlays. While its price tag and looks may push you to just hide this guitar in the closet, know that this instrument is built to make music in the road or in the studio. Martin employed modern bracing and construction techniques to ensure the guitar stays reliable, beautiful and great sounding for a long time. Those that are lucky enough to own this guitar have themselves a treasure that they can pass down to the next generation of players.
Installing pickups and wiring mods can be complicated, but learning to do common pot and jack repairs is almost more important, as they can save you time, money and frustration, especially before or even during a gig. That said, it can be daunting to know what to buy when jumping into the world of soldering, but for less than $80, you can have tools that will last for years.
This list kind of blows. There are no greatest guitarists. And I hate how people think guitar is sickly limited to rock guys who in the whole scheme of things are pretty amateur. How about Eric clapton? Heck if Charlie Christian or django rhinehardt had never started playing solos guitar would still be a strict rhythm instrument playing crotchets to emphasise the beat. He had 2 fingers and did more for the guitar than anyone on this list? Especially Tom Morello? How about pat methany, wes Montgomery, pat martino, tal farlow, JOHN MCLAUGHLIN, george benson? Listen to any of those guys and it will completely redefine your thoughts on the guitar. It can so easily be intelligent and soulful simultaneously…
By the late 1950s, the Les Paul was considered “staid and old-fashioned” as well as too heavy and expensive, no longer competitive with the Stratocaster, and by 1961 Gibson stopped producing the traditional Les Paul in favor of a lighter redesign called the SG. The mid-1960s, however, brought a resurgence of interest in the Les Paul, a development credited to one man and one album: Eric Clapton, using a Les Paul plugged into a Marshall Bluesbreaker amplifier as recorded on Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton (the “Beano” album, 1966),[13] set the standard for tone for a new generation of guitar players in blues and rock and roll (see Keith Richards’ contribution to the Les Paul legend below in the section ‘Renewed interest in the Les Paul models’ below). [14][15] Clapton was initially followed by American guitarist Michael Bloomfield and British guitarist Peter Green, and the subsequent rise in the instrument’s popularity was such that by the late 1960s Gibson reintroduced an updated Les Paul and a variety of other instruments “in its mold”, including a bass guitar.

I have many acoustic guitars in the collection including Gibson, Taylor, Fender and Washburn. That said none of these guitars come close to the richness in sound of a Maton. I'm assuming this is due to the quality of the Australian timbers and workmanship. Although a little expensive I highly recommend you at least play one in a shop as a treat and hope a dead relative leaves you some money to give you an opportunity of taking one home.

We would also recommend starting off with a DIY guitar pedal building kit. We created a list of the best DIY pedal kits here. Places like Mammoth Electronics and Build Your Own Clone (BYOC) have some fantastic sounding kits available – they even come with a step by step guide to lend you a hand along the way. Even Amazon has a killer tube drive pedal kit!
I've recently seen Mayer, the Chili Peppers, Clapton, and Neil in concert and had an amazing time at three of those shows. Mayer was just bad, I like his blues tracks but the show was not worth it. The Chili Peppers on the other hand were outstanding – but they just didn't compare to watching Clapton and Neil burn the house down. That's one of the reasons I always feel like Tom Petty gets missed out – he might not play the fastest or most intricate tunes, but damned if he hasn't written a ton of iconic songs.
The use of overdrive distortion as a musical effect probably originated with electric guitar amplifiers, where the less pleasant upper harmonics created by overdriving the amp are filtered out by the limited frequency response of the speaker. If you use a distortion plug-in without following it up with low-pass filtering (or a speaker simulator) in this way, you may hear a lot of raspy high-end that isn't musically useful. This is why electric guitar DI'd via a fuzz box or distortion pedal sounds thin and buzzy unless further processed to remove these high frequencies.
If a bold vintage look and a big vintage sound gets you excited, the beautiful Art Deco-inspired BG-2500 from Blueridge will be right up your street. Taking inspiration from the historic Gibson J200, this high-end model sports a jumbo 21” body made from quality woods, with a fit and finish that ensures the BG-2500 feels worth the hefty sum of cash.
The advantage of this specific package is that you’ve got everything you need to get started right away: guitar (duh), amp, strings, tuner, guitar cable, picks, gig bag, strap, and instructional DVD. Those of you who just wanna get a guitar and start, this is your choice. Squier also makes similar package, but I recommend this over the Squier because the parts (electronics) are higher quality, although the Yamaha costs a little bit extra.
The really important player on the scene today in the low end and intermediate price bracket is Mainland China. Whereas Yamaha and other makers have produced guitars in Taiwan for quite some time, Mainland Chinese guitars were always noted as being of extremely low quality. In the past few years, however, that situation has changed dramatically. In the past ten years, China has moved rapidly toward entrepreneurial private ownership of business. The new leadership has pushed this process quickly. China now permits foreign ownership of factories and businesses as well as encouraging Chinese citizens both from Mainland China and Taiwan to set up their own ventures. Just as the Koreans were able to progress from very low-end student models with crude workmanship to remarkably sophisticated guitars more quickly than the Japanese had, the Chinese now have all the advantages of the prior experience of Americans, Japanese, Korean and Indonesian ventures. In addition it should be noted that while Chinese labor is remarkably inexpensive, with an average annual income in China today of under $1,000, Chinese labor is by no means unskilled. China has a very high literacy rate and its workers are skilled and motivated. In the past the world has had areas with cheap labor and other areas with skilled labor. China is a major force to reckon with because it offers cheap skilled labor. The Chinese today are producing instruments in many different settings, ranging from small workshops specializing in handcrafted instruments on up to huge industrial complexes with the latest automated technology. Only ten years ago Chinese-made violins were viewed as almost a joke. They were violin-shaped objects but certainly did not play or sound like one. Today we at Gruhn Guitars are selling beautifully crafted Chinese violins made with excellent wood and superb craftsmanship at very reasonable prices. Some of these instruments compare very favorably with European and American violins costing thousands of dollars. Gibson has set up a factory in China to produce Epiphone guitars and numerous American makers, both large and small, are having guitars, banjos and mandolins made there. Whereas it would be prohibitively expensive to make guitars or other instruments in Japan today using techniques similar to those employed by Martin and Gibson in the 1930s with assembly line production but still featuring a high degree of hand craftsmanship and human judgment, in China today it is economically emminently feasible to do so. The violins we import are beautifully crafted and even feature genuine varnish finish for a very small fraction of the cost that companies such as Gibson charge simply for the option of a varnish finish on one of their standard models. The Chinese are very rapidly taking over the student- and intermediate-grade markets. Not only do they produce fretted instruments, but they have taken over a large segment of the piano market as well as producing wind instruments. I have seen and played prototype acoustic Chinese instruments which rival American-made guitars by some of the same American manufacturers bringing in these imports. It will be most interesting to see how this develops.
Not sure I would recommend this for someone over 11 or 12 who is genuinely serious about learning, I probably would have skipped ahead to something larger. But if you are looking for a "toy" that really could inspire a child to develop a talent, this guitar is an ideal choice. One word of caution... the amp/guitar connectors are standard size so there is nothing stopping one from connecting it straight to a much more robust megawatt amp! For the price, five stars easy.
The original Overdrive pedals were created to mimic the sound of tube amps being cranked to 10. This will cause the tubes to be pushed to their limits, producing a crunchy and aggressive tone. The sound of overdriven tubes are certainly iconic as it gave birth to the sound of Rock ‘n’ Roll. However, the problem with bringing your volume up to 10 to overdrive your tubes is that it gets really, really loud--safety hazard loud.
Some electric guitars such as the Parker Fly Deluxe® have stereo jacks to output both the magnetic and piezo pickups. For this, the Radial PZ-Select™ was born, allowing the different pickup’s tones to be adjusted and switched between without messing with the guitar’s knobs. Guitar virtuoso Dave Martone writes: “I always wanted to be able to turn these guitar sounds on and off with my feet, because my hands would always be doing something and could not get to the switches on the guitar fast enough. Frustration set in until Peter Janis at Radial contacted me and work began on the PZ-Select. There were approximately four prototypes made as we went through the necessary changes and then BAM!!! An amazing unit was born! No longer do I need that clunky cable. I use a regular TRS cable and that’s it! No more grounding issues or phase issues!!! The PZ-Select gives me full switching capability with lights to tell what channel is active! Tuner out! Piezo FX loop! Drag™ control! XLR balanced Piezo out and the list goes on!”

In 1979, there was a benefit for Amnesty International called “The Secret Policeman’s Ball”. Pete Townshend played acoustic versions of “Pinball Wizard”, “Drowned”, and (in a duet with classical guitarist John Williams) an astonishing version of “Won’t Get Fooled Again”. Unfortunately the soundtrack for that show has never been available in the CD and digital download era, but you can often spot these performances on YouTube. Highly recommended.

Benefits of this system are fairly obvious. You get to choose which source to use based on the venue you are playing at. Let's say the stage you are about to perform on has a number of large monitors pointed directly at you. In that case, you'd definitely want to stick with a piezoelectric pickup. On the other hand, if there are no monitors around, you can use both or only the microphone. Alternatively you can mike your acoustic guitar with external mics, which is great in isolated situations such as a recording studio.


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