Sune, you should know that there is no "right" or "wrong" string gauge for any guitar - it's all based on what you prefer in terms of feel and tone. It's good to try different gauges at first to find out what fits you the best. All my guitars are tuned to a drop-C tuning with 11-50 gauge strings, and I've only come to that perfect balance for me after a bunch of experimentation.

Ibanez has always been a company that breaks new ground. For starters, they led the way for Japanese guitar makers to become a force to be reckoned with in music stores and stages all over the world. But, even more significant than that, they pioneered seven and eight-string guitars, laying the groundwork for others to follow in their footsteps and bringing these extended-range axes into the mainstream for the first time.  There's an Ibanez axe to cater to any player's sound. Rockers Steve Vai and Joe Satriani use Ibanez electric guitars, for example, and they can be heard in alternative metal with Mick Thompson of Slipknot as well as power metal from Dragonforce's Herman Li and Sam Totman. On the other end of the musical spectrum, there are the smooth jazz performances of George Benson and Pat Metheny. While their styles are as different as they come, the one thing that all of these artists have in common is that they each have their own signature model Ibanez guitar.


Korg SDD3000 Preamp Clone Great project! Since I finished it, it become one of my always on pedal! With a extremely subtle compression... Eclipse Device-2 DOPAMINE OVERDRIVE based on the Klon Centaur circuit. Materials: 01. Xicon 1% metal film resistors. 02. Kemet 5% MLCC (C0G) 03. WIMA Box Film... Refractor Black Octopus Pedalworx More build reports
Sound quality-wise, it’s too close to call. All modern Zoom, Line 6, Boss, and DigiTech multi-effects units sound excellent. Distortion sounds a bit better on the DigiTech, and if reverb is your thing it doesn’t get much better than the Lexicon verbs. The other multi-effects units might be better if you’re looking for more experimental sounds and textures. The DigiTech RP500 tends to be more conservative, and focuses on nailing the classics.
All that being said the best guitar is the one that allows you to express yourself to the best of your ability and makes you feel good doing so. If you need a custom shop Les Paul to do it then by all means go for it. If a Godin or Ibanez or Dean or Jackson is the one for you who are we to tell anyone they are wrong. Personally I think the best guitarists on the planet play Telecasters! :-)
From its humble beginnings as an experiment in resonance to the flagship image of rock and roll, the electric guitar has taken many forms over the years. All of them have their advantages — and their disadvantages. Every manufacturer has tried their own take on some of the different body styles, which include hollow body, semi-hollow body, fully solid body electric, and even acoustic-electrics. Here, we will take a look at what exactly those terms mean, and what to look for in each.
A very, and in my opinion (from experience), the most difficult technique to learn and one of the most versatile. From simple single string transitions (a term I use to describe it I don't know the actual term) and used in jazz to quick shredding in rock. Learning this skill was not only a task, but helped me more fully understand a lot of musical theory.
I think I understand the value of not being tied to those things so your own technique can flourish -- not relying on anything, really. I think that it's cool to keep an eye on your purism sometimes. I'm glad I can pick up an acoustic guitar, and if it's not sounding too good, I just put it into a tuning until it does. I also have an appreciation for the almost novelty factor of being able to hit a couple of switches and go from one amp sound to another.
Upgrading the components in your guitar’s control cavity should give you significant improvements in tone and component life. If your guitar has single-coil pickups, buy 250K pots. If it’s packing ’buckers, go for the 500K jobs. If your ax has humbuckers and single-coils, I recommend 500K pots. This could make your single-coils sound a bit brighter than normal, but it will unlock your humbuckers’ full potential. For this job you’ll also need a soldering iron, solder, safety goggles, wire cutters, and a camera, to help you keep track of your original wiring connections (your cellphone will work just fine for this).
If you’re recording or practicing at home, or you think your own amplifier sounds like garbage you’ll enjoy the Cab Sim switch. This when activated, causes your signal to simulate the sound of a mic'd up guitar cabinet rather than your direct amp signal, which is extremely useful when you want high quality recordings at home direct to a DAW, or you just can’t seem to make your amplifier sound good!
• Wrap around: On wrap around tailpieces, what’s wrapping around is the string. Strings are slid into the tailpiece from the front and then pass over the back and top of the bridge before making their journey up the neck. This system creates less string tension. Some players report tuning and intonation issues with these tailpieces. Others swear by them.

I purchased a Dean Performer Plus -acoustic/electric with cutaway; the top is sitka spruce and the back & sides are mahogany;the fretboard & bridge are rosewood, the saddle is bone, the nut is tusq… now I am not saying this guitar sounds like my Martin – BUT – it does sound awfully good. I would highly recommend this for beginners & intermediates. The action on the neck is extremely good for a low budget guitar. They list for under $400. If you get a chance check one out… see how it matches up against your list of guitars. I hope this was helpful- especially for the beginners. Sincerely > George M.
Description: Body: Maple - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearl & Abalone Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Vintage Yellow Sunburst - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
The company was founded in 1931 as the Ro-Pat-In Corporation (ElectRo-Patent-Instruments) by Adolph Rickenbacher and George Beauchamp in order to sell electric Hawaiian guitars. These instruments had been designed by Beauchamp, assisted at the National String Instruments Corporation by Paul Barth and Harry Watson.[1] They chose the brand name Rickenbacher (later changed to Rickenbacker), though early examples bear the brand nameElectro.[2]
The ADA MP-1 was a legend for it’s superior versatility at the time of it’s release. Since first becoming available during the 80’s, players vied after it for it’s midi switching capability via footswitch. Paul Gilbert is most famous for his loyalty to the amp during the spawn of his career.  It runs on two 12AX7 preamp tubes and has three main voicings — Solid State, Clean and Distortion. One downfall of this amp stems from it’s lack of an input volume control, but thanks to a host of mods available nowadays for this thing, one can look really look past this minor flaw. On top of that, you can find them used for around $250! A steal for 80’s tone-in-a-box.
So this book is a great way to keep on top of practicing valuable techniques to build a very solid foundation over the course of a year. What this book is not good for is licks or detailed instruction about technique. It is much more focused on giving you a set schedule and practice regime that will build your skills. For people who get distracted and are unsure of what to practice in order to maximize their time and improve their skills, this book is a good way to remain focused and build a valuable skill set while learning guitar.
First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.
Our list of best electric guitar brands will remain incomplete if we do not add Schecter in it. Schecter Guitar Research is a firm that evolved from a startup into a guitar giant during the recent years. Aimed mainly at the heavy metal side, Schecter produces several guitars that metal players look. However, players from all genres will find something of their wish at Schecter as it touches every side of this domain. Created with the utmost care, delicacy, and artisanship, these guitars exhibit the most amazing and high-end features that suffice to surpass most expensive brands in the market today.
ESP is another Japanese guitar brand that makes this top 10 list with its many artist endorsements and actual user recommendations. Founded in 1975, it started as a builder of custom made parts for guitarists who want to personalize their existing instruments. Now ESP is known worldwide for their hot-rodded versions of popular guitar shapes, and other unique and eccentric designs, built to please modern rock and metal players.

Forget Risky Business (remember the famous scene of Tom Cruise rockin' out in his boxers?); this technique, which I consider real air guitar, is serious business. It entails capturing the airy, percussive sound of the plectrum strumming or picking the electric guitar's strings-either in acoustic isolation or combined with the ambient sound from the amp-and then mixing this sound with the recorded amplifier sound. The addition of just a little percussive plucking can enhance the presence wonderfully for any style of guitar playing. In my opinion, it's the greatest studio-recording innovation since John Bonham's distinctive drum sound.
Gibson has produced three Jimmy Page signature models. The first was issued in the mid-1990s. It was based on a stock Les Paul Standard of the time (rather than the more prestigious and historically correct 1958/1959 re-issues issued by the Gibson Custom Shop). The modifications were based on Jimmy Page‘s “#2” 1959 Les Paul, which had been modified with push-pull potentiometers on all four control knobs, as well as mini push-pull switches under the pickguard. This first version of the Jimmy Page Signature did not have the mini-switches under the pickguard, nor did it replicate the custom-shaved neck profile of Jimmy Page’s guitar, but it did include the four push-pull pots. With all four pots pushed down, the guitar operated as normal. Pulling up the volume pot for the Bridge or Neck pickup turned the respective pickup into a single coil, rather than humbucking pickup. Pulling up the tone pot for the Neck pickup changed Bridge & Neck pickups wiring from series (stock) to parallel. Pulling up the tone pot for the Bridge pickup put Bridge & Neck pickups out of phase with each other. The first iteration of the Jimmy Page Signature utilized Gibson’s then-current high-output humbuckers: a 496R in the neck position and a 498T at the bridge.
The Yamaha APXT2 is a 3/4 size version of the world's best-selling acoustic-electric guitar, the APX500III. This well-constructed, compact guitar makes a great companion when you're on the road. The APXT2 features an ART-based pickup system and Yamaha's proprietary tuner, offering great sensitivity and accuracy for quick tuning. The APX T2 also includes a gig bag.
Another point to remember about ’65 Teisco Del Rey guitars. While, in reality, Japanese Teiscos were never too particular about consistency in headstock design, they at least tended to show consistency in the catalogs. The American Teisco Del Reys were even more varied, and the ’65 Teisco Del Rey catalog shows a mix of the Bizarro square Strat head (the most predominant), the new ’64 hooked design, and the older elongated Strat design. This is probably explained by the vicissitudes of stockpiles and shipping to the new American market. In any case, it makes it a bit harder to date these instruments.
Awesome and amazing are just two of the many favorable adjectives that are used to describe the Orange Micro Dark. Most users find its tone to be convincingly tube like, while others are very impressed with its volume, considering its portable profile. A lot of users also appreciate its ease of use, and it also helps that it looks really good. Bobby Cannon of Guitar Player magazine describes it as "more than capable of delivering all the vicious tones you can dial in, and there’s no shame in going for a super-light amp that does the job..."
Like effects pedals, multi-effects processors are used to modify and alter the clean signal of your guitar to produce a large variety of effects (reverb, wah-wah, overdrive, distortion, chorus, etc). Unlike a simple pedal that gives you one or two options for modifying tone, a multi-effects processor has a full load of effects and sounds that allow you to play music with a rainbow-colored tonal palette. There are processors for modifying guitar, bass, and even units for vocalists with pitch-correction tools and harmonizer effects.
The clipping detector stages receive inputs from the guitar preamp and the reverb recovery amp, they act in an identical manner. The 1458 op-amp is wired as a comparator with a threshold that is near the high side of the allowable voltage swing on the associated 2N3906 preamp stage. If the transistor output exceeds this voltage, the 1458 output turns on, causing the 4011 one-shot pulse stretcher circuit to fire. The one-shot circuit activates the LED, and stays on long enough that even minor clipping on the amplifier causes visible blinking.
I kind of think what I do is like producing with my feet because I do a lot of that in my own shows. Particularly when I'm playing guitar with other bands, I'm always changing reverb [settings] and modulation types and the very sorts of things that [maybe no one else realizes what's going on], but it keeps me interested. I think because I come from a time before that was possible, it's a magical thing for me.
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