Neither player uses any sort of stomp boxes in their rigs. In an effort to emulate his heroes, Bo keeps it straight ahead, using no effects at all, while Frank opts to program his effects via rackmount gear and to make setting changes through a MIDI controller. The advantage is that he can change gain levels, EQs, and effects instantly with one tap, instead of having to do the stomp box break dance in time for the next down beat. Both axemen prefer to get their overdrive the old-fashioned way, by driving the tubes in their amps.
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peavey marshall bass tc electronic ampeg svt bass guitar laney ashdown mag ashdown cab carlsbro ashdown abm bass amp head marshall fender bass amp behringer peaveybassamp ashdown bass 4x10 bass cab sale sales roland bass amp speakers for bass amp combo peavey for sale guitar bass practice carlsbro amp fender ashdown head amplifier ampeg bass carlsbro bass bass guitar amplifier
A pedal itself can have an effects loop, but the most commonly used place is on the amplifier itself. You'll see on most amps (but not all) some form of output labeled as Effects Send or Preamp Out accompanied by an input labeled Effects Return or Power Amp In, respectively. Both sets of outputs and inputs refer to the effects loop that you can add between the preamplifier and the power amp section of your amplifier.
These guitars appear to have lasted through 1989 or so. In 1990 the Stinger line shrank dramatically. Three guitars and two basses were listed in the Guitar World 1990-91 Guitar Buyer’s Guide. The three guitars in ’90 were the SSX, SPX and SSL. These were basically Strats (gone were the arched tops). The SSX now had three single-coils and fixed bridge/tailpiece. The SPX offered two humbuckers with a coil tap switch. The SSL had one humbucker and one single-coil, with a tap on the ‘bucker, and a traditional vibrato.

Preamp, or gain, controls (sometimes called “volume” on master volume–equipped amps) let you dial in impressive-sounding distortion at low volumes, but excessive preamp distortion can sound too compressed and sizzling at high volumes. Turn down the gain and crank up the master volume until the amp is set at the output level you’d normally play at. Now, slowly increase the gain until the sound becomes as distorted as you want it to be. If the tone is buzzy and lacks dynamics, the amp will have all the onstage presence of an American Idol reject.


* Advertised Price Per Month: The advertised price per month is the estimated monthly payment required to be made on your WebBank/Fingerhut Advantage Credit Account for a single item order, or if at any time your account has multiple items on it, then please see the payment chart for payment terms. The advertised price per month will not apply. See Full Cost of Ownership.
We all know the sound of this effect: It replicates varying degrees of the sound of playing your guitar in the gym showers, a cathedral, or Mammoth Cave, and it has proved itself one of the most atmospheric aural adulterations available. Since none of those locations is entirely gig friendly, however, our ever-handy techs have bottled the flavor in a reliable, portable form. This category covers both echo and reverb effects, since they are versions of the same thing. The term “echo” was used more often in the early days, and is sometimes used today to refer to the distinct and distant repeats of a signal, while “delay” refers to anything from the same, to the short repeats heard as reverb, to the complex, long, manipulated repeats of an intricate digital delay line. Either way, they are both really the same thing, just used differently.
The 1960s were the Golden Age for guitars in America. The folk music boom was followed closely by the British Invasion and the demand for guitars skyrocketed as young people by the millions started making their own music. The Silvertone Amp-In-Case model 1457 was the entry point for thousands of them. Some of the most sought-after Silvertones are from this era … more
We are really proud of our instruments, but what makes us most unique is our people, and your access to them. The world is full of faceless guitar companies, most are big conglomerates. We have a team of passionate guitar people and are committed to giving you unprecedented access to our team. Each member of the team is focused on supporting you. We treat each player like a Michael Kelly endorser. We value personal relationships with Michael Kelly owners and work hard to give you a level of service not readily available from other guitar brands or retailers. Let us help you get the right instrument!
Nashville studio engineer Glen Snoddy discovered the Fuzz-Tone sound when recording Marty Robbin’s 1960 hit “Don’t Worry About Me.” Allegedly an overloaded transformer blew in a Langevin tube module, transforming Grady Martin’s bass guitar into a distorted, heavy fuzz. Some put the event down to another case of amplifier malfunction. Either way, Martin continued to use the tone throughout 1961 while Snoddy transistorized the malfunctioning circuit through trial and error, and sold it onto Gibson in 1962.
This company slowly merged into Hoshino/Tama but prior to their unification, produced instruments with the Star badge, mainly drums. They also produced guitars, including the infamous Zim-Gar badged electric and acoustic guitars. Over time, drum production was segmented to Pearl, while guitar contracts were taken up by Tama. Zim-Gar production was relatively short, as these were budget guitars made for K-mart between 1962 and 1968.

Amp: Gain- increases and decreases how much gain your sound has. Treble- increases and decreases high frequencies in your sound, AKA the brightness of your tone. Mids- increases and decreases the middle frequencies in your sound, AKA the 'punchiness' of your tone, if that makes any sense. Bass- increases and decreases the low frequencies in your sound, AKA how much 'thump' it has.


Another popular modification is to reverse the electric polarity of one of the pickups (or one coil of a dual-coil pickup). When two pickups are selected, this produces a very thin and weak sound, due to phase cancellation between the pickups.[21] The closer the pickups are to each other, the greater the cancellation and thus the weaker and thinner the resulting sound. In case of a humbucker this results in a sound that is so weak as to be almost unusable, as well as the loss of the pickup's hum-cancelling properties (due to the coils being magnetically out-of-phase, but electrically in-phase with each other).[22]

I own a v100 gold top modified to fit regular humbuckers and boy it is great. I have played it with gibson lps and it holds it own. Not as nice really but damn it sounds great. I have an SG too but have never played an SG before this guitar. I am weirded out by the light body. Are they all like that? I know they are all neck heavy but this seems out of order. I do like the sg though more every time I pick it up. 

A very good option in the budget pedal market. Comes with a great number of effects to combine for solid sounds. Virtually all the factory pre-sets are worthless and are sort of demonstrations of what the pedal can do. But you have plenty of user saves and setting up good tones is straight forward and simple. The tuner in this and my handheld one never agree. Someone is lying!
I have to say I'm really impressed with the Obsidian HSS wiring harness, The build quality is top notch, and the simplicity to install really delivered.It only took a few minutes to connect and be up and running. I love to customise my guitars and love to play around, so having the ability to swap out pickups without a messy soldering iron is fantastic, and the wiring is super clean giving a professional finish. I'll be intending to use the obsidian wiring harness in future project guitars -I highly recommend- Guitar sounds great ( oh did I mention the extra guitars picks too. nice touch)" - Ricci Custom HSS Strat® Wiring
No, could it be!? Finally we see a brand that does not come from England nor the US, but from Germany. ENGL specializes in tube amps for high-gain and heavy-metal. Its most famous users are Ritchie Blackmore and Steve Morse (Deep Purple), Alexi Laiho (Children of Bodom) and Chris Broderick (Megadeth). Both past and present Deep Purple members even have their own signature model. And there's also the standard Powerball, Fireball, Classic, and Invader series.

I received a Dorado 12 string as a birthday present in the late 1990s, installed a passive pickup, and played it around the house and at small venues for fifteen years or more. For an all-laminate, smaller body 12 string with a trapeze bridge, it sounded great. The neck was comfortable, too. I had a 1965 Gibson B-25 12 for a few of those years, but the neck was way fatter than the Dorado, which I passed along to a friend in need. I can't say the Dorado sounded better than the Gibson, but it sure out-jangled it. Wish I still had it!
Foden: In 1912 to 1917, Martin made guitars for concert guitarist William Foden. These are similar to the standard Martin models, but have simple soundhole rings and a 20 fret fingerboard (instead of 19). Made in sizes 0 and 00, the styles were similar to Martin's Style 18, 21, 28, and a pearl trim model. Only 27 of these guitars have been documented to date.

This string overview is useful for understanding what choice to make that suits your play style the best.  As players, we are always searching for the highest possible functionality, while balancing tone and playability for the genre we play.  Check out what brand and gauge your guitar heroes use to help you zero in on your perfect string set and keep on rocking!


The Tune-o-matic bridge was the brainchild of legendary Gibson president Ted McCarty in 1954, setting the standard for simplicity and functionality that has never been bettered. The 2008 Les Paul Standard features TonePros locking Nashville Tune-o-matic in a chrome finish, which has saddle adjustment screws on the pickup side, and pre-notched saddles for quick installation. The chrome locking stopbar tailpiece is also from TonePros. These parts come with locking studs designed to secure both components firmly to the body so that there is no lean, yielding a great union between the strings and body which results in excellent tone and sustain.
Our pick here is the PAC112V version, for a few reasons. First off, the solid alder body offers you the same tonewood you’ll find in a lot of higher end S-style guitars. The maple neck and diecast tuners will feel really premium in your hands, too. But the 112 series further boosts its value with two Alnico V single coil pickups and an Alnico V humbucker. The addition of the humbucker in the bridge position will open up a whole other world of tones for a budding musician, giving the option for both clean, crisp single coil sounds and thick, high-output humbucker growls.
it's really hard to beat the ric sound. the 335 12's and fender 12's are cool, but really the ric has the sound we're all familiar with. that being said, everyone has different tastes and I encourage you to play as many different ones as possible. Jimmy Page used a Fender 12 on Stairway. I went rick for that early beatles sound. the neck is tiny but it's part of the instrument.

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You aren’t likely to really know what works best until you get the song a little further along in the mix, when you can hear how the guitar sound sits with the vocals and other instrument tracks. Sometimes, what sounds like the best guitar tone in the room isn’t always the most effective guitar tone in the track, but as ever, at this point you can only take a stab at what you think will work. Through experience, you’ll build a tool kit of go-to mic positions that achieve what you are seeking.
The first two Cordobas we’ve featured have been cedar-top guitars. Now we come to the C7, which is available in both spruce and cedar (see item 7). If you hadn’t noticed by now, the “SP” or “CD” abbreviations in the Cordoba listings indicate the wood that the front of the guitar is made from, so that should help you in the future when looking for a particular guitar with a particular sound, just with the factory-supplied strings alone.
Your own write-up suggests that the RP500 is "best of the best" for nailing classic amps/effects, and for being affordable; additionally your own write-up suggests Zoom should not be "best of the best" since it's tonally inferior to both the Digitech and the HD500X. Finally, the M5 isn't even a multi-effects pedal. It can model any single effect, that is all: it shouldn't even be mentioned here. Otherwise I like the actual write-ups: they're informative.

1979 Alvarez 5053 - D-45 Martin Style Replica Japan Crafted Exotic Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood Here we have a really great one from our 30 years of Alvarez collecting and she is absolutely one of the finest Alvarez model Martin Copies crafted in Japan from this golden era the late 1970's.. This example is a 1979 #5053.. its ALL ORIGINAL with the only exceptions being we changed the old cheap tone defeating plastic nut & saddle for the preferable upgrade to a Martin bone nut & compensated saddle set and of course the Martin Marquis 80/20 Phosphorus bronze strings 12’s strings along with the Martin Bridge pins as seen. This is a unique & exotic true Vintage Japanese version of the classic ornate Martin D-45 again this one was Crafted in Japan by one of the finest acoustic instrument builders from this time period Alvarez, This guitar is possibly even a bit more fancy than even the actual Martin D-45 with the intricate exotic woods used see this examples exotic Beautiful 3-piece back simply gorgeous! The Martin D-45 version just has a 2-piece back in most cases...This example is a RARE Alvarez with such woods and its workmanship level is very ghigh suggesting a master luthiers hand its model #5053, with the date stamped inside on the label reads ( 1979 ).,,see pic detail. Bound body(front w/b/w/b/w/b/w, back w/b/w/b),bound neck(white),bound peg head(w/b/w). See the Beautiful detailed Abalone inlay around the sound hole with its white mother of pearl fret markers. With an adjustable Ebony bridge with a bone saddle and the sweet smelling Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood fretboard its simply stunning. Special truss rod cover that has the word Alvarez in gold lettering and SLM (Saint Louis Music)in gold also. Medallion on the back of the headstock says imported and customized Saint Louis Music since 1922. Choice Sitka AAA Spruce top, with old highly exotic looking Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood - awesome landscape figure sides are very figured exotic looking Jacaranda. Smells great. Wonderful exotic figuring. for the back and sides Better looking we haven’y seen...The Perfling between the woods on the back is just absolutely stunningly gorgeous,unbelievable craftsmanship!!. I've only seen one other like it. Real difficult to find much info on these rare exotics. A truly Beautiful vintage Japanese acoustic guitar and quite the collectible instrument ...for the person wanting only the best at a fair price...not on sale for $6,000-8000 like the Martin this one is a true bargain Vintage exotic WoW! What a great find. JVG Rated at a solid 8.8/10 very good original Vintage condition. I suggest you get his before she's gone..don't know when I'll find another like it. .


Picking out a guitar can be a bit daunting. And since there’s a lot of subjectivity involved, new players trying to pick out an instrument often find a lot of ambiguity and guesswork awaiting them. For someone buying their first guitar, the goals become fairly simple. Get a decent, budget guitar that you can afford and see if you stick with it. In so doing, avoid the worst guitars.
Unfortunately, there is no single unified format used for Ibanez serial numbers. Ibanez guitar production is outsourced to several companies and facilities through the world and the numbering schemes are different in each region and/or factory. The information on this page is culled from several sources both on-line and off-line and represents a distillation of the available information. It applies primarily to electric guitars, but some information may also be applicable to acoustics.
This is a really cool program. It let's you fiddle with a lot of cool effects, without having to spend a lot of money. The program works really well, after a bit of fiddling with the Jack server, and it far exceeds some of the commercial programs I have tried. I hope that this project gets some attention :) If I wasn't a "coding dyslexic", I'd be the first to sign up.
String Tension: Acoustic guitars must be built stronger, because the tension of the metal strings is approximately twice that of nylon. This is done with bracing. Any acoustic guitar top must be thin enough to resonate, but so thin that the top alone could not hold it together against the string tension. The bracing adds strength with a goal of minimal damping of resonance. Bracing patterns vary widely, but most Spanish guitars use "fan bracing" and most acoustics use "X bracing."
From beginners to seasoned professionals, most guitar players will experiment with effects at some point in their musical journey. While learning to play your instrument well should be a top priority, messing around with effects can be a fun way to engage with your instrument and start learning its sound possibilities without a lot of hard practice. There's a huge variety of stompboxes out there, many with very low price tags that make great gifts and can add a new dimension of fun for beginning players.
There are of course, other buttons and positions featured on guitars. BB king’s Lucille had a switch to toggle different values for R11 (thus going from moody chords to punchy ‘Lead’ with a finger and no need for extra gear). Advanced guitars may have phase and antiphase switches for humbuckers or dual pickups. The jackson 5 Telecaster I think is an example as it has both a phase and anti-phase wiring on their pickup selector.
The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.

In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega Electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet to rehearsals and shows. 1n 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp which added the feature of metal corner protectors, which keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]


In 2003, The Blues, a PBS-TV series produced by famed director Martin Scorsese, traced the roots of the blues from Africa to modern day society, showing how it inspired other generations of musicians. While in production, Marshall Chess got an e-mail from Chuck D saying that he heard he was doing a film that connected the blues to hip hop and that he wanted to be part of it. Chess was happy to hear Chuck D say "Electric Mud was one of his favorite, most influential albums and that all the early hip hop guys were inspired by it," affirming a connection he thought had happened. In the episode titled Godfathers and Sons, the focus is on the Chicago blues, Chess records and the effect of Electric Mud on Public Enemy, with Chuck D coming to Chicago, led on a historic blues tour by Chess. There, Chuck D's feverant appreciation of EM got him to reassemble the musicians from the sessions to perform material from it for the upcoming 20th Anniversary Chicago Blues Festival. In keeping with the experimental vein of the record, Chuck D added a turntablist (Juice) and a rapper (Kyle Jason) to the band, re-naming the group the Electric Mudcats. Having the material played at a blues festival showed how the album had finally come full circle, from being hated to being respected and enjoyed.
Another option would be to instead buy a mobile guitar interface and download one of the many guitar apps available, but I typically don’t recommend this for beginners. These apps are very robust, and can be a little overwhelming for someone just starting out. First learn how the controls on a real amp affect your tone. Once you’ve grasped these basics (and acquired some basic guitar skills), you can think about buying some fancy apps and effects.
Semi-hollow designs are similar to hollow-body guitars, but typically feature a thinner body with a central wooden block inside. This helps to control feedback while giving the instrument some of the same tonal characteristics as a hollow-body. This type of guitar has been used successfully in just about every genre of music, with the exception of extreme metal.
I've gone into a fair bit of detail here, which may be baffling to some, or may be old news to others, but I hope it cleared some of the common misconceptions about certain parts transforming tone that I have discovered in my time doing this! Truth is, upgrading your wiring is a really worthwhile modification to carry out. Replacing parts with quality components, of reliable build quality and accurate tolerances and ratings will simply be the best for your guitar. You may well see a tonal improvement afterwards which each customer of mine has reported back after fitting one of our harnesses, which is lovely to hear. But approach with the right facts, approach without the mystique of 'this vintage style pot will transform my tone' and you'll be pleasantly surprised I'm sure! There's no magic to a responsive, great guitar tone. 
The Squier Affinity series is a great beginner instrument. All of the bodies & necks have been CNC manufactured, so they are consistent and solidly built. In recent years, Fender has completely re-hauled the Squier series of instruments to make them decent introductory level instruments, at a great introductory cost to the beginner player. You can choose from Strats, Teles and even Jazzmaster style guitars!

The varying amplified current of the valve is connected through the first coil of wire (primary) and creates a varying magnetic field. The varying magnetic field created by the primary coil, causes electricity to be generated in the second coil of wire, which is wound tightly around the first. Electricity is transferred to the second coil only when the magnetic field is changing, not stationary. The iron core of the transformer keeps the magnetic field contained so little is lost. The transfer is very efficient. The secondary coil is connected directly to the speaker. The reduced secondary voltage is adjusted by the ratio of turns between the 2 coils. Eg 1,000 turns on the primary and 100 turns on the secondary would change the voltage 10:1. Most output transformers have a turn’s ratio of approx 20:1.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
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