But having hot tubes is only half the recipe for getting great tone. Room sound is the other ingredient necessary for obtaining a full-bodied guitar track. It didn't take me long to figure out that the guitarists on my formative blues sessions were slyly contributing to my "education" by nudging the mics away from their amps as soon as I left the room. Thanks to their clandestine efforts, my ears opened up to an entire new world of electric-guitar sounds.
Open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., the Visitor Center showcases a diverse selection of Taylor guitars, including standard models and seasonal limited edition offerings, for players to enjoy. To enhance the playing experience, two sound rooms are equipped with amplifiers, enabling players to plug in and play in a private environment. The Visitor Center also houses the Taylor Guitars store, where guests can purchase items including guitar parts and accessories, along with Taylor-branded clothing and other items from the company’s TaylorWare line.
But Harmony produced a lot of instruments other than guitars: ukuleles, banjos, mandolins, violins etc; the company was proud of it's history, proudly American, and as proud of its skilled workforce, as it's use of modern technology "We've produced millions of instruments but we make them one at a time". This long history of instrument manufacture explains why Harmony had the expertise to produce so many well-built acoustic and hollow-body electric instruments; guitars like the Meteor and Rocket were very well received. They were slow, however, in committing to the solid body market; although they released the H44 Stratotone neck-through solid body in 1952, it was gone by 1957, and there were only hollow bodies until the release of the Silhouette in 1963.
Staggered brass saddles offer individual string intonation never before available in a design of this type, still widely regarded as the tone machine. The baseplate itself is a faithful reproduction of the original, made from steel, very important in a bridge of this style due to the tonal effect it has on the magnetic field of the pickup mounted in it.
Also called tuners or machine heads, these geared mechanisms, usually mounted on the guitar's headstock, hold the strings in place and allow tuning the instrument by adjusting string tension. Most modern tuners have enclosed, permanently lubricated mechanisms. Strings are held in place on posts that are attached to knobs, which are turned to adjust string tension allowing the guitar to be tuned. Some tuners are designed to lock in place. This provides more tuning stability, and helps prevent strings from slipping loose from the tuner. It also makes changing your strings a little easier.
The double-neck guitar is designed so that two guitar necks can share one body. This design allows the guitarist to switch between either neck with ease. The double-neck guitar will normally have a standard six-string neck and a twelve-string neck. Other combinations, such as a six-string neck and a fretless neck, are available. The double-neck guitar may be used in live situations when a guitarist needs a twelve-string guitar for the rhythm part and a six-string guitar for the solo break.
Although most acoustic guitars have steel strings, classical and flamenco guitars use nylon strings. Nylon strings produce a mellower, softer sound. It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. Nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
Comes with hard case.This is the iconic Yamaha apx-6a. Made in the 1990s it has the iconic Yamaha AMF preamp/Eq system. This specimen is in overall faircondition for a guitar that is over 20 years old. It has normal scratches and other sings of wear. Shipping is free. Estimated arrival is 4-8 business days. A signature is usually required at the time of delivery.
More often than not, we always find it interesting to see and hear if there is any possible way an entry level electric guitar can outshine or even just come close with an expensive guitar model. These comparisons would mainly starts on looking at how they are built, time spent making them, where it is made and components used on the whole guitar. Having those as criteria in mind and as reality of it. So far it is given that it is going to be all in favor of the expensive models by a margin.
More information on Ovation can be obtained from Walter Carter’s book, The History of the Ovation Guitar (Hal Leonard, ’96), although solidbody electrics are not the primary focus, and some inconsistencies exist between the text and the model tables (when in doubt, the text seems to be more reliable). Except for using Carter’s book to confirm some dates and a few details, most of the information presented here was gathered independently prior to publication of that book.
Chorus: Though it can be overused, light distortion works well as a filler for choruses in Christian worship and most other genres.Verse: You won’t typically hear a distorted verse, though at times a two guitar group can make this work. Generally, you’ll want to leave distortion for the higher intensity portions of a song.Bridge: A lot of Christian songs tend to lower intensity during the bridge, which means light distortion becomes a little less usable. Though for bridges that keep the tempo up, it can work pretty well.
These 1950s models featured the thicker, more sustaining tone of Gibson’s humbucker pickups with the original units known as “Patent Applied For” (PAF) pickups. These PAFs were designed by Seth Lover while working for Gibson in 1955 (U.S. Patent 2,896,491), and debuted on Les Pauls in 1957. This innovation became a standard pick up design for Gibson, and subsequently, many other guitar companies followed suit, outfitting their electrics with copycat versions of the humbucking pickup altered to avoid infringing Gibson’s patent. Gretsch had their Filtertron pickups, and when Fender entered the humbucker market in 1972, it was with the radically different Fender Wide Range pickup. “Standard” humbuckers from other guitar manufacturers and third party replacement pickups from the likes of DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan were only offered after Gibson’s patent had expired.
Repair body wings. These wings form the main body shape and may have been broken by dropping the guitar or other damaging methods. If you do not properly glue in the wings you will need to use extra caution as to not break the bond. Repairing wings or any body wood is rarely necessary, especially on a thick guitar body such as a Les Paul Standard. It may be needed on a smaller bodied guitar much like a Les Paul Junior.
A combo amplifier is a unit in which both the amp and speaker is integrated. You plug a guitar into one of these, turn it on and you are ready to play. The obvious benefit of a combo is that you have everything you need in one standalone unit, while the sound tends to be optimized by the manufacturer to be the best it can be – there’s no worrying about matching it with a good speaker. Combo amps also tend to be cheaper than heads and, as such, are excellent for beginners. While some are very capable of small to medium-sized performance, the drawback is that combos are limited in power compared to a head. They also tend to be much heavier, which can be a pain when regularly transporting it.

Tone pot usually connected just as a variable resistor (one lug is not connected), so you got some “small” resistance (when compared to amp’s input) and a cap going to the ground. When you crank your tone there is no significant resistance, so all signal above cutoff freq is shunted to the ground (with graduate slope) — but still this is the brightest position of the tone pot.


yeah i know the GSP has 2 EQ ( well 3 if i wanted to use up a slot in the OD section ) but i use both EQs on the GSP and i prefer a external eq, that i can adjust on the spot depending on that patch, rather then going in and changing the EQ each time on that patch. I use 3 different guitars each one is totally different in sound, so the external EQ really helps.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Diamond - # of Strings: 6 - 12 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Custom - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Brown


Takamine GS330S: Like Yamaha, Takamine is a Japanese guitar company. They also have low price Jasmine series for beginners. I don’t recommend you buy Jasmine series if you have enough budgets because Jasmine has a laminate top. Go for the GS330s, it has a solid Cedar top, cedar is a kind wood that make better sound when aged. So if you buy Takamine GS330S and keep it for a long time, the guitar will sound better and better. For more details features and price, check out here.
The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
Launch price: $1,499 / £1,399 | Body: Ash | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple/rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x V-Mod Single-Coil Telecaster | Controls: Volume with treble-bleed, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: 3-saddle, strings-through-body Tele bridge with compensated brass saddles, 6-screw mounting with removable modern 'Ashtray' bridge cover | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Mystic Seafoam, 2-Color Sunburst, 3-Color Sunburst, Black, Butterscotch Blonde, Candy Apple Red, Crimson Red Transparent, Natural, Olympic White, Sonic Gray

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Well, sanding the bridge isn't really a standard procedure, haha. Only, to be able to get the (in my case adjustable) saddle low enough without the strings hitting the bridge I had to sand it down. This Landola is an old, but not particularly valuable guitar, so I decided to try that (and it had been severly damaged to begin with, I bought it like that just to have a go at trying to repair it)


    Kahler Tremolo bridges feature 6-way adjustable string saddles, which really allow you to dial in your string action and intonation. They have a fairly wide range-of-motion, but less than the Floyd Rose. The Kahler’s have a smoother feel compared to the Floyd Rose, and also have a convenient locking mechanism to convert the bridge into a fixed bridge.

Line 6 gets a bad rap amongst the guitar community, due to the fact that they apparently operate on a ‘quantity over quality’ business model. The truth is, however, their digital modeling tech has improved vastly since that reputation stuck and they definitely deserve renewed consideration. And that’s all the more true when it comes to beginning players. As you’d likely be learning how to play songs by your favorite artists, this amp with its massive array of presets (128 to be exact) will allow you to mimic your idols with little, if any, effort. And, honestly, it’ll sound pretty great. It even has a built-in tuner, metronome to keep you on time, and real drummer loops so you can get in the swing of playing live.

Boss’ CE-1 Chorus Ensemble was the first of these types commercially available, and is the best remembered of the company’s now-archaic looking early range of die-cast metal pedals. The unit was an instant success when it hit the market in 1976, and was quickly snatched up by a range of major players. Andy Summers used the CE-1 with the Police in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and it’s probably most famously heard on the band’s big 1979 hit “Message In A Bottle,” though others made creative use of it too. Shortly after the Boss, Electro-Harmonix offered both its Memory Man Stereo Echo/Chorus—which featured a very good, spacious chorus setting that a lot of player’s loved—and smaller, stand-alone Small Clone chorus. Like the Small Stone phaser before it, the Small Clone had a softer, subtler sound than many of the chorus pedals that would soon flood the market, and it too was a huge hit. Kurt Cobain’s use of the pedal on “Smells Like Teen Spirit” and Chris Novoselic’s bass part on “Come As You Are” from Nirvana’s Nevermind album shows off how it can add a rich, moving, liquid texture to both clean and distorted parts. MXR, DOD and Ibanez all offered popular early IC-based analog chorus pedals, and today every major mass-manufacturer has a unit on the market.


[Attention Korg Pa3x /Pa4x owners and Korg Pa700/1000 owners- I have a special version of this 6-velocity layer piano in .set format that will load to your Korg in compressed format at 116mb (equivalent to 232mb) - This set sounds wonderful on the Korg and uses 22 oscillators for outstanding realism including resonance, key-off and pedal effects. Send me an email (see bottom right) and I can provide a download link or go to the demo on SoundCloud here Korg Pa Yamaha C5 and follow the download link]

SPRAYING TECHNIQUE Spray the body holding the can 6 to 8 inches away, moving either up and down or right and left depending on how you have set the nozzel. Start spraying from 2 inches outside the body and finish the stoke the same way. Don't stop or start the spry right on the body because you will end up with an uneven build up or paint drips. It is also good to spray a light "tack" coat first and let that dry for 45 min before laying on the thicker coats. This lets the paint adhere to the body better. You can also mount the guitar body to a square wooden stick that will fit inside the neck pocket so you can hold the guitar flat while you paint the top of it. This lets the coats build up thick and even, but watch for drips on the side.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Carved - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Richlite (Paper/Phenolic Resin Composite) - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Resomax - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Godin Tuner, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Cherryburst, Creme Brulee, Black, Burgundy
This company specializes in guitars meant for heavy metal and hard rock lovers. It is the proud manufacturer of some of the most outstanding designs in the history of metal such as Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. It molded and influenced hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s. It is a great choice if you are looking for some edgy designs for your guitar. The guitars are available in 6, 7, or 8-string models that are suitable for players of all genres. Their recent introduction was the Villain series that has incredible designs and has a body of basswood or mahogany.

I disagree about Martin being THE BEST ACOUSTIC GUITAR. While Martin is an excellent guitar that is definitely ONE of the best! Taylor is THE BEST FOR THE HIGHER END TO MID PRICE RANGE! A decent TAYLOR will bea Taylor will beat the brakes off a brakes off the same Martin, because they SOUND BETTER and they can be used for more than one or two styles. If you are playing county music the Martin is better, but Taylor will play a lot better sound way better on every other kind of music styl! Buy a TAYLOR


We wanted to find electric guitars that sound as good as possible and in a blind test would make anyone hesitant. We must advice you to not only take our word for it, though. When buying a new guitar you should always try it out and compare it to other guitars. Even if it on paper might look like a guitar must be the best one for you, that might not be the case when you actually try it out. The sound might be great, the brand famous and the price ok, but you need to be able to feel like the guitar is an extension of you, and the only way to make sure of that is to try before you buy.

The benefit of a compressor lies in that every note played will be at nearly the same amplitude, and therefore nearly equal in volume. This will help normalize tones that are sometimes lost in the mix because of complex overtones, and it will result in a more articulate sound. Notice that if you don’t pick all notes of an arpeggio at exactly the same pressure you will likely get a different sound for each note, especially if you are playing a tube amp. Tube amplifiers react dynamically to stronger and weaker signals it’s the allure of them and thus the non-uniformity of picking at different strengths will be exaggerated. A compressor will fix this problem and normalize all notes of the arpeggio regardless of the player’s technique and equipment, which is consequently why many soloists prefer them.
The Effect:Chorus is one of the most recognized pedal effects, dating back from the beginning of the 70’s, and later on popularized in the 80’s, it was the most used effect on guitar pedals back then, and no guitarists dared to step foot on stage without the classic Boss CH-1 Stereo Super Chorus Pedal or MXR Micro-Chorus, to name a few. Originally, Chorus pedals came in Analog form, however today the market is mixed with both Analog and Digital pedals, with the difference between the two being that Analog modifies the signal directly, while Digital takes the original analog sound coming from your guitar, converts and modifies it into digital form, before finally converting it back to analog form prior to its release.
The ’37 Hawaiian Guitar in both the Sorkin and Grossman books was basically the same squarish, pear-shaped guitar as in ’36, sans pickguard. It had a polished Ebonoid fingerboard with new parallelogram position markers replacing the old dots. Also, the large, two-part rectangular pickup cover/tail assembly was replaced with a more conventional, modern design. The pickup cover was the new rectangular type with the two pole extensions exposed. Off to the side of its surround was a little square plate on the treble side containing the volume control. The strings attached to a small piece of slotted metal hidden under a rectangular cover or “handrest.” Gone were the control wings. The microphone attachment stuck out the bass side of the guitar. The cost was $35, plus $6 for a case.

Alonso de Mudarra's book Tres Libros de Música, published in Spain in 1546, contains the earliest known written pieces for a four-course guitarra. This four-course "guitar" was popular in France, Spain, and Italy. In France this instrument gained popularity among aristocrats. A considerable volume of music was published in Paris from the 1550s to the 1570s: Simon Gorlier's Le Troysième Livre... mis en tablature de Guiterne was published in 1551. In 1551 Adrian Le Roy also published his Premier Livre de Tablature de Guiterne, and in the same year he also published Briefve et facile instruction pour apprendre la tablature a bien accorder, conduire, et disposer la main sur la Guiterne. Robert Ballard, Grégoire Brayssing from Augsburg, and Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510 – c. 1558) significantly contributed to its repertoire. Morlaye's Le Premier Livre de Chansons, Gaillardes, Pavannes, Bransles, Almandes, Fantasies – which has a four-course instrument illustrated on its title page – was published in partnership with Michel Fedenzat, and among other music, they published six books of tablature by lutenist Albert de Rippe (who was very likely Guillaume's teacher).

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Do you have an old guitar that requires knowing how to repair a damaged guitar body? Read on and learn some neat tricks for repairing body damage on a guitar. Body damage on a guitar ruins the acoustics. Body damage on a guitar body really make it useless in the playing arena. If you are looking to bust out that old guitar but need some handy advice on how to repair some old damage, MadeMan has the fixes for you. This article will give you the fixes for larger damage and the annoying little nicks and teach you the way to repair them.
@Michele – Thanks for checking out our blog! 🙂 If you are going to be using both multi-effect units in your setup, you will need to decide which of these has a better compressor that you will be using. If you like the PEU5’s Compressor and Overdrive, I would place it near the beginning of the chain in front of your existing MojoMojo overdrive. This way, you can use the RP100A’s Delay and EQ within the effects loop of your amp. But keep in mind, there is no wrong way to set this up. I encourage you to place them in different locations of your signal chain to find what sounds best for you.
Some of the best pedals in this segment, like the TC Electronic Sentry, will allow you to set both the volume threshold where the noise gate kicks in, and the type of interference you want to filter out. The important thing to remember about noise gate pedals is that they only eliminate hissing when you don’t play. As soon as you do, the pedal disengages and the noise comes back. With that said, noise gate pedals are essential for a good tone.
Berklee College of Music professor Thaddeus Hogarth thinks the hands and the human element accounts for almost all of what we consider guitar tone. “Providing the instrumentation and the amplifiers are above a certain quality and in the general ballpark, I think it’s safe to say that we’re talking 90 perecent,” Hogarth says. In his classes and on his blog, The Quest for Good Guitar Tone, Hogarth argues that much of a guitar player’s tone is based upon the attack more so than the sustain. “If you take away the first second of the attack of a note played on any instrument, it is often very difficult to determine what that instrument is and certainly impossible to identify who played it,” he writes on the blog.

One full step down from standard tuning. Used by bands/artists such as Volbeat, Mötley Crüe, Nightwish, Pantera, P.O.D., Sepultura, Dimmu Borgir, Cradle of Filth, Watain, In Solitude, Agalloch, Inquisition, Drive-By Truckers, Soulfly, Children of Bodom, Symphony X, Oceansize, Death, Decrepit Birth, Dream Theater, All That Remains, Exodus, Gojira, Shadows Fall, Mastodon, Asking Alexandria on their Stand Up and Scream, Ghost, Lordi, and Kreator. Used in a vast majority of songs by musician Elliott Smith. Also used in Nirvana's songs "Come As You Are", "Lithium" and "Drain You", by Metallica in their songs "Sad but True", "Devil's Dance", their cover of "Whiskey in the Jar", some of their covers on The $5.98 E.P.: Garage Days Re-Revisited ("The Small Hours" and "Crash Course in Brain Surgery"),"Dream No More", "The Thing That Should Not Be" and in live performances of "The God That Failed" and "Seek and Destroy"; by Bullet for My Valentine in several songs on Scream Aim Fire, by blink-182 in "Adam's Song", in Doug Anthony All Stars live performances and by John Fogerty.
Solid body guitars were the next step in guitar development, with Leo Fender creating a modest instrument called the Broadcaster, which was then rebranded as the Telecaster. The Stratocaster came later and, in addition to the changes in the pickups, included contours in the body that made the guitar more streamlined and easier to play while standing up. Today, the Stratocaster is still the most iconic electric guitar shape; it’s associated with guitar wizard Jimi Hendrix, and many beginners end up with a Stratocaster-style guitar. Gibson introduced their own line of solid body guitars, the considerably swankier Les Paul.
Otherwise, while the manufacturer is considerably shy when releasing specs regarding this product, customer reviews can give us a good idea of how well it performs under real-life circumstances. In brief, it performs well, particularly so for country music and slow rock, especially when paired with a couple more 12” speakers on top of the ones that are already integrated into its chassis.    
It's interesting how one of the biggest brands in guitar amplification was built by a drummer! The story goes that professional drummer Jim Marshall was inspired by Pete Townshend, Ritchie Blackmore, and Big Jim Sullivan to develop a louder and better sounding amp. And he went about it by looking at a popular American amp design (i.e. Fender Bassman) and finding ways of how to improve it. After many prototypes, Jim and his team eventually came up with an amp that had their own "Marshall sound", this amp inherited the JTM label, an abbreviation of Jim's and his son Terry's names. The rest as they say is history, with Marshall being one of the most familiar amplifier brands, even to none musicians. Their brand is still the amp of choice for a long list of virtuoso guitarists, including Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Slash just to name a few. While their vintage and professional level amplifiers are still very much in demand, the company is not doing as great in the entry level to mid-tier market - which really is the bulk of where sales and reviews of come from. Still, their fans gave them enough good feedback to make it to this list, thanks to the improvements they are making to their entry level line of amps.
Now you see why these Spectrum 5s are so desirable! It is not clear, by the way, how many (if any) were ever made with ebony necks. The few I’ve personally seen had maple necks. Certainly the expense of the ebony would have been enormous and hard to justify on the Teisco brand name. Also, with the density of ebony, the guitars probably would have been hard to balance. In any case, these are the Holy Grails of Teisco!
Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.
For my tastes, position 1 on a clean tone can be a bit too boomy. Even if one backs the volume a bit to take the edge off, it doesn't quite suit acoustic-style strumming. Position 2 is perfect for these sorts of things, though. I'd always use it for the small high chords you often find in funk and reggae. Position 2 is also a nice way thinning a distorted tone without it cleaning up too much, like Position 1 with the volume dialled down does. If you have your rig set so Position 1 screams, Position 2 will sing.

Back in the mid-60s, a desire for independence in business led to John Skewes forming a small musical instrument agency and wholesale business based at his home near Leeds, England. Over time, his new business steadily began to take off, and soon included throughput of some self-branded lines of musical merchandise. That effective early decision to carry self-branded merchandise continues to this day, with their signature Vintage® acoustic and electric guitars and basses which were first produced and sold in 1985. Today, Skewes is the largest family-owned independent musical merchandise distributor in the U.K. and the Vintage ‘family’ includes Fret King® electric guitars, Pilgrim® Banjo’s and Mandolins, Laka® Ukuleles, Encore® electric and acoustic guitars, and Kinsman® cases.
The Effect: Volume pedals are a simple, yet frequently essential piece of equipment for many musicians out there. This device’s function is quite self-explanatory – it allows the user to control the level of the sound output, allowing them to increase or decrease the volume of the instrument. Additionally, many of these products can also operate as expression pedals, or a control for some of the other effects on your pedalboard. These gizmos are typically known for being strong and sturdy pieces of gear, as they should since they get stomped on quite a lot. If you are looking for a proven solution, go for the Boss FV-500H, if not, check out our Best Volume Pedal reviews to find your perfect match.
Now, since I have started on my wishlist there is another thing that I would like to add. I have seen multi angle videos that include a shot the finger board from the point of view of the player. Looking at this video angle it shows the fingerboard from the same angle as when you are playing it yourself. This is a great view as you do not need to translate what you see mentally. You see it, you play it the same way.
The C3M comes with Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings, but you can always change them out for something different if you prefer. Aesthetics-wise, the guitar has a matte finish (the “M” in the model name), but it really has no bearing on the way the guitar sounds.All the same, you’ll want to protect your guitar from nicks, cuts and other damage.
In addition to acoustic and electric guitars, the company now also makes mandolins and ukuleles. Their mandolins are highly regarded, they “more or less rule in the bluegrass market” in the United States.[5] As of May 2012 the company has about 85 employees and manufactures six to seven acoustic guitars, three electric guitars, two mandolins, and two ukuleles per day.[4]

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But if you never play with a tone as dark as the fully-rolled off sound, you might consider a lower-value cap. The next example is an .033μ (also know as 33n and 333), another popular choice, followed by the smaller .022μ (also know as 22n and 223), and the even smaller .01μ (also know as 10n and 103). As the cap gets smaller, the minimum tone knob settings gets less dark. As the overall range of the tone pot decreases, it may be easier to locate any desired “nooks and crannies” between the highest and lowest settings.
Small-diaphragm condenser mics, on the other hand, tend to have flatter frequency plots and a better-behaved off-axis response, giving a sound sometimes described as more focused, but they seem to be less commonly chosen by the interviewees than large-diaphragm ones. Neumann's KM84 seems to be the most regular choice of small-diaphragm condenser, and numbers John Fry and Bill Price amongst its high-profile users, while Sennheiser's MKH40 warrants a particular mention from Mike Hedges: "I started using [these mics] when I was working with the Beautiful South. I started off with two and now have more than 20. I think they were originally designed for classical recording, because they have very high gain and very low noise. This means that you can get a very clean sound. They also accept massive amounts of volume, so you can put one against a guitar amp on full and it will take it." Hedge's concern about the ability of the microphone to handle the sheer volume of some guitar amps is echoed by several of the other producers, who make a point of mentioning that they switch in a condenser's 10dB pad when recording electric guitars.
Stompboxes are small plastic or metal chassis which usually lie on the floor or in a pedalboard to be operated by the user's feet. Pedals are often rectangle-shaped, but there are a range of other shapes (e.g., the circle-shaped Fuzz Face). Typical simple stompboxes have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers ("pots" or "knobs") for controlling the effect, and a single LED that indicates if the effect is on. A typical distortion or overdrive pedal's three potentiometers, for example, control the level or intensity of the distortion effect, the tone of the effected signal and the volume (level) of the effected signal. Depending on the type of pedal, the potentiometers may control different parameters of the effect. For a chorus effect, for example, the knobs may control the depth and speed of the effect. Complex stompboxes may have multiple footswitches, many knobs, additional switches or buttons that are operated with the fingers, and an alphanumeric LED display that indicates the status of the effect with short acronyms (e.g., DIST for "distortion").[5][9] Some pedals have two knobs stacked on top of each other, enabling the unit to provide two knobs per single knob space.
Most of the modern electric guitars are provided with several tones and volume controlling circuits which helps in controlling the string vibration and thus the electrical charge produced. These adjustments are mainly done with the help of knobs provided on the neck of the guitar. Thus, the more the number of electrical circuits, the better the guitar can be adjusted for different sounds.
Welcome to Silesia Guitars, the guitar repair shop in Shoreline that is dedicated to taking good care of your dear friend, the guitar. We are located in Shoreline, just 15 min north of downtown Seattle. Our work consists of repairs of anything from broken headstocks and  cracked guitar tops, through replacing/installing electronics and custom inlays. Just need a set up or a string change? No problem! We try to accommodate any needs, big or small. Usually, the cheaper the guitar, the more it would benefit from being professionally set up. Evaluations are free, so stop by with your guitar today and let's talk about how we can help you get the most out of it!
The guitars included three bolt-neck Strat-style models, the GS-1 (one humbucker), GS-2 (two humbuckers) and GS-3 (humbucker/single/single). Most had locking Kahler vibratos, although at least one GS-3 has been seen with a traditional fulcrum vibrato. The bodies had a German carve relief beginning at the waist and extending forward to the cutaway horns. The necks had 21-fret rosewood or maple fingerboards with dots. The six-in-line heads were kind of squarish and bi-level, with a carved relief along the lower edge, kind of an Ovation trademark. The logos said Ovation Ultra GS. The GS-1 (volume only) and GS-2 (volume, tone, three-way) had pickups mounted on rings on the top. The GS-3 featured a black Strat-style pickguard. One source refers to a GSL model, but nothing is known about what this means, if it isn’t a typo. Most of these came with typical exposed-pole DiMarzios, but the previously mentioned guitar with the fulcrum vibrato also had twin-blade pickups with DiMarzio stenciled on the covers.

“Top shelf” simply refers to any product that is sufficiently uncommon and/or of significantly high enough quality to place it “above” the rest of the “regular” crowd of products. In a shopkeepers parlance, the top shelf was where you placed things that you wished to be visible, but were, in actuality, were rarely sold. The best stuff was kept up and just out of reach of the daily rabble and only brought down when someone who truly appreciates the quality (and is willing to pay the commensurate price) came into the shop.
In 1966, Vox introduced the problematic V251 GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, although this never happened.[citation needed] According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative.[citation needed]
The main difference between analog and digital delays is delay time and note clarity. Digital delays can produce multi second delay times whereas the Deluxe Memory Man offered a delay time of 550ms. Digital delay units also introduced the tap tempo function which is extremely useful when using delay as a rhythmic tool. There are many excellent companies producing excellent delay units, certainly a ground breaker was the Line 6 DL4 which is still popular today. Although I love the sound of a true analog delay, the latest offerings from companies like TC Electronics and Strymon offer so many options and analog emulation options it makes it a tough sell to stick with analog delays.
It’s probably fair to say that drive pedals of all shapes and sizes outnumber the other types of effects. This is due to the fact that they form the backbone of your overall tone. It’s also probably fair to say that it’s one of the most subjective tonal changes you can implement. One man’s muff is another man’s screamer, so to speak. There are certain classics within the genre which may act as a gateway to stronger forms of grit though. Ibanez’ famous green Tubescreamer pedal is used by countless players on account of its versatility, whereby it can form the basis of a good quality blues tone. Or it can complement a distortion pedal by ‘boosting’ or tightening up the signal. Another favourite is the Electro Harmonix Big Muff, which has been used for decades by players looking to add a distinct fuzziness to their tone.
For guitarists looking to gig, this is the best category to start shopping in because stepping into the sub-$300 range offers some great diversity as well as real stage-worthy power. As well as improved solid-state combos, amp heads and tube amps become more readily available in this range, even if they are a little basic. Some very powerful modeling amps are available too, such as the Line 6 Spider V 60, which packs a stage-worthy 60 watts of power, with more than 200 amps, cabs and effects models built in.
In the studio, a dynamic noise filter such as the Symetrix 511A, Drawmer DF320/330, Rocktron Hush or Dbx Silencer can be less obtrusive than a gate for cleaning up guitar parts to which delay/reverb has not yet been added. Very generally, such devices work by progressively reducing the audio bandwidth once the sound falls below an adjustable threshold. Transients pass through with very little change, while high frequencies are removed from the tail end of decaying sounds, which reduces the subjective hiss level. A conventional expander then mutes the signal entirely at very low levels.
Our flagship guitar. Customers have been asking Denny to build this instrument for such a long time that he finally gave in and designed what many are calling the best acoustic on the market today.  We’ve had players put this guitar up against the best from Taylor, Martin, Gibson, Fender, Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, and we never get them back, even with our 100% money back guarantee. If you’re looking for your last guitar you can pass onto your children this is our #1 guitar. We’re sold out and back ordered on them most of the year so when you see one grab it as Denny builds only a few annually.
Marty is another player who’s built up his videos and YouTube Channels over a number of years and it’s become a vast resource for lessons at all levels. There’s a lot of stuff about how to play particular songs or how to mimic a certain musician’s style, but mixed up with these are plenty of absolute beginners’ lessons that teach the basics. There are some guest artists explaining different techniques, but mostly Marty’s The Man. The good thing about Marty is his great patience during the videos—he takes plenty of time to explain things and demonstrates them nice and slow, so you hardly ever have to stop and rewind the videos. Marty has a quirky sense of humour, too. It takes the hassle out of the harder lessons to master. He has a good website linked from his YouTube channel and a few cool, free giveaways. Check that out at www.guitarjamz.com

Here we have is one of the finest vintage Banjo's you will ever see. This example is a 32 year old High End no expense was spared. Its super well built with top grade materials like Brazilian Rosewood fingerboard and Mother of pearl inlay work just about everywhere WoW!... just have a good look at its AAA flamed Maple back and its AAA flamed Maple Neck.. this one is super nice and well its clean. The action is great and she has a very good feel & sound. More to come soon...stay posted for updates Thanks for looking. .
• Why fret ends get sharp: Sometimes the end of the fret wire can become sharp or, more accurately, protrusive at the sides of a guitar’s neck. Besides being rough on the hands, this is an indicator of a trickier problem: that the fingerboard has become dry and shrunk. This means that the guitar has been kept in an environment that lacks the proper humidity. More careful storage is the ultimate answer, but using lemon oil on the fretboard also helps prevent this from happening by moisturizing the wood.
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Official Vintage Guitar Price Guide: This print guide, published by Vintage Guitar and Bass, is an annual guide that is re-published with updated information each year. The webpage above is handy because it shows links for all guides that have been published in one place and will continue adding links for future years. The link shown for each guide will take you to a store online where you can purchase the guide. It is known for being extremely thorough, and its latest edition, the 2017 guide, has appraisals for 2,000 brands of guitars, basses, amps, effects, mandolins, steels, lap steels, ukuleles and banjos.
My cousin Mike had a red Lotus LP Custom copy that his mom got for him, it was a bolt-on one, looked just about like the one you have in your pic. It played pretty nice, but the tuners and pickups sucked. We added a set of Grovers and a pair of (then popular) DiMarzio super 2 pickups. Mike used this Lotus guitar for 3 or 4 years until he got a Guild s-100. He sold the Lotus for 125.00 after taking off the DiMarzios and Grovers. He gave me those parts and I installed them on a stripped and mutilated 71 SG Standard that I painted with auto enamel (a nice Candy red). I later sold the SG to Mike. The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.
I took it into a local shop to have it looked at, turns out the neck was warped, leading to problem #2 above. I ended up returning it and ordering the same model from a different retailer; although the new guitar didn’t have the same neck problems I ended up having to replace the bridge with a Mastery Bridge (see issue #1, above, the Mastery Bridge cost me another $200 or so, including labor for installation).
Body tops are optional. If you're just starting out, you should either skip this option, or choose the veneer top that appeals to you most. We offer veneer tops (paper-thin layer of wood) and cap tops (thick layer of wood). Most people will add a top to their instrument because of the top’s naturally beautiful appearance. Some people will add a top to their guitar because it can affect the overall sound of the instrument, too (only applies to cap tops, not veneers).
This diagram shows 3 single coils wired in parallel, allowing seven tone choices. The typical 3 single coil guitar contains a 5 way rotary switch which allows you to get 5 sounds - each single coil; neck and middle in parallel and middle and bridge in parallel. This modification will give you 2 more sounds - all 3 pickups in parallel and Neck and Bridge in parallel.
The PRS S2 Custom 24 is a stripped down version of the expensive yet sought after PRS Custom 24 guitar, and because of its accessibility, it helped put the Custom 24 design into the hands of more players. What's impressive about the S2 Custom 24 is how it retains the same attention to detail and quality as PRS' more expensive guitars, making it a viable instrument even for those who can afford more expensive alternatives.
Hidesato Shiino (1947–). Music-Trade.co.jp. Dai-Show Corporation. — The person who involved with a lot of remarkable Japanese guitars including: Yamaha FG, Fernandes & Greco models, Morris & H.S. Anderson (named after his son; well known as Prince's Hohner Telecaster), early ESP, Vesta Graham & Vestax (now known as DJ brand), Akai Guitar 1997 series, D'Angelico, etc.
Harmoniser – a frequency-based effect that sounds like a second guitarist is playing in harmony with the original guitar signal. The effect is created by doubling the guitar input signal and then shifting the pitch of the double up or down at a certain interval (usually a 3rd, 5th or octave). The harmony effect is often used in the metal and hard rock genre to play solos.
Guitar amp and FX plug-ins are very advanced nowadays to the point that you can actually record “clean” by plugging your guitar straight into a mixer or interface, and add a plugin like Guitar Rig, Amplitube or Waves GTR as an insert. You will hear this effect as you play but without any risk of feedback, since no mics are live in the room. This approach also means you can tweak and change any aspect of the sound post-recording since the raw recording is actually completely dry.
The reality is, each of these approaches to adding effects to your tone has advantages and disadvantages. Are you a no-effects type of player, or a pedalboard kind of player? Maybe you like some pedals for your dirt, but would like your delay and reverb in the effects loop of your amp. Or maybe you would like to go the full on w/d/w route, for the ultimate in power and programmability! Let’s take a closer look at the options that are out there.
Birmingham’s Table Scraps add a grunge-y Midlands mud to the garage rock sound established by the likes of 13th Floor Elevators and The Cramps. Guitarist Scott sticks to a “three-pedal limit”, using a Death By Audio Fuzz War (“a versatile monster”), Echo Dream 2 and Boss DD-3 to jarring effect to create freaky, DC59’d melodic lead bursts. As Scott says: “Once you try 12-string everything else only sounds half as good.”

Its simple yet effective design and revolutionary sound broke ground and set trends in electric guitar manufacturing and popular music. Introduced for national distribution as the Broadcaster in the autumn of 1950, it was the first guitar of its kind produced on a substantial scale. Its commercial production can be traced as far back as March 1950, when the single- and dual-pickup Esquire models were first sold. The Telecaster has been in continuous production in one form or another since its first incarnation.[1] The Fender Telecaster has been mostly used in music genres such as country and rock, but is also sometimes used in blues and jazz.


This is a very rounded sounding electro-acoustic bass. Recorded straight without a mic, so there is no noise. This fits nicely with most types of music. Its deep but not overpowering, leaving room for other instruments. There is a choice of sample sets to choose from in this soundfont. Direct or through my j-station (which makes it sound more like its through an amp), or a mix somewhere between the two. The j-station samples are the same direct samples routed out and through the j-station and back in again, which is why it is possible to have a mix of the two.
The tone knob is similar. Like the volume knob, the more you turn down the knob, the more of the sound you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier. But there is an additional trick involved. See, the current generated from each string is quite complex, like the sound characteristics it produces. Think of it like a continuum. On one end, the current is turned into low frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'warm') and on the other end of the continuum, the current generates high frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'bright').
The least expensive practice amps and basic combo amps may only have a single indicator light: an LED to indicate when the amp's power is on. More expensive amps may also have LEDs to indicate when the preamp has a signal present from the instrument (helpful for troubleshooting during set-up, because if the amp is not producing any bass sound even when the bassist is playing, and the "signal present" light is illuminated, this indicates that a signal is reaching the amp); when a limiter or similar speaker protection feature is activated (e.g., Peavey's DDT system); when clipping is occurring; or when the amp is in standby mode. Amps with a built-in tuner typically have several LEDs to indicate when the note being played is flat, sharp, or in tune.
Now, none of this should take away from the actual tones, which are beautiful, even when not fully convincing.  I haven’t commented on Instant Guitar’s GUI yet and that should tell all you really need to know. It gets the job done well, but looks unfortunately ugly — or at the very least bland and not matching the high-quality of the sounds found in this line of guitar VSTs.

Bought this to replace my Digitech RP 255 which I had better presets and found a little easier to setup- but I have every confidence this unit will give me sounds I like just as well- I already like the clean sound better, plus it is a much smaller and lighter unit which was one of my main goals. My pedal board has a GR33 guitar synth, a boost and a headphone amp. Those units and power supplies were getting too heavy.
The EB-18 was supplied with a quality hard flight case. The EB-18 body fits into the shaped recess and the case takes account of the oddly shaped ‘lizard-looking head and large tuning lugs. There is a pair of compartments inside forcables and other items. The inside is lined with a soft, burnt orange color, fur-like material. The case is closed with four toggle latches and has a centrally placed carrying handle.
Okay, choose from the best electric guitar brands to suit your needs and look great too with this helpful guide for guitarists of all levels! Would you rather get the proven model, or trust a relatively unknown brand? This is especially true for those who are looking to buy their first instrument. With that in mind, we have compiled a list of top 10 electric guitar brands which you can trust. We will talk about each, and explain why they are the best guitar brands. On top of that, we will mention some models which we have had the chance to handle in the past.
The S670 QM is a speedster's guitar, with locking tuners and a razor thin "Wizard III" Maple neck, developed by Ibanez to be specifically fast and easy to play. Players with smaller hands or those who like to use their thumb to grab notes on the sixth string will find the neck particularly accommodating. So this model (and many of the Ibanez designs) score high marks for playability.
Even if you are on a budget, it’s always worth looking in the higher price brackets and considering something a little more expensive, which will offer better sound quality (which is always encouraging), better build quality (usually more comfortable to hold and play), looks cooler (which will keep you motivated), and will last you longer – allowing you to grow with the guitar. It’s best to buy at the top end of what you can afford. For additional inspiration, make sure to check out this electric guitar list.
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