This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar recorded on the both pickups setting direct in and also through a valve driven Fender reverb unit. This can be used with software amplifiers such as the free fender and marshall vst plugins on this forum (there are lots of software guitar amplifier and pedal related things worth downloading on the Guitar Amp Modelling forum) or amplifier impulse response files with your convolution reverbs like Jconv on Linux or Freeverb on Windows. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them.

Pictures, description and soundclips from a 1973 Fender Musicmaster bass. The Musicmaster bass changed very little between it's introduction in 1970, and it's deletion in the early 1980s. Although often regarded as a student bass, the Musicmaster was of high enough quality, both in terms of components and build, to sell to student guitarists and more advanced players looking for an affordable shortscale bass.
A bit underrated and under the radar, Blackstar makes some superb amplifiers at a fraction of the cost you’ll find from bigger name brands. And while it’s a shame they don’t get more recognition, it’s good news for you, the user. This particular amp might just be the best option for apartment living – due to its small stature and low-level volume paired with the fact that it is still a tube amp. But don’t let the fact that it’s only 1-watt fool you – thanks to the simple truth that it uses tube amplification, it can still get plenty loud. Of course, if you’re overly concerned about noise, this option also comes with a headphone jack, and it’s one of the few tube amps to even offer that convenience.
For most players, the ideal location to place modulation effects—which include phase shifters, flangers, chorus, rotary, tremolo, vibrato and so on—is directly after a compressor and/or overdrive/distortion pedal. When these effects are distorted after the fact, the sound tends to smear and lose definition (particularly with chorus), although there are a few exceptions where distorting a flanger or phase shifter can sound really cool. The best example is Eddie Van Halen, who doesn’t use distortion pedals and instead generates all of his distortion from the amp. When a flanger or phase shifter is placed in front of a distorted amp or overdrive pedal, it can create dramatic thick, jet-like phasing and flanging effects (See Example 2, below).
3,000 to 8,000 Hz - Brilliance and Presence: This is the range that can add shimmer or allow a guitar to cut through a mix when boosted. It can also be where you make cuts to keep a guitar from conflicting with a vocal. If making boosts in this range, keep an eye (ear?) out for noise, as any noise present from distortion/effects pedals will very quickly be accentuated as well
This depends on a number of things. Are you looking for placement in a series of pedals? If so, it should go towards the end of your chain. Are you looking at it as a functional point? If so, using an octave lower can give some hugeness to heavy guitar or might pull a fatter sound out of some higher solos, whereas an octave up is almost always great for a layering effect.

Best acoustic I've owned. It's an Oregon dreadnought, an all round stunning looking guitar. The sound is beautifully balanced, clear with nice defined bass, sits perfectly in the midrange and projects well without being too bright. It's light weight with meticulous craftsmanship and beautiful timber. When you look at these guitar it's obvious that they are built with a lot of care and attention to detail.
yea, i’ve looked on a lot of websites. The way the 5-way switch is explained here helps a lot. Actually, the Dimarzio site has the closest wiring schematic that I’ve seen. I tried it and I got 2 out of the 5 positions to work. The problem is that all 3 pickups are running on both the working settings, just the bridge is more defined on the one setting and the neck is more defined on the other.
The basic function of the volume knob is to change the level of your guitar’s volume output in a smooth and even way. But there’s more to it than that. Some players use the volume knob as a means of boosting their signal to make solos pop out. For example, if you keep your volume dialed in at seven or eight and perhaps lean on your amp a little more for output, you’ve got two or three more notches to ride your loudness up via the knob when it’s really time to burn. No need to spend money on a volume pedal, and unlike distortion or overdrive pedals this doesn’t change your sound much.
Phrase sampler: Like a loop pedal, a phrase sampler will store loops or phrases of even greater length. The more expensive and sophisticated phrase samplers will save multiple phrases or loops, drum and bass, rhythm guitar, or practice solos. Some have USB connectivity and can hook up to your computer for uploading, so you never lose a loop or phrase.
Almost all bass amplifiers are designed for use with an electric bass, which has magnetic pickups. When a double bass player is plugging their instrument into a typical bass amp, the signal usually comes from a piezoelectric pickup mounted on the bridge or beneath the feet of the bridge. The direct signal from a piezoelectric pickup does not usually sound good when it is plugged into a standard electric bass amp. Many upright bass players who use piezoelectric pickups use a preamplifier or preamp-equipped DI box before the signal is sent to the bass amp. The preamplifier helps to ensure that the impedance of the pickup signal matches the impedance of the amplifier, which improves the tone. Some preamplifiers also have equalizers which can be used to modify the tone.

I started playing & kinda grew up then (although my wife would dispute the 'grew up' part). We used to play mostly 9s or 10s. It depended on the quality of the neck on the guitar we could afford. A good guitar neck/fret job would let you go to the lighter 9s. You couldn't get all the great pedals then, so sustain was often achieved with some feedback, which is a product of TURNING UP the volume. Lighter strings seemed to feedback more easily. Lighter strings don't last as long as heavier ones, so unless you love re-stringing, 10s are a good compromise. I think Billy Gibbons still plays 8s, but he has a guitar tech that probably changes them for every show.
One glance at this bad boy reveals just how accurate it is to the 1959 version. We are talking exact same tubeless truss rod assembly, aniline dye, exact same finish... everything. In terms of hardware, they went with a set of Klauson Deluxe tuners and period specific Tune-o-Matic bridge. The custom humbuckers were coiled and voiced to perfectly match the original PAF design from the late '50s which was done using Alnico III magnets and 42 AWG wire. The performance of this guitar is an experience that is rarely found out there.
In May 1965 Keith Richards used a Gibson Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone to record "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[24] The song's success greatly boosted sales of the device, and all available stock sold out by the end of 1965.[25] Other early fuzzboxes include the Mosrite FuzzRITE and Arbiter Group Fuzz Face used by Jimi Hendrix,[26] the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi used by Hendrix and Carlos Santana,[27] and the Vox Tone Bender used by Paul McCartney to play fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" and other Beatles recordings.[28]
Full hollow-body guitars have large, deep, fully hollow bodies and are often capable of being played at the same volume as an acoustic guitar, and therefore of being used unplugged at intimate gigs. The instrument originated during the jazz age of the 1920s and 1930s, and is still considered the classic jazz guitar, nicknamed the “jazzbox.” Like semi-hollow guitars, they often have f-shaped sound holes. Having humbucker pickups (sometimes just a neck pickup) and usually strung heavily, jazzboxes are noted for their warm, rich tone. A variation (popular in country and rockabilly) with single-coil pickups and sometimes a Bigsby tremolo has a distinctly more twangy, biting, tone than the classic jazzbox.
The ‘boomer’ kids wanted their own voice and opinions to be heard, they wanted to be taken seriously – and like the quote from the 1966 film ‘The Wild Angels’ which exaggerated this rebellious angst to the extreme “…We wanna to be free to do what we wanna do…”  There was a sense of needing to rebel against ‘The Man’ – basically anyone who told them what to do or how to conform to society respectfully.
Of course, this top-down lecturing is all very abstract without examples. Let me give you the worst case scenario. My school talent show, 2008. Two friends of mine performED an ambitious but utterly inappropriate Metallica cover in front of the other students, their parents and the faculty. It was excruciating. Although the solos (presumably the only thing they had bothered to practice) were technically flawless, the whole song was undone by their terrible rhythm. The timing of the song became displaced, the chords were so badly fingered that it was difficult to hear the riff and consequently the whole performance fell apart. They looked like morons. They had sacrificed learning basic rhythm and paid the price. Make sure you don’t do the same.
Their songs cut right to the melodic and rhythmic core of great rock and roll. Johnny contributed song ideas and slashing guitar arrangements, but he also kept the whole thing on the rails. A straight guy in a world of addicts, perverts, weirdoes and psychos, Johnny’s politics were dubious. But, like Mussolini, he made the Ramones’ rock and roll train run on time for more than two decades. John Cummings passed from this life in 2004 after a five-year fight with prostate cancer.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  250K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.  Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.
Upon starting the game and creating a new profile, Rocksmith 2014 asks you to assess your basic skill level so that it can tailor games and lessons to your specific ability. But it can also adapt on the fly based upon how well (or poorly) you handle a particular song, riff, or skill. That's key to Rocksmith's teaching prowess. And the feature immediately becomes clear when you select the Learn a Song mode, which allows the user to play through any one of the dozens of real licensed rocks songs included in the game.
If you feel that you must attempt a setup on your own, and you have a suitably worthless guitar to work with, then there are a few pieces of advice that you should know. When adjusting the truss rod on any guitar (this changes the bend or warp in the guitar neck) you want to move in small, one quarter or less turns. Over-tightening the truss rod will lead to a back-bend which can permanently destroy your guitar’s neck. Loosen the rod to bring it from this kind of a bend to flat. From there, you will want a slight amount of sag in the guitar neck to allow the strings room to vibrate. Intonation on an electric guitar is achieved by making sure that the pitch of the note when a string is struck open matches the pitch of the note as struck at the twelfth fret of that string (one octave higher). If the note at the twelfth fret is higher, the string should be slightly loosened at the bridge (achieved by moving the saddle towards the neck). The opposite is true for flat sounding notes at the twelfth fret. It is best to use a high quality tuner when intonating an electric guitar.
The objects connected to the red and purple wires are a capacitor and resistor in series. The round brown object is a capacitor, typically around .001 microfarads. The rectangular brown object is a resistor, typically around 150K ohms. Increasing the value of the capacitor will expand the treble range you're preserving. Too large a value, end you'll be preserving midrange, too. Too small a value and you'll only be preserving the highest treble frequencies.
A note on acoustic guitar pickups (piezo, in particular): Making crazy 10 dB cuts? Contemplating making some absurd boost? You're probably not wrong – the acoustic pickup world can be the Wild West when it comes to tone. Some are great, and some are downright questionable. There are too many variables to even begin suggesting frequencies, so use your ears to guide you home on this one.
Processing audio before it passes through an amp simulator is a creative alternative to adding effects to its output. As described elsewhere in this article, pitch-shifting can work well in conjunction with amp simulation, but other ways of editing and processing the raw guitar file before it goes through the amp modeller also yield interesting results. Reverse reverb, resonation, vocoding and Auto-Tune can all produce distinctive effects. Try chopping small sections of guitar out, for an interesting stuttering effect that's nothing like tremolo. A piece of guitar that's been reversed before being fed through an amp modeller sounds quite different to what you get by reversing a guitar part that's already been through an amp, and this technique can be very effective. Likewise, recording three or four separate tracks of single guitar notes and routing them simultaneously through the same guitar amp simulator sounds very different from playing chords. Sam Inglis
No guitar recommendation list is ever complete without a Fender product in the mix. Squier is Fender’s more affordable instrument range, and this set is a great place to start. The affinity series Stratocaster is available in sunburst, classic black, or candy apple red. A 10 watt Fender amp and corresponding cable are also included alongside a strap, 3 picks, snap on the tuner, tremolo bar, replacement parts and tools, strings, gig bag, and an instructional DVD to help you get off on the right foot with your playing.
There is a historical parallel between musical styles (baroque, classical, romantic, flamenco, jazz) and the style of "sound aesthetic" of the musical instruments used, for example: Robert de Visée played a baroque guitar with a very different sound aesthetic from the guitars used by Mauro Giuliani and Luigi Legnani – they used 19th century guitars. These guitars in turn sound different from the Torres models used by Segovia that are suited for interpretations of romantic-modern works such as Moreno Torroba.
The National STEM Guitar Project, in partnership with NSF Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Centers with funding provided through a grant from The National Science Foundation (#1700531, #1304405, & #0903336), hosts innovative Guitar Building Institutes throughout the US. Five-day institutes, combined with additional instructional activities comprising 80 hours, provide middle, high school, and postsecondary faculty training on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) applications as they relate to the guitar. The institutes present and teach participants hands-on, applied learning techniques to help engage students and spark excitement for learning STEM subject matter.
Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE, is an English musician, singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and fourth in Gibson's "Top 50 Guitarists of All Time". He was also named number five in Time magazine's list of "The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players" in 2009 In the mid-1960s, Clapton left the Yardbirds to play blues with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Immediately ...more on Wikipedia
Echo controls usually let you determine the level, the period between playbacks, and the decay—the rate at which succeeding notes become quieter and quieter until they fade out altogether. The period (or time) parameter is often controlled by a single button you push repeatedly in time with the music. This is called tap delay and keeps your echo effect from clashing with the music's time signature.
There are of course, other buttons and positions featured on guitars. BB king’s Lucille had a switch to toggle different values for R11 (thus going from moody chords to punchy ‘Lead’ with a finger and no need for extra gear). Advanced guitars may have phase and antiphase switches for humbuckers or dual pickups. The jackson 5 Telecaster I think is an example as it has both a phase and anti-phase wiring on their pickup selector.
The electric guitars have to be plugged in for sound to be produced. A cable and an amplifier are a must for them to produce sound. They are largely dependent on some electronic pickups, having between one and three pickups on their bodies, for them to produce this sound. They are relatively much lighter and have lighter gauge strings when compared with their acoustic counterparts. It is therefore a better option for the small statured or small-handed players. Getting comfortable to hold a guitar or fret the notes is quite physically challenging when working with the acoustic guitars than with the electric types.
Petros Guitars are an elite customized acoustic guitar luthier, formed by the Petros brothers, Bruce and Matt Petros, based in Kaukauna, Wisconsin. They are noted for their exceptionally high quality craftsmanship and often make guitars similar in appearance to Spanish Baroque guitars with the design, making both steel and nylon string hand-made guitars. Bruce began making guitars in 1972, and in 2000 he was joined by his brother to form the Petros company.[

No matter how good a tech may be, his preferences are going to be different than yours on string height, etc. And he is never going to use the exact same amount of pressure fretting a note as you do (affects intonation adjustments). So, the best you can hope for is finding a good tech with good comunication skills, willing to listen to what you want. I'll admit I've never tried to find one, but that sounds more difficult than learning to do the setups yourself, which is what I did.
Alternatively – and often most effectively – you can fix phase issues in the digital realm. Record your two-mic signal on two separate tracks, then zoom in on the sound waves in each of the two channels in your DAW’s editing window until they are huge and you’re seeing the full up-and-down crests and troughs of the waves. Now, drag or nudge the sound wave of the ambient mic forward (i.e., to the left of the screen) a few milliseconds at a time until the sound waves line up perfectly. Listen again, and you should hear a very different blend that is fuller, richer, and more “together.”
The neck and fretboard (2.1) extend from the body. At the neck joint (2.4), the neck is either glued or bolted to the body. The body (3) is typically made of wood with a hard, polymerized finish. Strings vibrating in the magnetic field of the pickups (3.1, 3.2) produce an electric current in the pickup winding that passes through the tone and volume controls (3.8) to the output jack. Some guitars have piezo pickups, in addition to or instead of magnetic pickups.
By the late twenties, the idea for electrified string instruments had been around for some time, and experimental banjo, violin and guitar pickups had been developed. George Beauchamp had himself been experimenting with electric amplification as early as 1925, but his early efforts involving microphones did not produce the effects he desired. Along the way Beauchamp also built a one-string test guitar made out of a 2X4 piece of lumber and an electric phonograph pickup. As the problems at National became more apparent, Beauchamp’s home experiments took on a more rigorous shape, and he began to attend night classes in electronics as well as collaborating with fellow National employee Paul Barth.[1] When the prototype electric pickup they were developing finally worked to his satisfaction, Beauchamp asked former National shop craftsman Harry Watson to make a wooden neck and body to which the electronics could be attached. It was nicknamed the frying pan because of its shape, though Adolph Rickenbacker liked to call it the pancake.[6] The final design Beauchamp and Barth developed was an electric pickup consisting of a pair of horseshoe-shaped magnets that enclosed the pickup coil and completely surrounded the strings.[1]
I’ve played Martin D35 and O18 for decades and fooled around with Maton and Cole Clarke’s for a bit, but switched to James Goodall’s ( 6 and 12) which are simply stunning instruments. Why they’re not mentioned here is a mystery to me – especially if it’s quality of woods and craft and tone you’re chasing. I love the Martin’s but Goodall stole my soul.

The original guitar recording preamp was almost certainly the Scholtz Rockman, but within a few years we had several sophisticated competitors (from Sansamp, Groove Tubes and Mesa Boogie) using both solid-state analogue and tube circuitry. These all include speaker emulation of some kind, though usually offer few or no effects. On the whole they are easy to use and some produce excellent results, though they have less tonal flexibility than digital systems designed to model the characteristics of a range of specific commercial amplifier and speaker combinations.
I gave some relief to the guitar, just enough to be able to move a business card on the 8th fret. I think the truss rod adjustment is ok now. Strangely it's still buzzing. I compared the height of the bridge to my Navigator N-LP-380LTD and i have the same height on the RLG-120 the same. The string that buzzes the most is the D string!!! E and A string buzz too but less than the D. Don't know if i want to raise the bridge more. G B E are ok! Don't know if the D slot on the nut is too low. Seems like the slots on the nut on my guitar are higher than the ones on your Burny. Don't know what to do. Frets seem even. Any chance it's the saddles or something? Do they play a role on buzzing. I will raise the bridge tomorrow morning and see how it goes. Any idea what should be a standard string height on these guitars? Lets say height on 1st fret, 5th fret, 8th fret, 12th fret, 16th fret, 22nd fret. Can we say that? Can you tell me yours to check with mine?
The first Touch Guitar Invention started in 1959 with the filing of patent #2,989,884 issued in 1961 as the first touch tapping instrument which could be played on two separated necks Simultaneously by muting the strings at the distal end of the neck along with numerous other claims. Until 1974 it was known as the DuoLectar and with a new patent "the "Electronic Mute" has been known as the "Touch Guitar. It is held in the normal way over the shoulder and design with the left hand playing the lower bass neck in a traditional way and the right hand playing over the top on a neck which has a wider string spacing allowing the hand to be used in both vertical and horizontal angels to the strings. It is absolutely off at all times, until Touched or picked.
I nearly returned this guitar when it first arrived. I'm very glad I changed my mind. When I first unboxed it I was not a fan of the sound at all, and I didn't think it could improve significantly, but I was wrong. I put my trusty Tone Rite on it and left it there for several days. It opened the sound up and made it project much better. The finish is great, and I love the dark sound of sapele. It just takes some time and playing to get it to open up. When I first picked it up, I much preferred the sound of my Seagull, but now the Martin is really speaking to me and the Seagull has been relegated to backup status. I've even picked up a couple of bluegrass tunes, just because I'm playing a Martin now. I've only plugged it in a couple of
The Univibe effect was produced to also mimic the sound of the Leslie rotary speaker, but in a slightly different way from the new digital pedals previously mentioned.  They often combine slight amounts of all modulation type effects at the same time to approximate the rotary sound, but became a unique sound of its own.  Some pedals allow some individual tweaking of each modulator, but most typically allow the user to adjust the speed of the Univibe effect.
The Yamaha's FG series FGX800C is a perfectly machined instrument. If there is one thing Yamaha is known for, it's the quality of their mass-produced acoustic guitars, which people like to pooh-pooh due to the romanticization of extremely expensive handmade guitars. Yamaha has perfected this machining process to a point where you wouldn't really be able to figure out if the instrument was put together by a luthier or if it was made on a factory floor somewhere. This is the case with nearly every accessible guitar these days thanks to machines reducing errors and driving prices down.
My services include re-frets, fret dressing, fret end dressing, action adjustment, truss rod adjustment, intonation setting, nut replacement, bridge saddle replacement, acoustic pickup installation, electric pickup fitting/replacement, output jack replacement, pot replacement, re-wiring, sound post setting, tuner installation, brace re-gluing, broken headstock repairs, strap pin installation, re-strings, bridge setting, tremolo setting, Floyd Rose setting, custom scratch plate cutting, tuning problems, restoration, polishing, cleaning, wiring modifications...Get in touch I'm sure I can help!

Every electric guitar has a series of electronics that give the guitar its unique sound. Fender guitars signature sound comes from their five-way switches and single coil pickups where as Gibson Les Pauls comes from their three way selectors, multiple tone knobs, and humbucker pickups. Many other aspects of electric guitars affect the tonal qualities of the instrument, but the electronics cannot be overlooked. In this article, I will talk about different electronics in electric guitars as well as some common repairs. For more information about electric guitar pickups, see the electric guitar pickup page.
Imagine a rich, authentic acoustic guitar tone coming from your electric guitar - at the flick of the switch!  Replace your current saddles with Graph Tech's ghost modular pickups and one of our Acousti-Phonic preamp and you'll have instant access to true, acoustic tone from your electric guitar or bass, without altering your electric pickups.  With the ghost Acousti-Phonic system you can play one guitar!  It can be electric AND acoustic, separately, or blended together for an infinite range of new and exciting sounds.
Taylor went with their own Expression electronics for the BT2. This system features volume and tone controls as well as a built-in tuner. You generally don't get too much maneuvering space in terms of tone shaping, however, the default setting of the Expression preamp is perfectly capable of reproducing this Taylor's native tone, and there's generally never any desire to leave that realm either.
Gibson: These guys have been making musical instruments for well over 100 years. Founded by Orville Gibson back in 1890 and not producing guitars at the time (and certainly not electrics because those hadn’t even been invented yet), Gibson has had plenty of time to cement itself as one of the leading guitar companies. They are one of the few to keep their main brand name as a prestige-only brand and applying a different brand name (Epiphone) to their imported, lesser-priced instruments. They invented the arch-top guitar and created some of the most iconic instruments in guitar-history. These includes their by far most famous model, the Les Paul. Other iconic models are the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-175 and the Firebird. The ES-175 was to become the first really popular electric guitar. This happened before solid body guitars had even been invented. To this day, the Gibson Les Paul remains one of the most desirable and expensive guitars in the world. In order to tap into various price-points, Gibson creates less expensive Les Paul models around the $1,000 range, like the very popular Les Paul Studio. The more expensive models such as the Les Paul Standard are up in the $2,500+ range. Finally, there are even more expensive models such as the Les Paul Custom in the vicinity of $3,000+. Off course, they also create some very special limited run guitars than can easily fetch close to the $10,000 mark. In line with the car analogy earlier: While not Italian, I’d be happy to call the $2,500+ Gibsons the Ferraris of the guitar industry.

Mostly everything about a guitar in this price range feels premium, and the sound quality and playability is enough to put a smile on any guitarist’s face. You also start to find advanced features such as brand-name pickups, active pickups, and EverTune bridges, as well as unique signature models that are too expensive for manufacturers to produce as a budget line.
Recently picked myself up a second J28SCDL Jumbo, which was set up beautifully and I have to say it truly is an amazing guitar. It could give some of the higher priced guitars a run for its money. Lovely sound, creative design and clearly a lot of guitar for your money. I seriously encourage you not to over look Washburn when looking for a good guitar at an affordable price. Might end up your favorite guitar!
First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.

Freshly Realeased from the JVG Vintage Vault..... Just serviced with fresh set up & cosmetic clean up remove grime etc, lube & adjust tuning gears, rehydrate the woods and polish out to the Beauty you see now...detailing & set up here at the JVG shop she's 100% ready NOW and a real rare style beauty too. She's a very clean example of a real Vintage guitar its over 35 years old and is a Japanese Vintage Acoustic guitar. She Plays like butta now! .


The thoughtful design and close-tolerance machining of the mechanical components of most electric guitars enables them to be set-up and adjusted with great precision. But it is important to make these adjustments in the correct order- Neck-Nut-Bridge saddles. Making fine tune adjustment to any of these elements without reference to the others, or out of this order, will prevent a guitar's true potential from being realized.
Ibanez brand guitars are manufactured at a variety of factories in several countries under contract from the brand's owner, Hoshino Gakki Group. The catalogs scanned and linked below represent output from the year 1971 through the present. During the 1970's and most of the 1980's, Ibanez guitars were made almost exclusively in Japan, and the majority of electric models were made at the Fujigen Gakki manufacturing plant.
Thanks for posting the cool video. I have a Decca like that one. Its pickups migrated to my #1 guitar, which is a relative from roughly the same era (early 1970’s), a Daimaru (sunburst, jazzmaster / jaguar copy surf guitar body, tremolo, etc.). The Decca now has one Daimaru pickup (I wrecked the other one when I was a teenager — thinking I was going to ‘improve’ it), but otherwise, my Decca looks basically identical to yours — except for it has the original tuners, and I angled the bridge in the 1990’s. The neat sound you can get from one of these particular Deccas is the placement of the bridge pickup, it’s a bit further from the bridge than a lot of other electrics, which gives it a neat, plunky sound to it — as is apparent from your video.
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The color black is powerful, mysterious and evokes a sense of potential and possibility. It’s widely regarded as the single most popular color for Rock ‘n’ Roll thanks to rock pioneers such as KISS and AC/DC. Get back in black with these fine offerings from Dean with our vivid take on the classic black electric guitar with a few other shades thrown in for good measure. Plug in and play. Get your wings!
Official Vintage Guitar Price Guide: This print guide, published by Vintage Guitar and Bass, is an annual guide that is re-published with updated information each year. The webpage above is handy because it shows links for all guides that have been published in one place and will continue adding links for future years. The link shown for each guide will take you to a store online where you can purchase the guide. It is known for being extremely thorough, and its latest edition, the 2017 guide, has appraisals for 2,000 brands of guitars, basses, amps, effects, mandolins, steels, lap steels, ukuleles and banjos.
If you want to get really technical, the electronics “on board” a basic non-battery-powered guitar form an “RLC” circuit, the letters standing for resistance (R), inductance (L, since I is used for current) and capacitance (C), three key values in an AC circuit that determine the relative “impedance” of various frequencies. The inductor is the magnetic pickup (which “induces” voltage/current based on the vibrating metal string), the resistor is the tone knob (a potentiometer or variable resistor), and the capacitor is a tone cap, in this example 0.05 uF (about right for a humbucking pickup like in a Gibson Les Paul).
Best Songs of 2018Best Songs of All TimeBest Singers of All TimeBest Guitarists EverBest Eminem SongsBest Metallica SongsTop 10 Linkin Park SongsBest Green Day SongsRockerboyBest Albums of All TimeBest Female Singers of All TimehayreanmarjonBest Avenged Sevenfold SongsBest Beatles SongsGreatest Music Artists of All Timecamp0112Top Ten Best Music GenresRHCPfan
Clarence White helped shape two genres: His acoustic flatpicking, first displayed as a teenager when he and his brother formed the Kentucky Colonels band, was key in making the guitar a lead instrument in bluegrass. Later, he set the stage for country rock and transferred that dynamic precision and melodic symmetry to the electric guitar. A top session man in the Sixties, he played on the Byrds' 1968 landmark, Sweetheart of the Rodeo. After he joined the band later that year, White brought a full-bodied rock elation to his California-inflected Nashville chops. "He never played anything that sounded vaguely weak," said the Byrds' leader, Roger McGuinn. "He was always driving… into the music." White had returned to bluegrass with the acclaimed Muleskinner album when he was killed by a drunk driver in 1973. He was 29. "Clarence was immersed in hard country and bluegrass," said Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. "He incorporated those elements into rock & roll, and it totally blew people's minds."
However, you don͛t need to fork out over $10k for this version, as it comes with a respectable sub-$1,000 price tag. Sporting a familiar Strat style basswood body, this model is available in three iconic EVH-approved colors. Playability – as you͛d expect – is top-notch, with a reinforced quatersawn maple neck and a compound radius rosewood fretboard.
Play heavy rock or metal music? Listen up! These guitars feature a twin horn cutaway shape and a long-neck design. They are lightweight compared to the Les Paul, but can be difficult to get used to. They can feel unbalanced because of the long neck. They have two humbucker pickups like Les Paul guitars but have different volume and tone controls for precise settings.
If you’re making the crossover from electric to acoustic, then Takamine won’t be a particularly well known brand to you, but rest assured that they’re a top make when it comes to acoustics, and of course electric acoustics. The GN93CE-NAT is a mid-range electric acoustic that features some really nice touches, such as the rosewood fretboard, and is an interesting choice.

Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.
If you are recording the output of a bass amp, try to use a mic that will capture more of the low-end than a typical stage mic. An SM57/58 will work, but a mic with a more extended low-frequency response would be a better choice. The Sennheiser 421 is often used, as is the classic kick drum mic, the AKG D112, which has a bumped-up response tuned specifically for low-pitched instruments. I prefer the Electro-Voice RE-20 (you know, the “announcer’s mic”)—it’s more neutral, and it has an extended low-end response, so you’ll get not just boom, but real depth.
What most of us know as the classic ’60s Teisco line began in 1964. The year marked both the debut of many new guitar models, noted by a transition to a new headstock designs (which can help you date a particular guitar). As already noted, Teisco headstocks through the ’50s were mainly variants of the Gibson three-and-three. Indeed, these remained into the ’60s on Teisco hollowbodies.
The body was perfectly flat and the sanding sealer that was on it was great. I however in wanting a finish that was like a mirror used a enamel filler primer. The body was then shot with 6 coats of enamel black, wet sanded, and hung up to cure for 2 weeks. After curing the body was then shot over a matter of another couple of weeks with 10 coats of clear (remember that temperature and humidity have an effect ... full review

We’ve decided to give our top choice award to the Martin DRS2 dreadnought acoustic because it’s simply the best all round balance of quality, sound and price, and pretty much anyone reading this should be able to consider it as an option. The only reason you might not is if you’re dead set against a dreadnought body. Otherwise, it’s a fine choice to spend your money on.
Reverb is a more subtle form of delay that replicates the natural echo effect of various spaces, such as small, medium, or large rooms or concert halls. Many amplifiers have built-in reverb effects, but a lot of guitar players like having a separate reverb pedal for an increased range of programmable options. Some modern reverb stompboxes emulate the sound of vintage reverb devices that used reverberating springs or plates to achieve their effects. Reverb is great tool to add color to a very clean tone, but can quickly make a heavily distorted tone sound muddy.
Amp: Gain- increases and decreases how much gain your sound has. Treble- increases and decreases high frequencies in your sound, AKA the brightness of your tone. Mids- increases and decreases the middle frequencies in your sound, AKA the 'punchiness' of your tone, if that makes any sense. Bass- increases and decreases the low frequencies in your sound, AKA how much 'thump' it has.
This type of acoustic electric guitar is pretty simple and is actually the oldest system in use. The whole thing is based on a small microphone that is located inside the body of the guitar, right under the sound hole. Once you pick strings, the microphone sends the tone it picks up to the preamp, which is then fed into an amplifier through the guitar cable.
Since 1994 The Music Zoo has been a trusted source for musicians around the world. We've located guitars for Slash, sold guitars for Steve Miller, held performances by major artists like Steve Vai, built thousands of customer relationships, and helped countless enthusiasts find just the right instrument. Today we look forward to finding your next guitar!
The pickups on this guitar are really cool and not found on any other model that I’ve seen.  They are really loud single coils reading out at 5.58k at the bridge, and 5.90k at the neck.  The pole piece screws even have some “gold foil” surrounding them, which is really cool and not usually seen.  These pickups sound very close to vintage American p90s, and they have this loud, articulate, sparkly clean tone combined with a really grindy dirty tone.  These pups are special, seriously!  Also, those switches were standard fare through the late 60s on most Matsumoku guitars.
Play with it, see what happens. Worst case; you’ll set it, forget it or use it as a means to dial out some hum. Best case, you’ll find the guitar in your hands is far more versatile than advertised and use the tone knob to wield it like a musical samurai and leave everyone wondering…”how the hell do they get so many sounds without a guitar change?!”

For a novice like me, hitting those notes is no easy task. On my first brush with "Rocksmith 2014," I tackled Arctic Monkeys' "R U Mine?" This included a lot of missed notes and looking at my hands to find the right frets. But after playing the song a few times, it got easier and easier - even with the inclusion of more notes to master and more frets to find.
Pyle Pro’s PEGKT15SB package is the next step up. This guitar has more of a vintage feel thanks to its sunburst finish. Like the Silvertone above, it features 3 single coil pickups, two tone knobs, a tremolo bridge system, and a full-scale neck complete with a 22nd fret. Also included in the package is a Pyle Pro gig bag, a small 10-watt amp with cable, 3 guitar picks, a strap, and extra strings.
An amplifier stack consists of an amplifier head atop a speaker cabinet—a head on top of one cabinet is commonly called a half stack, a head atop two cabinets a full stack. The cabinet that the head sits on often has an angled top in front, while the lower cabinet of a full stack has a straight front. The first version of the Marshall stack was an amp head on an 8×12 cabinet, meaning a single speaker cabinet containing eight 12" guitar speakers. After six of these cabinets were made, the cabinet arrangement was changed to an amp head on two 4×12 (four 12" speakers) cabinets to make the cabinets more transportable. Some touring metal and rock bands have used a large array of guitar speaker cabinets for their impressive appearance. Some of these arrangements include only the fronts of speaker cabinets mounted on a large frame.[25]
During the late Middle Ages, gitterns called "guitars" were in use, but their construction and tuning was different from modern guitars. The Guitarra Latina in Spain, had curved sides and a single hole. The Guitarra Morisca, which appears to have had Moorish influences, had an oval soundbox and many sound holes on its soundboard. By the 15th century, a four course double-string instrument called the vihuela de mano, that had tuning like the later modern guitar except on one string and similar construction, first appeared in Spain and spread to France and Italy. In the 16th century, a fifth double-string was added. During this time, composers wrote mostly in tablature notation. In the middle of the 16th century, influences from the vihuela and the renaissance guitar were combined and the baroque five string guitar appeared in Spain.[33] The baroque guitar quickly superseded the vihuela in popularity in Spain, France and Italy and Italian players and composers became prominent. In the late 18th century the six string guitar quickly became popular at the expense of the five string guitars. During the 19th century the Spanish luthier and player Antonio de Torres gave the modern classical guitar its definitive form, with a broadened body, increased waist curve, thinned belly, improved internal bracing.[34] The modern classical guitar replaced an older form for the accompaniment of song and dance called flamenco, and a modified version, known as the flamenco guitar, was created.
Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.
Best Answer:  First, make sure you have new or clean strings that aren't dead. You should hear a metallic harmonic overtone to picked notes particularly on the low E, A, and D wound strings. If your low E sounds in tune but makes a flat dull boww boww boww instead of dang dang dang when you pick change them. Set your amp up for a fairly bright sound clean, playing off the bridge pickup. Make sure the guitar volume knob(s) are rolled all the way on and tones are all the way up, no roll off. If you can't get a nice clear clean sound that doesn't sound distant and muted then you have some issue with the guitar electrics or amp. If you're playing off the neck pickup that's a big muddier right there. The neck pickup is good for clean rhythm playing, jazz, and for a hollow warm tubey sound on single notes but tends to muddy overdriven power chords. Once you have the amp set for a bright clean sound that's not too brassy (if it has a master volume in addition to a gain or channel volume set the gain or volume low for a clean sound and use master for output level, let the RP90 do the effects work, not the amp preamp for now.) bring in the RP90. I'm not familiar with it but try it on a few overdrive and distortion settings. If you've only been an acoustic player high overdrive or distortion "power steering" takes a different play style.
FU-Tone is very excited to welcome the amazing Zakk Wylde to our list of fine artists. Zakk, of course, needs no introduction and has a established career with Ozzy and his own band Black Label Society. Here are some photos of Zakk with Adam at a recent show with the FU equipped Dean Dimebag Razorback Vertigo guitar! Check out some of the new photos with Michael Wilton from the current Queensryche Tour with his ESP Signature model guitar featuring FU-Tone Big Block and other upgrades. Check out Nuno Bettencourt on the cover of Young Guitar Magazine with his Washbun N4 Equipped with FU Titanium saddles, 42mm Brass L Block, and EVH Dtuna! Also, FU-Tone is really excited to introduce some really cool new bridge parts and accessories for Telecaster Guitars from Vibramate and Bigsby! Enjoy!
Flanger: A flanger creates a "whooshing" "jet plane" or "spaceship" sound, simulating a studio effect that was first produced by recording a track on two synchronized tapes and periodically slowing one tape by pressing the edge of its reel (the "flange"). When the two tapes' audio signals are later mixed, a comb filter effect can be heard. Flanger units add a variably delayed version of the audio signal to the original or signal, creating a comb filter or Doppler effect.[73][74] Some famous uses of flanger effects include "Walking on the Moon" by The Police, the intro to "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love" by Van Halen, and "Barracuda" by Heart.[75][76]
The significance of Les Paul’s contributions to his Gibson guitar design remains controversial. The book “50 Years of the Gibson Les Paul” limits Paul’s contributions to two: advice on the trapeze tailpiece, and a preference for color (stating that Paul preferred gold as “it looks expensive”, and a second choice of black because “it makes your fingers appear to move faster on the box”, and “looks classy―like a tuxedo”).[11]
As you saw in the video, I’ve gone through the Learn and Master Guitar Setup course, and all in all, I think there is a lot of great content in there. Greg Voros teaches you the basics of guitar setup and maintenance, and he does it in a slow and detailed fashion so that even if you’re following along at home you should have no problem learning his guitar setup techniques. Keep reading for more information on the course.
You've come to the right place.  We offer a wide range of vintage and used guitars and basses including a great selection of Fender instruments.   We're guitar players who recognize and appreciate how important Fender has been to the evolution of Rock and Roll.  Please browse our web site, give us a call or visit our Chicago show room.  We're constantly searching for Fender guitars, new gear is arriving daily and they often sells before we have a chance to list them on our web site.  

I always recommend the Cordoba C5 for beginners who are looking for their first classical or nylon string guitar. It’s comes at a very wallet-friendly price, but it sounds and plays exceptionally well for a guitar in its price range. More experienced players can look to other C-Series Cordoba guitars like the C12, which is built for advanced guitarists.

Tonhöhe ebenfalls gehoben und kann auf die gewünschte Tonlage eingestellt werden. Der Ibanez DOWNSHIFTER erlaubt es, die Tonlage einer Saite durch einfache Hebelbetätigung auf eine vorgegebene gewünschte Position zu senken. Um präzises Tuning für sowohl Auf- und Ab-Positionen zu erzielen, müssen Sie beide Hebeleinstellungen vor Betätigung des Downshifters voreinstellen.


Unlike the 60's and 70's, it is almost impossible to buy a poor quality guitar today. There are many hundreds of "brand" name guitars being produced in dozens of factories throughout the world, with these same factories producing instruments for the world's best known brands - and nearly all of these instruments are well made and perfectly playable. Don't worry about the name on the headstock. If you are buying the guitar as a gift, have a guitarist-friend advise you on the suitability of the instrument for the intended recipient. Even the world's best known and respected guitar manufacturers market instruments in a variety of price markets, and while there are differences in materials and tonal qualities, these are usually well beyond the beginner's ability to discern. All are playable; it is up to the player to make them sound good.
This is a guitar tuning and style of playing on the Classical Guitar that has been developed by Ian Low. It was recently publicized in the form of a series of videos posted onto his YouTube channel on 14 July 2016. The 6 strings are tuned to F, G, C, E, C# and C using the standard guitar strings EADGBE strings to allow a different style of harmonic playing.
The sound quality is pretty excellent. Relative to the Zoom, Line 6, and Boss multi-effect pedals, the distortion on the DigiTech is surprisingly nice. The reverbs are absolutely gorgeous, which is no surprise given they are Lexicon algorithms. Chorus and delay also sounds great, and the effects’ parameters are easy to set up and adjust using the row of knobs below the display. We also find the noise gate works extremely well at taming any unruly noise issues caused by dirt effects. Overall, we’re impressed at how the RP500 replicates a lot of the “classics.” A quick note on the presets - they are less than stellar, so don’t judge this pedal by them. You’ll have to play with them a little bit to arrive at better, more usable sounds.
A: If it looks like a ??? it almost certainly is a ??? Because the factory used to change the hardware at a whim there will be slight variations. This has, in most cases, nothing to do with a particular year but more to do with what happened to be to hand at the time. Some exceptions are pickups, pickguards, logos and headstocks. All I know is here on the website if you look hard enough. Also bear in mind that your guitar may have been modified at some stage in its life.
In 1980, however, Martin had hired another guitarmaker, one John Marshall. Marshall had studied lutherie with Eric Schulte whose base of operation was in the far western Main Line suburbs of Philadelphia around Frazer, PA. Schulte himself had worked with the legendary Sam Koontz, who was responsible for Harptone and some Standel guitars, as well as his own. After learning the tricks of the trade from Schulte, Marshall became involved in the ill-fated Renaissance guitar company of Malvern, PA, just up the road from Frazer. Renaissance, you’ll recall, made those exotic plexiglass guitars and basses in around 1979 (plus a later series in 1980 designed by John Dragonetti). These were designed by John Marshall. Marshall left Renaissance to join Martin, where he was hired to work on the electric guitars which would become Martin’s 28 Series.

During Michael Laskow's 20-year tenure as an engineer/producer, he worked with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, Eric Clapton, Cheap Trick and countless others. He continues to write articles for magazines like Recording and Electronic Musician. He's also the founder of TAXI, an independent A&R company that links record labels with unsigned artists and songwriters.
ESP is another huge brand in the realm of electric guitar, with huge bands like Metallica, The Rolling Stones, Deftones, Lamb of God, and Slayer endorsements in full swing. Any fan of this kind of acts will be very interested in starting with an ESP of their own. Like Fender and Gibson, ESP has a more affordable range known as LTD. This kit includes an electric blue H-51 guitar with 24 frets and dual humbuckers, as well as a 12 pick sampler set, gig bag, guitar stand, strap, 10-foot instrument cable, and a tuner.
The electric bass was invented in the 1930s, but the instrument did not sell well until Leo Fender developed the Precision Bass in the 1950s. As such, the type of bass players who first began trying methods to make their instruments louder with amplifiers and speakers were upright bass players. While the upright bass is a large instrument, standing about six feet tall (with its endpin extended), due to its low register, it is not a loud instrument when played acoustically. This is largely a result of the decreased sensitivity of human hearing, which is most sensitive to mid-range tones; equal perceived loudness for a mid-range sound and a low frequency sound requires much more acoustic power in the low-frequency sound. In the 1890s and early 1900s, upright bass players performing in bars and brothels in an era before amplifiers and speakers were available, particularly those who performed in bands with louder instruments such as trumpet, often found it hard to be heard. About the only solution available in the pre-amplifiers era was playing slap bass, a style of slapping the strings against the fingerboard to make a relatively loud percussive sound. Beginning in the 1920s, the first amplifiers and speakers designed for gigging musicians became available.

I think for somebody reasonable, the right answer would be that yes, it has an effect on the tone of the guitar and the notes coming off the strings, but not nearly as much as other factors in the design of the guitar. If you think I'm wrong then you should read more about the overtone series, the physics of sound, difference tones, and how sounds interact both as vibrations moving through air, and digitally as numbers in a computer. It's just not as simple as to say wood doesn't have a magnetic field so therefore it can't possibly affect the tone. It's true that much of what we hear is a result of the ear-brain axis, but there are also many fundamentally measurable physical properties of sound as it occurs over time (as all sounds do) that can easily explain why different types or shapes of wood could have a subtle but real effect on the tone.

The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.
ANYBODY, OF EVERY ABILITY, CAN PLAY – Designed for every type of learner, ChordBuddy includes modifications that allow individuals of every ability to successfully learn a new instrument. Perfect for use in the music therapy, home, or school setting, ChordBuddy can help individuals learn to play the guitar flat or with two people at a time, making for what is an all-around therapeutic experience.
here is an example of why an acoustic reigns supreme for practical reasons. Last week, I had to get new tires on the truck. Knew I had a couple hours to kill while there. the Discount Tire was on the way to my guitar teacher… in a big way (an hour drive up to Denver for guitar lessons, the Discount was half way there). So, I brought my acoustic in to Discount and played for a couple hours in the waiting room. People loved it, and were shouting out requests and stuff.
Perhaps our favorite feature is a far more subtle aspect of this pedal's interior, which is a circuit design that runs your dry signal through an analog path, before reuniting it with the wet reverb signal, which is produced by a digital processor. This means your guitar's signal coming into the pedal is unimpaired by the digital components, giving you a far more pure and organic-sounding output. 
You can always rely on Epiphone to provide an acoustic guitar with eye-catching looks and a quality sound at an excellent price, and the EJ-200CE is certainly a testament to this. Based on one of the world’s most famous guitars, the J-200 (introduced in 1937), this revamped model offers an excellent mix of vintage style and modern components, perfect for any level of skill.
The dark underbelly is Lou Reed’s comfort zone. Despair and degradation are his muses. Emerging in the mid Sixties at the helm of the Velvet Underground, he offered up a gritty black-and-white alternative to the rainbow-colored pyschedelia of the prevailing rock culture. He brought us along, albeit reluctantly, to meet junkies and hustlers, S&M bondage goddesses and suicidal transvestites. He was one of the first rock guitarists to embrace chaos truly and wholeheartedly.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
Guitar -> G-Lab True Bypass Wah Pad -> Keeley Mod Vox Wah -> INTO GIG RIG (and send to Strobostomp tuner) -> Keeley Compressor -> Ibanez Tube Screamer -> MXR Phase 90 -> MXR Distortion+ -> Zen Drive -> TO AMP FRONT INPUT (red cable) -> FROM AMP SEND (purple cable) -> Uni-Vibe -> Tape Delay -> EH Deluxe Memory Man -> G-Lab Dual Reverb -> TO AMP RETURN (blue cable).
Most beginners find that during the process of learning (after a year or so) you will figure out your own sound. You will naturally be drawn to music that features guitar in it, and great guitar parts. So what usually happens is that your own musical tastes will change and with this change the type of instrument that suits your sound the best will also change. So when you’re ready to take the next step, you will have a much better idea of what you really want.

The prototype was introduced at the 2011 NAMM exhibition. Bolan is seen holding the instrument on the outer gatefold jacket of T. Rex, his first album after shortening the band name from “Tyrannosaurus Rex”. The guitar was stolen from Bolan in London, and for the last months of his career he was using a wine-red 1970s Les Paul Standard. Gibson announced the availability of the Marc Bolan signature Les Paul in February 2011.
Like most affordable super strat guitars, the Omen-6 has a basswood body, carved into the elegant looking shape that Schecter is known for. The neck is crafted from mahogany and joins the body via a bolt-on joint. It is topped by a 14" radius rosewood fingerboard that has 24 jumbo frets. It comes setup for fast and comfortable playability, with its 25.5" scale length, 1.65" nut width and stylized fretboard markers. Giving this guitar its voice are two Schecter Diamond Plus pickups, which are passive pickups but are still hot enough for driving high-gain pedals and amps.
So half of it is finding a happy place in terms of neck size. The other half is the setup. String height is usually adjustable, with electric guitars, which is a good thing in your case. Lower string height means you don't need to push down on the string as hard to play the notes. When you find a guitar that feels good to you but the strings are kinda hard to push down, talk to the store about having it setup and intonated with a very low string height... some people use the term "fast" action.
New too was “the popular Supro” Baton Guitar, sold with a matching Baton amp as the Supro Baton Guitar Outfit No. 200. This was basically the same shape as the old Avalon, but a short-scale (21″) student version now finished in a grained walnut finish. The silkscreened fingerboard sported diamond inlays. The Supro logo plate was on the slightly flared head. This had the new exposed-staggered-pole pickup with a rectangular handrest bolted on over the pickup, all mounted in the middle of a large square plate. The strings attached to a pyramidal tailpiece. Controls now included bakelite volume and tone knobs on either side of the end of the fingerboard. The back was covered in no-slip suede. It came with a natty alligator soft case. Based on the use of the description “popular,” which Supro almost always used to describe previously available models, the transition from the Avalon to the Baton may indeed have begun in 1940.
very recently I've been trying to get a band together where the Humbuckers of my les paul would suit the sound a lot more and decided to pull out my les paul, on trying to tune it, I noticed the intonation was a little off on all strings (not particularly noticeable by ear, but plugged into a tuner one could see it was off), but on the high E string it was very much off, from the third fret and higher it is very off sounding.
As you will see, our list embraces outsiders, trailblazers, outliers, and Eugene Chadbourne playing a rake. We don’t worship “guitar gods,” but prefer our axe-wielders to be resourceful, egalitarian, flawed, and human. We’re not drawn to Olympic feats of fleet-fingered athletics, unless they’re used for unique and exploratory ends. We see the mewling histrionics of Jeff Beck as tyranny instead of catharsis. The name Derek Trucks is practically alien to us.
Paint chips and cracked binding: Common on older instruments. Over time these openings will collect sweat, polish, and dirt, causing discoloration, lifting of the edges, and further deterioration. It is best to clean these spots w/ naptha (lighter fluid)or alchohol, remove any loose edges around the chips before cleaning (they will be holding polish and grime preventing the glue from working), then seal the chips and cracks with thin superglue. Super glue can be heated in the microwave for a few seconds (plastic bottles) to make it flow better. Drop Filling is a technique for filling chips with paint. This is covered at the ReRanch site.
The guitar is very light in weight and pretty resonant. At this point they were hard-wiring the cord right into the guitar with a nifty spring strain relief on the plug. This guitar has a brighter sound than my Gretsch and I probably prefer it for ultra-clean work because it has that vintage "thang" going on that some call "mojo." I am, however, trying to get the driven sound sorted at this point because of all the overtones. Now I know what sort of sound the Telecaster bridge pickup was based upon!
Hollowbody guitars feature full hollow bodies much like acoustic guitars do, and are used often in jazz and mellow style music as exemplified by Jazz greats that include Joe Pass, Pat Martino to name a few. It is however not limited to just that as exhibited by Brian Setzer and his Rockabilly style, along with Chet Atkins and his iconic country guitar playing.

No matter your vision, SparkFun's products and resources are designed to make the world of electronics more accessible. In addition to over 2,000 open source components and widgets, SparkFun offers curriculum, training and online tutorials designed to help demystify the wonderful world of embedded electronics. We're here to help you start something.
Also in 1952, Kay introduced the matching K-162 "Electronic" Bass, which was the first commercially available thinline-hollowbody electric bass guitar, and the second production electric bass guitar after the Fender Precision Bass debuted in 1951. Due to the use of K-162 by a bassist of Howlin' Wolf, Andrew "Blueblood" McMahon, it is commonly known as the "Howlin Wolf" bass. These instruments[clarification needed] are believed to be the first semi-hollow electrics[citation needed] (i.e., thinline-hollowbody electric with solid center-block), predating the Gibson ES-335 by six years. Their unique design[clarification needed] featured a flat top with no f-holes, a free-floating arched back, and two braces running along the top. The result was a semi-acoustic instrument that was feedback-resistant while retaining natural acoustic resonances. In 1954, Kay added the K-160 bass to its catalog with baritone tuning, according to the catalog,[citation needed] "tuned like the first four guitar strings but one octave lower." Structurally this bass was basically same as K-162 bass, except for the higher pitched tuning and the addition of a white pickguard.
I took lessons with him when i was 8 years old. I stopped taking lessons when i was 12 years old. In those four years i have learned so much about guitar in such a little time. Patrick is an amazing teacher and by the time i left his teaching, i joined 4 bands and played at the whiskey twice, the house of blues four times, and the grove once. All amazing experiences and it all started from Patrick. I am 16 now and i will never forget what he has done for me. If you are thinking about eventually taking on guitar at all, Pat is your man.
At the other end of the size extreme sits a shape called the parlour. Parlour acoustics are among the smallest in body size you can buy – not counting the modern ‘baby’ guitars – and are typically favoured by players of more low-key, less brash musical styles like folk and indie. Once again, the guitar’s distinctive shrunken body shape is another invention from the CF Martin guitar house, with the guitar’s neck typically joining the body around the 12th fret.

Mahogany is a very dense, strong wood used in all parts of guitar manufacture except fretboards and bridges, which require harder wood. A mahogany neck and back are often found on short-scale guitars with maple tops. Another common combination is an all-mahogany body and neck (excluding the fretboard). Because mahogany is not very hard, it emphasizes the midrange and bass frequencies for a mellower guitar tone. Mahogany is a very resonant wood which enhances a guitar's sustain. It is generally a uniform rich brown color.
My visit to NAMM showed me that we’d definitely find at least a couple of good beginner’s amps for less than $100, so we decided to make that our price ceiling for this test. That’s enough to buy an amp loud enough to play with a small combo, compact enough to fit easily into a small bedroom, and light enough for kids to carry. Beginners don’t need more than that. And when you consider that most people who take up a musical instrument don’t stick with it long, it’s wise to limit the expenditure until one really needs a larger or more fully featured amp.

As you know, like most guitars sporting more than a single pickup, your Strat lets you select any pickup by itself or choose certain dual-pickup combinations. The standard way to connect multiple pickups is to wire them in parallel. This generates the classic tone our ears know from countless records, when a guitarist uses the bridge and middle or middle and neck pickups in tandem (positions 2 and 4 on a normal 5-way Strat switch).
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It should be noted that some bridge assemblies have pre-set, non-adjustable saddle pieces. The Gibson "tune-o-matic" bridge is just one example. On these bridges you will have an overall height adjustment post on either side of the bridge. For these bridges, measure the height at the 12th fret for the low and high "E" strings and make your height adjustment for each side at the respective post. The other string heights will be defined by the bridge assembly.
Just wanted to get back with a thank you note. I received the kit last week and installed it in my Stratocaster with Texas Special p'ups. It's absolutely brilliant. Not only is the Blend control a superb new addition to the tonal options, but the pots also feel so sturdy and smooth. Feels like I have some custom build now. Just amazing, thank you! In addition, the treble bleed mod is the icing on the cake. I’m no longer afraid to roll down the volume knob." - Andrei Custom Blender Mod for Strat®  
Among the most common rookie amp buyer mistakes is buying a big amp that's too heavy to gig with, or going the opposite and buying one that's too small. If you're gigging at different places and you don't have a roadie, then consider going with a smaller amp that has DI output so you can go straight to PA with your tone intact. In big venues where big amps are a must, some opt for amp heads because the separated head and speaker cabinet are lighter on their own, although you'll have to move more pieces.
I've contacted them once before and they are SO eager to please. None of those steps is an issue for them at all. I don't condone buying out of China but that is a pretty sure fire way of squeezing the best quality guitar out of an otherwise shithouse marketplace. If you just order and wait, they are just going to pick one off the shelf, and that's not what you want. You need to push them to make your guitar.

Gut strings were the original strings for the classical stylist.  They were literally made from the guts of farm animals, mostly sheep.  The intestines and the process used to make these strings became more expensive than nylon and thus have fallen out of favor.  Even though you may hear the term “cat gut” strings, this style of string was never made from the innards of our cute, cuddly, feline friends… just the beasts we like tend to use as a food source.


You can always rely on Epiphone to provide an acoustic guitar with eye-catching looks and a quality sound at an excellent price, and the EJ-200CE is certainly a testament to this. Based on one of the world’s most famous guitars, the J-200 (introduced in 1937), this revamped model offers an excellent mix of vintage style and modern components, perfect for any level of skill.
While jazz can be played on any type of guitar, from an acoustic instrument to a solid-bodied electric guitar such as a Fender Stratocaster, the full-depth archtop guitar has become known as the prototypical "jazz guitar." Archtop guitars are steel-string acoustic guitars with a big soundbox, arched top, violin-style f-holes, a "floating bridge" and magnetic or piezoelectric pickups. Early makers of jazz guitars included Gibson, Epiphone, D'Angelico and Stromberg. The electric guitar is plugged into a guitar amplifier to make it sound loud enough for performance. Guitar amplifiers have equalizer controls that allow the guitarist to change the tone of the instrument, by emphasizing or de-emphasizing certain frequency bands. The use of reverb effects, which are often included in guitar amplifiers, has long been part of the jazz guitar sound. Particularly since the 1970s jazz fusion era, some jazz guitarists have also used effects pedals such as overdrive pedals, chorus pedals and wah pedals.
Immediately you can see that this unit is on the larger side, measuring 25 inches (63.5 cm) across, and weighing about 11 lbs (5 kg). If you’re concerned about portability, we noticed one of the most purchased items together with the HD500X is this case, which comes highly recommended and will keep your multi-effects pedal safe during transit and storage. The Line 6 POD HD500X itself has superb build quality. It has a very nice metal chassis, and heavy duty construction. The build quality probably doesn't get much better than this in a multi-fx unit (we say it is a step above the Zoom G3X). We won’t spend a ton of time talking about the inputs/outputs and controls available on the Line 6 POD HD500X, since you can very easily discern that from photos of it. We will say that of all the multi-effects pedals on our top 5 list, this is the most robust. The inputs/outputs cover above and beyond what you probably need. You’ve got your basic inputs and outputs, USB 2.0 so you can use it as a USB interface and for DAW integration, MIDI in/out/thru, FX send and return, AUX input, balanced XLR outputs, integrated mic preamp, and more. In short, however you want to integrate the HD500X into your bedroom, music studio, or live setup, there’s a very good chance you’re covered.
All of the hardware is gold on this model, and while it’s stock Epiphone stuff rather than licensed equipment, it’s of good quality, and we don’t expect it to be difficult to keep in tune. The eSonic preamp and NanoFlex pickup system are both excellent and really help the guitar to come alive. In terms of looks, there are no particularly notable features, but the combo of gold hardware and florentine cutaway make for an attractive design.
No information beyond this debut is available. It’s also probable the Merson “Tempo” name was applied to other acoustic guitars. Merson instruments from this period do not appear to have been widely distributed, so they are probably a regional phenomenon, although they did get notice in The Music Trades, a major trade publication. Other instruments distributed by Merson in 1948 included Harmony, Kamico, Favilla, Temp and Supro electric guitars and stringed instruments; Covella, Fontanella and Galanti accordions; Tempo Bandmaster, Merson, Merson Ultratone, and Rudy Muck brass instruments; and Kohlert Thibouville, Freres, Penzel-Mueller, Barklee and Merson woodwinds.
To be able to buy a name brand guitar like this at such a great price was a real steal. One of my sons is a beginner learning to play, so it was great for me being able to purchase a guitar like this that would carry him from beginner into an intermediate player in later years. It is a well-made and beautiful guitar, and it produces a wonderful sound that you would expect from a name like Fender. Plus, with my son being left-handed, I thought it would be difficult to find a good affordable left-handed guitar for him. Not only was able to find this high quality one, but the price couldn't be beat.
The Kaman Corporation soon diversified, branching off into nuclear weapons testing, commercial helicopter flight, the development and testing of chemicals, and helicopter bearings production. But in the early 1960s, financial problems due to the failure of their commercial flight division forced them to consider expanding into new markets, such as entertainment and leisure. Charles Kaman, still an avid guitar player, became interested in the making of guitars.[2][6]
As technology for manipulating VSTs improves - such as piano roll editors replacing step sequencers and more advanced GUI's allowing faster access to more expressive voicing collections -- and as increased processing power eventually paves the way for simulated rather than sampled guitar sounds -- guitar VSTs will inevitably play an ever increasing role in music production and musical enjoyment. They will never be guitars, never offer the original expressive inspiration of a guitar strapped over the shoulder, powering a wall of sound or launching delicately nuanced resonances through waves of wood-fired warmth in the serene, silent air of a snow-covered mountain cabin, but it's a safe bet guitar VSTs will become just as much a force in music as pitch correction and lip syncing have become major players in the large-venue live performance business -- and in amateur musicians' collections of creative panacea for the stress and toil of daily life.

Fender has shown the spec sheets of its popular Mexican-built Deluxe Series Roadhouse Stratocaster model some love to create a reboot that comes seriously well appointed. The upgraded model features an alder body and bolt-on maple neck, with the option of maple and rosewood fingerboard, finished with satin polyurethane. Keep sniffing around and you'll find other features like the 'Modern C' neck profile, 22 narrow/tall frets, a contoured neck heel, synthetic bone top nut and a set of locking tuners with vintage-look buttons. While the previous editions of the Roadhouse and came with a 241mm (9.5-inch) fingerboard radius, the new model packs a flatter 305mm (12-inch) camber. Yes, the same radius as a Gibson Les Paul, making for easier string bends and lower action. The new Roadhouse features three Vintage Noiseless (1st generation) single coil-sized humbuckers wired to a five-way pickup selector blade switch, and master volume and tone controls. Lurking between the volume and tone knobs is the V6 preamp control, a six-position rotary switch that gives you access to a series of tweaked single-coil tones. Plugging in the Roadhouse reveals a slew of classic Strat tones. The pickups exploit the natural tone and woodiness of the guitar, while the Noiseless aspect lives up to their vow of silence, making them indispensable in a recording situation. As a result, bar metal, this is the best Fender electric guitar for just about all scenarios.
No reference materials are available to me for this early Unicord period of Univox amplifiers, but there was undoubtedly a line. These American-made amps featured tubes and use high-end Jensen speakers. The Univox logo was on the upper right corner of the grille on a large piece of plastic. The cabinet was covered in charcoal-flecked tolex with white beading, with a grey grillcloth. Front-mounted controls included two inputs, volume, tone, tremolo with speed and intensity, plus footswitch jack with footswitch. The jewel light on these early Univox amps was a little red square.
Echo controls usually let you determine the level, the period between playbacks, and the decay—the rate at which succeeding notes become quieter and quieter until they fade out altogether. The period (or time) parameter is often controlled by a single button you push repeatedly in time with the music. This is called tap delay and keeps your echo effect from clashing with the music's time signature.

Designed by Todd Langner (who also engineered the ADA MP-1), the Langner DCP-1 possesses somewhat of an infamous reputation. Very few know about it, but everyone who does, swears by it’s greatness. Built with much of the same blueprint as the Bogner Fish, the Langner features two independent channels with fully adjustable boost functions. Using five 12ax7a tubes, it’ll produce the glassiest cleans to the highest of high gain tones. Presets can be front panel selected or footswitched. If you’re into rare gear, this is the amp for you. Good luck finding one!
Breedlove is a semi-recently founded guitar manufacturer that has a main focus of acoustic guitars. Breedlove doesn’t have a massive following like some other brands, so it can be difficult trying to find one to test before purchasing. Breedlove tends to evolve their guitars and tries to push the world of acoustic guitars forward. Their Oregon Concerto Myrtlewood acoustic, for example, manages to produce a big, refined sound and the notes are more resonant. This is due to their tapered myrtlewood body and smaller sound-hole. The body shape is also very important as it’s part of the reason they sound so good and it’s even comfortable to play. All of their guitars are very high-quality and work well for all fingering styles and genres of music. If you want a really great acoustic, you really can’t go wrong with Breedlove.
My band has two guitar players. One often plays acoustic while the other one plays an electric guitar. There has always been a problem balancing the volume and the frequences. While both guitars play on a clean sound it sounds fine but when electric guitar changes to distorted, overdriven or crunched sound then even at a low volume the acoustic guitar is almost unheard. Is it a common problem or particulary our local one. Any solution?
Lyndon Laney established his brand in 1967 in Birmingham (England). In those days, he was also playing in a band with a couple of guys you might've heard of: John Bonham and Robert Plant. You might also know Tony Iommi (Black Sabbath) who happened to be one of his first clients. The LA100BL is a must among heavy-metal guitarists, while the KLIPP aims to be more versatile. The AOR (Advanced Overdrive Response) series provides more gain every time, contributing, in part, to the brand's constantly growing reputation. Among Laney addicts, we could mention Ace Frehley of Kiss and Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits.
I work out of my home shop in Idaho Falls, Idaho. I do repairs for clients and guitar shops all over the United States. I’d love to help you repair or restore your guitar. Repair prices are based on a rate of $60 per hour. These prices apply to guitars in otherwise good working order. Your repair may vary depending on the condition of your guitar and the specifics of the work needed. Please contact me using the contact page if you have a repair that you would like to discuss. Consultations are always free.
Many inexpensive starter guitars are built with laminate tops, made from several layers of wood pressed together. While laminate is durable and can be quite attractive, it will not produce as pleasing tones as solid wood. To a lesser extent, this is also true of the guitar’s back and sides—solid woods will produce better tone. When reading guitar specs, if you see terms such as “select spruce top,” that indicates the top is made of laminated woods with a spruce-like grain pattern imprinted on it.
On some amps with a number of input and output jacks, the jacks may be consolidated in a patch bay. Some amps have an input jack for a foot-operated switch which can be used to turn on an effect or switch to a solo channel. Some higher-end amps have a Speakon speaker jack for an extension speaker. In the 2010s, the Speakon jack is often used in high wattage amplifiers, because the design of the connector, which is shielded from human touch, prevents electrical shock from a high-powered amplifier. Some amplifiers have a "tuner out" jack, for sending the instrument signal to an external electronic tuner. Bass speaker cabinets often have two 1/4" jacks. These are provided so that one speaker cable can be plugged into the first jack and connected to the power amp; if the bassist wants to use a second cabinet, a second speaker cable is plugged into the second jack and then into second speaker.
The FX8 lets you configure up to eight effects per preset, from a list of impressive effects that are modeled from classic to modern stompboxes. It also offers a more traditional work flow via Fractal Audio's "Scenes" mode, which lets you assign effects to footswitches, turning the unit into a virtual stompbox pedalboard. And since it utilizes the same algorithm as their premium processors, you can be sure that each effect model has the same sound quality. Fractal Audio is also known for their boutique like attention to detail and build quality, which is prevalent in the FX8's design. Most notably its footswitches which are designed to have no-mechanical contacts, meaning no noise and improved reliability.
Tone woods only effect acoustic or hollowbodys. The more dense wood harder tighter grained woods along with steep pitched saddle to stop string angle increases sustain.research labs experimented with marble body's and had tremendous sustain.also effecting sustain is type of neck.ie. bolt on set or thru. A bolt on May have equal sustain to a set if the thickness of body at bolt joint is made thicker but thru are best all have give and takes. Thru are less adjustable and limit repairs. Bolt on offer more adjustment. Set necks can be replaced or reset but cost more to do so. Thick heavy gibson let Pauls are known for the sustain.but endurance limited by heavy weight. It's all matter of choice. Buy usa or if not available japan. Stay away from Chinese or Korean they are bottom feeders
Ken Rosser picked the Spider Classic 15 as his favorite of the amps we tested, saying, “I think the effects on the Line 6 sounded the best. It gives you a nice range of tone options. The clean tones stay clean even at loud volume, which a lot of these can’t do. One caveat is that, when you switch the amp sound, it changes the way all the knobs work, so the sounds can really jump out at you.” Fred Sokolow liked the Line 6 in general, saying, “I could pretty much figure out what to do with it, but I could figure out the Fender more easily.”
Yet another acoustic steel guitar for the right handed guitarists. It has 6 strings and mostly comes in tobacco sunburst without a case. The perfect design makes it suitable for use by beginner guitarists. The sides and the back are made of meranti, with a spruce top. It is quite cost effective, with prices ranging from around INR 8,500 depending on available offers. More about Yamaha F310 TBS can be found on the following website link.

While tone and volume should be your foremost considerations, you should also determine what extra features you really need. Built-in effects are great if you want a no-hassle, all-in-one package, but they may not be as flexible as external effects pedals and processors. An effect loop is useful for effects like digital reverb and delay, but it’s not essential if your effects consists of a few stomp boxes. Line outputs with speaker emulation are helpful for home recording, and external speaker outputs are great for expanding your live rig.
Besides the guitar just being fantastically sampled and recorded, Silk owes a lot of its realism to the controls in the upper right-hand corner on the main screen. Swing, Timing, Feel, and Variance can all be effortlessly adjusted and do a fantastic job of recreating that natural human touch or really the human flaw.  Timing is my favorite because the ebb and flow of the tempo between individually picked notes really reminds me of my own fingerpicking technique (or lack thereof).
This includes guitar tutors and coaching software, guitar & amplifier emulators, reference tools and more. You will find tablature software in the Tablature category and software to slow down guitar solos in the Slow Down Music category. Software to tune your guitar can be found in the Instrument Tuners category and specialized chord software in the Chords category. Software designed specifically for bass guitar players can be found in the Bass Guitar category.
A tabletop unit is a type of multi-effects device that sits on a desk and is controlled manually. One such example is the Pod guitar amplifier modeler. Digital effects designed for DJs are often sold in tabletop models, so that the units can be placed alongside a DJ mixer, turntables and CD scratching gear.[17] For a DJ, a pedal located on the floor would not be practical because she/he would find it hard to adjust the knobs.
“Perhaps the weakest block, and the only one I spend time trying to dial in a decent tone. Lots of high gain fizz options with loss of body and character. Boost is decent, Tscreamer isn't, but for me the Blues choice with drive=1pm, tone=noon and output=11am gave a nice breakup tone without losing bottom end. If you have an overdrive pedal you like..you may still be using it.”
The Broadway by Epiphone features a laminated maple body with a select spruce top, producing a bright sound rounded up by the warmer tone of the spruce. It also has a hard maple neck with a Slim Taper C profile, a rosewood fingerboard with block-and-triangle abalone inlays, binding on the headstock, body, fingerboard and around the F-holes, a mother-of-pearl Tree of Life inlay on the headstock, gold hardware, a three-way pickup selector and an adjustable floating tremolo bridge.
The Quebec-based Robert Godin decided to create his own music instrument company in 1972. Today, the manufacturer sells its products under different brand names: Norman (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), Art & Lutherie (entry-level guitars), Simon and Patrick (mid-range and high-end guitars), La Patrie (classical guitars), Seagull (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), and Godin for electric guitars. Some models are equipped with a piezo and/or "synth" pickups. The body shape is pretty classic, somewhere between a Les Paul and a Telecaster. Among the most famous Godin players we have John McLaughlin and Leonard Cohen. The brand catalog is sorted in different series: Performance Series, Signature Series, Multiac (acoustic/electric hybrid), Passion Series (high-end instruments), 5th Avenue Series, plus some very original single models like the Glissentar, an acoustic/electric 11-string nylon-string fretless guitar!
Telecaster is considered to be the oldest solid body electric guitar in the world. Capturing that type of pedigree is not easy, but Squier managed to pull it off. Handling the Squier by Fender Vintage Modified Telecaster brought back some of the best memories of my youth, when Telecaster was the go to axe. This is definitely one guitar worth trying out.

The original guitar recording preamp was almost certainly the Scholtz Rockman, but within a few years we had several sophisticated competitors (from Sansamp, Groove Tubes and Mesa Boogie) using both solid-state analogue and tube circuitry. These all include speaker emulation of some kind, though usually offer few or no effects. On the whole they are easy to use and some produce excellent results, though they have less tonal flexibility than digital systems designed to model the characteristics of a range of specific commercial amplifier and speaker combinations.


If you’ve read our full reviewof the 50s Stratocaster, you’ll know that this Classic Vibe Stratocaster is an excellent prospect for any beginner who loves the good old days of rock n’ roll! Made by Squier, this 50s-inspired electric has huge vintage appeal, with a modern feel thanks to a trio of Alnico III single-coil pickups and a smooth, modern C-shaped maple neck (with 21 medium jumbo frets).
Yamaha’s Pacifica Series spans many ability levels and price ranges, with notable models such as the entry-level PAC112 proving one of the most popular beginner’s guitars on the market. Then there is the RevStar Series, which launched in 2015 – another beautiful collection, inspired by the street-racing motorbikes of London and Tokyo in the sixties.

Several producers like to create larger-than-life recorded sounds by splitting the guitarist's instrument signal to several different amps, which are then recorded simultaneously. Joe Barresi is a devotee of this tactic, and uses a dedicated guitar splitter box, such as the Little Labs PCP Instrument Distro or Systematic Systems Guitar Splitter, for the purpose. "In choosing the amplifiers and speakers, it's important to remember that larger speakers give a more compact, tighter sound. A tiny amp turned all the way up will give a more blown-out sound."
ESP LTD is a big name when it comes to the production of electric guitars and has been making quality instruments for over 40 years. The ESP LTD EC-256 Intermediate Electric Guitar is just another example of the genius of ESP LTD. The body of the guitar is mahogany and the neck and fretboard are made out of rosewood. There is also a TOM bridge and a tailpiece attached to this guitar. The pickups of this guitar are the ESP designed LH-150 set. It comes in two color options, black and metallic gold.
To wire three two-conductor pickups we only need one pole. Common goes to volume pot input and 3 switched terminals are connected to pickup outputs. That way, we will select one pickup in positions 1-3-5 and two pickups wired in parallel in positions 2-4. When middle pickup has reverse polarity, noise will cancel out in positions 2-4 and they will be wired in so called “humbucking” mode.
It is to note that each of these metal strings is made to vibrate at a particular rate. The amount of electrical charge produced by the vibrating motion in the pickup coils is then sent to an electric circuit, consisting of resistors and capacitors, which controls the tone and amplitude of the electric signal. The electric signal is then sent to an amplifier which is electrically connected to the magnetic pickups.
This is an absolutely stunning OM acoustic in MINT/As New Condition. This has been in my personal collection for a few years. In the words of Bill Kraus, the builder: An OM model in my favorite combination of woods: Red spruce top, Honduran rosewood back and sides, curly Koa bindings. I first heard about Bill Kraus from my good friend, Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music in Buffalo, NY. Scott has been a factory authorized Martin repair center since 1979 and has seen the finest 6 figure pre-war Martins. Scott was raving about Bill Kraus, his knowledge of tonewoods, and the insane quality of his guitars. I also learned that Stan Jay of Mandolin Bros. was equally impressed with Kraus Guitars and had started carrying Bill’s guitars in his store. Every Kraus guitar at Mandolin Bros. has sold!
Electric guitars are the easier to play as compared to acoustic guitars. But only because the chords are easy to play, that much force is not required to hold the chords as well as strum the chords. So it would better if you first practice the chords and the strumming on an acoustic guitar. The song Yellow by Coldplay, mentioned below, is considered as one of the best guitar tabs for beginners.
Silvertones were guitars sold by Sears but manufactured by five main companies: Danelectro, Harmony, National-Dobro (Supro/Valco), Kay, and Teisco. These companies were called "jobbers" because they were contracted (jobbed out) to make guitars for Sears. They also produced guitars under their own brand names. In almost all cases the guitars manufactured for Sears were identical to models sold directly by the manufacturers with only a logo or color change.
Say that three times fast.  Don't even bother yourself about halfround strings.  They aren't that popular for a reason, but it is good to know they exist.  The roundwound strings feature a textured surface created by winding a round wire around the core metal.  Flatwound strings are far more flat along their length because the core is surrounded by a smooth wire, as pictured below:
Typically, guitar amplifiers have two amplifying circuit stages and in addition frequently have tone-shaping electric circuits, which usually include at least bass and treble controls, which function similarly to the equivalent controls on a home hi-fi system. More expensive amplifiers typically have more controls for other frequency ranges, such as one or two "midrange" controls and a "presence" control for high frequencies. Some guitar amplifiers have a graphic equalizer, which uses vertical faders to control multiple frequency bands. Some more expensive bass amps have a parametric equalizer, which enables precise control of tone.

Whether you are an acoustic or electric guitar player one of the simplest ways you can add some dynamic or sonic change to your worship set is by stepping on an effects pedal at appropriate moments. However, if you are new to the world of pedals there seems to be endless choice of single or multiple effects units (and no, you don’t need as many as are in the photo!). Whilst multi-effects offer loads of sounds in one box, they can be hard to programme and difficult to adjust quickly on stage. There’s a million things written about effects pedals out there in Googleland but if you’re brand new to this here’s a potted overview of some of the most popular types.
Vintage guitar amps are older guitar amplifier "heads", speaker cabinets and combo amp/speaker cabinets, which guitarists, record producers and bandleaders seek out for their unique tone. Some[which?] recording studios have a selection of the most popular vintage guitar combo amps, amp heads and speaker stacks, so that performers can get a retro sound. During the 1980s, when most guitar amps being manufactured used "solid state" semiconductor technology, many musicians seeking an older style of sound (for blues, roots rock, etc.) favored older amps that used vacuum tubes (called "valves" in the UK).[23] Popular vintage models include the Fender Showman, Bassman and Vibroverb amps, and older models made by Ampeg, Gibson, Marshall, and Vox,[24] as well as other smaller companies such as Valco, Danelectro, and Premier.
GUITAR BLEND/BALANCE POT, 500KA.  Bourns dual MN taper blend-balance with center detent. Split shaft. 17 mm body diameter. 1/4" knurled shaft diameter. Solder lugs. 3/8" bushing.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special MN taper used for balance/blend pots.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.
This list would have been incomplete without us mentioning the Shure SM57-X2U. Because it is a plug and play device, as it uses USB connectivity, this microphone enables its user to record itself/herself while jamming to his/her favorite songs.  As its manufacturer claims this unit is capable of offering a frequency response that is tailored for vocals. What is more, the model also has brightened midrange as well as bass roll off.

Re-amping a DI'd keyboard or bass can really liven up a sound, but if you don't have access to a nice amp or amp modeller, you can simulate the effect by sending the audio to a bus with a delay plug-in set to a short delay time and with the wet signal set to 100 percent and dry to 0 percent. Then send the bus's output to another bus with a distortion (or better still, a guitar amplifier emulator) plug-in inserted. This simulates the delay you get from miking up a speaker, and if you blend this in with the DI'd sound, it can give the recording a live feel — especially if you use a convolution reverb to add some 'room' ambience. You may also want to roll off the very low and high frequencies to help get rid of that DI'd vibe. Nicholas Rowland
Most often, you will see effect pedals housed in small metal boxes on the floor at a guitarist’s feet. They are often called stompboxes because stepping on a metal button turns them on and off. Many effects boxes also include a foot pedal allowing the player to modulate the effect’s intensity or volume. Sometimes you will see a larger floor unit with multiple buttons and pedals. These are called multi-effects pedals or processors. They usually have a wide variety of different effects that can be engaged simultaneously. Multi-effects processors have grown enormously in popularity as their sounds and functionality have improved.
While vintage guitars tend to hold a reputation as the best ever made, there are more high-end boutique makers turning out truly magnificent instruments than ever before. Following the wake of trail-blazers like Paul Reed Smith, the current class of boutique guitar makers includes the likes of Knaggs, Kauer, Swope, Fano, Huber, Koll and many many more. Keep an eye on this page for the latest and greatest luthier-made new and used electric guitars to hit the pages of Reverb.
According to Longworth, Martin began to use built-in Schaller Straploks beginning with guitar #2085. However, the example shown here is #1034, the thirty-fourth made if #1000 was indeed the first, and it has the Schaller Straploks, which are original. Pot dates are late 1978, confirming that it’s probably one of the early examples. The serial number on #1034, by the way, was printed on a piece of tape in the cavity under the neck pickup. The control cavity had “EM-18” stamped in it.
TC Electronic's Hall of Fame reverb pedal is stacked with features and is easily our top recommendation from this list. The first perk is a mode selector that gives you a total of ten different reverb types, in addition to the TonePrint option. TonePrint is TC Electronic's signature feature that allows you to program tones into your pedal designed by artists and popular musicians.
Popular music typically uses the electric guitar in two roles: as a rhythm guitar to provide the basic chord progression and rhythm, and a lead guitar that plays melody lines, melodic instrumental fill passages, and solos. In some bands with two guitarists, both may play in tandem, and trade off rhythm and lead roles. In bands with a single guitarist, the guitarist may switch between these roles, playing chords to accompany the singer's lyrics, and a solo.
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