This acoustic-electric parlor style guitar features a solid cedar top and solid sapele back and sides, premium appointments that other builders will require you to pay top dollars for. And it features old school parlor style body shape, which gives the instrument a vintage appeal, and blues box style tone with emphasis on the middle frequencies. This makes it ideal for blues, folk and old school comping, a good contrast to regular sized acoustics in a mix.
MOD® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All effects pedals operate on a 9V battery.
Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.
Before taking the plunge, make sure that you have the necessary tools to build the guitar of your dreams. Most kits will require you to have screwdrivers, pliers and soldering iron for the assembly process. While others require more, like wood glue, bandsaw and other wood routing tools. Once you've decided on the finish, you'll also have to get finishing tools like sandpaper, wood sealant, primer, paint and more. It is also recommended to have a dedicated room or space for you to work on, a nice working table would also make work a bit more easier.
Myths and Legends: Valve technology is intrinsically the most elegant means by which a speaker is able to reproduce music. This is not because valves have magical qualities but because the technology by which they function is not achievable by other means. In ten thousand years from now Valve amplifiers will possible be the only remaining technology from the 20th century that will be still be being used and loved with as much passion as when first invented. As much as there is no proof that Valve amplifiers can sound superior to solid state I for one if given the choice will only listen to music through Valve amplification.
Welcome to the world of premium! While there are several tiers of boutique amplifier priced higher than $1000, this category is when you really start to hit the high end. Some of the most iconic guitar amps sit in this section, although all models are capable of performing on big stages and professional recording studios with pro-grade features, exceptional tones and massive power, extending into 100 watts and above. One amp you will find in this market is the legendary Peavey 6505 Plus head, which has helped shape the sound of metal over the past few decades.
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I remember the first time I saw Eddie Van Halen on MTV, the way he played two hands on the fingerboard during his short “Jump” guitar solo. I loved his cool “Frankenstein” guitar, so named because he cobbled together a variety of guitar parts and decorated his creation with colored tape and paint. Even as a 13-year-old who grew up primarily listening to, and playing, classical music, I felt compelled to run out and buy his band’s “1984” LP at my local Tower Records store.
I own several guitars ranging from 700 dollars to 2000 dollars so I knew not to get my expectations up when purchasing a 100 dollar. I bought this as a gift for someone to learn on but when it arrived, I could not believe the quality of guitar this is. The tuning keys are high quality, the neck and fret board are high quality. It holds its tune as good as my Ovation and Ibanez acoustics as well as my 2000 dollar PRS guitar. Very easy to press the strings. Surely I thought this would be the difference maker from my more expensive guitars but it's actually easier to play. The pickup is a little more brighter sounding than on more expensive guitars but it's nothing you can't fix with your settings.
Martin Guitars has a storied history that dates back as far as the mid-1700s when Christian Frederick Martin was born to a family of modest German cabinet makers. At the age of 15, Christian Frederick traveled to Vienna and took up an apprenticeship with a renowned guitar maker, where he flourished in his craft. Years later and after a feud with the Violin Makers Guild, Martin decided to move his business to the United States, opening up shop in New York City. More than 100 years later (and through many trials and tribulations), Martin introduced their signature Dreadnought acoustic guitar, the same shape as the one pictured above. Funny thing is, it was actually based on a defunct style created by another company years prior. Now the standard for acoustic guitar shapes, nearly every manufacturer offers a version of the instrument made popular by Martin. Currently, the brand is run by Christian Frederick Martin IV, the 6th generation of the Martin family – and they’re still making some of the best instruments in the world.
i have a grand total of 1 pedal. it's an overdrive pedal that i only use when playing heavier songs. Other than that, i tend to play just guitar and amp. My amp has reverb and i tend to set that at about 1/3 the way round. Does that count as effects? My settings are set just on the edge of break up so i get a nice clean tone, but when i hit it harder, it gives a little crunch.
MAKE YOUR OWN BODY BLANK Another neat trick to create your own body blank for $10 is to get a 3/4" thick peice of Birch Plywood that comes cut into a 4' by 2' board. Simply cut out two rectangular sections of the board that will accomodate your desing and wood glue them together. Be generous with the glue to make sure there aren't any spaces between the boards when you press the two together, clamp and stack weights on top of it so the two peices are joined firmly and let dry overnight. This gives you a a 1 1/2" thick body blank that is rigid and works great for electric guitars. You will have to go with a solid color paint when you finish it but you won't be able to tell the difference between it and the solid wood blank. Plus you'll save a good chunk of change that you can use towards good pickups and hardware. If you want to make the body a little thicker, you can get a 1/4" peice of birch and glue it between the two thicker peices. It's also a good idea to prerout any wire cavities in that 1/4" peice before you glue them together. That way you don't have to worry about drilling them later and ruining the top of your guitar body with the drill.
If the Complete Technique book is good for quick starts, this would be the bullet train. Another Hal Leonard selection, this is a trim 48 pages for teaching you how to hold a guitar for the first time. Tuning up, easy chords, and strumming. If you got a guitar on Friday, use this to put together your first three-chord jam by Monday. Will it sound good? No, no, it will not. But you’ll have started, which is key. Some of the other books on this list are dense with both concepts and pages, which might delay your starting. Don’t let that happen.

Birmingham’s Table Scraps add a grunge-y Midlands mud to the garage rock sound established by the likes of 13th Floor Elevators and The Cramps. Guitarist Scott sticks to a “three-pedal limit”, using a Death By Audio Fuzz War (“a versatile monster”), Echo Dream 2 and Boss DD-3 to jarring effect to create freaky, DC59’d melodic lead bursts. As Scott says: “Once you try 12-string everything else only sounds half as good.”
Scott Baxendale has been building custom hand made guitars since 1974. Recently he settled in Athens Georgia where he is currently building custom guitars, restoring vintage guitars and teaching the art of lutherie to aspiring craftsman. Scott Baxendale’s legacy of building custom instruments began in 1974, when he arrived in Winfield, Kansas to work for […]
Most reviewers are simply floored by how good the Roland Blues Cube Artist sounds right off the bat, with many commending its organic tube-like tone for being so life-like. It's vintage aesthetics and familiar controls also gets a lot of thumbs up, especially from experienced players who are in it for the sound, and not for the bells and whistles. It should also be mentioned that there are many reports of it working well with different types of guitars and pickup configurations.

Also called tuners or machine heads, these geared mechanisms, usually mounted on the guitar's headstock, hold the strings in place and allow tuning the instrument by adjusting string tension. Most modern tuners have enclosed, permanently lubricated mechanisms. Strings are held in place on posts that are attached to knobs, which are turned to adjust string tension allowing the guitar to be tuned. Some tuners are designed to lock in place. This provides more tuning stability, and helps prevent strings from slipping loose from the tuner. It also makes changing your strings a little easier.
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EQ placement is similar. Some players prefer to mold and shape their guitar’s primary tonal character before it is processed by other effects, but others prefer to adjust the EQ of the finished sound (again, placement in front of delay and reverb is preferable). Or maybe your distortion pedal’s EQ controls just don’t have enough bass or treble and you need to tweak its tone a touch more. If you own an EQ pedal, have fun and try placing it in different locations to see what works best for you.
In October 2017, Gibson announced plans to relocate its Memphis operations to a smaller location and plans to sell the Memphis property. Gibson opened its Memphis facility 18 years before, which occupies just a portion of a massive 127,620 square foot complex. According to the Memphis Daily News, Gibson plans to search for a new facility for its Memphis operations and will stay in the current spot for the next 18 to 24 months. The facility, which sits across from the FedExForum along South B.B. King Boulevard, is expected to list for $17 million.
SHAPING THE BODY This is totaly up to you. You can carve down the body however you want. For my project I chose to carve down the body as close to the way the guitar I was modeling it after was. I used a verity of different sanders. I used a belt sander for the arm contour on the top back of the guitar, a dremmel tool with a sanding attachment for the small carve down under the neck, a 6" sanding disk attachment on my drill for the body contour on the back of the guitar, and a Black and Decker mouse sander for the neck area and smoothe down of all the other areas that had previously been carved. One rule of thumb is to only sand with a 220 grit when carving the body down. This will prevent any deep scratches any lower grit will cause. Don't use any electric sander on the falt parts of the guitar either, like the top or the back. Use a 220 grit paper with a sanding block to smooth out those areas. You can also run a slightly dampened cloth along the surface of the body and let dry before the final hand sanding. This will raise the small grains in the wood so they can be cut by the paper easier. Sand in the direction of the grain.
Beyond specific favoured mics, a number of engineers also mention more general principles when choosing pairs of mics for guitar recording. Jim Scott and Stephen Street both mention using a 'cheap' or 'bad' mic with a good mic (both give the SM57+U87 combination as an example). "Between the two you can find the ideal sound," remarks Jim, "and you can get brightness and fullness."

Two new models that would eventually become mainstays joined the Teisco line in ’65. Theye were two double cuts with slightly more flared horns, in a sort of tulip shape. Both had a single, wide, chrome-covered pickup with poles exposed along one edge. This was similar to the old MJ-1 but by ’65 would become the new SM series. Both had bolt-on necks with bound rosewood fretboards and the top-edge rectangular inlays. The E-100 had a bridge/tailpiece assembly, volume and tone on a small pickguard, and one of the elongated Strat-style heads. The ET-100 had a platform vibrato. As a sign of things to come, the Teisco Del Rey ET-100 had a regular Strat-style headstock, the first to appear on Teiscos, as far as I’m aware.
The microphone set up I described earlier will give you a similar effect. The close mic gives you great detail (in audio terms, top-end, treble) and warmth. The mid-distance mic will give you the perspective that the amp is in a room, but without too much loss of detail. The far mic will tell you in no uncertain terms that you are definitely in a room, and with any luck, the listener's brain will process that information and tell the listener what size the room is (I'm not talking exact measurements here--just rough approximations). There will be a fairly significant loss of detail though. The combination of any of the mics will give you varying degrees of perspective and detail.
“I started to get really frustrated, and I said, ‘I know! I’ll fix you!’ I got a single-sided Gillette razorblade and cut round the cone like this [demonstrates slitting from the center to the edge of the cone], so it was all shredded but still on there. I played and I thought it was amazing, really freaky. I felt like an inventor! We just close-miked that in the studio, and also fed the same speaker output into the AC30, which was kind of noisy but sounded good.”

The distortion effect was first created back in the 1950's by overdriving the tubes of a guitar amplifier, usually by turning an amp all the way up. This caused the guitar signal to distort or "break up." While this effect was originally considered bad by amp manufactures, early rock players found it exciting since it provided a new tone for the electric guitar's sonic palette. A tone that had an edge and power that fit perfectly with the new type of rock playing that appeared in the 1960's. As amplifier manufacturers embraced distortion, they began adding more gain to their amps, which resulted in more distortion and lead to styles such as metal and shredding. Pedals have been created to simulate all these types of distortion.


This company really does nothing for me. Hideous designs, cumbersome shaped guitars and the fact that they keep milking dime bags name just makes me feel like they don't have much else. There are definitely worse brands out there like first act and daisy rock (shudders) but I've always thought dean just always sucked as a metal guitar company and b.c. rich isn't to far behind them in my opinion.
I recall reading about one on a thread Gary was a part of. Much ribbing going on. Consensus was that it was pretty much a junker. Now, if you can get it to play and intonate well, I'm a big fan of junkers. I'm intrigued by the ladder bracing too. Very unique sound to that. In/re the bridge, I have an old Carlos that I've been considering doing that to. It's not worth a real neck reset, and the bridge is really high. Not the saddle. The bridge is fat and quite substantial. I could take it down by at least 1mm without it being as thin as a standard Martin bridge.
Flawless build, the action is set up so well I don't see any need to tinker with anything. Pulled it out of the box, tuned it and strummed a few chords, then set it aside for 24 hours. Re-tuned it the next day and it has stayed in tune. I cannot find anything amiss or out of place on this one. Per the serial number, this is a 2015 Indonesian build. The wood is simply perfect in appearance and the tone is outstanding for a thinline. Yeah, I am happy with this one. Recommended.

The Epiphone brand scores another spot in this list with the Hummingbird Pro, a stylized take on the popular dreadnought shape. This guitar is the affordable version of the original Gibson Hummingbird, as seen in the hands of big name artists like Keith Richards, Noel Gallagher, Sheryl Crow and many more. It is a modern and more cost effective take on the guitar that Keith used on many of The Rolling Stones' popular tracks, including "Play with Fire" and "Satisfaction".

It features an all-mahogany body with a narrower depth that makes it easier to carry around and to play with. The downside being is lack of low end and projection - which can also be a good thing if you prefer acoustic tones with more midrange. Giving this guitar its amplified voice is a Fishman Sonicore pickup, which is paired to an AEQ-SP1 Preamp that also comes with a tuner. And since Ibanez is not one to skimp on aesthetic features, you get a really good looking instrument with distinct fretboard inlays, bindings and more.
The Headload may be the ultimate tool for gigging electric guitarists. It has the same features as the JDX 48, but allows the player to adjust the phase of their signal to be matched with a microphone and comes with equalization controls to further sculpt the sound of their direct signal. Most importantly, the Headload is a “load-box”, meaning that it can absorb the energy of the amp’s head and produce a lower volume through the amp’s speakers. This is crucial, since most guitarists only like the sound of their amp when it is driven hard at high volumes. Unfortunately, amps being pushed to their full volume is not as enjoyable for the audience. The Headload also allows guitarists to play through their favorite sounding amp heads without even needing guitar cabs!
Let me begin by saying this guitar is really good right out of the box. It has a booming sound, and really fills a room even when not plugged in. However, to make it really shine, you should perform a basic setup. I replaced the saddle and pins with bone and sanded the bone saddle down to lower the action. The nut is good from the factory. I also oiled the rosewood fretboard and added Martin phosphor bronze medium strings. After doing this work, the guitar sounds every bit as good as my 90’s Martin DR which is stellar. At this price range, I didn’t expect much, but what I received was a very pleasant surprise. Don’t hesitate to buy this package!
You know you’re getting great guitar from the outset, because it’s based on Gibson’s legendary Dove model, which has been sued for decades now by distinguished guitarists in numerous genres, including the likes of Elvis himself. It really does look the part, with the dove design on the fretboard and pickguard, and numerous other nice little touches.
Washburn started in Chicago in 1883. They manufactured guitars and various other string instruments. Now they’re a division of the US Music Corp and owned by JAM Industries USA, but they continue to produce quality guitars. In the beginning, they mostly focused on banjos and mandolins. Starting in the 80s, they branched off into producing signature guitars. Now days they make a wide variety of instruments and are very beginner friendly. Washburns are made from fine-quality wood. This means they can get pricey. But the quality the solid wood offers is well worth the price increases. They’re a decent american company that make very consistent instruments. 
As a new learner, the biggest reason for you wanting to begin with a full-sized guitar as opposed to a slender Stratocaster or a stylish Les Paul, has to do with your love for classic heavy rock tones. In this day and age, when you have scores of guitars with dizzying combinations of single-coil and humbucker pickups, along with complex toggle options, the Davison Full Size Black Electric Guitar keeps it really straight and simple. This is one of the few electric guitars that I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing straight out of the box, with hardly any setting required. And lest I skip the most important purchasing criteria here, you are not just buying a 39” electric guitar but a full-fledged Davison Guitar Beginner Starter Package. So you have a lot more going for that hundred bucks you spend, with a cool gig bag, strap, guitar picks as well as a compact amplifier and cable.
It features an all-mahogany body with a narrower depth that makes it easier to carry around and to play with. The downside being is lack of low end and projection - which can also be a good thing if you prefer acoustic tones with more midrange. Giving this guitar its amplified voice is a Fishman Sonicore pickup, which is paired to an AEQ-SP1 Preamp that also comes with a tuner. And since Ibanez is not one to skimp on aesthetic features, you get a really good looking instrument with distinct fretboard inlays, bindings and more.
Make sure you have a sharp pair of wire cutters and a pair of those pointy nose pliers for bending and cutting component leads. Don’t forget solder too. There are a whole bunch of solder specifications covering materials, size, process etc. You’ll need rosin core solder. It comes in different thicknesses. 0.031” diameter is a common size, and will work for most pedal projects. Solder is normally sold in reels by weight. A 1/4lb reel will be enough to last a good few pedal projects. Lastly, get lead free, no clean solder. Although not strictly necessary for personal projects, lead-free solder is common now and safer. No clean, means that you can leave the flux residue behind without having to clean it off, and it won’t damage your board.

Here we have a sweetie from the late 1970s folks they just don' make them like this anymore this is the RARE High End Lawsuit 5053 model this model was discontinued decades ago. This guitar was made nearing 40 years ago of woods said to have been aged 20-30 years at time of its being built.... food for thought. Fresh release from the JVGuitars Vintage Vault is a beauty seldom seen in this configuration and in this condition we have collected many 5053 Alvarez lawsuit era guitars not all are like this one is SPECIAL this is a must see and hear beauty! Based on the Martin top of the line D-45 this Japanese crafted D-45 copy was crafted with top workmanship only the top luthiers were allowed to use this precious expensive aged Brazilian Jacaranda rosewood on this guitar its back - sides - fingerboard - bridge and headstock are ALL made of this exotic tone wood, the neck looks to be a high grade Honduran Mahogany and proudly still displays it's original imported by Saint Lewis Music gold Medallion and fancy SLM truss rod cover see pics The top is Solid Sitka spruce this guitar is detailed and adorned with much perfling and inlay top to bottom including its fingerboard and headstock, this example is in top playing condition and cosmetically excellent as well and is VERY RARE in deed to find one so excellent. The neck is a nice handful like the old Martin a medium slim profile, its beautiful fingerboard is excellent as are its frets.... Headstock is striking with its A over A inlay in mother of pearl, tuners are original and still doing an excellent job, This guitar has the tone only the Exotic wood series guitars can produce unique rich and dynamic with excellent volume and clarity a fingerpickers delight. Just freshly received a JVG setup with a new Martin Bone & compensated sadle along with a fret dress and a new set of Martin 80/20 Phosphorius Bronze strings 12's x 54 for a substantial tonal upgrade from its old plastic. Overall rated 9.0 +++/10 well preserved it is over 40++ years old and has been lovingly played and well taken care of all these years is not new or mint of course it clearly is well above average used / vintage This comes with a good hard shell case ... and will protect it for the next 4-5 decades. Wonderful players guitar in excellent vintage condition when will I ever see another like this??? its here as of today ask if serious about owning this gem Thank you for your interest in our vintage guitar contact Joe to buy this guitar at: JVGuitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come.
Based on the popular Les Paul Jr, the Saga LJ-10 DIY electric guitar kit follows after its streamlined aesthetics and electronics. It comes with the popular LP style body, crafted from basswood and pre-drilled for complete assembly. It has a bolt-on neck that you have to screw into the body, and a headstock that you can carve into your preferred shape.

The heaviest heffalumps in this year’s roundup, share a few strands of DNA with early Mastodon, blending bludgeon and benign  in ambitious and unpredictable ways. Brady Deeprose and Dan Nightingale form the two-pronged guitar attack, leading these lofty compositions from blast-beaten brutality to doom-y sludge and back again. Their debut album Mire was released last month and is the sort of fully-formed statement that requires metallers to pack a spare pair of pants.


If you are new to electronics, the essential tool you most likely need to buy is a decent temperature controlled soldering station. A basic one such as a Weller WLC100 can be had for less than $40 and will do the job just fine. Really nice ones with digital temperature readouts from Weller or Hakko are $100-$150 and as much as you will ever need for a home pedal shop. The soldering pencils have interchangeable tips, so you can keep a selection of different sizes. The one that normally comes with a new station will be suitable for most through-hole pedal kits.
At Sam Ash, we maintain close relationships with the most prominent electric guitar brands to make sure that we always have the very best, latest selection of electric guitars in our inventory. We carry acclaimed electric guitar brands including Fender, Gibson, Paul Reed Smith, Ibanez, ESP, Gretsch, Dean, Epiphone, Yamaha, Schecter, and so much more! If you’re a discerning player or guitar aficionado looking to add a new guitar to your collection, be sure to check out all the fine, premium electric guitars featured in our exclusive Electric Guitars of Distinction collection.
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