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The roots of the Supro story go back to the ’20s and the sometimes tempestuous relationship between Czech immigrant/instrument repairman/inventor John Dopyera and dapper Vaudeville musician George Beauchamp (pronounced “Beech-um”). Both were searching for the guitar’s holy grail of the era, more volume. Disagreement, and some animosity, has always surrounded the account of just who was responsible for what, but Dopyera ended up building an ampliphonic or self-amplifying guitar (or “resonator” to most guitar buffs) for Beauchamp. John applied for a patent on his tricone design on April 9, 1927, obtaining it on December 31, 1929.
I built me my own custom guitar in high school shop class and it was simple i made an Ibanez RG styled body and a Randy Rhodes/Alexi Laiho styled body just so i can swap the 2 when ever i want and i can say the cons are waaaaaaay over exaggerated cause it was VERY cheap to do it i spent a total of $350 to do it and thats even with the the EMG 81's i have in them. I mean yes its only a 1 pickup guitar on each but its how i want the wood was only $60 for an Ash body (thats for both of them not each) and i have a hook up to get free mahogany that i used on the neck for it and mine noooo one could tell the difference between an actual Ibanez RG or ESP Alexi Laiho's signature guitars the only thing that they were able to know it was custom was the head stock being my signature and the parts that were on it and color option i used is NOT used by ether of them but the time is spot on it took 3 months for me to do them but this was of course all during the course of 45 mins for 3 months so it would of been much faster without it being in school but then again i also sort of cheated with mine cause i have been doing carpentry work since i was 8 so i already knew how to do everything professionally
An acoustic-electric guitar has an electronic pickup that’s usually built into its bridge. This pickup is used to capture the sounds produced by the top’s vibrations. This is then transmitted via an onboard preamplifier to an external acoustic guitar amplifier or PA system. But plugging-in is strictly optional. Unplugged, an acoustic-electric guitar typically sounds just like a fully-acoustic guitar.
Yes, most of them are very useful! These days there are hundreds of online tutors offering great guitar lessons. And there’s no need to throw your money at the first offer you see, as a lot of quality instructional and tutorial videos are completely free on platforms such as YouTube. Generally, paid courses tend to be better because they are tested and are well-structured, and – in theory – you should be able to progress faster. But it all depends on your budget and on your will to learn on your own.
AT LAST!! some gd stuf about john frusciante, hes the best living guitarist in my opinion. i don't get people who think those random metal shredders should belong in the top 10 list…. bein insanely good just on technical stuff means nothing… its kinda like shredding as fast as possible on a pentatonic scale, people will respect the skills, but wheres the soul? this is the exact reason why hendrix and jimmy page always get on these lists but not guitarists like buckethead, i mean seriously he has less tone then any of the GnR guitarists.. if slash is not on the list, theres no way the kfc man can get any close. to all the haters, tom morello is a very innovative guitarist and by far more creative then buckethead. I swear the world is no longer a place for good music.
Here’s an interesting (they’re all interesting to me!!!) guitar that shows the evolution of Matsumoku made guitars.  Even the earliest solid body electrics that came out of the Matsumoku plant were made of solid wood and displayed really good wood craftsmanship!  Lots of start up companies went to Matsumoku in the early days because the plant had proper wood drying facilities (if the wood wasn’t dried properly, the guitars often became seriously messed up during the import trip across the ocean).
Generally speaking, no. When it comes to guitar quality there are always exceptions, but for mass produced brands, the top models almost always come from America (generally more skilled craftsmanship: more attention to detail, less assembly line). The top Fender guitars, for example, are American made, and consequently significantly more expensive. That doesn't mean that they are inherently better than their Mexican made brothers, but that they tend to be crafted in a more quality controlled environment. That being said, the guitar is a very personal instrument, they change guitar to guitar for the same model. It's all about the connection between the guitar and the player: what feels right and what sounds best to them.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: V-Shape - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 22, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.6" (62.5cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Pickup Configuration: H-S-H - String Instrument Finish: Emerald Green - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case - Made In: America - # Produced: 150
A six-string guitar has five musical-intervals between its consecutive strings. In standard tuning, the intervals are four perfect-fourths and one major-third, the comparatively irregular interval for the (G,B) pair. Consequently, standard tuning requires four chord-shapes for the major chords. There are separate chord-forms for chords having their root note on the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth strings.[41] Of course, a beginner learns guitar by learning notes and chords,[42] and irregularities make learning the guitar difficult[43]—even more difficult than learning the formation of plural nouns in German, according to Gary Marcus.[44] Nonetheless, most beginners use standard tuning.[45]
In 1972, Ovation introduced one of the first production solid-body electric-guitars with active electronics, the Ovation Breadwinner. The model failed to gain widespread popularity, however, and production of the Breadwinner and the Ovation Deacon ceased in 1980. Ovation made several other solid-body models up until the mid 1980s.[28] Since that time the company’s main focus has been acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars.
The arched top Strats all had maple necks, rosewood ‘boards, black hardware, Floyd Rose licensed locking vibrato systems, and slight finish variations. The SSL-1 had a single humbucker with a volume control that had a push-pull coil tap. This could be had in metallic black, purple burst, white pearl, red pearl, and pink fire. The neck on the early SSL-1 is described in different sources as having a stain finish or as having an oil finish; there’s probably a clue to dating sequence here, but I don’t know the answer.
* The Chinese examples of the sunburst model that I have seen have a slightly golden-orange tone to the sunburst pattern, more like the traditional sunburst color in American guitars. The Indonesian examples I have seen have a much more over all orange look. Basswood does not have a lot of visible grain. The example guitar shown in the official Epiphone product photos, the photos you see on most web sites like Amazon and Musician's Friend and so forth, are probably a little optimistic when it comes to visible grain and the golden hued quality of the sunburst finish.
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Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.", "value":"447.99", "priceMin":"447.99", "priceMax":"699.99", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"0", "brand":"Ibanez", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"5.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"10", "reviewHowManyReviews":"3", "usedOrNew":"new", "discontinued":"1", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"0", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "", "checksum":"", "priceVisibility": "1"}

“If Gibson offers two pickups, let’s have three!”  This simple statement by Leo began a revolution in sound for electric guitarists by offering 3 single coil pickups instead of the usual 2 humbucking pickups that Gibson offered players.  These lower output pickups provided a thinner sound, but with more tonal variants.  Players could now have clear chunky rhythm tones alongside cutting trebly lead tones, while the inclusion of the middle pickup gave players access to the “spongy quack” distinctive of the Stratocaster’s “in between” positions.
Of this list I think it's such a shame to see some names there and others missed but it's only a list to grab attention, not a definitive, set in stone, tablet for future generations to adhere by. But seriously where is Brian May? The man that made me want to play in the beginning. Every time I hear him hit those strings it sounds like the first time. And no Danny Gatton either. But hey that opinions for you.
You’ll find a full slate of dedicated bass stompbox effects as well as many multi-effects pedals and processors. Like their guitar-friendly cousins, bass effects offer most of the same tone shaping capabilities, including chorus, reverbs, delays, phasers, and tremolos. Because of the bass’s unique sound dynamics that reach deep into the lower frequencies, many bass effects are focused around compression and limiters that help keep a lid on destructive subsonic sound waves that can damage gear. Typically, many guitar effects are not optimal when used with a bass.
As Tom Wheeler writes in The Soul of Tone: Celebrating 60 Years of Fender Amps, "It’s powerful, it’s loud and it’s sensitive to the player’s touch. It sounds great, responding beautifully across the frequency spectrum. It exhibits a sparkling, harmonically rich tone at low and moderate volumes. At louder volumes it thickens with a sweet distortion that only seems to get creamier the more it’s cranked. It is particularly well matched to certain popular guitars, especially the Stratocaster."
By far the most common way to sort out this tablature selection is by artist. Some best-selling highlights include the Hal Leonard Jimi Hendrix Complete Guitar Tab Library, Alfred Led Zeppelin Box Set I-V Guitar Tab Platinum Edition and Hal Leonard Eric Clapton Complete Clapton Guitar Tab Songbook. And those are just a few examples from a library packed with hundreds of books. No matter what sort of music you want to play, there's tablature ready to teach it to you.
There were also a number of guitars that featured the same headstock style as the 700-800 models that featured symetrical hollow or semi-hollow bodies similar to some of the Gibsons. Gibson aficionados refer to the bodies as having "Mickey Mouse ears". One model had a deep jazz guitar-style body. They all had what appear to be humbucker pickups, some black and some plated. The Kent name only appeared on the headstocks.
Play with it, see what happens. Worst case; you’ll set it, forget it or use it as a means to dial out some hum. Best case, you’ll find the guitar in your hands is far more versatile than advertised and use the tone knob to wield it like a musical samurai and leave everyone wondering…”how the hell do they get so many sounds without a guitar change?!”
ESP calls the body shape "Eclipse", which in the case of this guitar, is crafted from mahogany and paired with an arched flame maple top. The body is then wrapped in amber sunburst finish that complements the beautiful grains of the top. The guitar has a maple neck with a thin U profile and a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard. It is meant to play fast and smooth, with its 24.75" scale length and narrow 1.65" nut width. ESP opted for two Seymour Duncan pickups for this guitar, the '59 Humbucker for the neck and the hotter JB Humbucker on the bridge - both of which can handle both clean and high gain tones.
Fulltone’s popular Full-Drive pedal has the bonus of a switchable booster channel, while its overdrive channel goes to a fairly high gain and, unusually, uses asymmetrical clipping for a more textured sound that is quite different from the Tube Screamer’s. Asymmetrical clipping is also at the center of Boss’ SD-1 Super Overdrive (as used by Eddie Van Halen), generated by a circuit that uses two silicon diodes in series in one direction, and only one in the other, to clip each side of the waveform differently. Some players credit asymmetrical clipping with more richness, body and character; others say it sounds clanky and harsh, like an amp with mismatched output tubes. Then again, some guitarists—those in the former camp, probably—say they prefer the sound of mismatched output tubes for these same reasons. As ever, what works is up to you.
A middle ground between solid and hollow-body guitars, semi-hollows are hollowed out but have a solid block of wood running through the center of their bodies. This achieves the increased sustain and reduced feedback of a solid-body guitar while retaining the mellow tones of hollow bodies. For this reason, semi-hollow guitars became exceedingly popular with blues players like Chuck Berry and Freddie King. Their duality — sweet and mellow but also some awesome, crunchy sounds — makes them great all-purpose guitars with classic sound.
Where there is more than one pickup, a switch selects between the outputs of individual pickups or some combination; two-pickup guitars have three-way switches, and three-pickup guitars have five-way switches. Further circuitry sometimes combines pickups in different ways. For instance, phase switching places one pickup out of phase with the other(s), leading to a "honky", "nasal", or "funky" sound[citation needed]. Individual pickups can also have their timbre altered by switches, typically coil tap switches that effectively short-circuit some of a dual-coil pickup's windings[vague] to produce a tone similar to a single-coil pickup (usually done with push-pull volume knobs).
SCALE LENGTH What is a "Scale Lenght?" The scale lenght is the lenght the string travels between the nut at the top of the fretboard and the bridge at the mid section of the base of the guitar. To determine the scale length of your guitar you would measure from the front part of the nut where it meets the fretboard to the center of the 12th fret on the neck and multiplying that by 2. Add about 3/16" to that on the low e string and taper that to about 1/16" added to the high e string. This is called compensation and that is why you see that tapered line on a bridge. Go to Stewart MacDonnaldfor more info. They also have a Fret Calculator that helps you determine your particular scale length in addition to a page dedicated to helping you out with tons of free info for your guitar building projects.The fret is the metal of nickle wire that is raised up off the fretboard. I would suggest buying a neck that has been pre made from a manufacturer that fits the design concept that you want to go with. I bought mine from Guitar Parts USA for about $70. You can pay anywhere from $50 to $300 for a neck at online retailers, but surf around and make sure you are satisfied with what you get. Guitarpartsusa will tell you to buy an expensive neck if you are building an expensive guitar, not a $70 neck. But for mine the $70 neck works just fine. Once you get the neck in and you determine what the scale length is you can lay it all out on paper. I recomend buying all your hardware, pickups and knobs before you draw your final template. This will allow to place everything where you want it and know what size holes to drill for the electronics and how big the cavites will need to be for them and the pickups.
Most of Peter, Paul and Mary’s work had splendid fingerstyle guitar work. My favorite is “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”. Paul Stookey also had some fine acoustic work going solo with stuff like “Sebastian” and “The Wedding Song”. “The Wedding Song” was supposedly “must learn” stuff for aspiring acoustic players in the 70’s (so they could play at their friends’ weddings).
After the wah, we have a compressor. A compressor improves the sustain available to your guitar by increasing the overall volume of any signal you feed into it. At the same time it helps to soften out any big volume spikes by clamping down the volume if it gets too loud. The ME-80 puts the compressor close to your guitar because any other effect placed before the compressor will be boosted in volume which will make the effect a lot harder to control.
Yeah. He may have to sit down when he plays, but he’ll have you on your feet when he does. BB’s creamy yet piercing tone, his unique vibrato and his absolute flawless ability to express his emotions through the guitar earn him a spot in the top ten. King’s years of fame haven’t gone to his head. He is still as humble as ever giving front row seat tickets to fans waiting in a cold parking lot just to have a glimpse of him. BB King can’t play chords. Nor does he sing and play at the same time. But he has worldwide recognition of his accomplishments as an artist. That’s a mark of a truly great guitarist.
These soundfonts were started by converting some presets from the gig files using cdextract demo and then altered using Viena, Swami and SF2Comp. The gig files are better as they contain more samples and a better variety of presets that were not possible in the soundfont format. For instance, I could not include the Fender reverb samples as the release samples would all play at the same volume no matter where in the envolope the key was released. So, if you have a chance you would be better off to use the gigasamples. They can be used in LinuxSampler of which is free and runs on windows and linux. Some people need samples in sound font format though, so I have created these samples out of the same samples that I used for the giga samples. I also have an impulse response of the Fender Reverb that I made with voxengo for download on the Other Stuff page so you can use that if you want to get the reverb sound with the soundfonts. At the moment I use Freeverb3 for realtime impulse in windows and Jconv in linux.

Looking to connect with other fans of vintage gear? Join the community. Allow us to introduce you to the exclusive network of musicians and music lovers: Music Aficionado. This social network gives music enthusiasts a place to collect, share, listen to, and discuss everything they love about music from their favorite albums, playlists, and artists to their favorite pieces of gear, instructional videos, and altered tunings.

In terms of the electronics, Yamaha went with a System 66 piezoelectric platform. The preamp packs a standard three-band EQ couple with a built-in tuner and a flexible mid-range control. Needless to say, it gives you more than enough room to dial in a decent tone. Quality-wise, this might be the best acoustic electric you can get in this price range, period.
The 2-6kHz region is good for adding bite or presence to guitar tracks at the mixdown stage.There is no 'right' electric guitar sound because the instrument has no natural sound, so you can use as much EQ as you like without feeling guilty. Even so, getting something close to the desired sound at source is always the best way to work. Should you need to use EQ, here are a few comments concerning the frequency areas you might want to tweak. Boxiness tends to occur between 100Hz and 250Hz, so if this is a problem, use a parametric to tame it. Experiment with the Q setting as you may be able to notch out a narrower section than you think to get the desired result. Cabinet thump can be accentuated by boosting at around 80-100Hz, but take care not to boost anything much lower than this, as you'll just bring up unwanted resonances and hum.
The Original Blackout humbuckers are designed to be everything metal, handling thick rhythm play and well-defined lead melodies at higher speeds. The tone has an almost shimmering quality, especially on a clean amp setting. The tone profile of both the neck and the bridge version of this pickup emphasize treble with a hollowed out mid-range that helps give you the best of searing leads and heavy power chords.

It’s little wonder that Fretboard SE is such a popular guitar book. It focuses on the practical application of learning guitar and relies less on intellectual theory. That is not to say that a guitarist attempting to improve their skills from this book won’t be challenged and introduced to a unique system. It is just to say that the system it introduces is different than you may be used to if you’ve read other books or tried learning guitar from another method. This book teaches around the "CAGED" method. That is, the book will attempt to explain the fretboard layout to you and how to navigate it by focusing on the five basic chord shapes and the root notes in those chords. As you might have guessed, the chords the method teaches are C, A, G, E, and D, thus the name. For a more detailed explanation check out this article from Premier Guitar.
The company has been run by the Martin family throughout its history. The current chairman and CEO, C.F. ‘Chris’ Martin IV, is the great-great-great-grandson of the founder. The firm was the first to introduce many of the characteristic features of the modern flattop, steel-strung acoustic guitar. Influential innovations include the Dreadnought body style and scalloped bracing. Some time in the 1970s, Martin bought Levin guitars[1] and around 200 D-18’s were apparently built in Sweden; they are stamped LD-18[citation needed].
This is essentially the distance measured between the saddle and the nut, or more accurately described as double the distance from the nut to the 12th fret plus some "compensation" added by the position of the saddle. A longer scale length requires higher tension in the strings and results in a brighter tone. A more detailed explanation with examples is presented quite well by Stewart MacDonald and a good description of the implications of different scale lengths can be found on Guitar Player. Guitars based on Stratocaster and Telecaster designs usually have a longer 25.5" scale while Les Paul and SG style guitars are characterized by a shorter 24.75".
My current setup is tuner>wah>blues driver>keeley falng/delay/fuzz box>sonic max>looper. The second photo is current setup which sounds way better than original. Problem is now my flanger/phase side of my keeley won’t get loud like it used to and my loop wont let me hear what I’m playing when I lay down a riff, also when I play the loop back I can no longer play over the track.

So leaving aside the complexities of exactly emulating acoustic instruments with speaker technology -- which we have all come to accept although no speaker can sound quite as sweet as (or at least not exactly like) the acoustical nuance of a fine wooden stringed instrument, we reach the vast majority of modern music - amplified sounds. Again, stringed instruments are among the most difficult to emulate, if not the most difficult to emulate technologically, because of the vast and infinitely variable set performance possibilities which in turn produce a vast and infinitely variable set of physical reactions. Even if MIDI notation can document the coordinated left-hand/right-hand performance of various pitches, velocities, durations and legato, our VST is strained to faithfully reproduce every possible physical result of every possible combination of performed licks.
You might expect PRS's budget take on its venerable Custom 24 to pale in comparison to the real deal, but that certainly isn't the case. Considering the price, this is one impressively put-together instrument; we scoured our review model for signs of the guitar's price tag, and all we could find was a slightly loose vibrato arm fitting - a minor point. Like the traditional USA-made Custom 24 design, there's no scratchplate, so the SE Standard 24's electronics are installed in a cavity. The non-locking SE-level tuners are smooth-handling, and visually, you'd struggle to distinguish the vibrato from top-end PRS guitars. The SE Standard isn't quite as refined or sleek a playing experience as PRS's S2 and above models, courtesy of the chunkier Wide Thin profile, higher action and slightly creaky vibrato response, but a more player-personal setup helps to rectify that. The tones are here, though: searing solos, toasty rhythms and coil-split quack are all within reach – at this price, it's an impressive performance from one of the best electric guitar brands in the market.
DIY Guitars is Australia’s home of the best guitar kits. We stock a large range of kits at great prices, which will be delivered to your door! Whether you’re looking to shred like a madman, or play some classical blues riffs, we have the guitar kit for you! We also stock high quality ColorTone guitar stains and plenty of guitar accessories to help make the perfect guitar to suit your needs.
Needing a more compact logo suitable for the guitars’ headstock, the founders decided to change the name to “Taylor” as it sounded more American than “Listug” and because as Kurt Listug put it, “Bob was the real guitar-maker.”[3]Listug became the businessman of the partnership while Taylor was responsible on design and production. In 1976, the company decided to begin selling their guitars through retailers. In 1981, facing financial difficulties, Taylor Guitars took out a bank loan to purchase equipment.[4][5]
Electric instruments have a big role to play in the world of music, but there's a catch: they need amplification to do it! For that matter, even acoustic instruments need to be boosted when they're playing big venues. And while an amp alone can handle those tasks, many of the sounds in modern music (the signature distortion of rock and metal, for instance) rely heavily on effects units to shape the basic tone into something even better. If you're new to your instrument, then consider this selection of amplifiers and effects the doorway to your future sound - and your instrument will be the key that opens it up, once you've got your hands on your brand new hardware!
As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.
A guitar is a stringed instrument that has always been a favorite amongst musicians because it creates symphonic tones that foster creative expression. Guitars are available in a variety of make and brands. In India, the guitar is the most commonly played musical instrument. Since a good guitar lasts for more than a decade, it is important to keep a few things in mind when you are buying a guitar for the first time. There are different types of guitar that are available for buying.

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Some acoustic guitars, regardless of the body style, feature a cutaway in the upper bout to allow players to more easily reach the higher frets on the guitar neck. Phil Keaggy, a prolific and highly celebrated American guitarist, usually uses an acoustic guitar with a cutaway. If you plan to play leads on your acoustic, or are used to playing an electric guitar, you may prefer a guitar body with a cutaway.
Players who wish to self-appraise their own instruments have a number of options for finding a guitar blue book online. A number of websites that perform the same function as Kelley Blue Book for cars exist for guitars. You may just be interested in knowing how much your prized ax is worth, or you may be looking to buy. Either way, the internet can help you determine the fair-market value of nearly any guitar.
The Les Paul Express has everything a beginning player needs and nothing more. Its controls are simple, but it can still get a reasonable range of sounds. Unlike some very low-priced guitars, its action height and intonation are individually adjustable for each string. Its humbucking pickups have a mellower sound than the single-coil pickups on the Squier by Fender Mini Strat, and mellower even than the other humbucker-equipped kid’s guitars we tested, but they also don’t have the hum that the Mini Strat’s pickups do.
Earth Quaker Devices – Have you ever heard a song and wondered “how did they get that sound?”. If it was a recent recording there is a good chance these guys were behind it. They make an incredibly wide range of pedals that all go from great quality, usable pedals for almost any style to the weirdest, most wonderful tones that you have never heard before.

Why do these genres not require the use of a tone knob, or sometimes, require a tone knob to be fully open? Well, for metal and hard rock, first of all, most of the tone shaping happens on the amp and/or on the pedals, especially for those who use high gain distortion pedals. The pickups on typical hard rock and metal guitars are humbuckers, which are warmer and have less treble. Couple that with high gain and high output pickups which compress the signal and also take some of the treble away, and keeping the tone knob open becomes that much important so that the tone will not be muddy and keep its cut and punch. For country, well, I guess that’s just *the* sound of the genre, and wide open Telecasters and Stratocasters are the weapons of choice.

In 1964, The Rolling Stones‘ Keith Richards obtained a 1959 sunburst Les Paul.[19] The guitar, outfitted with a Bigsby tailpiece, was the first “star-owned” Les Paul in Britain and served as one of the guitarist’s prominent instruments through 1966. Because he switched guitars often enough in that period (using models ranging from the Epiphone semi-hollow to various other guitars made by Guild and Gibson), Richards is sometimes forgotten as an early post-1960 Les Paul player.[20][21] In 1965, Eric Clapton also recognized the rock potential of the late 1950s Les Paul guitars (particularly the 1958–1960 Standard sunburst models), and gave them wide exposure. He began using Les Pauls because of the influence of Freddie King and Hubert Sumlin, and played a 1960 Standard on his groundbreaking album Blues Breakers – John Mayall – With Eric Clapton. At the same time, Mike Bloomfield began using a 1954 Les Paul goldtop he apparently purchased in Boston while touring with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, and recorded most of his work on the band’s East-West album with that guitar. A year later, he traded it to guitarist/luthier Dan Erlewine for the 1959 Standard with which he became most identified. Concurrently, such artists such as Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Jeff Beck andJimmy Page began using the late-1950s Les Paul Standards.
by pedalhaven  @airbag3333  has a seriously stacked board! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
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“Hi folks here’s a classic beauty 1974 ALVAREZ 5024 DOVE Japanese crafted Dreadnought acoustic guitar mid 1970’s which is prime time lawsuit era when Japan was out and out copying the great classic AMERICAN DESIGN GUITARS the classics if you will they sought out to make an affordable alternative to the more expensive American built guitars in this case they obviously copied Gibson right down to the details...Like the open book headstock, the overall size -shape- the bridge detail on this is just like one My friend had as a kid it was his dads but we played it too was a wonderful 1964 Gibson Dove it was 1968 we admired it greatly to say the least but with our pocket books at the time forget about it one of my band mates brought one to practice an Alvarez like this one and it to had the tunimatic bridge installed on it, it made the difference to get your acoustic set up to intonate not new or ding and doink free but vintage beautiful JVG rated 8+/10It shines up quite nicely too. Ok here is the story of this guitar just one elderly owner of this California guitar. I have collected no less than 12 of these classics and have had some put away in our warehouse for about 15 years it’s been out of circulation all these years strings loosened inside a caddalic old Gibson case which is not included with this purchase. kept out of circulation over 15 years and not played that much by its original owner she is in better than average for one of these it’s neck is 1-11/16ths width at nut - medium profile- very good frets and rosewood fingerboard and classic inlays and the dove motif pickguard. I noticed it looks as if the treble side tuners were replaced and he chose to use the opposite side simply reversed... they look fine work the same good so I’ll leave that to you to decide , we can do a Grover tuner upgrade for you installed for $125 additional if requested. Other than ,that the bridge has upgraded to high end fossil pins that resonate tone far superior to the original plastic ones. No cracks in the wood or even finish checking none seen... neck joint also is excellent as is neck angle - set for proper relief it’s Mahogany neck is nice and strateght . It’s beautifully grained Sitka Spruce Top is nice - pretty flat not buldging no such issues it’s bridge is also original and is nice and tight to its top.its body is all mahogany and is beautiful as well have a good look, the back of headstock has what Gibson use to call a black stinger painted on... Gibson did that so did Alvarez... I like this one’ds white Alvarez trussrod cover as well .. truss rod is working as it should... The open book headstock mirrors that of the Gibson with the old style script Alvarez logo looking quite cool in deed... love this era.. ok it’s hard to find these that are not rode hard and put away wet... not this baby She’s a one owner sweetie pie... NO CRACKS - NO NECK ISSUES PLAYING REAL NICE contact Joe to buy it: jvguitars@gmail.com Thanks for looking folks!.
This is something that a lot of people get wrong. Electric Guitars are much smaller than Steel-String Acoustic Guitars and Nylon String Classical Guitars, they can basically be used by most people, but you do need to consider the extra weight. An Electric Guitar can weigh 5-6 Kg which can be difficult for children to handle. We would normally recommend children be at least 13 years before they try an Electric Guitar, but this is a generalisation and some children (sometimes as young as 10) have been ok. Every child is different, and some children may be capable at a younger age, so if you consider your child to be quite strong for their age, then by all means go for an electric. We carry a broad range of sizes in our entry level range. The correct size is most accurately determined by the player’s height, age and in some cases gender. If you can tell us these three details we can give you a personal recommendation.
When I received this Epiphone LP Special II Les Paul Electric Guitar, Vintage Sunburst I discovered there are cracks in the wooden body, under the paint. I can tell that the wood was cracked before it was painted because the paint flows into the crack in one instance on the back, is visible up over the "shoulder" close to the strap peg and can be seen under the paint on the front. In another instance the paint bridges a crack on back below the cutout shoulder and can be seen under the paint in the right light front and back. Is this normal? (There was no sign of shipping damage on either the outer carton or on the inner product box). Regarding playing, the bass strings buzz on the frets when fretted (not my fingers) which probably can be corrected by adjusting the bridge. I was under the impression that Epiphone guitars were ready to use right out of the box. I have contacted Epiphone/Gibson company to advise on the cracks and the buzzing bass strings. I am concerned that the cracks may get worse, and if this is this normal for a guitar in this low price range made in china. I got a reply from Gibson Customer Service which said "We would need to see pictures, but it would be highly unusual if there actually were cracks in the wood. The set up on an instrument can shift during shipping and handling, so a new instrument may need to be set-up." I will probably return this instrument and buy one in person from a music store where I can see and try the product before buying it.

Chris Broderick (b. 1970) is the lead guitarist for Megadeth, formerly of Jag Panzer and Nevermore. His main guitar was a 7-string RG model. During the recording of Endgame, he started using 6-string Ibanez S series guitars, which are painted with artwork from various Megadeth albums. This is because Dave Mustaine didn't want Broderick to use his 7-strings in the studio. He has since switched to Jackson Guitars.

This is a solid body bass guitar that has a full deep sound. There is not much middle to it which makes it less defined than a lot of basses but it does suit some music very well. There is a choice of sample sets to choose from in this soundfont. Direct or through my j-station (which makes it sound more like its through an amp), or a mix of the two. The j-station samples are the same direct samples routed out and through the j-station and back in again, which is why it is possible to have a mix of the two. The J-Station samples make a distorted beefy bass sound which can be useful for some music i.e. 3 piece bands where tha bass fills out instead of a rhythm guitar or just for a more lo-fi bass sound. The direct samples are not so distorted and can be used in alot more styles of music. There is a preset that includes slaps and slides etc to help add some realism.
Compression: A "limiter" is envisioned as a circuit which prevents the output signal from exceeding a certain limit. If it did this by clipping, it would cause distortion, but if it can do it cleanly by just progressively reducing the amplification of the incoming signal, then it may properly be called a compressor. A compressor reduces the overall dynamic range by "compressing" the gain of high amplitude signals while maintaining the design gain for lower amplitude signals.
Learning just a song won't get you far, there will be a point where you just won't be able to learn a song because of its difficulty. First of all you need to learn some chords, scales and study a bit of music theory. Here's one example: Lets compare a song to a poem. You can learn a poem and keep saying it, but if someone asks you the meaning of the poem, you won't be able to say anything. If you just learn how to play a song without knowing any chords, it won't be any good for you. (Btw sorry for bad English) Also if you know the essentials, learning a song will get easier and easier.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 55mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - # of Strings: 8 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Fixed - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: IBZ-8 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, White
• We'll add EQ to give some polish and let the guitar cut through a little better in a mix. Enable a stage in the standard channel EQ (which comes after the inserts in the signal chain), and choose the Parametric II response. Add a boost of around 4‑5dB at 3.5kHz, with a Q of 0.2.This screen shows the VST Audio Channel Settings and the roster of effects used to create our basic guitar rack.
When it comes to multi-effects pedals, the Zoom G3X delivers big-time. Voted the top multi-effect pedal in our research by a large margin, the G3X hits high marks for quality, value for the money, portability, and most of all ease of use. Aside from giving you a multitude of effects, this unit is also an amplifier simulator, tuner, fully functional looper, doubles as a USB audio interface, and has a built-in expression pedal. Zoom has stiff competition in the multi-fx “battle of the brands,” and we were surprised to see their G3X come out on top against solid offerings from Boss, Digitech, Line 6, TC Electronic, and more. When you watch some videos or demo this unit yourself, it’s hard to not get excited about it.
T5 (2005) – Abbreviation stands for Thinline 5-way. “5-way” refers to the five position pickup selector switch mounted on the top of the guitar which activates different combinations of components in the T5’s pickup system. When hooked up to an amplification system, it’s capable of producing a variety of acoustic and electric tones in a single guitar.
Across the United States, there are increasing concerns from businesses about the supply of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics trained workers. Although science and math test scores in the US are among the lowest around the world, the US educational system is in the process of revitalizing the “hands on” learning techniques as a way to enhance the participation and success of students. Our project meets the needs of applied learning with the flexibility of being modular in the classroom.

Speakers and speaker stacks are a necessary partner for standalone amplifier heads. Take the total power level into account when you're looking at speakers, ensuring you're getting a stack with the muscle you need for the venues you play. Speaker configuration is also important, with larger woofers delivering more powerful bass and smaller tweeters bringing through the high-end.

Two of the strongest reasons to buy an acoustic guitar are user-friendliness and price. Some musical instruments are prohibitively expensive for beginners, and they’re difficult to learn, too. Not the acoustic guitar. Acoustic guitars are easy to learn, easy to carry, easy on the ears. And you can buy an acoustic guitar for an affordable price. The most difficult challenge in purchasing an acoustic guitar is finding the ideal fit for you. In this shopping guide, we will discuss some important elements to consider when browsing the acoustic guitar market.
I have been playing guitar for over 40 years and purchased Taylor's, Gibsons and Fenders as well as many others. This Godin company understands value and passes that along to its customers. Fine tone when played acoustic or threw an amp. The wood tone and workmanship are awesome for this or any price point. You will not be disappointed with this guitar, it is a great value.
Every ZZ Top tour is a treat for guitar geeks, as Gibbons uses the occasions to unveil a six-string surprise. (Last year it was an elusive Gibson Moderne.) But what really makes Gibbons cool is a certain undefinable quality called “vibe.” Anyone who has ever met Billy and gotten to know him—however briefly—has an outrageous story to tell about the encounter.
Telecasters are another guitar in Fender's lineup which include a single cutaway to get at those higher frets. These guitars feature two single coil pickups which can be used separately or with each other for producing large-scale sounds. Telecasters are well-known for producing a thin, biting sound which is common in country music, but nowadays they are popular amongst indie musicians as well. These aren't the ideal guitars for heavy metal or rock music. If you want to concentrate on country or indie music, a Telecaster can do the job for you.
This guide is as marvelously written as it is exceedingly informative. It takes a long look at each of the major and minor American guitar companies — Gibson chief among them — and recounts the story of every guitar to come off their workbenches. Buoyed by scads of historical photos and thoroughly researched copy, this book earns its place at the top of this list.
Not something you have to think about with an acoustic guitar, the electrics in an electro acoustic are quite important, though not as critical as with an electric guitar. You’ll want to make sure that you’re getting a good quality pickup and preamp, and then the next thing to consider will be features. Preamps often come with EQ adjustment to alter the tone slightly, and some will even come with certain effects that you can add on. Builtin tuners are a common addition too which mean you don’t need a separate tuning box.
After covering the Top 5 Guitar Plugins You Need To Know and 5 Best Multi Effects for Beginner Guitar Players and 5 Guitar Stomp Box Pedals Every Guitarist Needs let’s face it: probably half of our sound comes from our amplifiers. That makes them kind of important… and with so many little things to consider, from size and reliability to power output and built-in effects, you might appreciate some suggestions. So without further ado, here are my Top 10 recommendations (in no particular order) for beginner Guitar Amps to get you started.
Ibanez is one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to gain a significant foothold in import guitar sales in the United States and Europe, as well as the first brand of guitars to mass-produce the seven-string guitar and eight-string guitar. The company has an impressive lineup of products ranging from instruments to pedals and accessories.
Fujigen went on to achieve lasting fame as the manufacturer of Greco guitars in the ‘70s and Fender Japan in the ‘80s and early ‘90s. But Fujigen’s work in the ‘60s is our focus. The Fujigen hardware is the easiest way to tell these guitars apart from Teiscos. For example, Fujigen embossed "mic 1" and "mic 2" into their metal control plates, while Teisco did not. This is just one example, but it requires a bit of reading and studying about the nuances of that hardware to positively identify the Fujigens for what they are.
In around 1988 Martin introduced a line of Stinger amps and effects pedals. Amps included the FX-1 (10 watts, 8″ speaker, “Tube Synth” distortion circuit, $152), the FX-1R (15 watts, 8″ speaker, Tube Synth, spring reverb, $220), FX-3B (15 watts, 10″ speaker, compression, separate pre-amp and master volume controls, 3-band EQ, $189), FX-3C (30 watts, 12″ speaker, Tube Synth, chorus, $299), and the FX-3RC (65 watts, 12″ speaker, Tube Synth, chorus, reverb, effects loop, $379).
While close-miking can indeed be punchy and muscular, you’ll often find it doesn’t capture the full breadth of your electric guitar tone – that is, it simply doesn’t sound the way your amp sounds in the room. That’s because when you stand somewhere near the middle of any room and play an amp that’s placed a few feet away, several other elements affect the sonic picture. The distance between your ears and the speaker (the “air”), the shape and size of the room, materials used to make the walls, ceiling and floor and/or their coverings, the ways in which sound reflects from them, along with other factors all contribute to how your amp really sounds in the acoustic environment. Most engineers find, therefore, that they need to use some form of distant miking when the aim is capturing a realistic amp tone.
Fuzz boxes and other heavy distortions can produce unwanted dissonances when playing chords. To get around this, guitar players (and keyboard players) using these effects may restrict their playing to single notes and simple "power chords" (root, fifth, and octave). Indeed, with the most extreme fuzz pedals, players may choose to play mostly single notes, because the fuzz can make even single notes sound very thick and heavy. Heavy distortion also tends to limit the player's control of dynamics (loudness and softness) - similar to the limitations imposed on a Hammond organ player (Hammond organ does not produce louder or softer sounds depending on how hard or soft the performer plays the keys; however, the performer can still control the volume with drawbars and the expression pedal). Heavy metal music has evolved around these restrictions, using complex rhythms and timing for expression and excitement. Lighter distortions and overdrives can be used with triadic chords and seventh chords; as well, lighter overdrive allows more control of dynamics.[citation needed]
After I published that blog post, a number of beginners wrote to tell me they had a higher budget and would actually like me to recommend some better beginner guitars than those you typically find in starter packs. When I dug deeper, most told me they had a max budget of about $300 for the guitar alone, and weren’t interested in all-in-one starter packs. They wanted a really great (but affordable) guitar and wanted to shop for amps and accessories separately. I further confirmed this with a little informal poll on Twitter:

In the grand scheme of things, fixed bridges are as simple as it gets. Aside from saddles, which are used to tune in intonation, there are usually no other moving parts involved. The benefit of fixed bridges is their ability to retain intonation and tuning over time. If you're just starting out, sticking with a fixed bridge will make your life much easier. However, it does have its limitations compared to a tremolo bridge.
Australia’s best known guitarist, Tommy Emmanuel, owns many Matons and almost exclusively uses the BG808 acoustic model on his latest albums. Maton has even constructed a Tommy Emmanuel “TE series” according to Tommy’s specifications. His understudy Kieran Murphy also uses Matons. Joe Robinsonplays Maton guitars and was the company’s featured performer at the Frankfurt Musikmesse in 2009.[3]
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The Effect: Pedalboards are not guitar effects, but are an essential piece of equipment for every musician utilizing more than 2 or three pedals. Essentially, a pedalboard is a casing for guitar pedals, specially crafted to house a number of effects – typically ranging from 4 to 12. In some cases, boards come as just casings and it’s up to the player to sort out the electronic department and powers supply; in other cases, all the electronics are included in the mix and even cables are included. So in a nutshell, boards make your pedal use far more convenient and practical. In our opinion, they are an absolute must-have for any player who has more than two effects in use. For a first pedalboard I would recommend the Donner DB-2 as a great option.
All-fifths tuning is a tuning in intervals of perfect fifths like that of a mandolin, cello or violin; other names include "perfect fifths" and "fifths".[35] It has a wide range, thus it requires an appropriate range of string gauges. A high b' string is particularly thin and taut, which can be avoided by shifting the scale down by several steps or by a fifth.

That is true, but without the many fine guitarists of today, who will inspire the gifted musicians of tomorrow. Musicians are artists and it would be quite dull if they all copied each other and sounded the same wouldn’t it? Whether we like it or not the world keeps on spinning regardless of what we want, think or do. Enjoy the gifts that are shared today, because we’re not guaranteed a minute more.


The FX8 lets you configure up to eight effects per preset, from a list of impressive effects that are modeled from classic to modern stompboxes. It also offers a more traditional work flow via Fractal Audio's "Scenes" mode, which lets you assign effects to footswitches, turning the unit into a virtual stompbox pedalboard. And since it utilizes the same algorithm as their premium processors, you can be sure that each effect model has the same sound quality. Fractal Audio is also known for their boutique like attention to detail and build quality, which is prevalent in the FX8's design. Most notably its footswitches which are designed to have no-mechanical contacts, meaning no noise and improved reliability.
PRS: One of the best guitar brand one can go for (if they don’t want to go for the custom-built route). Their guitars look beautiful and sound buttery smooth. They have the most beautiful looking tops and inlay among non-custom guitars. The craftsmanship and attention to detail on PRS guitars is just exquisite. Of course they do have their custom shop called Private Stock and the Private Stock guitars are so gorgeous and meticulously built that anyone who sees them will be awestruck by their beauty, not to forget the sound of those guitars are like the voice of angels.
We answer this with a resounding, “Yes!” While electric guitars depend solely on pickups to be heard and to change or distort sound, acoustic electric guitars just provide the ability to amplify the sounds of an acoustic. The acoustic electric guitar construction is still built the same way as an acoustic but with pickups added in the design. You now have the ability to play plugged-in to amplify the natural acoustic harmonics of your tonewoods, or you can play unplugged when jammin’ it at a Summer bonfire.

There is no way to indicate strumming patterns or the duration of notes. Take our examples above. If you know these two songs, you can quickly figure out how to play these passages. But imagine that you don't know them. How long do you hold the C chord at the beginning of Silent Night? How long do you play the notes for Day Tripper? The only indication in Silent Night is the inclusion of lyrics. For Day Tripper, the distance between the numbers gives you minimal information about note duration, but you could never reproduce the riff if you didn't hear someone else play it.

Looper pedal: A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase, riff or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance (live looping) or they can be pre-recorded. By using a looper pedal, a singer-guitarist in a one person band can play the backing chords (or riffs) to a song, loop them with the pedal, and then sing and do a guitar solo over the chords. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops, enabling the performer to create the effect of a full band.[87] The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape loop effects are still used by some studio producers who want a vintage sound. Digital loop effects recreate this effect using an electronic memory.[88]
This article was tremendously helpful! My daughter is entering college for music therapy, and she is already an accomplished pianist but needed a more portable instrument to see patients. We have been scouting out guitars for some time and are looking to get a quality instrument without breaking the bank. Thank you so much for this well-researched article.
Youngman is also known for creating some of the best Frankenstein guitars in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. One of his favorites to build is his custom built Indian Esqu-wire Custom, a monstrous guitar with an SG body, a Telecaster neck and Fender pickups. "It's taking shit and making something playable," he says. And his touch must be golden because guitarslingers like Smokin' Joe Kubek, Bnois King and Rocky Athas each own one of his Frankenstein babies.
Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth used a Kent Polaris I solid body (with lots of duct tape on it) and several Kent 800-series guitars - a white 820 and a sunburst 821 12-string with 10 strings on it, shown at left. Since the B and high-E strings on a 12-string set are normally tuned to the same note, he left the duplicate strings off. He uses several alternate tunings with his guitars.
A sub-brand under the same umbrella as German brand, Behringer, Bugera has been flying under the radar for some time – though they make some surprisingly clever amplifiers. The BC15 is one such amp. Styled like its predecessors from the ’50s and ’60s, this vintage-inspired amp benefits from a single 12AX7 vacuum tube giving it a lot more warmth and character than for which you’ll pay. And don’t let its size fool you, either – while it only has a single 8″ speaker, it offers up a whopping 30 watts, making for a surprisingly loud little machine. For the price, it’s seriously difficult to do better than this.
Learning the notes on your guitar fretboard is one of the most important things you can do to advance your guitar playing skills. Knowing this information opens up an enormous amount of possibilities and can greatly help ease the learning curve for future guitar exercises. From scales, to soloing, to chord positions / progressions, knowing where each guitar note without having to think about it will put you well ahead of other guitarists who have not mastered this yet. This guide will give you some background information regarding how the notes on your guitar fretboard are laid out and of

This is one of several Squier models available that offer a pretty good product for a reasonably low price. The pickups and hardware are sometimes suspect, and the workmanship varies from instrument to instrument, but for the price, these are a very good beginner guitar choice. Squier Fat Strats are similar in appearance to the much more expensive Fender Stratocasters, so the look of the instrument is appealing. 


The diagram on the left shows you the fretboard on the guitar, with the thickest string on the left, and the E high string on the right. The numbers over the frets tell you where to press the string. At the top of the chart, you see an X or a 0 in near the strings. The X tells you to mute the string (not play it at all), the 0 tells you to play it open, without pressing any frets. So, in order to play the A chord as shown in the diagram, you should:

I finally had the chance to bring my les paul for Steve to look at an annoying fret buzz. First he said the guitar is too straight and adjusted it. Then he quickly discovered the 4th string buzz was at the first fret but it had nothing to do with the buzz because the issue was at the nut, it was cut too low! Steve redo the string while we were chatting about how the neighborhood has changed. Within 5 mins, Steve redo the with some filling and filing and voila!! The buzz was gone. I was so happy and asked him how much, he said it was easy so he didn't want take any money. But i have him some coffee money and he said it was too much, I said it was for a week and he laughed. My last issue I brought to Steve as well and we had the same conversation. I highly recommend Steve as experienced luthier and for someone who loves guitars and someone who can solve guitar problems. Steve is a hidden gem in the Boston guitar world.

Another thing that endears them to many guitarists is that they source 100% of their woods from sustainable sources and they use hydro-electric power. When it comes to the environmental footprint of a guitar, this is an area where Seagull are out in front and the big name brands, who while working hard to improve their own environmental impacts, are still playing some degree of catch-up.
The good people at Cordoba, therefore, sought to make a Spanish-style guitar with the traditional sound of a Spanish guitar, but the slimmer body and slightly narrower neck of a steel-string. They also added in a Fishman-Presys module for switching the guitar from an acoustic sound to an electric (including a built-in tuner), hence the “Fusion” in the model name.
Ask yourself this question right at the beginning. Before buying a guitar you have to make sure of the kind of style you are comfortable in- be it the jazz and blues or be it country, soul or pop. Only once you are sure of the kind of style you are in for, you should move forward to buying your new guitar. Make the wrong choice, and you will have to regret for it later on.
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Many people "re-amp" direct guitar tracks recorded to a DAW using amp-modeling software, with good results. Plug-ins are wonderfully suited to the virtual  recording environment, allowing for fast access to a plethora of modeling amplifier and speaker cabinet combinations, hence tones, effectively replacing a roomful of amps, cabs and microphones. Programming the virtual amplifier is the same as tweaking the knobs on the real thing, and the same is true for programming software dynamics and effects processors in relation to their hardware equivalents. As the realism and sophistication of modeling technology continue to develop, so does the viability of virtual re-amping as a production technique.
There sure are a lot of electric guitar options to choose from in this day and age. Thankfully, your choice doesn't have to be a difficult one to make thanks to world-leading guitar companies like Epiphone. In fact, Epiphone specializes in a wide range of electric guitar value packages, assembled specifically to help budding enthusiasts begin their musical journey on the right foot. If learning how to play the guitar is something you've always wanted to try but were never sure where to start, consider this section your launching pad.

When you're learning your instrument, having Books, Sheet Music & Media on hand is absolutely invaluable. It doesn't matter if you're a first time player or an old pro, this type of literature is going to help you to enhance your skills and become a better player overall. Think of having books, sheet music & media at your disposal like having the world's most diverse roster of teachers at your disposal 24 hours a day, seven days a week. By being able to learn on your own schedule, you'll find yourself playing new chords, progressions and songs in no time. So which books, sheet music & media are right for you? Well, as you can imagine, that's just going to be a matter of skill level and personal preference. If you're looking for a serious method book that will give you a solid basis in guitar technique, be sure to check out the Hal Leonard Guitar Method Complete Edition. This book and CD combo is designed to help anyone learn to play their acoustic or electric guitar. With convenient teaching ideas and fantastic audio assistance from Greg Koch, this set will help you cover all of your bases.

The design, while nothing particularly special, is clean and beautiful, which will help it appeal to most guitarists - the dreadnought acoustic body being one of the favorite parts. Ultimately, just about anyone could pick up this guitar and get what they need out of it, which is why it makes our top pick. We could recommend it to anyone, and when you talk about the price, it becomes even more attractive, because this is a high-end guitar for mid-range money.
Epiphone zenith guitar from the early 1960's,made from the 1931-1969,,16-3/8" body,oval pearl inlays,sunburst in color,single wide binding top & back.this guitar has a deep scratch on the top but not thru the wood,a couple extra holes in the top body on each side of the frettboard were it looked like an extra pickguard was,lots of finish crazing on the back of neck.this guitar has a new set of strings and plays and sounds great with nice action.
The Effect: Bass guitars are the core of every band. Along with drums, they make the rhythm section. Because of this, bass players are seen as ‘background members’ in a band. With that said, bass guitar offers much more range than that. Following the footsteps of legends such as Lemmy Kilmister and others, we can see that bass guitar can be the star of the show. All you really need is a good distortion pedal. Finding one may prove to be trickier than it seems. Your average guitar dist pedal may work, but chances are you will get better results with something like Tech 21 RIP Red Ripper. This is adedicated dist box for bass guitar, which covers the low end segment of bass tone and gives you some advanced tone shaping options. A proper bass dist box can really make all the difference if you are looking for proper sound.
Electro String also sold amplifiers to go with their electric guitars. A Los Angeles radio manufacturer named Van Nest designed the first Electro String production-model amplifier. Shortly thereafter, design engineer Ralph Robertson further developed the amplifiers, and by the 1940s at least four different Rickenbacker models were made available. James B. Lansing of the Lansing Manufacturing Company designed the speaker in the Rickenbacker professional model. During the early 1940s, Rickenbacker amps were sometimes repaired by Leo Fender, whose repair shop evolved into the Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company.

The most common route for absolute beginners will likely be a good, old fashioned guitar instruction book. We’ve all seen at least one of these kicking around. They tend to have a guitar and some interesting 80s-inspired graphics emblazoned on the front. The typical format is either an encyclopedia of scales and chords (indeed, some on this list follow that formula), or a series of songs broken down into digestible theory tidbits often accompanied by an ancient information vessel known as a Compact Disc.


The other switches you might find on a guitar can change the wiring of the pickups from being in series or parallel , or to switch the phase so the pickups are in phase, or out of phase. All the switches are there to allow you to change the tone of the guitar.  Those switches can be toggle switches, or push-pull switches built into the volume or tone control knobs.
If the book had been proofread better, I'd give it 5 stars. For example, there are places where the text has both a fret number and standard musical notation, and the fret number is wrong. The book refers you to play along with the instructional CD backing tracks, but it doesn't tell you which track number to play. It's easy enough to figure out what was meant, but a little more care would have been better.
I am new to guitar but had played Baritone in grades school thru high school in a small school with a band teacher who went on to Iowa State. So I wasn’t finding where notes were and started watching guitar/music theory and found several who headed me to learn my Pentatonic E minor scale before I have finished with chords. I wanted to know where notes are on fretboard.
Most seven-string guitars add a low B string below the low E. Both electric and classical guitars exist designed for this tuning. A high A string above the high E instead of the low B string is sometimes used. Another less common seven-string arrangement is a second G string situated beside the standard G string and tuned an octave higher, in the same manner as a twelve-stringed guitar (see below). Jazz guitarists using a seven-string include George Van Eps, Lenny Breau, Bucky Pizzarelli and his son John Pizzarelli.
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