It has a solid poplar body with a maple neck and rosewood fingerboard, and based on the early reviews of the Epiphone Les Paul SL, the fit, finish and general playability are all pretty good. It’s loaded up with Epiphone’s reliable tune-o-matic bridge, a volume and tone knob, as well as a three-way selector switch to toggle your pickups and dial in tone. The hardware does feel admittedly cheap, but the general consensus is that this guitar ships well-made, well-setup and more than appropriate for a first-time player.
The 5-position switch controls which pickups are activated. On a standard Strat, the position closest to the neck activates only the neck position pickup. The position next to that activates both the middle pickup and the neck pickup. The middle position activates only the middle pickup. The next position activates both the middle pickup and the bridge position pickup. The last position activates only the bridge position pickup.
The rest seems like a bit of an odd ball selection. It's the age old argument of technique over substance. BB King puts more into a small handful of notes than Malmsteen does in several hundred. One of the most musical guitar players to have graced the earth. In fact I think it was BB who stated that it's not the notes you put in but the notes you choose to leave out that count. Now that's music.
Unassigned maker badge names are AGS, Alex, Andre, Aquila, Asco, Avon, Axiom, Bradley, CG Winner, Clear Sound, CMI, Columbia, Commodore, Cortley, Crestline, Crown, D. Lewis (?), Danelectro, Dynelectron (some), Diplomat, Dixon, Dorado, Eagle, El Degas, Exceltro, Exper, Encore, Fandel, Garzia, Goya, Grant, Grenn, Laguna, LTD, Magnum (?), Maier, Monroe, Marchis, Mark II, Masaaki (?), Matador, Norwood, Palmer, Prairie, President, Rodeo, Sanox, S.G.C., Splender, Stella, Targa, Taro, Voxton by Vox, and Yoshi. Some of these badges are attributed to the importer as the 'maker', which is untrue. It's possible that some of these badges were made by smaller Japanese manufacturers that have faded into history.
Electronics, guitars and otherwise are as standardized as this book would have you believe. My problem was the 5-position switch. The one I took off the guitar was not the same as the replacement and the descriptions in the book were not sufficient to help me understand how to hook up the different switch. Fortunately, the rest of the circuit descriptions were right on and I got the guitar running (I had to use the old switch). If they author had described the signal flow through the switch I might have been able to figure it out. But the book is an invaluable resource for the DIY'er. I'm sure I'll be using it a lot more.
Launch price: $799 / £679 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple/pau ferro (dependent on finish) | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 3x Vintage Noiseless Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, 6-position V6 rotary tone switch, tone, 5-way pickup selector | Hardware: 2-Point Synchronized Tremolo, Deluxe locking tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Olympic White, Mystic Ice Blue, Classic Copper & 3-Color Sunburst
very recently I've been trying to get a band together where the Humbuckers of my les paul would suit the sound a lot more and decided to pull out my les paul, on trying to tune it, I noticed the intonation was a little off on all strings (not particularly noticeable by ear, but plugged into a tuner one could see it was off), but on the high E string it was very much off, from the third fret and higher it is very off sounding.
Gibson's factories were raided in 2009 and 2011 by agents of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In November 2009 authorities found illegally imported ebony wood from Madagascar.[37][38] A second raid was conducted in August 2011,[37] during which the FWS seized wood imports from India that had been mislabeled on the US Customs declaration.[39][40] Gibson Guitar Corp. filed a motion in January 2011 to recover seized materials and overturn the charges, which was denied by the court.[41][42]
Yet you’d never find a punk rocker who didn’t want to be just like him. Whereas most punk guitarists found inspiration from the same hard rock and proto-metal players that they pretended to despise, Strummer was influenced by reggae, rockabilly, soul, ska and even early New York rap music when most of the world still hadn’t heard of the Sugarhill Gang.
{ "thumbImageID": "American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Natural/J32625000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender American Elite Precision Bass Maple Fingerboard Electric Bass", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Tobacco Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000006153", "price": "1,999.99", "regularPrice": "1,999.99", "msrpPrice": "2,000.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Tobacco-Sunburst-1500000006153.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Tobacco-Sunburst/J32625000003000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Tobacco-Sunburst/J32625000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Natural", "sku": "sku:site51500000006152", "price": "1,999.99", "regularPrice": "1,999.99", "msrpPrice": "2,000.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Natural-1500000006152.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Natural/J32625000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Natural/J32625000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Two more guitars were introduced in 2008. Gibson USA issued the Slash Signature Les Paul Goldtop, modeled after a 1991 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop that was stolen from Slash’s collection in 1999 and never recovered.[37] It features a mahogany body and a hand-carved maple top with Gibson’s classic Bullion Gold finish. Production was limited to 1000.[38] Epiphone introduced a more affordable version of the Gibson model, featuring a traditional Les Paul body with a maple top, a mahogany neck with rosewood fingerboard, and Epiphone’s classic Goldtop finish. Production was limited to 2000.[39]
Simple answer is, if you have money for the higher end of Taylor, buy a Collings. I've been working as a repair tech in a store that stocks Taylor for around 5 years. Went to lutherie school under one of the best guitar builders in the country. I've played dozens of examples from nearly every model range Taylor has to offer, as well as a few of the more limited edition high $$$$ range. I will give credit where it is due, on the USA made models fit and finish is above many other brands.
6. Bugera V5 Infinium 5-watt 1x8 ($199.99): This little amp delivers pure all-tube tone at a fraction of the size of its larger counterparts. Bugera has utilized the Infinium Tube Life Multiplier technology to make sure your tubes stay healthy over the lifetime of the amp. If you want to get into the world of tube amplifiers but don’t care about a lot of bells and whistles, this little amp is a great option.
As suggested by the numerical designation, Martin’s 28 Series was essentially an upgrade or refinement of the earlier 18 Series. Martin typically indicates fancier materials and appointments with a higher number (a D-28 is fancier dreadnought than a D-18, etc.). These consisted of one guitar, the E-28, and one bass, the EB-28. The first prototypes appeared in June of 1980; production began in January of 1981.
Last week we talked about choosing the right “Guitar Effects to Expand Your Sound” with sub-topics of “Guitar Effects Used By Your Favorite Pro Guitarists” and “Guitar Effects To Use For Each Music Genre”. Now that you’ve hopefully acquired some pedals of your own, there is another important topic that greatly influences the outcome of your tone – your pedalboard order.
The relationship between power output in watts and perceived volume is not immediately obvious. The human ear perceives a 5-watt amplifier as half as loud as a 50-watt amplifier (a tenfold increase in power), and a half-watt amplifier is a quarter as loud as a 50-watt amp. Doubling the output power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural compressor at high volumes.
The Tone knobs on electric guitars are really just potentiometers. It’s important to know that they do not ADD treble or bass to your sound, they only remove higher frequencies as you turn them down and restore those frequencies to the sound as you turn them up. When they are set at 10, you are getting all the frequencies that your guitar and pickups can produce. In some cases, this may sound too shrill or harsh so if you turn the tone knob down, you are removing some of the higher frequencies or “rolling off “ the treble. Turning the knob back up towards 10 restores those frequencies, but isn’t actively “adding” treble frequencies to what your pickups are capable of producing.
The bass guitar has a long neck (scale-length) and thick strings. The open strings of the bass guitar corresponds to the four lowest strings of the guitar and are pitched an octave lower. The standard bass has four strings though five and six string basses are available which extends the range of the instrument. Though the bass guitar is the bass instrument of the guitar family and the double-bass is the bass instrument of the orchestral string family their similar roles have drawn bass players to both instruments.
If you decide to use my link to Guitar Tricks when you sign up as a member, I will receive a compensation for my referral. I am not a professional reviewer and my views are biased because I only recommend stuff that I use and like. I appreciate if you follow my links to Guitar Tricks if you like I Really Like Guitars and my review of Guitar Tricks. Thank you!
If you want to spring for a pedalboard and processor combo that offers multiple effects in one unit, you might want to check out something like the HeadRush Pedalboard with Guitar Amplifier and Effects Modeling Processor. It offers 33 amplifier models, 15 cabinet models, 10 microphone models, 42 effects, and includes an expression pedal, 7" touchscreen, 12 foot switches with OLED Screens, and more.
Wiring the phase switch is fairly simple. Solder 2 wires in the criss-cross manner shown in the diagram. In the guitar cavity, unsolder the 2 bridge pickup leads; solder the phase switch "Out" leads to the exact same spot where the pickup leads were; solder the bridge pickup leads to the "From Pickup" terminals on the phase switch. Mount the switch, close up the guitar and start enjoying the new sound you just created!

Bottom Line: The Line 6 HD500X is incredibly in-depth in the amount of options and editability it gives you. Doing all of it from the small screen on the actual unit is headache-inducing, but if you have a computer you can hook it up via USB and edit your sounds from there much more easily. There’s more of a learning curve with the HD500X than there is with the Zoom G3X, but the presets are decent enough and allow you to audition it if you’re the impatient type. Where the HD500X lacks is that it’s less of an immediate-gratification pedal, and it’s hard to tweak on-the-fly and come up with potentially inspirational sounds. Because of how the interface is, this is definitely more of a “sit down with headphones and tinker with it to get your perfect sound” type unit. If the effects quality of the Zoom G3X is a 7/10, the Line 6 HD500X is an 8.5/10. This is the one to get if you’re the type that likes to dig in and have control over every little thing. The price tag is a little on the high side, but considering what a powerhouse this unit is, it’s definitely not unreasonable.
At its core is a combination of solid spruce and maple, which gives it a subtly brighter tone when compared to conventional spruce and mahogany body acoustics. To retain as much of the guitar's acoustic body as possible, Epiphone equipped the Dove Pro with discrete Fishman electronics, with controls that are mounted on the underside of the sound hole.
O.K. These are my first impressions of this guitar kit, my first, right out of the box. About me: I own about a dozen guitars, both acoustic and electric, including 6 string and basses. I know a little about construction, as I have been studying, and have been wanting to build my own guitar for some time now. Building from scratch seemed a little optimistic so I elected to go with this kit after studying the Internet for days. I wanted a chance for a great result with my mediocre woodworking skills. Kit arrived quickly and undamaged, good packaging and the components were bagged nicely.
There’s an old joke in the technology industry: If a product has a problem, simply sell it as a feature. The electric-guitar-effects industry is no different. Music has often thrived on transforming faults into influential sound effects. Before professional studio production enabled granular tweaks in sound, standalone guitar effects emerged from deliberately converting hardware faults—often caused by the limitations of amplifiers—into positive features. By the end of the 1970s, it had become impossible to imagine how R&B, blues, and rock could have existed without these fortuitous mistakes.

Certain features make Vintage® guitars a “bigger bang for the buck.” Subtle changes to traditional guitar designs have been made so they perform much better. For instance, on the spring block, the holes are staggered in a way that allows the strings to leave the block and pass over the saddles at a consistent angle that helps keep those strings in tune. Trev also developed tuning keys called EZ-LOK™ that work like a locking tuner, but actually don’t require any mechanical manufacturing. There’s nothing to unwind when you’re slacking the strings using the vibrato, and they always come back to pitch. The same goes for our pickups. Trev doesn’t have a high-dollar pickup range to protect, so he can produce pickups that will sound as good as any company can wind anywhere in the world.
The Octavia was created by Roger Mayer for Jimi Hendrix in 1967. It’s musical debut can be heard on “Purple Haze” on the Are You Experienced record. One of the many ground breaking sounds on this recording. The pedal produces a doubling effect an octave above the fundamental note. The octave is similar to a ring modulator in that it is kind of dirty and strange sounding.
Most Gibson guitars feature two humbucking pickups, giving them a very full, clean sound. They are very simple in design, and easy to use with a focus on quality. Maintenance is also easy with Gibsons. Their bridge style places the strings closer together than the likes of Fender or Ibanez guitars, making them slightly different to play. While there is slightly less room for error in finger placement, the strings’ proximity makes them a better fit for small hands and for instrumentalists who need to rapidly navigate the fretboard.
All mass-market brands offer at least one distortion pedal—and often many. Boss, for one, tries to cater to all possible tastes. Its DS-1 (not to be confused with the SD-1 overdrive mentioned above) is one of the workhorses of the breed, with some big-name players happy to stomp on its rectangular switch, including both Steve Vai and Joe Satriani. The DS-2 takes things a step further, while the MT-2 Metal Zone and MD-2 Mega Distortion get successively more evil. And Boss isn’t the only one, with DOD, Ibanez, Marshall and many, many others playing the game too, along with a few of the boutique makers. The proliferation is most distinctive in many “metal” pedals that go beyond even the standard distortion sounds. These generally offer the archetypal scooped-mid sound with thudding lows and crispy highs. Many are adjustable for anything from classic rock to metal sounds, with a tone control that acts more to reduce or accentuate mids rather than the usual high boost/cut, and often a “resonance” control or similar to adjust the fullness of the bass.
The stompswitches take a couple stomps to cut on. There also some tape residue around the led lights where someone covered them. But its not a huge issue for reverb considering that the way I play, I always have a little reverb on to add texture and presence to my tone. Also, if you have a pedal switch looper that you can run all your pedals through it can stay always on that way too. But I'm going set the bidding price lower just because they don't work 100% properly and the tape residue. Other than the issue with the stompswitches the effect works great. Just clarify, you have to stomp on the switch 2 or 3 times and it cuts on.
As we discussed in our post about cheap effects pedals, price does not always indicate quality. As with buying anything, simply picking out the most expensive item isn’t the way to ensure you get the best product for your needs. Sure, you might really want to own a Ferarri, but have you ever spent any time driving one around town to pick up your groceries? Fortunately, we live in an era of truly great, yet inexpensive, guitars. There are lower-priced riffs on old classics right alongside purpose-built value axes. You don’t have to settle for that rattling pawn shop special. With a few hundred dollars you can buy a guitar that will suit all your needs and last for many years to come.

For those who just start to learn guitar, buying the expensive decent guitars is not a must. You can buy an affordable entry level guitar under those famous brands or buy guitars from those brands which focus on beginner guitars. So you can buy a Taylor entry level guitar or guitar from brands like Yamaha. Yamaha FG series are great for beginners because of the decent sound and affordable price.
While experimenting with the Vortex for this article, I was impressed by quite how well the ambient mics seemed to turn a close-miked guitar sound into something that sounded like it was on a record, but the downside of this approach for most home recordists will be that the Vortex is not easy to recreate in a smaller studio — so I thought I'd pass on some ways I found to make it more manageable on a smaller scale. One problem most small studios have is that they don't have large numbers of screens, but in practice I found that I was able to get decent results by putting the guitar cab in the corner of the room and using one or both of the room boundaries in place of the screens. Visconti's trick of aiming ambient mics at the studio glass also turned out to be handy to increase the apparent distance of the farther ambient mic.
The Octavia was created by Roger Mayer for Jimi Hendrix in 1967. It’s musical debut can be heard on “Purple Haze” on the Are You Experienced record. One of the many ground breaking sounds on this recording. The pedal produces a doubling effect an octave above the fundamental note. The octave is similar to a ring modulator in that it is kind of dirty and strange sounding.
{ "thumbImageID": "Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Silver/L20504000003000", "defaultDisplayName": "Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar Bass Special SS (Short Scale)", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Candy Apple Red", "sku": "sku:site51500000217472", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "329.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Squier/Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Candy-Apple-Red-1500000217472.gc", "skuImageId": "Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Candy-Apple-Red/L20504000002000", "brandName": "Squier", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Candy-Apple-Red/L20504000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000217471", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "329.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Squier/Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Black-1500000217471.gc", "skuImageId": "Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Black/L20504000001000", "brandName": "Squier", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Black/L20504000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Silver", "sku": "sku:site51500000217480", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "329.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Squier/Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Silver-1500000217480.gc", "skuImageId": "Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Silver/L20504000003000", "brandName": "Squier", "stickerDisplayText": "Preorder", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Vintage-Modified-Jaguar-Bass-Special-SS-Short-Scale-Silver/L20504000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
By the time this Blink-182 hit was recorded, the majority of Enema of the State had already been written. Tom DeLonge wanted to add one more song to the album that was simple, and radio friendly so he got to work. The lyric “She left me roses by the stairs” came about when DeLonge’s girlfriend at the time left him roses on the stairs, and the singer found them late one night after recording. The “na na na” section was also inspired by the next band.

On PremierGuitar.com, "Sponsored Content" refers to articles, videos, or audio recordings that are produced or curated by an advertiser but that Premier Guitar is happy to share alongside our own editorial content due to the Sponsored Content’s educational, musical, or entertainment value. Sponsored Content is clearly labeled everywhere it appears, and Premier Guitar's editorial department has no involvement in its creation.
What the hell!?!? Jimmy page is the greatest guitarist ever! And this is coming from a guy who has listened to many many types of music... Page is one of the reasons I fell in love Led zeppelin... From Hendrix to Vaughan to Clapton to slash to Johnson to sambora to gilmour to Santana nobody mesmerised me more than page did... He made his guitar TALK. Phhff, bucket head? Gimme a rest! Just give a listen to Achilles last stand or any song from led zeppelin 1, 2, 4, HOTH or Physical Graffiti. In my view all of the albums led zeppelin had produced rocked! Page forever!
While it may not look like a classic amplifier, if you're into classic rock style tones for home use, the Yamaha THR10C is probably the amp that you really need. Ideally, we would all be rocking with big amps, but not all of us have the space or acoustically tuned rooms to let loose. And since we are using low volume amps more often, Yamaha designed their THR line to be the best in providing you with just that - low volume performance for jamming, practice or recording. The THR10C is part of this line, featuring the same 10W setup and stereo 3" speakers, but with tones that replicate the sound of classic amps. It also houses some essential effects which include reverb, delay, chorus and more. In addition to the usual clean to overdriven tones, Yamaha also equipped this unit with acoustic guitar amp and bass amp models, so you can directly play or record with those instruments. All these features are packed in a distinct and portable profile, and is powered either by the supplied AC adapter or via 8 x AA batteries.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: ibanez","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop18":"skucondition|0||historicalgrossprofit|1||hasimage|1||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"schecter","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}

Part of their Espana series, the Cordoba 45MR is handsome, handmade in Spain, and brings all the character of Spanish guitar music to the player, starting with the idea of using the guitars of the 1880s and 1890s as a model for the appearance and sound. Nylon-string guitars themselves came from Spain, so this is perfect for the player who wants as much connection to tradition and authenticity as possible.

Meanwhile, in Sepulveda, Thomas Organ, after importing JMI's British-made amps for a short period in 1964–65, began to produce a line of mostly solid-state amplifiers in the United States that carried the Vox name and cosmetic stylings. With some assistance from Dick Denney, these amps effectively paralleled JMI's own transistorised amplifiers but were different from the British and Italian made Voxes in sound and reliability. To promote their equipment, Thomas Organ built the Voxmobile, a Ford roadster dressed up to look like a Phantom guitar, complete with a Continental organ and several "Beatle" amplifiers. Despite the huge marketing effort, Thomas Organ's Vox products did much to damage the reputation of Vox in the North American market for many years. By 1968, the company had also marketed a line of Vox drum sets (actually made by a German drum company, known as Trixon), which included a kit that featured a conical-shaped bass (kick) drum, that looked more like a wastepaper basket left on its side, and another with a bass (kick) drum, that looked like a flat tire. Such gimmicks did not help sales, and by the early 1970s Vox's American presence was virtually nonexistent.
An Octaver is a cool little effect that will tune your original sound several octaves up or down in pitch. This effect can give you the ability to fill up the bass frequencies with your guitar. You can often see Jack White using this effect when he plays live with only one other drummer. He will turn on his octaver at certain points of the song to play bass lines.
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
Double-neck (or, less commonly, "twin-neck") guitars enable guitarists to play both guitar and bass guitar or, more commonly, both a six-string and a twelve-string. In the mid-1960s, one of the first players to use this type of guitar was Paul Revere & the Raiders' guitarist Drake Levin. Another early user was John McLaughlin. The double-neck guitar was popularized by Jimmy Page, who used a custom-made, cherry-finished Gibson EDS-1275 to perform "Stairway to Heaven", "The Song Remains the Same" and "The Rain Song", although for the recording of "Stairway to Heaven" he used a Fender Telecaster and a Fender XII electric twelve-string. Mike Rutherford of Genesis and Mike + the Mechanics is also famous for his use of a double-neck guitar during live shows. Don Felder of the Eagles used the Gibson EDS-1275 during the Hotel California tour. Muse guitarist and vocalist Matthew Bellamy uses a silver Manson double-neck on his band's Resistance Tour. Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson is also known for using double-neck guitars in the live performance of several songs. In performances of the song "Xanadu" during the band's 2015 R40 anniversary tour, Lifeson played a white Gibson EDS-1275 double-neck guitar with six-string and twelve-string necks, while bassist Geddy Lee performed with a double-neck Rickenbacker guitar with four-string bass and twelve-string guitar necks.
The 2008 Les Paul Standard is one of the first models from Gibson USA to utilize the revolutionary Plek machine in setting up the guitar. The Plek is a German-made, computer controlled machine that carefully measures each fret, along with the fingerboard height under each string, and then automatically dresses each fret, virtually eliminating string buzz and greatly improving the overall playability of the guitar. This pioneering process does in minutes what it takes a luthier several hours—sometimes even days—to accomplish. Every fret is accurately aligned, and the guitar is properly intonated, leaving the instrument “Plek’d” and amazingly playable.
When B.B. King heard T-Bone Walker, he "thought Jesus Himself had returned to Earth playing electric guitar." Walker invented the guitar solo as we know it, building a new style on fluid phrasing, bluesy bends and vibrato. It was the clear tone and melodic invention of his 1942 single "Mean Old World" that blew everyone's mind, and Walker refined his approach through hits like "Call It Stormy Monday." "I came into this world a little too soon," Walker said. "I'd say that I was about 30 years before my time."
When looking at acoustic pianos, there are so many variations that can lead to differences in tone: upright vs. grand, hammer types, mechanical condition, the player, mic choices, and mic techniques. No matter what, though, the piano tends to be a behemoth in the mix – for better or worse – so most often you'll be looking to cut holes out for other things in your mix.
Some of the first Kents to have been imported into the U.S. were made in Sweden by Hagstrom. (Some sources, or maybe just one source quoted all over the net, states that they may have actually been Czech-made and sold by Hagstrom.) The Hagstrom HI, HII, and HIII (those are the letter H with roman numerals representing the number of pickups the guitar had) were branded Kent for sale in the U.S. and as Futurama for the U.K. They had the Kent name on the headstock and sometimes the upper bout. They were similar to Fender Stratocasters. They also made some Strat-shaped basses. There are several photos on the net showing David Bowie in his Ziggy Stardust days playing a red Hagstrom with Kent branding on the headstock.
Here is one electric guitar that has all the incredible features expected from an electric guitar. In terms of vibe and clarity of sound, this guitar is a jewel to have. The Gretsch G5422TDCG Electromatic Hollow Body Electric Guitar is a snow crest white guitar which features a laminated top, including at the neck, back and sides of the instrument.
Because most electric guitars offer far more adjustability than acoustic guitars, the setup and adjustment of the guitar is more important than it is with acoustics, which don’t have much to adjust. We decided John and I would test the electrics first right out of the box, with their stock strings and factory setup, then get a professional to set them up with Ernie Ball Regular Slinky strings in gauges from .010 to .046—for decades, this has been one of the most popular string sets for electric guitars. Our setup technician was Avishay Shabat, who heads the Guitar Groomer repair shop in Woodland Hills, California, and who also manufactures his own line under the Shabat Guitars brand.

{ "thumbImageID": "Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Blood-Orange-Fade/K35709000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "Gibson Les Paul Standard HP 2018 Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Blood Orange Fade", "sku": "sku:site51500000137377", "price": "2,429.99", "regularPrice": "3,629.00", "msrpPrice": "6,049.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Gibson/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Blood-Orange-Fade-1500000137377.gc", "skuImageId": "Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Blood-Orange-Fade/K35709000001000", "brandName": "Gibson", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Blood-Orange-Fade/K35709000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Cobalt Fade", "sku": "sku:site51500000137376", "price": "2,429.99", "regularPrice": "3,629.00", "msrpPrice": "6,049.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Gibson/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Cobalt-Fade-1500000137376.gc", "skuImageId": "Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Cobalt-Fade/K35709000002000", "brandName": "Gibson", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Cobalt-Fade/K35709000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Hot Pink Fade", "sku": "sku:site51500000137375", "price": "2,429.99", "regularPrice": "3,629.00", "msrpPrice": "6,049.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Gibson/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Hot-Pink-Fade-1500000137375.gc", "skuImageId": "Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Hot-Pink-Fade/K35709000004000", "brandName": "Gibson", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Hot-Pink-Fade/K35709000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Heritage Cherry Fade", "sku": "sku:site51500000137379", "price": "2,429.99", "regularPrice": "3,629.00", "msrpPrice": "6,049.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Gibson/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Heritage-Cherry-Fade-1500000137379.gc", "skuImageId": "Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Heritage-Cherry-Fade/K35709000003000", "brandName": "Gibson", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Heritage-Cherry-Fade/K35709000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Mojave Fade", "sku": "sku:site51500000137378", "price": "2,429.99", "regularPrice": "3,629.00", "msrpPrice": "6,049.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Gibson/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Mojave-Fade-1500000137378.gc", "skuImageId": "Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Mojave-Fade/K35709000005000", "brandName": "Gibson", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Les-Paul-Standard-HP-2018-Electric-Guitar-Mojave-Fade/K35709000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
×