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do you have any iOS devices? So far Garageband and Guitarism are the most convincing guitar emulators ive heard yet. Next to that, for VST i go with RealStrat. But still, its going to track midi for notes that do not exist on a guitar. So while it wont play those incorrect notes through realstrat, it will make exporting midi to tab or sheetmusic a nightmare. Dont sleep on the iOs stuff, particularly because of the input and control methods. You have no idea the difference between a fake strum on a touchscreen versus all manner of keyboard inputs. You spend most of your time trying to emulate plucking in VST guitar apps...
"Our expertise is to customize guitars according to the specifications of our clients and we have our own factory that recreates all major guitar brands, boutique brands and collectible guitars. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. We take great pride in the quality and designs of our electric guitars and basses. From traditional to unique styles a U.S. Masters instrument rates with the finest in detail, woods, finish, feel, components and consistency. Our designs incorporate some advanced high performance features, some patented, to improve on aspects of sonic response and feel, upper fret access, the ease of playing, comfort and all designed to provide you with one of the finest responding instruments available. These guitars are of the finest, and yet it is only fraction of the cost that you would normally pay. You may be wondering how such an amazing product could be so cheap, It is possible because it has been manufactured in China, where labor is cheap. Cheap labor does not mean that has been compromised; all parts are of the highest and have been imported from overseas. When purchasing this guitar you can only stand to win. If you are satisfied, you have just saved yourself hundreds of dollars! So go on, treat yourself to the guitar you have always wanted. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!"
If that were true, you'd have to take into consideration everything that vibrates after the string is stuck (the strap, the plastic of the knobs). You vibrate as well. So in essence, what you're saying is...the contents of your stomach affects the signal going to the amp. Hell, what wood your floors are made of affects the tonal quality. Maybe if you hit it hard enough you can get the ceiling involved.
Williamson injected new life into the group, bringing an ideal balance of discipline and frenzy, best heard on the group’s 1973 disc Raw Power, the album that launched thousands of punk and post punk bands. “I’m his biggest fan,” the legendary Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr once said of Williamson. “He has the technical ability of Jimmy Page without being as studious and the swagger of Keith Richards without being sloppy. He’s both demonic and intellectual, almost how you would imagine Darth Vader to sound if he was in a band.”
This is a real nice D-18 it Booms quite nicely with Vintage Tone of that of a much more expensive Big Named guitar for a fraction of what you would pay..its Japanese crafted 29 years ago by the master craftsman in one of the finest Japanese builders factory.. the great Ibanez...the Label inside says... THE MARK OF QUALITY CIMAR Quality Produced under Strict Quality Control by IBANEZ "Made in Japan" Serial # 82110013k ... 1st 2 digits 82 that's the year...now not all Japanese Ibanez old guitars are so great not at all ..many were very low end guitars we saw in the 60's & 70's as a kid myself most were junk or we called them toys.. now that's not true for all of them though I can honestly say that... This is not a cheap guitar nor is it built cheaply ..this example was one of the good impressive one's they used beautiful grade woods on... This particular example it has a Strikingly beautiful straight grained Sitka Spruce Top ... it has ambered nicely now naturally with it's great patina created over the last 29 years . ya don't get that with a new Ibanez or even dare I say Martin with those white looking spruce top "yuck on thanks"... sorry back to this one ... The back sides & neck are all gorgeously grained AA higher grade Mahogany the fingerboard is dark Indian Rosewood with an ebony bridge..even the Original string Pins are aged beautifully amber tipped... I'm lookin pretty hard everywhere and I can not find a crack - separation or a defect to be found anywhere only the most minute microscopic its that clean.... JVG Condition RATED: @ better than average in Excellent used vintage condition wow!..This neck is arrow straight with a perfect medium slim taper neck feels great and action is EZ to play just about perfect...1-11/16ths at the nut very comfortable feel, frets are considered excellent vintage at lest 92%... Comes with a free Chip board case or an optional upgrade to a Hard shell case / ask... Just in.. no pics yet coming very soon stay tuned! Thanks for your interest.
Some bass players cannot use a bass combo amp, either due to strict noise and disturbance rules in their apartment, lack of space to store a combo amp (if they live in a small room) or due to the need for a set-up which can amplify multiple types of instruments and/or voice. Alternatives to buying a bass amp for people who have noise or space constraints include a headphone amplifier or a micro-practice amp which includes a headphone jack (on bass amps, connecting headphones to a headphone jack automatically turns off the main loudspeaker). Multi-instrumentalists and bassist-singers can consider a keyboard amplifier, a small PA system, or some models of acoustic instrument amplifiers which include bass as one of the instruments which can be used; all of these options have full-range speakers that can handle the bass range.
Before buying any guitar you have to fix a budget range, so that later on you do not end up blowing off more money than you actually wanted to. Yes, it is true that buying a guitar can be expensive, but you do not have to burn a hole in your pocket in order to buy one. Just have a price range fixed and then search for the best ones accordingly. You may not find the good ones right at the beginning, but eventually you will definitely find the perfect one that will even last long.
There are several kinds of bridge (located at the bottom of the guitar, where the strings are attached), but to keep things simple you’ll usually find either a fixed bridge or a tremolo bridge. Both have their pros and cons. A tremolo bridge will allow you to experiment with everything from vibrato effects right up to full-on divebombs, and can sound amazing when playing high lead solos. However, tremolo bridges can affect tuning, unless the bridge and nut locks. A fixed bridge is excellent for sustain and tuning stability, although there’s no vibrato. Again, it’s all down to personal preference.

The Squire Affinity Telecaster has an alder body, maple neck and fingerboard. It features two single-coil pickups with three-way switching. The tuners and hardware are solid and durable. The guitar is the cheapest telecaster in the telecaster series, but it’s still a decent build guitar. The guitar plays and feels nice. An excellent guitar for the beginner and intermediate telecaster fanatics.
000-15: Base model of the upper end Martin Guitar line. All mahogany orsapele construction. ‘A Frame’ “X” top bracing, 14 frets clear, Optional model 000-15S 12 frets clear. All -16 and -16 series 000 instruments have long scales (25.4″) and 1-11/16″ nut widths, in contrast to the -18, -28, and -45 series, which have the ‘traditional’ 24.9″ 000 scale, retaining the 1-11/16″ nut width.
Beautiful Teisco Electric Guitar refinished in sea foam green or Daphne blue color, it has a custom series parallel pickups toggle switch, nice low action, sweet sound, plenty of tonal possibilities. Buy with Confidence....... Blessings! Item will be well packed, shipped and insured to any of the 48 contiguous States, No Alaska, No Puerto Rico, No Hawaii, No International buyers.

The Gibson style guitars generally have shorter stubbier necks, with a 233/4 inch scale length, which suits some but not all. The Les Paul, the quintessential model, boasts twin humbucking pick-ups which effectively reduce noise and produce the thick, warm tone associated with Gibsons. It is difficult not to be impressed by the tradition of Les Paul guitars. No-one will ever convince me there is a better looking guitar style. For under $1000 the Epiphone Les Paul Standard will give you a little bit of the legend to take home and for many that's a good enough reason to buy one. Epiphones are cheaper factory made versions of the Gibson USA range. For those who learn on Gibson style guitars the Les Paul is what all guitars are measured against.  more...


Vox Amplification Ltd. has been owned by Korg since 1992. Korg revived the tube rectifier and alnico speakers for their version of the AC30 in what is considered the most faithful version of the amp produced for many years. Korg have also used the Vox name for a new range of digital modelling amps. In 2005 manufacturing was moved to Vietnam, including a yet-newer redesign of the venerable AC30, designated the AC30CC, which has now been superseded by the AC30C2. A hand-wired, heritage version, the AC30H2 (and the wooden cased AC30H2L) were also produced. The AC30CC and AC15CC were later replaced with the AC30C2 and AC15C1 which had solid state rectification and a revised chassis. In 2010 Vox released a Hand-Wired version of the AC30 and AC15 with turret board construction, valve rectification and a choice of Celestion Greenback or Alnico Blue speakers. In 2011 a Hand Wired version of the AC4 was also released. Less expensive consumer versions of the retro AC4 have been marketed in recent years as well: various sizes of AC4TV.
In 1950, Leo Fender introduced the single-pickup Esquire, and a few months later released a dual-pickup version called the Broadcaster that, due to trademark issues, was later renamed the Telecaster. The Tele® would go on to become the world's first successfully mass-produced solidbody electric guitar. Simple yet elegant, it has been a show-stopper and session magnet since its debut. It’s the go-to guitar for twangy chicken pickin’ solos, which is why the iconic axe has appeared on the majority of country records over the past six-plus decades.
Most of Peter, Paul and Mary’s work had splendid fingerstyle guitar work. My favorite is “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”. Paul Stookey also had some fine acoustic work going solo with stuff like “Sebastian” and “The Wedding Song”. “The Wedding Song” was supposedly “must learn” stuff for aspiring acoustic players in the 70’s (so they could play at their friends’ weddings).
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Size: Baritone - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Canadian Hard Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 7 - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Tone Pros - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, Diecast, Nickel, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: EMG HX-7 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black

Meanwhile, Royston, due to the loss of a lucrative government contract in one of its other companies, went into liquidation in 1969. As a result, Vox went through a series of owners including a British bank and Dallas-Arbiter. The AC30 continued to be built alongside newer solid-state amps, but in a series of cost-cutting moves different loudspeakers with ceramic magnets began to be used, as were printed circuit boards and solid-state rectification. Particleboard replaced some plywood parts in cabinet construction, and at one point an all-solid-state version was introduced alongside the classic tube-powered model. Rose-Morris, Marshall Amplification's British distributor, bought Vox in the 1980s when their deal with Marshall ended. They tried to reinvigorate the Vox brand, continuing to build the AC30 along with a few other decent modern designs. In 1990 they sold the company to Korg.
Modelling effect – Many BOSS modelling effects use COSM or Composite Object Sound Modelling, which uses computer-processing power to digitally precisely model the electronic, mechanical, and magnetic characteristics inherent to an instrument, amplifier, or speaker, and also to create completely new sounds. Modelling effects can be dynamic or time-based – it can even make your guitar or amp sound like a completely different type of guitar or amp.
Finally the ease and portability of the small amp will allow you so much more flexibility with when and where you can practice. Just weighing a couple of pounds is already a great advantage over the rest of the amps available on the market. And being able to take it on road trips, travel trips, backpacking trips (for a bit of extra buck, we all have thought of doing it) means you can practice anywhere, any time. Small storage requirement means a great storing capability where you don’t have to worry about taking up too much space in your tiny room or apartment. It is great stuff, honestly.
In a way, the Ovation story (to use Robert Frost’s famous metaphor) is one of roads not taken. Of course, as the philosopher, Hegel, so neatly noted long ago, the paths tend to join up again, and the resulting synthesis works out fine in the end. It certainly worked that way for Charlie Kaman, whose choice of paths ultimately led to the synthesis (in more ways than one!) of Ovation guitars.
It can get a bit difficult trying to properly depict certain aspects of effects pedals to our newer musicians out there since much of music tends to be described in an intangible sort of manner which relies heavily the assumption of prior knowledge and personal tastes which is why we try our best to not get the pros out there the meat of the information they are looking for, but describe it in a way that players of even entry levels can comprehend. So with that in mind, one of the more complex aspects of effects pedals for newer musicians is their implementation of a signal chain.

It comes with two 6.5-inch speakers, delving out 100 W each for a total of 200. Now, the small woofer diameter might make these units work less-than-perfect for rendering stomach-churning bass noise, but ZT Amplifiers never intended for them to be used as such. Instead, they are supposed to deliver loud and clear enough sounds in the treble and mid ranges to make the guitarist hold its own even when a loud drummer is present.    
In order to trigger these notes, a MIDI guitar controller is needed. Alot of work just to recreate what you can do on a real guitar. The only advantage to this technique, is the ability to take a MIDI track, creating this way, and substitute different guitar models to audition what might sound best. Also, the MIDI guitar track can also serve as an educational tool and how a part is performed.
We've had a thread here in the last couple months about Squires, with some pretty discerning forum members praising their quality and tone. You don't need to spend a lot of money these days for a good guitar. The one the OP bought was years ago. The fierce competition in the guitar market since the economy went bad, has forced manufacturers to up their game, and recent production is of a much higher standard.

The Fender Squier Bullet Stratocaster is one of the most popular low budget electric guitars on the market. For what money can buy around this price, it’s good value. The quality of the hardware, tuners and pickups can’t go up against the original Fender Stratocaster, but it still sounds really nice and feels good for playing, practicing and some first gigs. A perfect entry-level guitar that is worth the investment.
The classical guitar (also known as the nylon-string guitar, or Spanish guitar) is a member of the guitar family used in classical music. It is an acoustic wooden guitar with strings made of gut or nylon, rather than the metal strings used in acoustic and electric guitars. For a right-handed player, the traditional classical guitar has twelve frets clear of the body and is properly held on the left leg, so that the hand that plucks or strums the strings does so near the back of the sound hole (this is called the classical position). The modern steel string guitar, on the other hand, usually has fourteen frets clear of the body (see Dreadnought) and is commonly played off the hip.
Alternatively – and often most effectively – you can fix phase issues in the digital realm. Record your two-mic signal on two separate tracks, then zoom in on the sound waves in each of the two channels in your DAW’s editing window until they are huge and you’re seeing the full up-and-down crests and troughs of the waves. Now, drag or nudge the sound wave of the ambient mic forward (i.e., to the left of the screen) a few milliseconds at a time until the sound waves line up perfectly. Listen again, and you should hear a very different blend that is fuller, richer, and more “together.”
Epiphone also makes several less common models of the Les Paul such as the “Les Paul Goth”, “Les Paul Goldtop”, “Les Paul Ultra” and “Les Paul Ultra II”, “Les Paul Custom”, “Les Paul Black Beauty”, “Les Paul Prophecy Series”, “Zakk Wylde Custom Les Paul Model”, “Slash signature Les Paul Models”,the “Les Paul Studio”, and the most current, “Joe Bonamassa ’59 Gold Top Les Paul”.[27][28][29]
It's a basic rule of physics (called Faraday's law) that a changing magnetic field produces electricity. So a guitar string will produce electricity only for as long as the magnetic field is changing—in other words, for only as long as the metal string is moving. Once the string stops vibrating, the sound stops. In that respect, an electric guitar is just like an acoustic one.
As Jay Verkuilen, has already noted here (no pun intended!), be careful not to hammer too hard on the unplugged guitar as you can be fooled into thinking you have to play much harder that you really do. Fretboard exercises & scales, practicing chord forms, and the like while unplugged is beneficial to your playing, "muscle memory," and aids your relationship with your housemates and neighbors.
A basic triode valve (tube) contains a cathode, a plate and a grid. When a positive voltage is applied to the plate, a current of negatively charged electrons flows to it from the heated cathode through the grid. This increases the voltage of the audio signal, amplifying its volume. The grid regulates the extent to which plate voltage is increased. A small negative voltage applied to the grid causes a large decrease in plate voltage.[42]
When Martin turned to jobbers rather than direct sales, more variation in cases took place. Depending on what part of the country you bought your Martin, the jobber would supply a similar range of cases - chipboard, hardshell, or deluxe hardshell, from the case manufacturer of their choice. So cases on old Martins can vary greatly. This changed in 1972 with the blue thermoplastic case which was included with the sale of all new Martins.

CF Martin & Co: When CF Martin & Co first started business, America only had 24 states in its union and Andrew Jackson had begun his second term as president. CF Martin & Co has seen two world wars, and huge economic peaks and troughs. The history of this guitar company is unlike any other, it’s the world’s oldest surviving guitar company in the world and the reason for so is they indeed make excellent guitars. When you own a Martin guitar you don’t just own a guitar, you own a small part of history.
Impossible to avoid this legendary American brand founded in 1946 by Leo Fender. Even if Leo Fender was not the first man to build an electric guitar — only hollow-body and Hawaiian solid-body guitars were available back in those days ─, his first model, the Esquire that became later the Broadcaster and then the famous Telecaster, quickly became a huge success for its versatility. The Telecaster and the Stratocaster, the other famous Fender model, would become standards that have been copied many times. You can hear them in some of the most famous classic rock recordings by the likes of Keith Richard (The Rolling Stones) and Bruce Springsteen (Telecaster), or Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix (Stratocaster).
Another +1 for shreddage. I have the PRS version and was trying it out through BIAS and TH3 the other day. Had an absolute ball, and was able to achieve somewhat realistic results with very little effort. I also love pretty much everything I have from Amplesound, though results through effects engines can be hit and miss. Their Taylor acoustic is lovely if that's what you're looking for. I've not found a really fantastic strum engine/option yet but then I will fully admit I haven't put the time into mastering what I already have in that department. I have heard demos using the guitar VIs that I have that do sound convincing so it is possible though maybe not easy.

I followed with visits to six Los Angeles music stores to play as many guitars as I could (more than 60, including multiple samples of many models), so I could get an idea of what their right-out-of-the-box quality was like and which ones offered the best value. I emerged with a list of the most promising models, and I contacted the manufacturers to request samples. In a couple of cases, I allowed the manufacturers to substitute models that they felt were better suited for this article.
You’ve decided to pick up an axe and learn to shred like one of the pros. While mastering the guitar is no easy feat itself, before you even start jamming you’ll probably find yourself looking through site after site trying to find the right instrument. It’s hard. There’s an expansive list of components to be taken into account: body styles, wood types, pickups, bridges, necks — and that’s just scratching at the surface.
Why We Liked It - The Martin DRS2 will take some beating as one of the all-round best electric acoustics you can buy, simply because you’re getting the finish and tonal quality of a much more expensive guitar for a solid price. Whether you’re mainly looking for a traditional acoustic you can occasionally amplify, or you need something professional grade for gigs, this could be it. In terms of recording your guitar, you can mics for guitars or a microphone for the guitar amp. If you're looking for an alternative, check out the Martin Road Series DRS1 Dreadnought.

With so many options available in the world today, buying a guitar that perfectly represents your own style, tastes, and attitude has never been easier. Whether you're a classical guitarist looking for that perfectly balanced nylon flamenco, or a hard rock enthusiast who needs Pete Townshend crunch combined with Jack White power, there is simply no shortage of axes to choose from.


From shopping for a first electric guitar to setting customized action, this do-it-yourself playerÕs primer for owning and maintaining an electric guitar explains the ins and outs of: choosing the right guitar; cleaning, tools and basic maintenance; personalizing and improving on a "factory setup"; trouble-shooting; basic guitar electronics; setups of the pros; and much more. Written by Dan Erlewine, author of the bestselling Guitar Player Repair Guide and the popular "Repairs" column in Guitar Player magazine, this book also includes a plastic sheet with specialized guitar tools you can snap-out!
You aren’t likely to really know what works best until you get the song a little further along in the mix, when you can hear how the guitar sound sits with the vocals and other instrument tracks. Sometimes, what sounds like the best guitar tone in the room isn’t always the most effective guitar tone in the track, but as ever, at this point you can only take a stab at what you think will work. Through experience, you’ll build a tool kit of go-to mic positions that achieve what you are seeking.
Every guitarist who bends or vibratoes a string to make it sing owes a debt to B.B. King. With influences as diverse as T-Bone Walker, Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, the late guitarist turned the blues world upside down in 1952 with “3 O’Clock Blues.” Almost overnight, the harmonica was supplanted as the primary solo instrument in blues, as guitarists scrambled to imitate B.B.’s soloing style, especially in Chicago.
Sure, your pickups pick up the sound, and your amp amplifies it, but even before they get to handle it, your precious tone has already been formed by the interaction of string and wood. Pluck a string, and you set into motion a transference of vibrational energy from the strings into the wood of the body and neck (via different coupling elements such as bridge saddles, nut, and frets). The spectrum of sounds kicked out by this acoustic interaction is the biggest determining factor at the heart of the sound that eventually reaches the listener’s ear, however you delay, spin, or distort it along the way. Let’s look at the characteristic voices of a few tone woods, and see how they contribute to our guitar’s sound.
Unlike the 60's and 70's, it is almost impossible to buy a poor quality guitar today. There are many hundreds of "brand" name guitars being produced in dozens of factories throughout the world, with these same factories producing instruments for the world's best known brands - and nearly all of these instruments are well made and perfectly playable. Don't worry about the name on the headstock. If you are buying the guitar as a gift, have a guitarist-friend advise you on the suitability of the instrument for the intended recipient. Even the world's best known and respected guitar manufacturers market instruments in a variety of price markets, and while there are differences in materials and tonal qualities, these are usually well beyond the beginner's ability to discern. All are playable; it is up to the player to make them sound good.
Cap paralleled with a resistor. DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan recommend this configuration. Typical values are 560pF and 300K. It’s supposed to provide more consistent treble bleed but having a resistor paralleled with the pot will mess up pot taper. When rolling the pot down it is actually getting closer to a ~190K pot because 500K || 300K gives around 190K.

Twelve-string guitars produce a brighter and more jangly tone than six-string guitars. They are used by guitarists for chord progressions that require thickening. The twelve-string is mainly used as a rhythm instrument due to the extra effort involved in playing lead guitar using paired strings. Twelve-string guitars have twelve tuning pegs and double truss rods and are slightly more expensive than their corresponding six-string version.
Because of stiff competition in today's low-end market, guitar companies are constantly trying to outclass each other by improving the quality and value for money of their instruments. One brand that consistently tops in terms of sales and feedback is Epiphone, a sub-brand of Gibson that specializes in quality mass produced guitars. The DR-100 is a great example of their impressive ability to balance quality and affordability, garnering nearly perfect positive feedback for its build quality and sound.
Now, let’s consider the tone knobs. Eric Clapton was one of the first guitarists to realize the power within those unassuming plastic spinners. His famed “woman tone” sound during Cream relied on rolling the pots on his Gibson Les Paul Standard, SG or ES-335 all the way off and turning the treble and midrange of his superbly overdriven Marshall amps high. Similarly, jazz guitar players who are looking for a classic tone roll their pots back until they get in the Wes-Benson-Burrell-Pass-etc. zone.
In this lesson we will study Tennessee Stud as performed by Doc Watson. The tune has a great bluegrass type intro that repeats throughout the song. It applies many of the basic bluegrass principles we have discussed in the Bluegrass Genre section. The chords used are not difficult, however the timing and arrangement are a little tricky. Best to learn a section at a time.

The core metal used for strings is an important variable to consider.  Not only does the string core affect tone, but it affects the tension strength as well.  The heavier the string gauge, the stronger the core metal needed.  You don’t want premature string breakage, especially during a gig.  Your options absolutely depend on the tone you desire, but they also depend on the string gauge you prefer for the genre of music you play.
Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.

I can't believe this! Blackstar are designed and built by retired Marshall professionals and they have every last bit of knowledge on tube amps, heads, and combos. I own a Blackstar HT-1R, it is 1w but it feels like 100w just the way the Blackstar team have combined their ideas and structures and balanced it out with tubes. And line 6 is further up the list? You are mistaken bro. Another thing. These are bloody expensive and aren't very well known but Two Rock make probably the GREATEST amps ever made and I would kill to fire one up!
I JUST GOT A PALMER P44 EC ACUSTIC/ELECTRIC..BANGED UP BUT FAIR,,I TIGHTEND IT UP,, PUT NEW #12 STRINGS,, WORKS & SOUNDS GOOD,,, I JUST GOT TO LOWER THE STRINGS ,,MY FRIENDS & EVEN THE GUY @ THE REPAIR SHOP KNEW NOTHING ABOUT "PALMER" WHICH GOT ME TO THIS SITE ...AS A FEW OTHER PEOPLE COMMENTED,, I AGREE,, GOOD ENOUGH FOR CAMPFIRES ,,,ITS A FUN INSTRUMENT,,ITS WHAT WE CALL A "BEATER" TO KEEP IN TRUNK & TAKE CAMPING OR HAND TO THE DRUNK GUY W/THE BIG BELT BUCKLE @THE PARTY,,
The pickup selector switch as the name implies allows you to select which pickup produces sound. In some cases, it will be your neck pickup, bridge pickup or a combination of both. In other cases, such as the Fender Stratocaster there are three pickups which utilize a 5-way selector switch. This also allows each pickup to be isolated or used in combination.
Bass chorus effects use a cycling, variable delay time that is short so that individual repetitions are not heard. The result is a thick, "swirling" sound that suggests multiple instruments playing in unison (chorus) that are slightly out of tune. Bass chorus effects were more common in the late 1980s, when manufacturers such as Peavey included chorus effects in its bass amplifiers. In the 1990s and 2000s, more sophisticated bass chorus effects devices were created which only apply the swirling chorus effect to the higher parts of the bass tone, leaving the instrument's low fundamental untouched.[5]

Indeed, for some unknown reason, George Beauchamp and Paul Barth left National in 1931 and started Ro-Pat-In, with Rickenbacker, for the purpose of making electric guitars based on a Beauchamp design (developed while he was at National) for which he would eventually receive a patent. Ro-Pat-In began making cast-aluminum Electro electric Hawaiian “frying pan” guitars in 1932, followed shortly that year by an electric Spanish guitar. In ’34, Electros became Rickenbacker Electro guitars, and founded the Rickenbacker dynasty, but that’s another story…
I'm not sure if it's been made clear or not yet, but the imported firewood that had a Kay brand name on it in the seventies bears no relation to the products of the the Kay Co. of Chicago USA. It's not all plywood either; they had a range of total crap to not-so-crappy models. I never much liked their p.u.s or their necks. This is a good body (late 40's K-44) with a better (Harmony!) neck.
Replacing pickup rings and restoring covers. These rings are usually plastic and cannot be restored but covers are normally metal on Les Paul styles. You may not want to rub steel wool across your covers so follow the method of cleaning painted bridges to avoid unwanted scratches. Also, replace your pickup rings properly with rings that are the same length and/or color and make sure the screw holes do not need to be resized.
I have many acoustic guitars in the collection including Gibson, Taylor, Fender and Washburn. That said none of these guitars come close to the richness in sound of a Maton. I'm assuming this is due to the quality of the Australian timbers and workmanship. Although a little expensive I highly recommend you at least play one in a shop as a treat and hope a dead relative leaves you some money to give you an opportunity of taking one home.
The solid-body electric guitar is made of solid wood, without functionally resonating air spaces. The first solid-body Spanish standard guitar was offered by Vivi-Tone no later than 1934. This model featured a guitar-shaped body of a single sheet of plywood affixed to a wood frame. Another early, substantially solid Spanish electric guitar, called the Electro Spanish, was marketed by the Rickenbacker guitar company in 1935 and made of Bakelite. By 1936, the Slingerland company introduced a wooden solid-body electric model, the Slingerland Songster 401 (and a lap steel counterpart, the Songster 400).
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