There sure are a lot of electric guitar options to choose from in this day and age. Thankfully, your choice doesn't have to be a difficult one to make thanks to world-leading guitar companies like Epiphone. In fact, Epiphone specializes in a wide range of electric guitar value packages, assembled specifically to help budding enthusiasts begin their musical journey on the right foot. If learning how to play the guitar is something you've always wanted to try but were never sure where to start, consider this section your launching pad.
Learning the notes on your guitar fretboard is one of the most important things you can do to advance your guitar playing skills. Knowing this information opens up an enormous amount of possibilities and can greatly help ease the learning curve for future guitar exercises. From scales, to soloing, to chord positions / progressions, knowing where each guitar note without having to think about it will put you well ahead of other guitarists who have not mastered this yet. This guide will give you some background information regarding how the notes on your guitar fretboard are laid out and of

Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, an unforgettable journey, slideshow. This optimistic and festive track can perfectly fit for any corporate media projects. Featuring muted electric guitar, electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.

i personally like epiphone/gibsonn a lot. if you are searching to BUY an electric guitar then you should go for your preference. go to guitar center, and play some guitars. find one that feels good to you. remember, the strings in there have been used a million times, so don't make that a factor. feel the guitar. along the sides of the neck, are the frets sticking off the neck a little? making it rough? its all about your preference. also it depends on what style you play blues is definatly Les Paul rock, probably an SG country, probably fender, i don't know much about that genre bluegrass type music is probably a hollow body electric.
The ’62 EG-NT, EG-K and EG-Z were fairly primitive and appear to be leftover from the mid-’50s. The EG-NT had a small rectangular body with the bass side flush with the neck and the treble sticking out a bit to handle the controls. The head was stubby three-and-three with a circle Swan logo sticker and the fingerboard had painted diamond markers. The pickup looks to be the old slotted pickup of the early J-1, but may not be, with volume control. The EG-K was the Teisco version of the Rickenbacker Frying Pan, with a round body and neck with a head wider than the neck. This, too, had the rectangular head with a circle Swan logo. Markers were diamonds, the pickup was the slotted J-1 pickup, with one volume control. The EG-Z had an asymmetrical body with a short width on the bass side and a longer width on the treble side, with diamond markers and the stubby head. This had the old slotted J-1 pickup with volume control.

1.  And now for my favorite customer fix… A re-glued bridge on an acoustic using Gorilla Glue and wood screws.  This is an epic failure on so many levels.  Wood screws should never be used to hold a bridge on (Gibson, take note) .  And anyone who has ever used Gorilla Glue knows it has no place in guitar construction/repair.  It’s a polyurethane glue that works very well in certain circumstances (water contact, etc.) but the foaming that occurs when the glue is curing can create a humongous mess.  Fix:  Take the bridge off and refinish the top.  What could have been a $85.00 repair is now over $400.00.
One of the tricky parts about teaching yourself to play is knowing what to focus on. As I said, I strongly encourage you to start by learning as many chords as possible because even tunefully outlining them through a progression will help you keep up in just about any setting. But that’s a pretty broad ask. This book is laser-focused on what modern guitarists need to know to best express themselves. Each of the 200 exercises comes with an audio track to help you learn how to listen, too. Though there are no shortcuts to greatness, consider this a quick-start guide that will help you know where to look. A fine complement to this might be Alexander’s The Practical Guide to Modern Music Theory for Guitarists, which takes a similar approach to learning the theory.
Most people think of Roy Orbison as the super-smooth crooner who sang songs like “Crying,” “In Dreams” and “Only the Lonely.” But Orbison was also a wicked guitar player, who ripped out several impressive solos on early Sun Records singles like “Ooby Dooby.” In fact, Sun owner Sam Phillips was more impressed with Orbison’s guitar playing than his singing during the early days of the rocker’s career.
Epiphone, coolest brand ever. More songs have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other. Sure! Gibson bought & attempted to hijack the Epiphone kudos, but failed, as all that happened was Epiphone became the affordable brand of the people. Gibson & Taylor are by far…so far…the least cool brands ever. I’m telling you, more songs (filled with passion & desperation & anger) have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other, by folk who can’t afford or don’t have a mummy to buy them a Fender strat or Gibson.
Playing power chords right up at the ‘dusty' end (past the 8th fret) gets difficult, because the frets are so close together. In the next stage we'll learn how to play power chords with a fifth-string root too, which solves that problem. However, it's important not to rush ahead, so make sure you put your effort just into the sixth-string root chords for now.

Two new models that would eventually become mainstays joined the Teisco line in ’65. Theye were two double cuts with slightly more flared horns, in a sort of tulip shape. Both had a single, wide, chrome-covered pickup with poles exposed along one edge. This was similar to the old MJ-1 but by ’65 would become the new SM series. Both had bolt-on necks with bound rosewood fretboards and the top-edge rectangular inlays. The E-100 had a bridge/tailpiece assembly, volume and tone on a small pickguard, and one of the elongated Strat-style heads. The ET-100 had a platform vibrato. As a sign of things to come, the Teisco Del Rey ET-100 had a regular Strat-style headstock, the first to appear on Teiscos, as far as I’m aware.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.

Note: Youpi Choupi's answer calls my answer below into question by pointing out that classical and flamenco guitars are acoustic guitars. He is correct in this of course, they are all types of acoustic guitar. However, most of the time when someone says they play "acoustic guitar," they mean the commonly used steel-stringed acoustic that most rock, folk, country and other artists play, and I believe this was the intent of the OP when they asked the question. Hence, an answer simply pointing out that Spanish guitar and acoustic guitar are both acoustic guitars would not have been a helpful answer.
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Jump up ^ "New Sales Avenue Opened with Tone Amplifier for Stringed Instruments". The Music Trades. October 20, 1928. This tone amplifier is electrically operated either by alternating or direct currents. It consists of two major units -- an electro-magnetic pick-up and amplifying unit. The electro-magnetic pick-up is built within the instrument and is attached to its sounding board. The unit is connected with the amplifier, which produces the tone and volume required of the instrument.
Distortion sound or "texture" from guitar amplifiers is further shaped or processed through the frequency response and distortion factors in the microphones (their response, placement, and multi-microphone comb filtering effects), microphone preamps, mixer channel equalization, and compression. Additionally, the basic sound produced by the guitar amplifier can be changed and shaped by adding distortion and/or equalization effect pedals before the amp's input jack, in the effects loop just before the tube power amp, or after the power tubes.

Coming from Martin's Travel Series, the LX1E Little Martin has smaller proportions, with a total length of 34", body width of 12", shorter scale length of 23" and 1 11/16" nut width. While it can be a bit too small for some, it is easy to appreciate its impressive workmanship, bearing the same build quality and materials as found on their more expensive models. With the LX1E, you can own an affordable Martin guitar that has been proven to be a true workhorse instrument.

Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple & Wenge - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 54mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Gibraltar Standard II-8 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 808 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Cobalt Blue Metallic, Galaxy Black - Made In: Japan


On top of that, the Champion 20 offers built-in effects, including reverb, chorus, flanging, delay, auto wah, vibrato, and tremolo. All of these effects can be chosen using a single knob, with an additional FX Level knob to control the mix of the unprocessed sound with the effect. These effects can’t match the flexibility and adjustability of separate effects pedals—for example, with the exceptions of reverb+delay and reverb+chorus, effects can’t be combined—but they can at the very least give beginners an idea of how these effects work. Many guitarists may find the Champion 20’s built-in effects to be all they need.
Usually considered the big brother to the phaser, the flanger is indeed related in a sense, but achieves its heavier, some would say more oppressive sonic results by imposing more control over its placement of the notches created by the phase relationship, rather than spacing them evenly as the phaser’s sweep does. Much of the basic circuitry behind flanging, very simply put, follows the template as given above, but requires far more complex engineering to take it where it’s going. Pedal-sized units designed to replicate the sound of two big reel-to-reel tape machines sliding in and out of sync weren’t made possible until larger, more complex ICs became available to help do the job. This extra technology is needed to harmonically tune the out-of-phase notches, and therefore, relative to these, the peaks, and it’s this harmonic spacing of the spread that can make a genuine flanger pedal sound almost like it’s actively participating in the note selection of a sequence you are playing. Whereas phasers have from four to ten stages, the individual chips within proper flangers may carry hundreds of stages in themselves. Dizzying stuff.

With a body shape that looks like it could have been cut out by hand using a saw in your garden shed, this Kay Old Kraftsman Sizzler guitar manages to be crude and quite fantastic at the same time. "Old Kraftsman" was actually a brandname used on Kay guitars sold by Spiegel stores. The maple neck gives it a rather Fender-like appearance, but this is in fact a set neck and not a bolt-on.

Fuzz: A fuzz pedal or "fuzzbox" is a type of overdrive pedal that clips a sound-wave until it is nearly a squarewave, resulting in a heavily distorted or "fuzzy" sound.[53][56] Fuzzboxes may contain frequency multiplier circuitry to achieve a harsh timbre by adding complex harmonics.[57][58] The Rolling Stones' song "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction", with the main riff played by Keith Richards with fuzz guitar, greatly popularized the use of fuzz effects.[23] Fuzz bass (also called "bass overdrive") is a style of playing the electric bass that produces a buzzy, overdriven sound via a tube or transistor amp or by using a fuzz or overdrive pedal.
Before Gruhn Guitars puts out any of our fine instruments for sale, they go through our repair shop to get them ready to play. Some older instruments require extensive repairs and restoration, while others just need new strings and basic setup. But every guitar, mandolin and banjo has to meet the high standards of the repair crew before it's released for sale. Our repair staff has over 75 years combined experience repairing, restoring, building and designing guitars.
Effects are electronic devices and circuits that process the electronic signal input from an instrument or mic. Also referred to as FX, they run the gamut from limiter or expander settings so subtle you can barely detect them to sci-fi modulation effects so extreme that the original sound is virtually undetectable. Think of your guitar or bass as your artist’s palette of primary colors. Effects are the equivalent of your brushes, tools, and color-mixing skills that add near-limitless creativity to your artistic vision.

In the first part of this two-part article, we look at the original five-way switch and find it lacking for some uses. The 2-pole super-switch steps in to help, and we look at how we would go about wiring a Strat in the standard way using that switch. Once we’ve understood that, we go on to create an interesting alternate wiring scheme for a Strat that wouldn’t be possible with the standard 5-way.
Harmony Hollywood H38- OK, here's the one we will sell. She's about the same as above but with opposite color combo. This one has a nice vintage DeArmond Gold Foil Pickup. Action is medium, but if you would like a lower action, we will be happy to cut that bridge a bit down. Guitar is in  nice vintage condition. All original except the period style Rosewood Bridge and reproduction Harmony Pick Guard. SOLD
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Hum in pedalboards is usually “ground loop hum.” You have two paths to ground, your audio ground and your power supply ground. You could use an expensive power supply with isolated grounds. But all you have to do is break one of the ground connections. You could disconnect the audio ground at one end of each of your patch cords. Or better, if you use one power supply, connect the hot and ground to only one of your pedals. Clip the ground wire on all the other pedal connections in your daisy chain. The power connections will then get their grounds through the audio grounds. No more hum
Music is an art, which can create pleasure in our mind. We can do it with the help of a good musical instruments like guitar, flute, harmonium etc. This art has the power to change our mood. Here we are introducing top ten best guitar brands with price in India. These brands are providing high quality guitar. Most of the musicians choose these brands. All are ensuring high performance. Some of the companies provide quality guitar at affordable prices. Our list covers ten well known company. They offer wide range of guitars. If you are looking for a good guitar brand, check out our list.
Unfortunately it’s during this critical time that a lot of people get discouraged and may even give up on playing altogether. The first 6 months of learning guitar are critical, statistics show that if someone can still be playing at 6 months they will be much more likely to go on to play guitar for life, so the first 6 months are actually the most important time.

Pickups are meant to capture (pick up) the strings' vibration. Now, the pickup closest to the neck captures the strings' vibrations at their highest amplitude, which results in a warm sound with lots of lows. Conversely, the pickup closest to the bridge captures the strings' vibrations at their lowest amplitude, rendering a bright and sharp sound. So, the same pickup will have a different sound depending on its position. That's why most guitars are equipped with several pickups.

While National blithely ignored Beauchamp’s electric experiments, their competition – Dobro – was next to enter the electric arena as early as 1933, with the introduction of the Dobro All-Electric. Basically, the All-Electric was a mahogany-bodied Model 37, most usually outfitted with a 12-fret square neck. It had a large lightning-bolt-engraved coverplate, two screen holes, three little holes under the fingerboard, a slothead, and rosewood ‘board with dot inlays. Instead of the usual resonator, this had a large metal plate where the cone assembly would normally be and a Stimson pickup mounted just in front of the bridge, curiously enough with the poles slanted from the bass side near the bridge toward the middle on the treble side.


Certain guitar brands are renowned and respected worldwide, and you don't have to be a player to be aware of them. Companies like Fender, Gibson, Epiphone, Ibanez, Yamaha and many others have built a solid reputation for providing exceptionally crafted guitars. In fact, these names are consistently endorsed by the greatest players of all time. However, you'll find more than enough guitar brands from lesser known manufacturers as well; these smaller companies take enormous pride in offering models of equally extraordinary playability, tone and construction.
Jazz – Does no-one listen to Eddie Lang’s recordings? Or that master of comping, Freddie Green? To Charlie Christian? MarleyIII gets special credit as the only one naming the marvellous Jim Hall, who really should be up there in one of those ten spots. Like Marley, I really like the work of John Abercrombie, although I can’t put hand on heart and suggest him for the top ten. If you like John A, let me put in a plug for the work of London session-man John Parricelli. (Which reminds me that the very different “Johnny A” is no slouch either!)
When playing seventh chords, guitarists often play only subset of notes from the chord. The fifth is often omitted. When a guitar is accompanied by a bass, the guitarist may omit the bass note from a chord. As discussed earlier, the third of a triad is doubled to emphasize its major or minor quality; similarly, the third of a seventh is doubled to emphasize its major or minor quality. The most frequent seventh is the dominant seventh; the minor, half-diminished, and major sevenths are also popular.[79]
Meaning of electronic: (of a device) having or operating with the aid of many small components, especially microchips and transistors, that control and direct an electric current. or (of a device) having or operating with the aid of many small components, especially microchips and transistors, that control and direct an electric current. Example is “electronic calculator”.

Tone pots are similar to volume pots except they are wired in such a way as to only increase resistance on the high-end allowing the low-end signal to pass through unheeded. As you increase or decrease the amount of high end by adjusting your tone knob, your tone changes accordingly. Tone pots can be better thought of as filters, they filter high-end frequencies that ultimately affect your overall tone.


Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: V-Shape - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 22, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.6" (62.5cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Pickup Configuration: H-S-H - String Instrument Finish: Emerald Green - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case - Made In: America - # Produced: 150

Although this multi-effects pedal is powerful and full of features, it doesn't mean that you’ll have to face those awkward manual reading moments. The ME-70 is like a simple stomp box, each effect section has knob-based controls which makes it easy to dial tones. Similarly, whenever you need to add any effect; just kick press on one of the four foot-switches to fire up the game.


Similarly to the previous model, this guitar has a mahogany body as well as a fine looking maple top. What is more, this unit has an elegant metallic gold finish that you might like. Among the features that make it stand out, we feel like it is important that we mention its practical Alnico Classic humbuckers and the fact that it has a Rosewood fretboard. Additionally, it comes supplied with trapezoid inlays.


Launch price: $2,099 / £2,499 | Body: Ash | Neck: Roasted maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Roasted maple | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Music Man SH single coil, Music Man SH humbucker | Controls: Volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: Music Man Modern hardtail bridge, Schaller M6-IND locking tuners | Left-handed: | Finish: Trans Buttermilk, Trans Black, Trans Maroon, Satin Natural

That is why pick-up manufacturers are always careful to explain that their pick-ups will sound different depending on the woods and construction of a guitar. Seymour Duncan (among many others) has written about this a lot, a you can read more on the Seymour Duncan website. You can also study more at the FRETS website, GAL (The Guild of American Luthiers), StewMac, and LMI (Luthier's Mercantile International).
• Library content : Choose from 154 patterns covering a wide range of realistic riffs, arpeggios, alternating intervals and chords. The patterns are conveniently grouped into 31 well-coordinated set of presets, suitable for everything from modern pop music to electronics. Autochord mode and convenient presets allow you to execute or program convincing batches of electric guitar, regardless of background music.

If you are not attracted to the way the guitar looks or feels in your hand, chances are you won't be too eager to pick it up every day. When you are just starting out, this is supremely important. Here's where a disclaimer needs to be placed. This isn't always the case, and often times people warm up to a guitar even if they didn't initially like it, but why chance it?
The Eastcoast Vintage T Series Custom Electric Guitar seen here in Flame Red is a cheap electric guitar that certainly doesn’t suck! It features appointments usually associated with higher tier guitars such as a solid alder body and hard maple neck. In addition, you have a high quality 22 fret rosewood fingerboard as well as 2 x single coil pickups to achieve a wide variety of tones from rock to blues to country – this thing can handle it all. The “T” style bridge is a great feature often found on guitars 3 x the price. A fantastic option and an extremely hard working, handmade guitar for those in need of a high quality first guitar or a great second option for the studio or stage.
The prime advantage of Epiphone is that you get a guitar built to the same specs as the Gibson Les Paul, at a greatly discounted price. With that being said, an Epiphone is not equal to a Gibson simply because it shares the same design. The craftsmanship is where the two brands differ the most, as USA made Gibson’s utilize higher quality materials than the Epiphone line. Epiphone uses a cheaper mahogany in the construction of its guitars, while the electronic components are lower quality as well.

Ibanez started off as a Japanese music company particularly focused towards producing copies of favorite guitars in America. Today, they have surpassed most firms by offering best quality products on their own. Being specifically directed towards the hard rock and metal players, Ibanez ensures to have something for players belonging to every genre.

The Effect: By all standards, tremolo is one of the oldest, as well one of the simplest effects you can get these days. The whole idea behind a tremolo pedal is to give you that wave type effect by reducing and increasing the volume of your guitar’s original signal. You can adjust the speed of the effect and how deep those dips in volume are going to go.
I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
In regards to which is best I personally think you pretty much got it right! Folks can piss n moan all they want but the facts are facts. Gibson, Fender, PRS ect all make fantastic guitars, time-tested tools of the trade. Many of you feel the need to want to publicly put down a certain brand in favor of another, there's good n bad in all of them!! If I could afford a Gibson Les Paul I would get one! Sure I could pull out the plastic n get one but I don't wanna have to do that just yet. I have no shame in purchasing a cheap guitar as long as I like it, to me if a guitar has a good smooth fast neck ......... it's a good guitar!! You can always swap pups n hardware but the neck is a little more complicated. I have a Fender Squire Strat, it is an "E" series Squire, I think it was made from 1984-87, and I can tell you that I will be 50 years old in May of this year and the neck on this Squire is the best I have ever felt on any guitar I have owned!! and yes it was a fairly cheap guitar. Now I hear that the "E" series of Squire Strats are supposed to be highly sought after or something, I don't know all about that, all I know is that I love the way this guitar plays n feels in my hands n riding in front of my belly! So folks don't put a guitar down simply because you can't afford it, like I said they are good guitars for a reason, same goes for the cheap guitars, don't knock 'em 'til you try 'em, there are some mighty good players out there to be had for cheap $$$, bottom line ..... regardless of the name on the head ..... if you can afford it, if it feels n looks the way you like n has a good neck then buy it n give it the love it deserves, it'll love you back in ways you never imagined!! Happy pickin n God bless

In rock music (and even in some pop music), guitarists often substitute power chords for full chords to enable the vocal part to stand out more from the music. You can hear this kind of power chord sound in old songs such as “Johnny B. Goode” and “Peggy Sue.” The following figure shows the power chords that you use to produce this kind of sound. Play this progression by using either two- or three-string power chords.

SOLD OUT ...Here is yet another GREAT Sounding and PLAYING Nippon Gakki 000 Red Label made in the famous Nippon Gakki plant in Japan. Absolutely surprising Booming tone from a small package who would have guessed these sound so great... This one is in excellent vintage condition that is to say all the important structural components of this guitar are in good shape that is to say that this guitar has GOOD BONES…. NO CRACKs its neck angle alignment is still good to this day its top is for the most part flat and its Bridge is nice and tight to its top … it appears to be a solid two piece center seam Sitka Spruce top and its cross braced like an old Martin , This guitar is over 40+++ years old and has been played and is not mint of course it has its share of superficial dings and drinks but nothing that can deter its ability to play great and sound great and look Fantastic with its Vintage Amber top and lush PATINA its a classic 000 that has THE SOUND!…. When we received it I loved the sound immediately it was pretty deep and rich sounding for such a small guitar with old cruddy strings I was thinking but like many of these Old Yamaha’s the action was too high so I did have to do our full JVGuitars UPGRADE set-up to it so I stripped its old strings off..its cheap plastic nut & saddle and bridge pins tossed to garbage, its fingerboard was remarkably clean and rut free and the pearloid inlays look great vivid with that patina of 40+ years and the frets were not bad with just minimal groves so I adjusted true rod -leveled -dressed & polished the frets, cleaned fingerboard and Lemon oiled the rosewood fingerboard and the bridge which is crack free as well.. all is looking and feeling great now.. Then using hyde glue installed a Martin Bon nut and a compensated bone saddle was fit following up with a quality set of fancy Rosewood bridge pins with Abalone and brass ring they fit sung for optimum tone resonance transfer. This has made a markable improvement in its resonance and its a bit louder now too SWEET sounding now! When we got this one it has a small chip at sound hole just under the fat bass E string looks like an aggressive finger style did the damage and was at the sound hole edge and I have successfully repaired this same sort of spot before so I wasn’t worried this one was nick named “Chip" for this reason I since repaired the spot using the professional woodworking Mohawk system of melting in a resin bar with jot knife that was spruce color then graining the repair and top coating brush tip matching lacquer to the repair spot area to blend…. its not really noticeable anymore now and is a non issue. I did notice that someone changed the tuners for other old Yamaha FG tuners tiny holes didn't line up but this makes no difference in performance what so ever and is not even noticeable they are Yamaha tuners. Overall structurally this guitar is still in top condition players and it really has that beautiful vintage 40+++ year old Martin like Patina aura about it.... i its VINTAGE PATINA and character is absolutely beautiful this is in the eye of the beholder of course but if your vintage lover you’ll appreciate this instrument for what she is. This Old guitar plays like a $ MUCH more expensive guitar any day... People of all walks of life worldwide on the net are comparing the sound of theirs to a Martin it take years for a guitar’s tone to naturally open up like this guitar has set up and plays and sounds amazing and the price is right Questions or to buy it contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
The stompswitches take a couple stomps to cut on. There also some tape residue around the led lights where someone covered them. But its not a huge issue for reverb considering that the way I play, I always have a little reverb on to add texture and presence to my tone. Also, if you have a pedal switch looper that you can run all your pedals through it can stay always on that way too. But I'm going set the bidding price lower just because they don't work 100% properly and the tape residue. Other than the issue with the stompswitches the effect works great. Just clarify, you have to stomp on the switch 2 or 3 times and it cuts on.
At Ibanez, there has always been a goal to be anything but traditional. For over half a century, Ibanez has been pushing the world of guitar manufacturing forward, consistently breaking new ground. It's this drive that led them to become one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to make a name for themselves in Europe and North America. With unparalleled commitment to quality, Ibanez Guitars are considered among the upper echelon by musicians of all playing styles around the world. A quick look at some of the musicians who play Ibanez guitars is sure to leave you very impressed. Artists such as Head and Munky of KoRn, Noodles of the Offspring, Mick Thomson of Slipknot, Fletcher Dragge of Pennywise, Steve Vai, and Joe Satriani all trust their sound to Ibanez guitars. Now it's your turn to do the same. Ibanez makes an impressively wide selection of guitars, so you're sure to be able to find one that is perfect for you here. Say, for example, you're a beginner who's looking for a great acoustic guitar? If that's the case, you'll love the JamPack IJV50 Quickstart Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar Pack. This set features everything you need to get started, including a beautiful dreadnought, as well as an electric tuner, a gig bag, a guitar strap, and an accessory pouch. If you'd rather a versatile acoustic-electric, you'll love an option such as the V70CE Acoustic-Electric Guitar. This guitar is highlighted by its outstanding playability and fantastic tone. With an incredible response and dynamic range, this guitar is perfectly suited for small clubs and larger venues alike. Of course, if all you want to do is plug in and pump up the volume, you're going to want to check out the JS1200 Joe Satriani Signature Guitar. This candy apple dream is built with top-tier electronics and sleek overall construction. With a resonant tone an impressive sustain (thanks, in part, to its DiMarzio humbuckers), this guitar is a progressive player's dream. Regardless of your playing style, there's an Ibanez here with your name on it that is ready to be played. With expertise that is second to none, Ibanez is a name you can trust in the music world.
Here we have a beautiful player with great heritage.. This guitar was an Import from Japan back in 1978 its a very well built guitar and employs the same x bracing seen on Martins. Workmanship is very high as is materials the vintage tone woods are beautifully mellowen and the tone has opened up nicely on this and so the volume is good on this guitar with a new set of straings now sounds like quite big a Piano...clear and clean god volume and reasonible bass.. Very good sound from this one..t also plays quite nicely with good play action not to low not to high...it plays very wel.. structually no cracks or serious anything to speak up just the most minimap superficial nicks as this vintage guitar qualifies for the xcllent vintage condition catagory. The finsh is wonderful and glass like shine to it and has a beautiful warm patine to it you can't get without waiting the near 40 years for it to age this way... this guitar will make somon a wonderful D-18 /28 style instrumnt to enjoy for another 40 years... If your like us you love vintage instruments and this is a bargain of a great lttle player, for a song.. You will be pleased. Thanks for looking if interested contact Joe at : gr8bids@comcast.net .

Another consideration, and something you’ll read a lot about, is the pickups, which give the guitar its voice. There are two kinds of pickup in this price range: the single-coil (which gives a bright, sparkly sound) and the humbucker (which is fuller, meatier and perfect for rock and metal). Both are as common as each other in this budget range, and a guitar with a mix of both will offer you the best versatility.
Coming from Martin's Travel Series, the LX1E Little Martin has smaller proportions, with a total length of 34", body width of 12", shorter scale length of 23" and 1 11/16" nut width. While it can be a bit too small for some, it is easy to appreciate its impressive workmanship, bearing the same build quality and materials as found on their more expensive models. With the LX1E, you can own an affordable Martin guitar that has been proven to be a true workhorse instrument.
Harmoniser – a frequency-based effect that sounds like a second guitarist is playing in harmony with the original guitar signal. The effect is created by doubling the guitar input signal and then shifting the pitch of the double up or down at a certain interval (usually a 3rd, 5th or octave). The harmony effect is often used in the metal and hard rock genre to play solos.
Then, as the most popular version goes, a young, jack of all trades guitarist named Les Paul got tired of all that. So, he set out to create a guitar that could be heard just as much as the louder instruments. He fiddled with a lot of electronic means to boost his sound. Some worked better than others. His piece de resistance at the time would come to be known as "The Log". It looked like what you see up there on the left:
To start off our list (albeit rather difficult to choose a specific guitar first), let’s take a look at the Fender Telecaster, a high-quality electric guitar for the musician out there who is looking to improve their amateur status to accomplished guitarist. With the clear tone and quality range that the Fender brand is known to famously provide, the Telecaster is equipped with shielded body cavities meant to limit reverberation and focus in on the individual notes. The dual single-coil pickups allow the musician to vary between sharp tones and strong treble, providing a unique sound to fit various genres of interest. The flat surface of the of the fingerboard makes it easy to switch between notes and chords, while the alder wood used for the body of the guitar provides and even and bright sound. With a ‘C’ shaped design meant for comfort for long wear use, the Fender Telecaster is one of the best electric guitars for the money. The sound? Very classic, biting, and clear. You’ll have to hear for yourself in this Telecaster video, since we can’t really find adjectives to truly portray this beauty.

1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-44? Electric Guitar. 4 single coil Pickups. Great, original Black / Green burst finish. '57 Chevy style aluminum pick guard. "Shark-Fin" headstock. Rosewood fingerboard. Original 4+2 tuners with cast cover. 4-bolt neck joint with an adjustable truss rod. Bridge adjustable for height, intonation and string spacing. 4-Square pole pickups, 4 pots, 4 pickup selectors and a 3 position rotary wafer switch. Some of the pots do things and some don't either by modification or design. The rotary switch simply acts as an On / Off switch. Guitar works great the way it is, or could be configured other ways as well. We have not modified it since we acquired it 8 years ago. It's spent most of it's time in the box, until I decided to get around to listing it. Missing whammy bar as are most every Teisco we have ever owned. The bridge pickup has had one of it's mounting screws changed. The finish is in exceptional shape for a 40 year old guitar (while the photos make the guitar look black the finish is actually a dark green to black burst). Plays and sounds great. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in near new shape with virtually no wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, oiling the fingerboard, nut checked for correct height, neck angle checked, pickup heights checked and adjusted, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .008 when fretted at the first and the body (super low)) adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!) and cleaning and polishing entire instrument. This is our old shops standard $75 tune-up. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .009 strings. No case included.
In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers had no tone controls. The first tone controls were simple, mainly providing treble adjustment. The limited controls, the early loudspeakers, and the low amplifier power (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. Some models also provided effects such as an electronic tremolo unit. In confusion over nomenclature, Fender labeled early amplifier tremolo as "vibrato" and called the vibrato arm of the Stratocaster guitar a "tremolo bar" (see vibrato unit, electric guitar, and tremolo).
Overall length is 28 1/2 in. (72.4 cm.), 10 in. (25.4 cm.) width, and 1 5/8 in. (4.1 cm.) in depth, measured at side of rim. Scale length is 15 1/4 in. (387 mm.). Width of nut is 1 3/4 in. (44 mm.). All original and complete, and quite clean overall; there are a few small dings to the finish and some light checking-almost inevitable on the Eko-made Vox instruments. The only notable finish marring is one spot where a superglue repair to a cracked pickguard corner left a bit of residue behind. A very nice little player, with an awful lot of chime! Excellent - Condition.
I’m also going to go out on a limb and suggest the earliest Univoxes also included the ‘Lectra, a version of the one-pickup Aria 1930 violin bass (made by Aria). These were basically violin-bodied basses originally inspired by the Gibson EB-0, and popularized among imports by Paul McCartney’s use of the Höfner violin bass, copied by EKO. This was a hollowbody with no f-holes, Cremona brown finish, single neck pickup, bolt-on neck with position dots along the top of the 22-fret bound rosewood fingerboard. Strings anchored to a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly.
Collings Guitars is an Austin, Texas based stringed instrument manufacturer. The company was founded in 1973 by Bill Collings who is “one of the most recognized and respected names amongst aficionados of modern acoustic instruments.”[ Their acoustic guitars have been highly regarded for decades.[2]In addition to acoustic guitars they also make electric guitars, archtop guitars,mandolins, and ukuleles.
Choose a pedal kit or two from one of the kit suppliers. If you are new to this, start with one of the simpler kits such as a boost pedal. You can move on to more complex circuits such as delays and reverbs later. You can order multiple kits at once if you want, but learn your skills on the easy ones first. Good kits come with comprehensive documentation. They normally list the tools that you will need, so read the docs online first and make sure you have the tools available. If not, order them at the same time as your kits so you’ll have everything ready. It’s very irritating when you are keen to get started on a pedal project and are missing that one small tool or part.
A great app for playing and basic editing of general midi files is Sweet Midi Player which includes a lyric viewer for midis with lyrics/chords. You can load one of the General Midi SoundFonts above to greatly improve the sound quality. For Windows PC use the free program Coolsoft VirtualMIDISynth to install a new GM SoundFont (Get the latest version 2.1.0 for Windows 10).
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The more contact the bridge has with the body, the better the sound will be transferred into the body. On the other hand, we have non-vibrato bridges which provide an anchoring point but have no control over pitch or tension of strings. Both bridges have their own pros and cons but non-vibrato bridges provide better tuning stability and solid contact between the body and the strings.
My first electric was one of these (1962, I was 14) . My mother bought it by mail order, probably from the Bell's catalogue. I remember coming home from school every day for what seemed like weeks hoping it had arrived! It was very crudely made with a plywood body (mine was in a red finish). The neck was wide and flat (think that was ply too!) and the action appalling! I remember the original strings were copper wound and left you with green fingertips! I remember the price was around 14 pounds, quite a lot at the time! Even at that age I wasn't impressed for long and soon traded it in for a Hofner Clubman. Wish I still had it now though!
Meanwhile, the Gibson Vari-Tone circuit uses a rotary switch rather than a pot, and a set of capacitors of ascending size. The small caps have a brighter tone, and the large ones sound darker. But once a cap is engaged, it’s engaged all the way. In other words, the cutoff frequency varies as you move the switch, but not the percentage of affected signal—it’s always 100%.  (The Stellartone ToneStyler employs the same concept, with as many as 16 caps arranged around a rotary switch.)
Gibson filed a lawsuit November 18, 2010 in Federal court, the Central District of California, against WowWee USA and their Paper Jamz battery operated guitar toys charging trademark infringement.[27][28] The lawsuit claimed the Paper Jamz toy guitars copied the looks of some of Gibson’s famous guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson Flying V, the Gibson Explorer, and the Gibson SG. On December 21, 2010 Gibson was granted a request for an injunction against WowWee and retailers in the United States which were selling Paper Jamz guitars: WalMart, Amazon (company), Big Lots stores, Kmart Corporation, Target Corporation, Toys “R” Us, Walgreens, Brookstone, Best Buy, eBay, Toywiz.com, and Home Shopping Network (HSN)[29][30][31] The case was dismissed with prejudice (dismissed permanently) January 11, 2011 by Federal Judge R. Gary Klausner.[32][33]

Meanwhile, in Sepulveda, Thomas Organ, after importing JMI's British-made amps for a short period in 1964–65, began to produce a line of mostly solid-state amplifiers in the United States that carried the Vox name and cosmetic stylings. With some assistance from Dick Denney, these amps effectively paralleled JMI's own transistorised amplifiers but were different from the British and Italian made Voxes in sound and reliability. To promote their equipment, Thomas Organ built the Voxmobile, a Ford roadster dressed up to look like a Phantom guitar, complete with a Continental organ and several "Beatle" amplifiers. Despite the huge marketing effort, Thomas Organ's Vox products did much to damage the reputation of Vox in the North American market for many years. By 1968, the company had also marketed a line of Vox drum sets (actually made by a German drum company, known as Trixon), which included a kit that featured a conical-shaped bass (kick) drum, that looked more like a wastepaper basket left on its side, and another with a bass (kick) drum, that looked like a flat tire. Such gimmicks did not help sales, and by the early 1970s Vox's American presence was virtually nonexistent.
Part of their Espana series, the Cordoba 45MR is handsome, handmade in Spain, and brings all the character of Spanish guitar music to the player, starting with the idea of using the guitars of the 1880s and 1890s as a model for the appearance and sound. Nylon-string guitars themselves came from Spain, so this is perfect for the player who wants as much connection to tradition and authenticity as possible.
Vintage Guitars has been around since 1985. We know what professional guitar players want. Our authentic guitars combine the classic design of vintage guitars with the modern playability of newer ones. The retro look is combined with patented new hardware that gives you the best of both new and old worlds. Whether your preferred genre is rock, country or jazz, we have vintage guitars for every working professional musician. If you’re looking for great features and old-school style, you’ve come to the right place. Check out all of our electric, acoustic and bass guitars!
But I’d also like to share my interesting Goldilocks setup into the mix, I’ve had a Boss GT-8 for years and I love that thing for all the control it can give me at the front of stage. However, I’m only 18 and never had the kind of money to buy an amp I’d love to run 4 cables for (or in my case three, I run a Line6 wireless), so I use the virtual preamps and run it into the Effect return of my 6L6 loaded Kustom amp (never liked the preamp in it). This very fact made my gigs in high school extremely easy, as I could use virtually any tube amp with an FX loop as my backline, then adjust the global EQ accordingly to pull the best tone possible, or in one instance I had two amps at my disposal so I got the pleasure of switching up my Delay and Chorus type effects to their stereo modes. I also have a couple of pedals on my board to address a few tonal setbacks I found in the Boss, but that’s only suiting my personal taste. Enjoy my board…
If you have a little bit more to spend than what you pay for the Epiphone LP Special II you might want to consider the Epiphone Les Paul 100. It has a mahogany body with a maple top, mahogany neck and rosewood fingerboard. It’s got solid tuners and hardware, a 3-way switch and two tone and volume knobs. It’s slimmer and therefore much lighter than the Gibson Les Paul. The Epiphone LP 100 feels and plays good. It’s a reliable and durable guitar. A great choice for rock and blues!
Unlike Andrew, before Rocksmith 2014 Carl had never played anything other than a toy-guitar controller. The lessons made it easy to learn the basics—from just holding the instrument properly, to playing basic notes and fingering techniques—all without the pressure of a human guitar instructor's waning patience. Since this was my first experience playing a real guitar, I was eager to learn and didn't mind that the notes scroll horizontally across the screen instead of Guitar Hero and Rock Band's vertical scrolling.
These handpicked guitars represent the very highest-end when it comes to collector-grade, vintage instruments. Take a look at these stunning, investment-level guitars and basses from the golden eras of Fender, Gibson, Gretsch, Martin, Rickenbacker and more. These stunning specimens are the things of gearhead dreams, and even if you can't afford one today, there's still plenty of fun to be had perusing and exploring these iconic guitars.
Another relatively drastic but easy and cheap way to hot-rod your guitar’s sound with its current components is to alter how and where its volume and tone pots are connected to each other. The difference can be subtle—and it’s more a matter of preference than what’s “correct”—but it can make the difference between a guitar that is just OK and one that really is a joy to play.
Lydia Lunch once beat her Teenage Jesus & the Jerks bandmates with coat hangers during practice; and her confrontational attitude was only matched by her completely unfettered guitar playing. Calling the instrument “a grand assaultive weapon,” she treated it as such, often attacking the strings with knives or even shards of glass, refusing to even bother learning chords, using it as a blunt force to express a total anti-pop, anti-punk, anti-everything rage.
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Great guitar at this price point. Want to make it better? For so little money you can add lighter strings, a bone saddle, bone nut and pins. It's not necessary but they may help some. A bunch of small improvements put together make a big difference. What really does make a difference is having the action set up properly. Lowering it made it much easier to play for me. The finish and craftsmanship on this guitar is excellent.
If you have been looking for an electric guitar that effectively blend tradition with modernity; the Gibson Les Paul Faded 2017 is the excellent choice that fit such description. This guitar stands as the perfect union between the old and the new—featuring a 490R modern and 490T humbuckers, closely followed with 22 frets designed for amazing bends and great feel.
Like effects pedals, multi-effects processors are used to modify and alter the clean signal of your guitar to produce a large variety of effects (reverb, wah-wah, overdrive, distortion, chorus, etc). Unlike a simple pedal that gives you one or two options for modifying tone, a multi-effects processor has a full load of effects and sounds that allow you to play music with a rainbow-colored tonal palette. There are processors for modifying guitar, bass, and even units for vocalists with pitch-correction tools and harmonizer effects.
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By far the most common way to sort out this tablature selection is by artist. Some best-selling highlights include the Hal Leonard Jimi Hendrix Complete Guitar Tab Library, Alfred Led Zeppelin Box Set I-V Guitar Tab Platinum Edition and Hal Leonard Eric Clapton Complete Clapton Guitar Tab Songbook. And those are just a few examples from a library packed with hundreds of books. No matter what sort of music you want to play, there's tablature ready to teach it to you.

Discrete models describing the low frequency behavior of stringed instruments have appeared in the technical literature for more than 25 years. These models are very useful in understanding the nature of acoustic-structural interaction, but only when they are correctly tuned to match the measured response of a particular instrument. The tuning process is easiest when FRF measurements are made... [Show full abstract]
The reason why you would want to have one of these on your pedalboard is simple. An EQ pedal allows you to adjust a variety of frequency bands and shape your tone based on your own requirements. As you evolve your skill and knowledge, you will soon realize that you can’t play without a pedal of this type. When it comes to some notable models, Empress ParaEQ comes to mind as the best choice.

The old ones were SOLD as cheap guitars. These new ones, at their price points, are probably decent instruments at the very least, and possibly even very good ones. I doubt they have much in common with the Kays from the 70s aside from how they look, which as other people have detailed, is probably just for nostalgia purposes. Lots of aging rockers with fat salaries who might've learned on those guitars a few decades ago!


There’s a common belief that certain strings are better for beginners than others. While nylon strings can be easier on beginner’s fingers, the main thing that matters when it comes to guitar strings is the style of music you are planning to play, because the difference in feel and sound between the two materials is significant – even for a beginner.
When people ask "What are the guitar string sizes?" they really want to know about the gauges, the term referring to the diameter of the string.  The answer is... that's not quite how it works.  Yes there are standard gauges but in several standard sizes like light, medium, and heavy.  Each, when properly tuned, will exert a different tension on the guitar's neck and if you jump to another size you'll probably need to adjust the truss rod and get used to the new action of the fingerboard.
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NOTE: Due to the nature of electric guitar construction, it is extremely common for these instruments to need fret work to play well. 80% or more of electrics, especially those with bolt-on necks, have high frets in the tongue area that must be addressed in order to play without excess buzzing. This includes most new electric guitars right off the shelf. Please see the section below for fret work pricing.
Beyond specific favoured mics, a number of engineers also mention more general principles when choosing pairs of mics for guitar recording. Jim Scott and Stephen Street both mention using a 'cheap' or 'bad' mic with a good mic (both give the SM57+U87 combination as an example). "Between the two you can find the ideal sound," remarks Jim, "and you can get brightness and fullness."
What our panelists didn’t like about the Spider Classic 15 is the weird operation of its controls. Because Line 6 uses digital processing to model not only the basic sound of different amplifiers but also the way all of their controls work, whenever you switch amp sounds, the operation of the tone controls shifts radically. Thus, when you go to turn the treble down just a smidge, the sound of the amp changes quite a bit, and you have to spend some time experimenting to find the treble setting you want—or even get it back to how it sounded before you touched it. It also automatically adds reverb and perhaps a bit of chorus effect whenever you switch to the Clean sound; to shut off this effect, you actually have to use the effect knobs to turn the effect on, then turn it off again.
Shouldn't even be questioned. Ever hear of 'Voodoo Child'? Yeah, that was recorded in one take. & almost entirely improvised. & it's the greatest recording of an electric guitar being played EVER. & this isn't from some idiot who just listens to a lot of music, I play the guitar and have done a lot of reading and I know a few of your favorite guitarists would agree with me.
It’s 1951, a dark, rainy night on the backstreets of Memphis, Tennessee. Ike Turner and His Kings Of Rhythm are packing the gear into the station wagon, getting ready to head off to the studio to record a track for producer Sam Phillips, a track that the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame will one day honor as the first rock and roll song of all time, ‘Rocket 88.’ (Although, distinctly unfairly, the song will be credited to singer Jackie Brenston and the imaginary band ‘His Delta Cats.’) “The amp—a Fender Bassman—was in the trunk of the car and it fell out, right on the road,” Ike Turner told Guitar Magazine’s Rick Batey in 1998, “and it was raining, so the amp got wet. When we got to the studio and plugged it in one of the tubes went ‘pop.’ We didn’t have no more tubes—so that’s where the fuzz came from.’
The truth is that you can play any genre of music with just about any type of electric guitar. Many blues players run Gibson Les Pauls with beefy humbuckers, while Iron Maiden completely broke the stereotype that you can't play metal with a Stratocaster.  Guitar effects pedals really changed the game too. However, some guitars do actually deal better with certain music genres.

However, Class D amplifiers (also called "switching amplifiers" or confusingly, "digital amplifiers") are more efficient than conventional Class-AB amplifiers, and so are lighter in weight and smaller. The Acoustic Image Focus head, for example, produces 800 watts of power and weighs 2.2 kilograms (about 4 pounds). Class-D amplifiers use MOSFETs (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors) rather than 'ordinary' (bipolar) transistors, and generate a pulse-width modulated signal that is filtered before it reaches the speaker.[15] In the 2010s, the availability of Class D amplifiers has enabled amp manufacturers to produce very lightweight and small, yet very powerful amp heads and small, lightweight combo amps.


Ask anyone at all if they've heard of Ibanez, and you'll most likely get a 'yes'—even if it's not a guitarist or even a musician that you're asking. It takes a lot for an instrument maker to become as well-known outside the music community as it is inside, and Ibanez is one of the elite luthiers that has managed to do just that. How have they done it? Simple: by making instruments so sought-after that they can be found nearly everywhere. Originally founded in 1957, Ibanez is one of the "original" manufacturers from the formative decades of the electric guitar as we know it today. Ibanez was one of the first Japanese companies to break through to the international music industry as well as, even more impressively, the very first brand to mass-produce seven and eight-string guitars. That makes extended-range guitars an important part of the Ibanez legacy alongside their many classic 6-string models. Some of the most renowned Ibanez instruments include hollow body guitars like Pat Metheny's signature model, and distinctive solid body axes such as the Iceman and Fireman series. You'll also find a wide assortment of basses, including 5 and 6-string models that join the 7 and 8-string guitars in the extended-range Ibanez family. There are plenty of acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars and basses to choose from as well, not to mention mandolins, banjos and ukuleles. Ibanez has a prolific catalog that spans the whole guitar family, offering something for anybody who loves to work the strings. In addition to stringed instruments, Ibanez is also renowned for a broad range of effects pedals, amplifiers and accessories. The TS808 Tube Screamer, for example, is an effects pedal that's beyond legendary. The unmatched warmth and tone of its overdrive makes the TS808 a must-have item for countless guitarists. Connect it to an amplifier like the TSA30 Tube Screamer 1x12 Combo Amp, and you're rocking an amazing recipe for serious vintage sounds. Ibanez was an early player in the electric guitar game, and their instruments, pedals and amps are certain to be on stages the world over for decades to come. Make yourself one of the artists that takes Ibanez onstage at every gig and this gear will pay off in spades with the incredible sounds that made them an industry giant in the first place.
In the 1980s, when shred metal was at its peak, Ibanez took a big share of the market with models that were geared towards the fastest, loudest players – thin necks, floating double-locking tremolos and high-output pickups. These guitars were endorsed by modern day virtuosos such as Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, with many artists designing their own custom Ibanez models.
Several neck shapes appear on guitars, including shapes known as C necks, U necks, and V necks. These refer to the cross-sectional shape of the neck (especially near the nut). Several sizes of fret wire are available, with traditional players often preferring thin frets, and metal shredders liking thick frets. Thin frets are considered better for playing chords, while thick frets allow lead guitarists to bend notes with less effort.
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