I had a similar problem and went with a similar solution - the Vox Tonelab amp modeler and multi-effects unit. Has a headphone out that works fine for practice. Plus it is working well for gigging as well. I can practice tunes with the exact amp and effects that I'm going to use. When I get in front of the guitar amp, I just need to get a clean sound and give it a little color in the tone. It isn't perfect for gigs, but it is SO easy to practice with and can sound like a Fender, Marshall, Hiwatt, Mesa - whatever. This is starting to sound like an ad, so I'll stop. :-) – Anonymous Jan 18 '11 at 10:47
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[SIZE="2"]Guitar Gear: Gibson '61 RI SG, Dean Cadillac Select, Charvel 475 Special, BC Rich NJ Bich, Gibson Faded V, MIM Strat, Warmoth Tele, LP Copy, Yamaha Acoustic, VHT Pittbull Fifty/ST, VOX VT30, Blackheart BH5H, '72 Hiwatt 4123 Cab, Traynor TS-50, POD XT, 16 ohm THD Hotplate, 80's Peavey Rage combo, Boss ME-50, Russian Big Muff, Graphic Fuzz
So when you plugged your guitar in and tried to play it electrified, you couldn't get any bass tone out of the guitar-the bass strings didn't go over the polepieces of the pickups! When you tried to fret notes along the low E string, your fingers would fall off of the fretboard. That one error turned an otherwise beautiful, comfortable and very functional instrument into something that played and sounded like crap.
Most overdrive/distortion pedals can be used in two ways: a pedal can be used as a "boost" with an already overdriven amplifier to drive it further into saturation and "color" the tone, or it can be used with a completely clean amplifier to generate the whole overdrive/distortion effect. With care - and with appropriately chosen pedals - it is possible to "stack" multiple overdrive/distortion pedals together, allowing one pedal to act as a 'boost' for another.[44]
The basic function of the volume knob is to change the level of your guitar’s volume output in a smooth and even way. But there’s more to it than that. Some players use the volume knob as a means of boosting their signal to make solos pop out. For example, if you keep your volume dialed in at seven or eight and perhaps lean on your amp a little more for output, you’ve got two or three more notches to ride your loudness up via the knob when it’s really time to burn. No need to spend money on a volume pedal, and unlike distortion or overdrive pedals this doesn’t change your sound much.
How it sounds: Ex. 1a demonstrates the treble-cut control—nothing surprising here. Ex. 1b features the bass-cut. With a clean tone like this, it’s a bit subtle, though you can hear the difference if you focus on the low notes. But Ex. 1c adds a vintage-style germanium Fuzz Face with the gain and volume maxed. With the guitar’s tone control wide-open, the signal easily overpowers my vintage Fender brownface—your typical Fuzz Face fart. As I gradually trim bass via the guitar, the tone acquires greater punch and clarity. I remain on the neck pickup throughout—the only thing changing is the guitar’s bass pot setting. The extreme-cut settings near the end of the clip may sound harsh in isolation, but they can be perfect in a band context. At the end of the clip I max the bass pot again to underscore how much the tone has changed. It ain’t subtle.
While an acoustic guitar's sound depends largely on the vibration of the guitar's body and the air inside it, the sound of an electric guitar depends largely on the signal from the pickups. The signal can be "shaped" on its path to the amplifier via a range of effect devices or circuits that modify the tone and characteristics of the signal. Amplifiers and speakers also add coloration to the final sound.

I'm not sure if it's been made clear or not yet, but the imported firewood that had a Kay brand name on it in the seventies bears no relation to the products of the the Kay Co. of Chicago USA. It's not all plywood either; they had a range of total crap to not-so-crappy models. I never much liked their p.u.s or their necks. This is a good body (late 40's K-44) with a better (Harmony!) neck.
The E-18 and EM-18 were basically the same guitar differing only in electronics. The E-18 featured two DiMarzio humbucking pickups, a DiMarzio PAF at the neck and a DiMarzio Super Distortion at the bridge. In addition to the regular controls, the E-18 had mini-toggle phase switch. Production of the E-18 began in April of ’79 and about 5,307 (about 1,320 a year) were made until the guitar ended in early 1982.
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The Hal Leonard Bagpipe Method is designed for anyone just learning to play the Great Highland bagpipes. This comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide serves as an introduction to the bagpipe chanter. The accompanying DVD includes video lessons with demonstrations of all the examples in the book! Lessons include: the practice chanter, the Great Highland Bagpipe scale, bagpipe notation, proper technique, grace-noting, embellishments, playing and practice tips, traditional tunes, buying a bagpipe, and much more!.
Up for sale, a 1961 Fender Super in excellent condition and in perfect working order. And of course this is the most compact Brownface-era amp to feature the "Harmonic Vibrato" circuit. The circuit has just been thoroughly tested by our techs here at Mike & Mike's Guitar Bar and almost all of the original blue Ajax capacitors in the preamp are intact.
Paul Landers, of Neue Deutsche Härte band Rammstein has a signature guitar based on his custom-built guitar. It features a mahogany body with a maple cap finished in satin black with silver binding only around the front of the body. The neck is also made of mahogany and features an Obeche fingerboard with no inlays or binding. Hardware includes a hardtail tune-o-matic bridge and Grover locking keystone tuners. The guitar also feature chrome-covered EMG pickups; an 81 in the bridge, and a 60 in the neck. It also only has a single volume control and a 3-way pickup toggle switch.
As his Tuareg brethren continue their separatist insurgency in northern Mali, the leader of Tinariwen again can lay claim to being one of the world’s few literal rebel rockers. Ibrahim gets credit for inventing the modern Tuareg electric guitar style adopted by Etran Finatawa, Bombino, and other Saharan musicians. He generates this gritty, grungy, churning sound by hammering open strings on his Fender axe in a laid-back desert boogie reminiscent of his late northern Mali peer Ali Farka Touré.
Like so much else, analog delays were first made possible by a shift in the available technology in the mid 1970s, in this case the advent of affordable delay chips. Techies call these “bucket brigade delay chips” because they pass the signal along in stages from the input pin to the output pin—with as many as from 68 to 4096 stages. Inject a signal, govern the speed at which it gets passed from stage to stage, tap the output and, voila, you’ve got echo. It’s clear from this that the more stages in the chip, the longer the delay the circuit can achieve. The longer the delay, however, the greater the distortion in the wet signal, so most makers compromised to keep maximum settings within acceptable delay/noise ratios.
Fret gauge might have a bigger impact on playing feel than on tone for many guitarists. Wider frets are often attributed a smoother, more buttery playing feel, which also makes it easier to bend strings. Ease of bending is also enhanced by taller frets, whether wide or narrow. Narrow frets shouldn’t be too hard to bend on, unless they are badly worn down, and they also leave a little more finger room on the fretboard—particularly in the higher positions— which might suit some players better.
Dismantled Fender Telecaster neck pick-up, showing the exposed enammeled, very fine, copper wire, wound on a bobbin around 6 magnets sitting below each string. From Mojo Pickups - 50's Telecaster Rewind. In case you are wondering the metallic case (used to be high-chrome content alloy) acts as a hardware low-pass filter, dispersing the magnetic field of the high frequency vibrations of the string across all 6 poles, but allowing long wavelength, low group velocity, bass frequencies to be captured relatively unhindered— the reason for this is quite complicated and the subject of a solid state physics class which we will not go into here.
Opening the case, the AE doesn't disappoint. There are the classic lines of the AE body, with just the right amount of bling, you instantly feel that you are looking at a quality instrument. As you'd expect from Ibanez, the neck, quite frankly is a dream. Featuring its advanced comfort profile to be found on all the AE range, it is slim and relatively shallow and combined with the silky satin finish makes it a joy to play. Tonally, the combination of Sitka spruce and the bracing result in a guitar that is seriously bright while still being well balanced and that definitely projects. It also sustains forever and, while uncomplicated, will sit exceptionally well in a band situation. At this price, the AE500 is a serious contender and gives the Martins and Gibsons in this price range a run for their money.

Here we have another Vintage Japanese GREAT find this example a beautiful pretty much exact copy of a vntage Martin D-45 ... this is a very High Quality built Lawsuit era Aria Pro II Model AW40. Made in Japan. From information on the Internet concerning dating these, the guitar's serial number would lead to 1976 manufacture. However, I could not find the AW40 model cataloged until the late 70's... but its a 76.. is consistent with all others. THIS is one beautiful guitar! it exudes fine detailed craftsmanship this was Aria's flagship dreadnought of this time period with D41-ish features. From an original vintage Aria catalog, AW40 features include: "Dreadnought sized, Solid Sitka Spruce top, Solid Brazilian Rosewood back and sides, bridge fingerboard and veneer headstock overlay with MOP logo, Marquetry Purfling" ( Top looks to be solid with the sides & back appears to me to be laminated )The catalog can be viewed at matsumoku.org, a site that deals with the history of Matsumoku made instruments like Aria, Electra and others. This guitar has the Martin classic snowflake mother of pearl inlays, abalone binding and rosette, and fully bound headstock and gorgeous rosewood fingerboard. Headstock also has a Rosewood overlay. The bookmatched rosewood on the back side is especially easy on the eyes. The guitar is all original with no repairs and with original tuning keys. It is in JVG Rated condition as excellent used vintage 8.8/10 WoW...its 35 years old and the woods have opened up now like fine wine the tone is richer & mellowed as only time can provide. No cracks or repairs ever. It plays very well with good action and has a nice warm rich tone. The Neck is arrow straight. Frets have minimal wear with no buzzing anywhere on the fingerboard....this is the one! At this link you can view more pictures of this guitar please cut & paste the following link: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/AriaPro2AW40D45BrazilianRosewood?authkey=Gv1sRgCOmS2c3RvMGpUg#slideshow/5609409732594635106.
Whether you use it to move on to fingerstyle guitar or integrate it into a hybrid technique, mastering the right hand in this finite way will make you a better player. In addition to the progressive book, you can download the song samples, which are enriched with the ability to slow them down, change keys, and set looping points to help you master parts one at at time.
When you are also tracking a close mic at the same time, you might try variations of the approaches discussed in the sections above on distant-miking or ambient-miking to get a little or a lot more room sound into the brew. This often will capture the best overall sound for a range of musical styles – the close mic delivers punch and plenty of midrange grind (depending on mic choice), while the distant mic – placed from about 12″ away to several feet – adds depth, dimension, and the natural reverberation of the space. After careful consideration for both mic placements (using the “position, listen, re-position” techniques discussed above to find ideal on-the-track sound from each mic), some skill in the mixing process is also often required to make the most of any multi-mic setup. The discussion about phase alignment in the sidebar (“Correcting Phase Issues”) is often a big part of this post-tracking approach to maximizing multi-mic techniques, but also be aware that you can use whatever proportional blend of the two tracks works best, a variety of effects and dynamic treatments on each track, and whatever panning of the pair best suits your overall mix, from dead-on together to any different pan of each within the stereo field.
Recently picked myself up a second J28SCDL Jumbo, which was set up beautifully and I have to say it truly is an amazing guitar. It could give some of the higher priced guitars a run for its money. Lovely sound, creative design and clearly a lot of guitar for your money. I seriously encourage you not to over look Washburn when looking for a good guitar at an affordable price. Might end up your favorite guitar!
In 2013, Gibson introduced the Government Series of Les Paul, SG, Flying V, Explorer and ES-335 guitars which were constructed solely of tonewood the US government seized but later returned to Gibson after the resolution of the company's Lacey Act violation in 2011. The guitars were finished in "government grey" and also featured decorations which intended to draw attention to the issue of government. A year later in 2014, Gibson released the Government Series II[77] of guitars, which were essentially the same as the first series, only finished in a new color: "government tan".
The varying amplified current of the valve is connected through the first coil of wire (primary) and creates a varying magnetic field. The varying magnetic field created by the primary coil, causes electricity to be generated in the second coil of wire, which is wound tightly around the first. Electricity is transferred to the second coil only when the magnetic field is changing, not stationary. The iron core of the transformer keeps the magnetic field contained so little is lost. The transfer is very efficient. The secondary coil is connected directly to the speaker. The reduced secondary voltage is adjusted by the ratio of turns between the 2 coils. Eg 1,000 turns on the primary and 100 turns on the secondary would change the voltage 10:1. Most output transformers have a turn’s ratio of approx 20:1.
“Spectrum ‘5’ has an unusually thin neck. To achieve the proper rigidity in this fast action neck Teisco had to select the hardest (and the costliest) material available…Ebony. The adjustable neck is fashioned out of 5 plys [sic] of laminated Ebony to insure maximum strength. The fingerboard of the Spectrum ‘5’ is likewise fashioned out of Ebony. Note the unique position markers and the extra wide, easy to finger frets.

From the outset, wooden bodies had been sourced from existing guitar manufacturers, particularly the plywood student guitar bodies made by theRegal Musical Instrument Company. Dobro had granted Regal a license to manufacture resonator instruments. By 1937, it was the only manufacturer, and the license was officially made exclusive. Regal continued to manufacture and sell resonator instruments under many names, including Regal, Dobro, Old Kraftsman, and Ward. However, they ceased all resonator guitars production following the U.S. entry into the Second World War in 1941.


Wampler would be considered a boutique pedal manufacturer, which means they'll tend to be a little more expensive, but also more likely to give their products more creative attention and include features like true bypass, which you don't get with Boss pedals. It's also a unique blend of delay layers and reverb tones, which can really draw you in and make you want to deviate from the cheaper reverb pedals.

ESP is notable for using active pickups — as opposed to the nearly universal use of passive pickups. Active pickups make use of internal amplification inside the guitar, so that the pickups produce a hotter, louder, and richer sound. The concept is very effective, however it requires the incorporation of a 9V power supply inside the guitar. This can be a great inconvenience if the battery dies and the guitar is not playable.


Primarily, reverb pedals tend to give you a lot more variety and control over the effect than you'll have with an amplifier. In fact, most amps that have reverb will have a single reverb knob that you turn up for more of the effect, or down for less. This can work if you use reverb sparingly, but if you're into the effect and like to use it a lot, that's not enough control to really get the most out of your reverberated tone.
Midco International, a former musical distributor, sold the Lotus brand as an exclusive trademark of guitars during the 1970s and 1980s. Like many other distributors, Midco commissioned a manufacturer in Asia to build guitars under a unique brand name. However, many of these factories in Asia received requests to build guitars for multiple manufacturers/distributors, meaning the same guitar could essentially end up under multiple trademarks. This isn’t much different from what Harmony, Kay, and other house-brand jobbers from the Chicago area were doing in the 1940s through the 1960s.

Flat tops from 1970 to present are considered to be excellent utility instruments, but are not collectible. Staring in 1976, Martin has been undergoing many changes with numerous reissues, new models, limited editions, etc. Workmanship has improved greatly from the early 1970's, and Martin is now producing some of its best guitars in over 20 years. While not currently collector's items, these intruments have excellent workmanship, sound, and playability.

For experienced players, you already know what kind of questions need to be brought up when purchasing a guitar. For beginners, a great starting point is to look at what your favorite guitarists play. By taking your own musical tastes into consideration, you can narrow down your choices to models that will provide the tone and sound you already know and love. But whatever you're looking for, you can be certain that the perfect guitar for you can easily be found, right here. Just take a look around and see for yourself.
A variety of labels are used for level attenuation potentiometers (knobs) in a guitar amplifier and other guitar equipment. Electric guitars and basses have a volume control on the instrument that attenuates the signal from selected pickups. There may be two volume controls on an electric guitar or bass, wired in parallel to mix the signal levels from the neck and bridge pickups. Rolling back the guitar's volume control also changes the pickup's equalization or frequency response, which can provide pre-distortion equalization.

Finally, the ’37 amplifier illustrated by both Sorkin and Grossman was the Supro Model D Amplifier, a little, dark-covered affair which – at 17″ by 91/2″ – basically looked like a little radio. It had a little metal “suitcase” handle, and the speaker was on the left side of the front. The circular grill hole was broken by two horizontal strips. This had five tubes, eight watts of power output, and an 8″ speaker. Inside were two compartments, one for the chassis and one for the speaker. The cost was $40. The Model D was made, again, by Webster and Bulwin in L.A.


Updated! Now has complete information on how to set up a guitar with a tremolo bar including the Floyd Rose Tremolo System. A complete step-by-step guide to maintenance and setup of your electric guitar. This guide, packed with images, will show every aspect of essential electric guitar care such as changing the strings, adjusting the neck, and setting the action to match your playing style. It will also show you how to fix common electric guitar problems such as buzzing strings, scratchy pots and much more. Electric Guitar Repair and Maintenance is a great resource for any guitar owner. Now at a lower price!
Similar to five-string bass guitar tuning, seven-string tuning allows for the extra string a fourth lower than the original sixth string. This allows for the note range of B standard tuning without transposing E standard guitar chords down two and a half steps down. Baritone 7-string guitars are available which features a longer scale-length allowing it to be tuned to a lower range.
MAKING A TEMPLATE Once you have traced out your design to the wood you can start routing. I recomend making a template first for the body rout out of 1/4" hard board or something equivalent to that. The professionals use cnc machines to carve and rout the bodies but smaller shops will use templates made from acrylic. The hard board works just fine, but might not last as long. You can also rout the body by hand and forget the template but if you mess up there's no going back so be carefull if you do.
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In pop and rock music, the electric guitar is often used in two roles: as a rhythm guitar, which plays the chord sequences or progressions, and riffs, and sets the beat (as part of a rhythm section); and as a lead guitar, which provides instrumental melody lines, melodic instrumental fill passages, and solos. In a small group, such as a power trio, one guitarist switches between both roles. In large rock and metal bands, there is often a rhythm guitarist and a lead guitarist.
In his early days, Jimmy James, as he was then known, played in rhythm sections, backing artists like Little Richard, B.B. King and Ike and Tina Turner. It isn’t until 1966, when he moved to London and formed the Experience, that Jimi Hendrix was able to cut loose and start getting the attention he deserved for his magnificent guitar work. Alarmingly, Hendrix was virtually unknown in the U.S. until he played at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967—the legendary performance in which he doused his Fender Stratocaster with lighter fluid and set it on fire.

Gibson’s drive to recapture the magic of the original “Patent Applied For” humbucker pickups of the 1950s culminated with the introduction of the Burstbucker line in the early 1990s. In 2002, Gibson followed up this innovative accomplishment with yet another breakthrough in pickup design—the Burstbucker Pro, designed specifically for the new Les Paul Standards. The Burstbucker Pro features an Alnico V magnet (instead of the Alnico II), which offers slightly higher output and allows preamps to be driven a little harder to achieve a more natural break-up. Like all Burstbuckers, the Burstbucker Pro has asymmetrical coils—true to the original PAFs—which supply a more open sound. The Burstbucker Pro Neck is wound slightly less than the original PAFs, while the Burstbucker Pro Bridge is slightly overwound for increased output. The Burstbucker Pro pickups are also wax potted to allow loud volume pressures with minimal feedback.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Nut Width: 47.6mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Piranha Tooth - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 26.5" (67cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line - Bridge: Floyd Rose Special Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Jackson Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan Nazgul/Sentient - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Bright Blue - Made In: America
If any item fails to meet your expectations at any time, please return it for a refund or exchange. From tuners to endpins, everything we sell at Stewart-MacDonald is backed by our rock-solid guarantee of satisfaction. This is how we do business, ever since selling our first 5-Star Banjo Head in 1968. We proudly continue this tradition by offering quality products and standing behind them.

A common mistake that most beginners do is buying a guitar without checking the wood quality. Many sellers deceive buyers with shiny and very attractive guitars that are of very poor quality and come in cheap prices. We can help you out of this trap so that you aren’t fooled into buying a poor quality guitar. You can visit our website before you make your purchase, and read through the specifications of any guitar. By doing this you will know the kind and quality of wood that has been used to make a guitar before you decide to buy it. So ensure you check the wood quality of a guitar before you consider buying it.
Have you ever looked at a guitar and wondered, "How do they make that?" Or thought to yourself, "I bet that I could build my own guitar," but never actually tried it? I have built several electric guitars over the years and through trial and error have learned many helpful tips that anyone who might want to tackle this sort of project needs to know before starting out. This kind of thing does require some wood working skill and also requires some specific tools as well but not all the fancy stuff that a guitar manufacture has. Building an electric guitar is time consuming and requires the completion of several steps before your project gets finished but be patient and you'll be happy with the results. I tend to go into detail so as not skip any steps or tips you need along the way, and use pics from other projects that I did as well so you can get more that on reference. If you set out to make a guitar you'll find that it takes quite a bit of time so you'll have time enough to go back and read other info if you just want to skim through the first go round. So I hope this helps all the future guitar builders out there!
Are you seeking reliable information and or the evaluation of your vintage guitar's actual real world value today?.... JVGuitars has a simple solution and that is a Joe's Vintage Guitars E-Guitar Appraisal and they are only $45.00 per instrument its fast and its painless and will be conducted by email with no need for damage risk or shipping to and from. Help support JVGuitars service today and go ahead and just order your E-Guitar Appraisal NOW!.. We can send a quick Paypal invoice to you for this E-Appraisal and get started.... ORDER YOUR JVG- E-Guitar Appraisal TODAY! email us your request NOW for your Appraisal at JVGuitars@gmail.com
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He embodies the stylish sideman identity forged by guitar greats like George Harrison and Keith Richards: a neatly trimmed pudding-basin haircut, and a stage presence that never upstages the frontman. Yet, he is intriguing in his own right. Marr’s post-Smiths career has been stellar. He’s worked with everyone from New Order’s Bernard Sumner (in Electronic) to Oasis to John Frusciante, and has been quite active recently with both Modest Mouse and the Cribs. He has an uncanny knack for being around whenever cool music is happening.
While guitar straps come in a variety of different materials, El Dorado only uses leather in theirs, so rest assured you're getting exceptional quality here. If you're going for a cool western persona, try starting your search with the top-rated Vintage Hand-Tooled Leather Guitar Strap, featuring classic basketweave embossing backed with genuine sheepskin shearling. This hand-engraved strap is finished with a solid nickel buckle and loops for a truly sophisticated look you'll be proud to showcase.
Straight away meeting the essential criteria and tonal platform for a good small solid state combo amp for practicing at low volumes with a pocket friendly price tag is Orange Crush 20RT. This dual channel 20 watt guitar amplifier that also comes in a 35 watt version is the upgraded model of the well received Orange Crush 20 for having a built-in spring reverb effect and a chromatic tuner which are the kind of features great for daily use.

“A magnet doesn’t have a tone, per se – you can’t put it to your ear and hear anything. It’s really the engine that drives the coils in a pickup. In a humbucker you’ve got a bar magnet located under the coils; if it’s a Stratocaster or a Telecaster you’ve got magnetic rods that are in the centre. But essentially they’re all doing the same thing: throwing up a magnetic field that the guitar strings vibrate in when they’re plucked.
Interesting cosmetics and great playing 4-string, Factory, but "custom re-built" Fretless bass. Appears to be re-finished. I had to buy this, as I recognized it immediately as a great "player", fretless bass. Adjustable P-J passive / dynamic pickup configuration sounds great. Separate volume and tone controls. Appears to be a "re-finish", in interesting "Fleck-Tone" gray paint. We think it is not the original finish, but it could be original. Someone did an incredible job it if is a re-fin, as the routed edges are perfectly finished and all parts had to have been removed with room made for the extra finish thickness. No worries about finger prints with this one. Un-bound, graphite? or other synthetic material, ebony black fingerboard  w/ dot inlay side markers on a solid mahogany neck with a 4-bolt neck joint. Black anodized tail piece perfect and rust-free. Finger board near new condition. Features 4 high quality, "sealed" tuning machines that work perfectly and hold tune. Plays and sounds great! Lots of fun. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!). 34.5" scale length. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .040 "Round-wound" strings (yes I know flat wounds are more correct for fretless, but I prefer a bit more brightness. You are free to install flats once you own it). No case or bag included.
With a typical Strat single coil pickup and assuming an instrument cable capacitance of 500pF, 250K tone pot, 0.022uF cap, guitar plugged in to a 1Meg input, the range of the tone control is roughly from 6.0kHz -3dB (tone fully clockwise – with a resonant peak of +7.4dB at 3.9kHz) to 950Hz (tone fully anti-clockwise – with a resonant peak of +4.5dB at 594Hz). These figures vary from pickup to pickup and depending on the instrument cable capacitance.
Let me shoot you some names Mr Pro Guitar player. When those you mention can play with the likes of Jack Pearson you can put them on a list. You didn’t even touch on country or bluegrass so I have to assume you know nothing about them. So let me throw this out there. There is only ONE called Mr. Guitar. Chet Atkins. His protege, Jerry Reed is another great. Let’s try Merle Travis, Jody Maphis and in recent years Redd Volkaert. I think you need to expand your listening radius. Let’s not forget the man who likely has his name on your guitar, Mr. Les Paul. Then I would ask you listen to bluegrass flatpicking. You want speed? These guys can play with Ygnwgie and do it on a Martin D28.

I wanna weigh in, I’m just an average player but having one of the best luthiers around and talking to them really gives you an idea of what quality your getting from a guitar. I play a martin DC 16gte, my singer plays a Chinese knock off Taylor. No one can tell the difference when he switched to the real genuine 314 CE Taylor (basically made the same way as the Chinese one), and we get no complaints about either guitar. Save your money, (buy quality) or buy the Chinese knock off and find it’s made the same and it will make you the same money playing and feel just as good in your hand as the 1000 dollar plus Taylor. Conclusions for Taylor or martin fans is don’t go name brand cause they (known or unknown) swear by them, is all personal preference, try everything in every price range find what’s right for you. My $750 DC 16gte Martin was right for me. My singer the 914ce Taylor Chinese knock off (327 bucks new) suits him better than his 1200 dollar original Taylor 314ce.

A combination of standard 6 string tuning and a 7th string dropped one full step for power chords, used by deathcore bands such as Suicide Silence, Oceano, and Whitechapel, as well as other bands such as Lacuna Coil, Blotted Science, In This Moment, Chimaira (on Pass Out of Existence and Crown of Phantoms), and occasionally Scar Symmetry, Escape the Fate, King 810, The Devil Wears Prada, Dry Kill Logic, Eldest 11, December In Red, A Fall To Break, and CFO$ on some songs. Triumphant Return guitarist Matti varies this tuning by dropping both the low B to A and low E to D and raising the high B and E a half-step to C and F (A-D-A-D-G-C-F).


When connecting more than one pickup, it’s important to follow the manufacturer’s color codes and wiring diagrams so that the phase relationship is correct. The phase relationship of a pickup is determined by the winding direction of the coil and the polarity of the magnets. The two coils of the traditional humbucker are connected in series with the phase relationship shown in Fig. 1. Most modern Stratocaster® style guitars with three single-coil pickups are supplied with a reverse wound/reverse polarity middle pickup for a parallel hum canceling effect when the guitar is switched to a two pickup position (e.g. neck & middle pickup together) as shown in Fig. 2.
The full-size electric guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul SL, Ibanez GRGA120 Gio, Indio 66 Classic, Indio Retro DLX Quilted Maple, Jackson JS11 Dinky, Squier by Fender Affinity Series Jazzmaster, Squier by Fender HSS Bullet Strat, and Yamaha Pacifica PAC012. The short-scale guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul Express, Ibanez GRGM21 Mikro, Jackson Dinky Minion JS1X, Jackson Rhoads Minion JS1X, and Squier by Fender Mini Strat.
The pre-1945 braces have a scooped or "scalloped" profile, making them lighter in design and weight. Functionally this means a greater vibrating surface (the guitar's top), and provides stronger bass response. Why did the Martin Company change from the lighter scalloped braces to heavier braces? The answer is in the strings. Many guitarists of that time were using heavier gauge strings, and these heavier strings were tough on the lightly constructed scalloped-braced Martins (especially on D-models with the long 25.4" scale). Martin didn't make a heavier guitar to withstand the extra string tension, so they compensated by adding more rigid (non-scalloped) braces to the guitar's top.
I am new to guitar but had played Baritone in grades school thru high school in a small school with a band teacher who went on to Iowa State. So I wasn’t finding where notes were and started watching guitar/music theory and found several who headed me to learn my Pentatonic E minor scale before I have finished with chords. I wanted to know where notes are on fretboard.
Godin (pronounced Go-dan) was founded in 1972 by Robert Godin in Canada and now owns a number of highly respected acoustic guitar brands including Art & Lutherie, Simon and Patrick, La Patrie and Seagull. Their electric guitars, produced under the Godin brand, have been played by greats including Roger Waters, Elliott Sharp and John McLaughlin. Many of their high-end models come with 3 types of pickups - regular electric guitar pickups, piezo pickups for producing an acoustic-like sound, and Synth/MIDI pickups for making any kind of sound you want.
Far as commercial recordings go, the oldest recording seems to be by the Hawaiian group Noelani Hawaiian Orchestra in 1933, which did four songs featuring the electric lap steel recorded on Victor records. However, the guitarist is unknown. Bob Dunn recorded electric lap steel in 1935, as part of the country swing group Milton Brown and His Musical Brownies. George Barnes recorded "Sweetheart Land" and "It's a Low-Down Dirty Shame" with Big Bill Broonzy in early 1938, followed a couple weeks later by  Eddie Durham with the Kansas City Five. Barnes played conventional guitar, not lap steel, so that's the first recording of a "conventional" electric guitar performance.
In regards to which is best I personally think you pretty much got it right! Folks can piss n moan all they want but the facts are facts. Gibson, Fender, PRS ect all make fantastic guitars, time-tested tools of the trade. Many of you feel the need to want to publicly put down a certain brand in favor of another, there's good n bad in all of them!! If I could afford a Gibson Les Paul I would get one! Sure I could pull out the plastic n get one but I don't wanna have to do that just yet. I have no shame in purchasing a cheap guitar as long as I like it, to me if a guitar has a good smooth fast neck ......... it's a good guitar!! You can always swap pups n hardware but the neck is a little more complicated. I have a Fender Squire Strat, it is an "E" series Squire, I think it was made from 1984-87, and I can tell you that I will be 50 years old in May of this year and the neck on this Squire is the best I have ever felt on any guitar I have owned!! and yes it was a fairly cheap guitar. Now I hear that the "E" series of Squire Strats are supposed to be highly sought after or something, I don't know all about that, all I know is that I love the way this guitar plays n feels in my hands n riding in front of my belly! So folks don't put a guitar down simply because you can't afford it, like I said they are good guitars for a reason, same goes for the cheap guitars, don't knock 'em 'til you try 'em, there are some mighty good players out there to be had for cheap $$$, bottom line ..... regardless of the name on the head ..... if you can afford it, if it feels n looks the way you like n has a good neck then buy it n give it the love it deserves, it'll love you back in ways you never imagined!! Happy pickin n God bless
Hi, my cousin gave me a bass guitar, the brand is called Cyclone by EKS Technology Inc. I looked it up and I could find barely anything. the bass has been in his garage since the early '90s and he told he that Fender bought the brand sometime around then, but I still can't find anything about the brand, apart from that they also produce electric guitars. almost as if the brand has been wiped from history. Any information regarding this brand would be gratefully accepted!
Included here after the filters are shifters like your standard pitch shifters, harmonizers, or octave pedals. You want to take care of any pitch changing (I'd argue even vibrato should happen here) before you add other effects into your signal, since they will react to the audio signal itself. You don't want to add reverb and then try to pitch shift, because the signal you send becomes too complex and inaccurate for such a precise effect.

Now you might not have heard of Beauchamp or the company he founded to capitalize on his neat idea, which was initially called Ro-Pat-In Corporation, then Electro String. Eventually, the company took the name of its president and cofounder, George's friend Adolph Rickenbacker—and the rest, as they say, is history. Many others have built on Beauchamp's work since then, constantly trying to refine and improve the sound. Here's an improved pickup design by another guitar great, (Clarence) Leo Fender, from about a decade later:
We spent 46 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. If you want to become a real guitar hero, you'll need the right ax. Our selection of electric guitars includes something for everyone, from simple, inexpensive options best suited for beginners to top-tier models coveted by amateur and professional musicians alike. We've ranked them all here by playability, tonal range, durability, and style. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best electric guitar on Amazon.

Nut slots too deep: Take a course file and file the top of the nut 1/2 the distance you want to raise the slots. Catch the filings on a piece of paper. Tape both sides of the nut with masking tape and then fill the slots with the filings. Soak the filings with thin superglue. Press into place with a toothpick. When dry, refile the slots. The slots should be made so the string sits in about 1/2 to 3/4 thier diameter. Slots should be wider, and taper downwards on tuner side. Square slots are acceptable.


Although most acoustic guitars have steel strings, classical and flamenco guitars use nylon strings. Nylon strings produce a mellower, softer sound. It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. Nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
Tailpieces are the end of the highway for guitar strings. Or maybe the beginning, since strings are first threaded through or over tailpieces, or pegged into them, before they are pulled along the fretboard for their big meeting with the tuning pegs. Essentially their function is to anchor the strings, which means most guitar tailpieces must be strong enough to withstand the combined tension of at least six strings without lifting off.

This is an American Gibson Les Paul electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This soundfont has the same presets as the Fender Jaguar above (except it does not include the slaps and slides preset) and is also recorded with the volume on the edge of break up on the amp (read the Fender Jaguar above for description of amplifier setting). This guitar is suited to jazz and blues but can easily be used for rock if used with more distortion. It has a very full rounded sound with good sustain and when played harder has a bite to the attack. This guitar is a classic that has been used in alot of types of music.
When two pickups are wired in series, a good portion of the treble frequencies is lost because the long pickup wire works like a resistor. Any resistor in the signal path will suppress the signal. The formula works like this: The longer the wire, the higher the resistance, and the more treble is lost. We all know this from guitar cables: When you use a very long guitar cable, the sound isn’t as detailed and transparent as it is with a shorter cable. A long cable acts as a resistor.
Since 1996, ESP’s subsidiary LTD has been creating quality guitars at very affordable prices. The EC-256, for example, is a great guitar if you’re looking to spend around $400. With extra-jumbo frets and a thin-U neck, this guitar is super comfortable to play. These guitars are known for their reliability and excellent build quality. And with a lightweight body, they make for great gigging guitars.
I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar. I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best. You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment. You get treated like a valued customer. Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars. They have a great variety of quality instruments. Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars. A place like this is so rare nowadays.

SG style guitars are synonymous with hard rock thanks to guitarists such as Angus Young of AC/DC and Tommy Iommi of Black Sabbath. As a result, most customers interested in SG guitar kits are looking to play hard rock and heavier styles of music in general. But limiting the SG to one specific style of music really doesn’t do justice to the versatility of the instrument.
Phaser: A phaser or "phase shifter" creates a slight rippling effect—amplifying some aspects of the tone while diminishing others—by splitting an audio signal in two and altering the phase of one portion. Three well-known examples of phaser are the two handed tapping part on the Van Halen instrumental "Eruption" and the keyboard parts on Billy Joel's "Just the Way You Are" and Paul Simon's "Slip Slidin' Away".[77]
Plate reverb and spring reverb were the first attempts to simulate reverb in a portable device. The plate and the spring, respectively, are made of metal and attached to a transducer. The signal is fed to the transducer, which causes the plate or spring to vibrate. Reverberations bounce around the plate or spring. A pickup at the other end, converts the spring or plate's vibrations back into an electrical signal.
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