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Nowadays, you can find many in-between sets, but you'll want to have a solid understanding of what the gauges are in terms of actual measurement and how they affect your ability to perform with your desired tone.  These relatively open descriptions will also differ from acoustic strings to electric strings, so your experience in handling many types of guitar strings and gauges is paramount in making the right choice.

également et la corde pourra alors être ajustée à la hauteur souhaitée. L'Ibanez DOWNSHIFTER vous permet de réduire la hauteur d'une corde à une hauteur prédéfinie en actionnant simplement un petit levier. Pour que l'accordage soit précis, aussi bien en position haute qu'en position basse, vous devez régler les deux positions du levier avant d'utiliser le Downshifter.
In the 2000s, new developments in bass amplifier technology include the use of lightweight neodymium magnets in some higher-priced cabinets and the use of lightweight, powerful Class D amplifiers in some combo amps and amp heads; both of these innovations have made transporting amps and cabinets easier. As well, some 2010s-era bass amps and heads have digital effects units and modelling amplifier features which enable the recreation or simulation of the sound of numerous well-known bass amps, including vintage tube amplifiers by famous brands (e.g., Ampeg SVT-Pro amp heads) and a range of speaker cabinets (e.g., 8x10" cabs). Digital amp and cabinet modelling also makes transporting bass amps and cabinets to gigs and recording sessions easier, because a bassist can emulate the sound of many different brands of very large, heavy vintage gear without having to bring the actual amps and cabs. Another trend for higher-priced and higher-wattage amps and cabinets aimed at professionals is providing Speakon speaker jacks in addition to, or in place of traditional 1/4" speaker jacks. Speakon jacks are considered safer for high wattage amps, since the bassist cannot accidentally touch the "live" parts of the cable end and they lock in, so there is less risk of accidental disconnection. As of 2017, a few digital amp and cabinet modelling amplifiers have a USB input or other computer input, to enable users to download new sounds and presets.
The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.
London and Tokyo’s vintage street-racing motorbikes have inspired the designers, and the guitars from the Revstar collection look and sound accordingly. The idea is to have a diverse range of guitars so that you can be sure to find one that suits you perfectly. They even claim that this guitar is so good that you will consider it to be your other half (maybe even your better half).
Here we have a wonderful vintage 1971 Yamaha FG75 Nippon Gakki this one is from the famous Red Label series by Yamaha well know for Quality Marty like sound made affordable by Yamaha Japan over 45 years ago this guitar has well aged woods not the Faux aged “gassed pressed” high Tech way they are trying to re-create the naturally sweet aged tone that “Old aged instruments can provide “ This one was aged the old fashioned way over decades of time and as a result a surprisingly big sound is produced by this smaller bodied Grand concert like size of the Gibby LGO- but sounds even better for less dough …..Just in Excellent vintage 45+ year old Vintage Red Label Nippon Gakki FG75 .. this baby makes an excellent Parlor style guitar thats fun to play because of its real good play action, and it sounds great... JVGuitars upgraded to Martin bone Nut and compensated saddle and upgraded fancy bridge pins that improved its resonance too .... not a crack, plenty of patina with minor superficial nicks or scratches and such as seen absolutely but no structural damages ... this one plays very nicely and is ready to enjoy .... for a song contact Joe to buy at Joe's Vintage Guitars at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.

While you can play one through an electric guitar amp, an acoustic guitar will sound its best if it is played through a dedicated acoustic amplifier. While similar in structure to electric guitar amps, acoustic amps are primarily designed to offer transparency. In other words, it strives to reproduce the tone of your acoustic guitar’s natural sound as closely as possible. Interestingly, they almost exclusively come in a combo format, while most acoustic amps will have two channels – one for the instrument and the other geared towards microphone use. The AER Compact 60 represents what a great acoustic guitar amp looks and sounds like, with enough power for stage use as well as a high-end organic tone.
The Hughes & Kettner Tube Meister 36 is a distinct looking tube amplifier head that's packed with features. For something that's compact, this amp can do quite a lot of what bigger amps can in terms of functionality, including having three channels that let you switch between clean, crunch and lead and a full set of complementary controls to tweak each channel to your liking. Another interesting feature of this amp is its TSC (Tube Safety Control), which automatically keeps the tube in bias and monitors them to extend their use. Finally, this amp head comes with a built-in Red box DI, so you can plug the amp head straight to any PA system or recording console without any problem. The people also installed a power attenuator into the amp, which lets you lower the rating to just 1 Watt for quiet practice. Wrapping up its features is the built-in reverb, which compliments the amp instead of distracting users.
I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar. I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best. You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment. You get treated like a valued customer. Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars. They have a great variety of quality instruments. Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars. A place like this is so rare nowadays.

What Fender might lack in heavy, modernized features, it makes up for in affordability, novelty and being some of the best all-around guitars in existence. They would also have to be considered some of the most stylistically versatile guitars, covering all kinds of musical genres and songs. We’ll focus primarily on the Standard (non-American) models, since they’re priced below our $700 cut off. If you want to go with something nicer, target the American series Strats and Teles.
Harmony's market share of entry and intermediate-level instruments was it's downfall in the mid-1970s, as it found itself unable to compete with the competition from overseas (particularly Japanese) manufacturers. The higher-end American companies like Guild, Gibson and Fender struggled to some extent too, but the imports were generally aimed at student guitarists rather than professionals.

I must confess -- I am horrible at soldering. So after messing up another wiring harness with my soldering skills, I came across ObsidianWire and purchased out of desperation. Now I wish this would have been my first choice. The wiring sounds awesome, it was a breeze to install and the included switch and input jack completed the upgrade. I would HIGHLY recommend ObsidianWire harnesses." - Ross G Vintage 50s Wiring for Les Paul


I have an old 1964 60watt Australian Goldentone which I love and will keep. Had a Marshall 800 Lead at one time (head and quad box) when I was in a band but let that go when I stopped gigging. I tried a 50W ENGL combo as I was looking for an amp that was easier to cart around than my old Goldentone and I was blown away with the sound and the build quality. The ENGL should be in the top ten.
Read Full Review If you’re looking for a lightweight guitar aside from a Stratocaster. You prefer the quality of tone produced using humbuckers than a single-coil can deliver. This SG model from Epiphone meets that requirements on the overall sound, playabilty and price that fits the under two hundred dollar budget of a beginner. As well as for seasoned players looking at the market for an affordable studio or back-up guitar to bring on stage.
A fuzz pedal is essentially an extreme distortion effect. Because fuzz so radically alters the signal, it is often used sparingly for contrast, rather than as a meat-and-potatoes sound. Since it thickens up the tone so dramatically, fuzz can be fun for intros and solo guitar parts when no other instruments are playing. Jimi Hendrix playing "The Star Spangled Banner" is a classic example of fuzz-infused guitar.
Every guitar player loves pedals. We all have at least a handful in our collection and will always try a new one we come across. When you're starting out, you probably know when you need something, but you aren't exactly sure what it is. You may not even know what flanging or phasing actually does to your signal and how that's different from a chorus effect. We're offering below some great effect choices that will add some character without overtaking your sound, so you can really distill out what each of these effects do. While distortion and overdrive have their place (and are usually the effects beginners jump to initially), the following picks offer some other alternatives that will feed your creativity and help get you started.

This Ibanez has a flamed sycamore top, and delivers a well balanced sound unplugged or plugged in. It has a great finish that is referred to as vintage violin. Owners of this guitar say it sounds great as the similarly priced Seagulls and Yamahas. The price has recently dropped on this guitar, which was a pain point for many owners. At $250 it’s a steal given the quality. The onboard pre amp contains a tuner, which is nice for beginners to always stay in tune. The slim neck will also make for great playability. Click here for more pictures and details.
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The output of the rails is a crunchy, high sustain rock tone that turns your Strat into a much heavier and hard-hitting instrument. The pickguard, pots and five-way volume selector are all included with the wiring taken care of. It’s also really easy to change pickups using a solderless method that allows you to remove and add pickups by simply using screws.
Beyond those generalities, replicating a standard formula for the be-all-end-all tone isn’t possible. Why? Because some people will genuinely pass on a ’59 Les Paul and Marshall stack combination—they might prefer what sounds like a vibraphone under water. Sometimes, a certain “it” factor just grabs musicians and won’t let them go. Waara explains that even in a business as technologically advanced and specialized as Line 6’s tone research, “There’s no escaping that we emotionally say ’Man, that just sounds cool.’ ” Frequently, part of that “cool” factor is imprinted on our brains as a result of a component that we often overlook.

This book comes from the former editor of Guitar One magazine who has been playing since he was 14 years old, so he has a reputation of knowing a his way around a guitar neck AND knowing how to write. Let’s face it, when you are trying to learn guitar through reading a book, the author's ability to write and communicate is crucial. Anyway, this book delivers a “workout program” for your fingers, giving you a technique driven approach to learning the guitar and actually improving in record time. The exercises are designed to help with dexterity and accuracy.


The intervals between the notes of a chromatic scale are listed in a table, in which only the emboldened intervals are discussed in this article's section on fundamental chords; those intervals and other seventh-intervals are discussed in the section on intermediate chords. The unison and octave intervals have perfect consonance. Octave intervals were popularized by the jazz playing of Wes Montgomery. The perfect-fifth interval is highly consonant, which means that the successive playing of the two notes from the perfect fifth sounds harmonious.
Effects are often incorporated into amplifiers and even some types of instruments. Electric guitar amplifiers typically have built-in reverb and distortion, while acoustic guitar and keyboard amplifiers tend to only have built-in reverb. Some acoustic instrument amplifiers have reverb, chorus, compression and equalization (bass and treble) effects. Vintage guitar amps (and their 2010-era reissued models) typically have tremolo and vibrato effects, and sometimes reverb. The Fender Bandmaster Reverb amp, for example, had built-in reverb and vibrato. Built-in effects may offer the user less control than standalone pedals or rackmounted units. For example, on some lower- to mid-priced bass amplifiers, the only control on the audio compression effect is a button or switch to turn it on or off, or a single knob. In contrast, a pedal or rackmounted unit would typically provide ratio, threshold and attack knobs and sometimes "soft knee" or other options to allow the user to control the compression.
I have achieved my best results with this technique when miking resonant hollow-body guitars, getting the mic in as close as possible to the guitarist's picking hand. Large-diaphragm condensers, especially the Neumann U 87 and Manley Cardioid Reference tube mic, have proven superlative performers on big-box guitars such as the Gibson ES-175 (see photo on p. 114). The small-diaphragm Oktava MC 012 and medium-diaphragm Shure KSM32 have worked wonders on solid-body instruments, most notably on improvisational-guitarist Ron Thompson's seven-string custom axe.

For metal there are few better performers than this menacing guitar from Schecter; the signature model of Avenged Sevenfolds lead guitarist Synyster Gates. From the pinstripe double-cutaway mahogany body emerges a hugely-playable thin C-shaped mahogany set neck with ebony fretboard, 24 extra-jumbo frets, and Schecters Ultra-Access construction to allow unhindered access to the highest of frets.

Speaking of session guys, we have Joe Messina, but where are his partners Robert White and Eddie Willis? Or Dennis Coffey? There’s a whole slew of great musicians whose names get forgotten but whose playing we all instantly recognise – alongside the Funk Brothers, there are the likes of Buddy Emmons and Grady Martin from the A Team, and then there’s the Wrecking Crew and the whole LA scene. Someone has already remembered Glen Campbell but how about Howard Roberts and Ted Greene? Whoa! How can you guys have neglected Barney Kessel, truly a top ten contender?


Here we have a truly wonderful sounding example By Yamaha its an OM / 000 style and this guitar is really nice playing FG170 and is from Yamaha Japan Nippon Gawki factory and these 170’s were produced in smaller numbers from 1972 to 1974 and this guitar was made in 1973 and it sounds impressive at twice this price point .This guitar is pretty good and LOUD too because of its being so well made as well as from Quality woods TIME aged woods over the past 40+ years. Its All original too and has been taken excellent care of here in California’s nice climate due to this no checking or weather type of issues we see elsewhere… its neck is great in the hands feel to it and neck structural angle is excellent to this day as a result its action is still good making this guitar fun to play for hours at a time…with excellent resonance and response associated with a very good 40+ year vintage guitar so I believe this guitar is recording worthy it has really well aged tone… someone will be very pleased. Its Construction: Solid Spruce Body top (Solid Spruce laminated with thin layers of Spruce just like Yamaha FG180 Red Label), Mahogany (Sapelli is Japanese Mahogany) back and side Rosewood Fingerboard/Bridge Mahogany (Sapelli) Neck is nice medium profile, and is comfortable for many styles and very easy to play Its Head stock has the Old Three Tuning Forks Logo The Tuners in my opinion are the best original Yamaha design tuners on these vintage Yamaha this one tunes so nice and smoothly and effortlessly and keeps this guitar in tune well as you might be able to tell I really like this old Nippon Gakki Yamaha. This guitars JVGuitars condition ….. used - very good - excellent vintage ]and better than average for near 45 years old. Frets have some play but are excellent used Body back and side has some superficial minor scratches or drinks - overall Beautiful Under the nut placed a 0.4mm sim 43mm nut width and soft V neck profile, importantly Action is very good and is easy on the fingers and is a Pleasure to play. This guitar is absolutely JVGuitars approved and is ready to play for another 45 years!! JVGuitars has thoroughly cleaned and inspected which include: detailed cleaning, strings replaced with a new set, cleaned frets and fret board, set up neck, checked playability and polished entire guitar and have been playing it myself in my office for a few weeks now Oh ya …..Love it! Check all our high res photos out and feel free to ask Joe any questions, You can email me at: JVGuitars@gmail.com thank you for your interest in our Vintage Guitars .
For a relatively new band, Dream State have - in industry parlance - gained some serious frigging traction, playing Reading/Leeds last year, gobbling up streams in the millions and signing to hardcore label par excellence UNFD. Lead guitarist Aled does a deft line in a tapped arpeggio, while breakthrough single White Lies covers a hell of a lot of ground in its four minute runtime - combining Marmozets’ urgency in its opening and Deftones’ dynamics at the close. 
The following year the Standard model received a short-lived redesign seeking to reduce production costs and price on American Stratocasters. This revised version lacked a second tone control, a newly designed Freeflyte vibrato system, and a bare-bones output jack. A reshaped ‘Comfort Contour’ body with deeper forearm and waist contours similar to an early 1960s model was introduced. What it did retain was the 1970s-style headstock decal. The 1982/83 version of the Standard Stratocaster has little in common with the Dan Smith guitar, apart from the period when they were sold, but is sometimes informally (and controversially) presented as a “Dan Smith-era” or “redesign” guitar. After the Standard Stratocaster was discontinued in 1984, Fender Japan produced a 22-fret version with a flat 9.5″ radius and medium-jumbo fretwire until 1986.[14]
I have a Decca that my uncle gave to my dad and he gave to me (I think, he's never really asked for it back since he doesn't play). It's in rough condition, has stripped and rusted screws with a lot of connection issues. But I love the shape, I love the pickguard, I love the all out retro look of it. Any idea on if I should spruce it up with some new screws and seeing what I can do to fix the wiring? And if so, how do I get the cash for such project?
And while he'd heard its calling, Swank didn't move into the field until death arrived at the music shop where he was working. The resident guitar repairman suffered an aortic aneurysm and died. "It was terrible," Swank says. "He was a good friend of mine, but he still had a bunch of stuff in his shop." But Swank was able to step in and finish some of those jobs, and then more jobs began pouring in. The next thing he knew he had built a reputation for himself. "I'm a [guitar] player. I know how I like things to work, how instruments should play."
The idea behind a piezoelectric pickup is more or less the same as with any regular electric guitar pickup. Guitars which utilize this system have a piezoelectric pickup located under the bridge. Once you pick a string, the sound vibration from the string is then interpreted by the pickup, generates an electrical signal, and is then fed into the preamplifier to be boosted to line-level.  You can think of it like a microphone's diaphragm.
Bassists who want a more powerful low end may use a subwoofer cabinet. Subwoofers are specialized for very low frequency reproduction, with typical maximum useful high frequencies of about 150 or 200 Hz, so a subwoofer cabinet must be paired with a full range speaker cabinet to obtain the full tonal range of an electric bass or upright bass. In addition, subwoofers intended for PA system use have much higher power handling requirements than do subwoofer designs for high fidelity home use. Bass guitar players who use subwoofer cabinets include performers who play with extended range basses with include notes between B0 (about 31 Hz); and C#0 (17 Hz) and bassists whose style requires a very powerful sub-bass response is an important part of the sound (e.g., funk, Latin, gospel, R & B, etc.).
The world is full of guys who will zero in on all the details they find inferior about this guitar by noting the rather obvious fact that this is not a Gibson Les Paul Standard costing $3,000.00. There are some people who will complain that this guitar has a bolt on neck. True, the set necks of the more expensive Epiphones and Gibsons are nicer. But, considering the fact that every Fender Stratocaster ever made had a bolt on neck, is this really a big deal? Would Jimi Hendrix have played "Purple Haze" better if his Strat had a set in neck? Probably not.

1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-44? Electric Guitar. 4 single coil Pickups. Great, original Black / Green burst finish. '57 Chevy style aluminum pick guard. "Shark-Fin" headstock. Rosewood fingerboard. Original 4+2 tuners with cast cover. 4-bolt neck joint with an adjustable truss rod. Bridge adjustable for height, intonation and string spacing. 4-Square pole pickups, 4 pots, 4 pickup selectors and a 3 position rotary wafer switch. Some of the pots do things and some don't either by modification or design. The rotary switch simply acts as an On / Off switch. Guitar works great the way it is, or could be configured other ways as well. We have not modified it since we acquired it 8 years ago. It's spent most of it's time in the box, until I decided to get around to listing it. Missing whammy bar as are most every Teisco we have ever owned. The bridge pickup has had one of it's mounting screws changed. The finish is in exceptional shape for a 40 year old guitar (while the photos make the guitar look black the finish is actually a dark green to black burst). Plays and sounds great. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in near new shape with virtually no wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, oiling the fingerboard, nut checked for correct height, neck angle checked, pickup heights checked and adjusted, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .008 when fretted at the first and the body (super low)) adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!) and cleaning and polishing entire instrument. This is our old shops standard $75 tune-up. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .009 strings. No case included.

The Magnums met with a reception roughly as enthusiastic as the previous Breadwinner and Deacon. In the Carter tables it suggests that the Magnum line was redesigned to look like more conventional Fender-style basses with offset double cutaways in 1978. Other than the body shape, the 1263 Magnum III was identical to the I, and the 1264 Magnum IV was the same as the II.
In 1978 the Les Paul Pro Deluxe was introduced. This guitar featured P-90 pickups instead of the “mini-humbuckers” of the Deluxe model, an ebony fingerboard, maple neck, mahogany body and chrome hardware. It came in Ebony, Cherry Sunburst, Tobacco Sunburst or Gold finishes. Interestingly, it was first launched in Europe, rather than the US. It was discontinued in 1983.
The Les Paul Custom then became known as the “tuxedo” Les Paul with its Ebony and Alpine White color finishes, accentuated with shiny gold hardware. The Custom PRO features a classic gold LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge and a gold stopbar tailpiece. You’ll find more gold in the headstock with the gold Grover tuners. It also features a fully bound body, headstock and neck, as well as pearloid fretboard inlays.
After a peak in the 1970s, driven by the use of several high profile players, another lull occurred in the early 1980s. During that time, CBS-Fender cut costs by deleting features from the standard Stratocaster line, despite a blues revival that featured Strat players such as Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Robert Cray and Buddy Guy in their choice of the Stratocaster as a primary blues-rock guitar.[citation needed] Yngwie Malmsteen is known for playing a Stratocaster in the Neo-Classical genre.
The new generation of ‘boomers’ as they were known, thrived with the growing push on consumerism.  This of course included buying records and with the pin ups of Rock and Roll like Elvis and Chuck Berry – they felt part of a new movement which understood them and related to their struggles, such as growing pains, responsibilities and fitting in with society.
The SIX6FDFM’s jaw-dropping aesthetics belie its price tag. It has an arched flame maple top on a bound mahogany body, a bound ebony fretboard, and a three-piece maple/purpleheart neck that has a colorful streak running down the middle. Only a Blue Space Burst finish is available, but, coupled with a matching headstock, it looks good enough to lick.
Hi-Gain (descended from the more generic electric guitar amplification term high-gain) is the sound most used in heavy metal. High gain in normal electric guitar playing simply references a thick sound produced by heavily overdriven amplifier tubes, a distortion pedal, or some combination of both--the essential component is the typically loud, thick, harmonically rich, and sustaining quality of the tone. However, the Hi-Gain sound of modern pedals is somewhat distinct from, although descended from, this sound. The distortion often produces sounds not possible any other way. Many extreme distortions are either hi-gain or the descendents of such. The Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier Series of amps are an example.
Replacing or repairing knobs. Knobs are covers for your pots so you can easily turn them, if any of your knobs are unable to be correctly placed on try due to broken or enlarge holes, place a good amount of tape around the pot's shaft that covers it and try to keep the the knob on the tape. If you cannot do so then you may need to replace your knobs.
Fender made some pretty big waves when they announced their latest line of Mustang amplifiers – primarily because of their sound-shaping abilities. You see, the brand’s modeling amp line has 17 preprogrammed amp models to choose from, as well as an auxiliary input so you can play along to your favorite tunes, and a wealth of included effects. The real highlights of this particular amp, however, can be found outside of the amp itself. You see, it includes a smartphone app that will let you shape the sound of the amp easily and remotely. Better still, the amp comes with its own recording software, so you can capture your songs at your leisure. For something so inexpensive, this amp packs a serious wallop.
On Thursday, mere days after launching a news site for women called the Lily, the Washington Post published a story by Geoff Edgers that mused on the supposed death of the electric guitar. Sales are down at places like Sam Ash and Guitar Center, big guitar makers like Fender and Gibson have seen their revenues decline, and in 2010, acoustic guitars began to outsell electric guitars. Why? According to the piece, it’s because male guitar heroes are dying off and aspiring musicians have no men to look up to. Sad!

I am not satisfied with the sound I am getting from my guitar so I have decided to invest in a new set of strings. I bought an Electric guitar about 1 year ago and have not changed the strings as yet. Since it was not new when I bought it so I do not know how long they have been on it. I am not sure what the gauge of the strings are. I am trying to play lead. Should I go for a .,08 or .09 or a bit higher? I want to do bends as well.
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it's really hard to beat the ric sound. the 335 12's and fender 12's are cool, but really the ric has the sound we're all familiar with. that being said, everyone has different tastes and I encourage you to play as many different ones as possible. Jimmy Page used a Fender 12 on Stairway. I went rick for that early beatles sound. the neck is tiny but it's part of the instrument.
Overdrive pedals are very different to distortion pedals, and without getting too technical, they drive/push your guitar signal harder rather than changing the sound completely like a distortion pedal does. An overdrive pedal retains a lot of the original sound of your guitar and amp but pushes the amplifier harder to give it a heavier, thicker signal. They’re ideally used with valve/tube amps as they push the tubes to their limit and allow them to bring out the more natural distortion that tube amps are so renowned for. Incidentally, we wrote about the best tube amps for home use here, but if you wanted some great practice amps, we also wrote about them here too!
OM-28: Similar to the 000-28 model in body size and ornamentation, but uses a 25.4″ scale, 1-2/4″ nut spacing, and 2-3/8″ string spacing at the bridge. Also known as the “orchestra” model, so named because of its association with banjo players transitioning to guitar in the late 1920s and early 1930s. The 14-fret neck-to-body design was designed to allow greater upper fret access, and thus feel more comfortable to banjo players accustomed to full acces the length of a 24-fret + neck.
Wildwood Guitars is proud to be recognized as one of nine authorized online Gibson dealers. We invite you to browse our extensive inventory and discover the magic of one of the greatest American brands of all time. Located in the heart of Tennessee, the Gibson Memphis factory is known for crafting the majority of Gibson’s incredible semi-hollow and hollowbody instruments. These guitars are overflowing with the soul of the city they’re born in, and they represent the ultimate in both vibe and versatility.
I listen to a lot of internet radio, from soul to death metal. I think it's good to listen to a wide variety of music, even if you're not particularly into certain genres. Each genre has its own qualities when it comes to guitar, so spend time just... listening. Listen to how rhythms, chords and solos are used. You may not know how they're doing it just from listening, but you might like the sound of something which you'll then be inspired to go and investigate independently.
Many consider the D-28 to be ultimate expression of the dreadnought form. ‘Reimagining’ such a guitar could be a poisoned chalice. Fortunately, you can still feel the gravity of that 184 years of history in its high-end guitars. The latest D-28 features forward-shifted bracing, a wider nut and vintage-style aesthetic changes, but it’s the new neck design that really makes this the most comfortable and accessible dreadnought playing experience we can remember for some time. The sound is balanced and maintains the very definition of an ‘all-rounder’. Notes ring out with sustain - that clear piano-like definition we love from Nazareth’s craftsmen. Harmonics come easy and, with strumming, the high mids and treble have choral qualities that don’t overshadow the lower mids. Despite the tweaks, our test model still largely feels like the acoustic equivalent of Leo Fender’s Stratocaster design. Just as that outline is most synonymous with ‘electric guitar’, so to the D-28 continues to embody the dreadnought in look and sound.
While tube technology is still considered state-of-the-art in countries where a potato is regarded as a square meal, these days solid-state and digital amps offer excellent tone for a lot fewer bucks, and with fewer maintenance headaches. However, tube tone is still considered the standard by many top players. Take a blind listening test, and let your ears be the judge.
Rack-mounted effects processors are another option, and are often used in pro and home studios as well as in stage rigs.. These effects units offer the same options as floor-based pedals and multi-effects units. They are simply mounted in a rack, and usually can be controlled with a foot pedal or the controls on their front panels. Newly developed iOS app-based and DAW-based effects add even more options to how you go about building an effects collection.

The Blackheart Killer Ant is another slightly unconventional choice. Features wise, the Killer Ant does not have even the basics found on most beginner amps, yet it costs more money. The only controls on the Killer Ant are a power switch and a volume control. However, what sets the Blackheart Killer Ant apart is the fact it is a tube amp, rather than the cheaper solid state amps used for most beginner amps.


At its core is a combination of solid spruce and maple, which gives it a subtly brighter tone when compared to conventional spruce and mahogany body acoustics. To retain as much of the guitar's acoustic body as possible, Epiphone equipped the Dove Pro with discrete Fishman electronics, with controls that are mounted on the underside of the sound hole.
Finally, there were some twelve Hawaiian lap steels in ’55, the EG-NT, EG-K, EG-Z, EG-A, EG-S, EG-R, EG-L, EG-7L, EG-P, EG-8L, EG-M and EG-NW. Again, since I have no reference materials, there’s no point in attempting any description. However, many of these guitars continued on into the ’60s where we’ll discuss them in detail, and you can probably extrapolate backwards to these mid-’50s models, allowing for pickup changes, etc.
In general, using an acoustic electric guitar expands your possibilities. You are no longer limited to the volume the guitar itself is capable of producing, which can come in pretty handy at times, nor having to mic an amplifier either. With an acoustic electric, you can perform in just about any venue that's worth its salt, without dealing with close miking and a lot of post-processing like equalizing out the boomy low-end.

The main thing to keep in mind regarding vintage guitars: A guitar is worth what somebody will pay for it. There aren’t necessarily rational reasons behind the value of a particular model. Rarity is only really relevant if the guitar in question is part of a group of guitars that are lusted after by many collectors, and many of those collectors are also considering investment potential, so those guitars will never be played and may end up in museums in Europe or Asia. In other words, Rarity means nothing without demand. A rare crappy guitar is still a crappy guitar and if nobody wants it, it’s just firewood. Condition counts for more.
By the turn of the century, new-metal grinders and post-grunge plodders had given loud guitars a bad reputation. Then Jack White hit the reset button. With each savage riff, he reconnected hard rock and roots music and showed that a blues-based band could escape what he calls "note-pushing Stratocaster white-blues bullshit." And he didn't let his analog leanings prevent him from ingenious use of a DigiTech Whammy pedal – the secret behind the faux-bass thunder of "Seven Nation Army" and the screaming leads of songs like "Ball and Biscuit."
Let's discard the keyboard idea. And the human hand idea. Let's isolate the guitar player from the instrument. The player can manipulate only three parameters - the tone, velocity and duration of sounds to be generated. We have that in MIDI. (Okay, the guitar player can dance and wear a costume, but for our purposes, that's not part of the equation.)
For rehearsals, studio recording sessions, or small club performances, electric and upright bass players typically use a "combo" amplifier, which combines a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and a speaker (or multiple speakers) in a single cabinet. Combo amps come in a variety of speaker configurations, such as one speaker (e.g., often one 12" speaker or one 15" speaker, although there are some micro-amps with one 10" speaker) or two speakers (e.g., two 10" speakers) or four speakers (e.g., four 10" speakers). The dividing line between practice amps and combo amps that can be used for live venue shows is described in the power in watts section. The most powerful combo amps available deliver between 800 and 1000 watts to the internal speakers.

People that "hear a difference" are usually pre-conditioned to hear one. If you were removed from the guitars presence completely and only given anonymous samples of their tone, it's highly doubtful you'd identify, match or even come close to choosing 100% of the guitars tones correctly. Especially based on some imagined effect the wood is having on the sound.
Rarely have we come across a redesign of a classic instrument that is so thorough… yet still adheres so closely to the original! Neck shape, body contouring, hardware, pickups and electronics have all been under the microscope of Marr and his design cohorts in redesigning this short-scale offset classic. The new bridge design swaps the threaded rod saddles of the Jaguar for the bigger, solid, non-height adjustable Mustang saddles that sit flush on the bridge tray. The saddles just have a centre-placed string groove but this increased width means there's very little gap between the low E and the outer edge of the fingerboard the further up the neck you go. Marr has also ditched the traditional dual rhythm/lead concept. This Jag has just one circuit: standard volume and tone controls and a four-position lever switch mounted on the smaller of the three chromed plates. In position one, it offers just the bridge pickup; position two, bridge and neck pickups (in parallel); position three, neck pickup; and lastly position four, neck and bridge pickups (in series). We still have the slide-switch style of the original Jaguar to engage not one, but two, of the original's high-pass filters. The top switch is the master filter (up engages the cut); the lower switch, mounted at a right angle, only works on position four where forward is on (ie, it introduces the cut). Both these switches stick up less than the standard slide switches too, and are slightly more comfortable: typical of the thought and detail that has gone into this guitar. There's Fender-aplenty in the sounds but, as Marr says, Gretsch and Rickenbacker spring to mind, especially with a little tone roll-off. Above all though, the clarity, and the musical sweetness of the tones allow for complex chord voicings for jazzier rhythms or simpler soul and funk styles. The Johnny Marr Jaguar is a thorough redesign from the perspective of a very busy working guitarist. Aside from the low E being rather too close to the fingerboard edge in higher positions, it's faultlessly built for purpose, addresses five decades of 'Jaguar-ness' and puts a decidedly leftfield design squarely back in the mainstream.
There are two main types of controls on bass amps: switches and rotary knobs. The simplest, least expensive practice amps and combo amps may only have a few switches and knobs, such as an "on/off" switch, a volume knob, and a bass and treble control knob. Mid-priced models may add additional tone controls (e.g., one, two or three "midrange" controls and a "presence" knob for very high frequencies) and/or add a second type of volume knob called a "gain", "preamplifier" (or "preamp"/"pre"), or "drive" (short for "overdrive") control. A good selection of equalizer knobs and gain stages is standard on expensive amplifiers. If an amp has one or more preamp or gain knobs, the second volume knob may be called "master", "volume" or "post".
To learn how to practice correctly, you can sign up for a FREE No B.S. Guitar membership below. I’ve created this free course to teach you everything you need to know on how to practice correctly (Pit-Stop Practicing). I go much more in depth on the “how to learn” side of things, and you’ll avoid making all the same mistakes I made when I got started.
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Here's a fresh one from the JVG Vault... vintage tone much like an old classic Martin Acoustic has some wear and has the "feel" just feels great in your hands and plays & sounds wonderful. Good volume and rich sounding lows and very nice.. condition rated at a solid 8.5 / 10 or better no cracks no repairs and plays nicely with original nut & saddle still in place , optional change nut & saddle & set up add $80.00. Please SEE MORE FULL SCREEN HIGH RES PICTURES HERE: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sYamahaFG140RedLableLikeFG180?authkey=Gv1sRgCIHmw573kYa6HA#slideshow/5634523767539294722.

The more contact the bridge has with the body, the better the sound will be transferred into the body. On the other hand, we have non-vibrato bridges which provide an anchoring point but have no control over pitch or tension of strings. Both bridges have their own pros and cons but non-vibrato bridges provide better tuning stability and solid contact between the body and the strings.


You can think of these as distortion pedals turned up to 11. Usually, a fuzz pedal comes in as an accent for solos and intros, since its effect is so strong that it could overpower the rest of the band otherwise. You can hear an example of fuzz in the classic recording of Jimi Hendrix playing The Star-Spangled Banner at Woodstock. This is a good type of pedal to try out as an introduction to more powerful effects.
The first part of this book shows why Guthrie is such a great player, and dives into his mindset when it comes to teaching and playing. I really believe you should go buy this book, so I don't want to give too much away, but he covers great topics like how to avoid guitar injuries, setting goals for yourself, thoughts on technique, tone and gear, and general tips on how to practice.
A chorus effect alters the duplicated waveform in a more subtle, nuanced way. The altered waveform will sound much like the original, but just different enough to sound like multiple voices playing the same note or notes. As it is usually applied, chorus sounds like the same signal running through two amps with a very slight delay between them. In fact, Pat Metheny's famous chorus sound is produced in exactly this manner, using no actual chorus effect at all.
Heck, if you decide to pay for a setup when you buy a guitar they'll set it up right then and there. They're not gonna have you buy a guitar and have you wait a week or two to take it home just for a setup. Everyone else has brought in personal guitars that weren't just purchased and most times not purchased there, and they have their own waitlist. But they make more money prioritizing a setup to make a sale rather than doing a stand alone setup.

Hal Leonard's series of books may be more responsible than any other series of books for people learning the guitar. It may be an understatement to call it a standard for students starting to learn the guitar. This book covers introductory topics like how to read music, chords, different scales and keys. Beyond that, it moves into advanced techniques and music theory in later books. The book is available as a stand alone, but we think the 3 CDs that come with the book are really useful, especially for practicing. It is so helpful to improving timing as a fundamental skill to play along with the CDs that are included with the book.
This guitar needs love. It is in used condition with the biggest flaw being near the input jack.  This is the super rare RT series that were only produced for a couple of years and it is MIJ. Has tremolo but no arm If you are reading this, then you know what these are about.. I am the second owner of this guitar. Was bought from a guitar shop locally in San Jose, CA. No returns please
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An instrument unlike any other, the electric guitar gives musicians a feeling and hands-on experience that's nearly indescribable. Even with the same electric guitar, no two players sound exactly alike. Every nuance of the player's hands comes out in the electric guitar's tone, both in fretting and plucking the strings. The best players master not only command of the electric guitar, but also its interaction with their effects and amplifier. It's difficult to imagine a world without the combination of the electric guitar and amplifier, yet it's still relatively new in music. By the turn of the twentieth century, it only made sense that the popularity of the guitar would soon be combined with the onset of electronics. Over the past 75 years, the electric guitar has established itself as one of the most iconic, unforgettable instruments in the world. From jazz and big band to rock 'n' roll and funk, popular music would be drastically different today had it not been for the electric guitar.
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