We are your Vintage Pickup specialists.   We have cornered the market of manufacturing the most accurate vintage pickup reproductions to which can not be equaled.  Our process is to chemically analyze an original pickup magnets and wire, then we reproduce them with the exact same magnets and wire.  We don't use stock magnets or wire.   We don't degauss magnets and say they are vintage.  Our magnets are only as strong as the elemental composition will hold.  Our wire is specially manufactured for us, we have many batches of wire with all different types of resistances and O.D.'s.  Our wire also is processed differently than modern conventional wire, these little details are what makes the Klein Pickups Reproductions the most accurate in the world.   We have a full array of models that we reproduce.  Check out our site for the full list of all of our offerings.   As a small business we always appreciate your business & support.  -Thanks
A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the "stereo" effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1⁄4 inch (6.35 mm) plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
So far I’ve only tried this on breadboard, though I plan to deploy it in a new “parts” guitar I’m assembling. So far it sounds … really good. A lot like a ToneStyler, actually, but with fewer parts and handpicked values. The only tricky thing was finding a good pot value where all the action wasn’t bunched up at one end of the knob’s range. A reverse-log pot worked best for me—I got nice results with both a C500K and C1M.
The first step in deciphering the serial number is determining the country or facility in which the guitar was produced. In most cases the country of origin is provided in the same location as the serial number. In cases where you have a serial numbe r but not a country of origin, the origin can sometimes be deduced from the serial number, although in this case it's very helpful if you have at least a rough idea of the date of manufacture.
While larger frets do seem to result in a rounder tone, perhaps with increased sustain too, they also yield a somewhat less precise note than narrower frets—at least, as examined “under the microscope.” Unless it is very precisely shaped, and frequently dressed, the broad crown of that jumbo fret can “blur” your note ever so slightly, which might even be part of the sonic appeal for some players—the way, for example, a tweed Deluxe is a little blurrier or hairier at most volume settings than a blackface Deluxe. Be aware, however, that the phenomenon can work against some sonic goals too.

Many of the modulation type effects pedals are made to approximate some aspect of the original rotating speaker.  That’s correct, you heard right.  The Leslie Cabinet was made as a companion to the Hammond B3 Organ and literally had a rotary speaker that could produce all of the common modulation effects depending on the speed setting.  Many companies now offer digital pedal versions that mimic the Leslie sound very well, so lugging around a huge speaker cabinet isn’t necessary, unless you are a purist or have a crew of roadies available.


On a Strat, you can also replace one of your tone pots with a “blender” pot. This allows you to “blend” in the neck pickup when your selector is in the bridge or bridge/middle positions, and allows you to blend in the bridge pickup when in the neck or neck/middle positions. You can have the neck/bridge on, or all three on at once. There are slight, but noticeable, tonal changes from one end to the other, as the blend pot does have some attenuation. You do have to buy a specific blender pot to do it right; otherwise when turned down it won’t shut the third pickup off all the way. Super cool mod, and doesn’t change the look of your Strat.
So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category. For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave. BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer. Loopers fall into this category also, so let’s add an RC-3 Loop Station to the mix. And you might want the NS-2 Noise Suppressor to kill the noise in your rig, so let’s add that in, too. What about a tuner? The TU-3 is the most popular pedal tuner in the world.
Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.

Epiphone's offering in the low and mid-range segment has been pretty strong for years. The Epiphone Hummingbird Pro is their take on a legendary Gibson model and it brings much of the same qualities. What really makes this acoustic-electric stand out is the overall level of quality you get for your money. You can trust it as an accurate emulation since Gibson now owns and produces Epiphone's guitars.
This string overview is useful for understanding what choice to make that suits your play style the best.  As players, we are always searching for the highest possible functionality, while balancing tone and playability for the genre we play.  Check out what brand and gauge your guitar heroes use to help you zero in on your perfect string set and keep on rocking!
Guitar FX BOX does REALLY real-time DSP. Signal is sampled from sound card input, processed and then sent to the output with VERY LOW LATENCY. Unlike many other "real-time" audio programs, I/O delay with Guitar FX BOX is extremely low, virtually undetectable! This is achieved using DirectSound (or WDM streaming) for fast access to the hardware (sound card) and fast DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Through DirectSound, latency is about 20ms with most sound cards, or even less. When WDM streaming driver is used, latency can go as low as 5ms! Nevertheless, exact total i/o latency still depends on hardware/drivers.
In 1974 Martin Sigma electrics included two SGs, a Tele and a Fender bass. The SBG2-6 was pretty much a straightforward SG copy with a bolt-on neck, center-peaked three-and-three head, block inlays, large pickguard, twin humbuckers, finetune bridge, and stop tailpiece, in cherry. The SBG2-9 was pretty cool, with a natural-finished plywood body, white pickguard, rosewood fingerboard with white block inlays, gold hardware and Bigsby. The SBF2-6 was a Tele with rosewood fingerboard, three-and-three head, block inlays, neck humbucker and bridge single-coil. The SBB2-8 was the bass, with natural finished body, three-and-three head, rosewood ‘board, block inlays, white ‘guard, and two humbucking pickups.
Purchase a more suitable microphone, if necessary. If you have found that your mic really doesn't capture sound the way you need, you'll have to research to find the right mic for your situation. For example, you might use a large diaphragm condenser mic to capture crisp, pop rock tones.[32] However, you should be able to achieve consistently good recordings with the use of either a common:
With this high availability I can immediately check back with the program if I am unsure whether I am getting it right when practicing. I can play along to the backing track while practicing and I can continue with new material if I feel that I am ready to do so. All of this is simply not possible with a local instructor on a 30 minute per week basis.
In the studio, a dynamic noise filter such as the Symetrix 511A, Drawmer DF320/330, Rocktron Hush or Dbx Silencer can be less obtrusive than a gate for cleaning up guitar parts to which delay/reverb has not yet been added. Very generally, such devices work by progressively reducing the audio bandwidth once the sound falls below an adjustable threshold. Transients pass through with very little change, while high frequencies are removed from the tail end of decaying sounds, which reduces the subjective hiss level. A conventional expander then mutes the signal entirely at very low levels.
In the midst of the controversy, conservative commentators alleged that the raid was a politically motivated act of retaliation by the Obama administration, as Juszkiewicz had frequently donated to Republican politicians, including Marsha Blackburn and Lamar Alexander. Chris Martin IV, the CEO of Gibson competitor C.F. Martin & Co., had donated over $35,000 to the Democratic National Committee and Democratic candidates in the same time period. Though Martin featured several guitars in its catalog made with the same Indian wood as Gibson, the company was not subjected to a raid.[55] Following revelations in the 2013 IRS targeting controversy, the right-leaning magazine FrontPage declared that "there is now little doubt the raid...was politically motivated," and that "the Gibson Guitar case can hardly be dismissed as regulatory overreach. In hindsight, it was an ominous foreshadowing of the explosion of misdeeds we are witnessing today.[56]
The first step is to remove all the electronics from your guitar. This includes the potentiometers (volume and tone knobs), the switch, the pickups, and the jack. For most Fender style guitars, most of the electronics listed are mounted on the pick guard with the exception of the jack which usually has its own plate it resides on. For Gibson style guitars, the pickups are removed from the front and the rest of the electronics through the back. 
A typical digital multi-effects pedal is programmed, with several memory locations available to save custom user settings. Many lack the front-panel knobs of analog devices, using buttons instead to program various effect parameters. Multi-effects devices continue to evolve, some gaining MIDI or USB interfaces to aid in programming. Examples include:
CHEVALET HARDTAIL Pour remplacer les cordes, faites passer les nouvelles cordes à travers les passe-cordes qui se trouvent au dos de la guitare et faites-les ressortir par-dessus les pontets. L'intonation peut être réglée en déplaçant le pontet vers l'avant ou vers l'arrière, en utilisant un tournevis cruciforme (+) pour ajuster la vis de réglage de l'intonation, située à...
The output jack is where you plug in your guitar lead. These are generally 1/4″ and transfer the signal created by your pickups to your guitar amp. They are usually connected from a ground wire and input wire. When the lead is plugged into the output jack the signal can be transferred. These can often be a source of trouble and need to be kept tight to reduce noise.
With $500 in your pocket, buying a good amp becomes a lot easier. In fact, it’s probably as expensive as most casual guitarists would ever need to go. This category includes a big choice of both amp heads and combos, solid-state and tube amps. While they make great practice amps, they are all worthy of small to medium-sized gigs and studio recording. For example, you can find the excellent Peavey ValveKing II. This little amp head offers the same beastly tone as the iconic full-size 6505, with 20 watts of power and solid controls.
Tremolo – Not to be confused with a tremolo bar (which is closer to the Whammy pedal), this effect works on volume. You can think of tremolo pedals as being like strumming a note, and then wiggling the volume knob on the amp while it’s ringing. Usually, the pedal will have controls for speed (equivalent to how fast the volume is “wiggled”) and depth (equivalent to how far the knob would be turned).
An extremely wise Liverpudlian once said: "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." Well, we've been busy with life and now, after a few year's hiatus, it's time to present the first phase of our new collection. For your consideration are some truly unique guitars: Silvertones, Danelectros Harmonys, a Supro 60, an Eko Florentine, and many more. Also, did we mention for all you Shagg's fans, there's a pretty stunning Avalon AV-2T. There's more to come very soon, stay tuned. Welcome to VintageSilvertones.com!
The hollow body — the original electric guitar design — is completely hollow on the inside, like an acoustic guitar. Hollow-bodied guitars like the Gibson ES-150 saw use in jazz ensembles by players such as Eddie Durham and Charlie Christian, but were also adopted for country, folk and, eventually, rock and roll. If you’re looking for warm, mellow tones, the hollow body is your best bet. That isn’t to say it can’t give you some sweet, raunchy distortion. A proper hollow-body setup can pull off a great classic blues or rock sound, but they are more prone to feedback than solid body guitars.

Ibanez is considered to be one of the best-selling electric guitars and bass guitar brands. But, they also produce a quality acoustic guitar for acoustic guitar players. The V series is really popular for newbies, making it one of the best acoustic guitar brands for beginners. Their guitar uses mahogany wood on the neck, and back and sides of the guitar. It also includes a rosewood bridge and rosewood guitar fretboard.

Whether you are a beginner or the pro guitarist, choosing the right guitar brand is always essential. We are sure you will find your desired electric guitar from the range of best electric guitar brands we review above. If you want something different or best acoustic guitar brands, do share with us your thoughts in the comments below. Maybe we missed out something that you would remind us.
The first thing I did was solder all the colored pickup wires to their correct positions on the switch. You can solder the components on in any order you want. Make sure that all the wires go to their correct places. A lot of times the jack wire goes through a small hole in the body,  so make sure that the jack is mounted in its correct place before soldering it into the circuit. 
As much a sculptor as a guitarist, Pajo’s work in post-rock progenitors Slint was a frightening, seemingly rootless display of guitartistry that glided between extremes. Songs formed and dissolved without notice, turned inside out and back again, always at wildly unpredictable volumes. Pajo’s uncanny knack for both creating and shrinking spaces on tape would eventually become the blueprint for later luminaries like Tortoise, with whom he also played.
The first “real” guitar I ever bought for myself as a teenager was an Ibanez RG much like this one, and I played that guitar for almost 10 years before buying yet another Ibanez RG. Note that this model does not have a tremolo, which means great tuning stability and fewer headaches when it comes to changing strings, tuning, and setup. However, you won’t be able to perform any crazy whammy tricks, so be sure you’re okay with that. Mahogany body, two hot humbuckers, jumbo frets, and an ultra-stable 3-piece maple neck. Hard to beat at this price point. Love it.
Solid body guitars were the next step in guitar development, with Leo Fender creating a modest instrument called the Broadcaster, which was then rebranded as the Telecaster. The Stratocaster came later and, in addition to the changes in the pickups, included contours in the body that made the guitar more streamlined and easier to play while standing up. Today, the Stratocaster is still the most iconic electric guitar shape; it’s associated with guitar wizard Jimi Hendrix, and many beginners end up with a Stratocaster-style guitar. Gibson introduced their own line of solid body guitars, the considerably swankier Les Paul.
When in doubt, reach for the Dummies guide. These standardized, annotated guides have taught countless people to do countless things that were once over their respective heads. Like the Hal Leonard complete guide above, this massive, 648 page door stop includes six different sub-books, including three basics volumes and three genre-specific guides. It’s the everything-to-everyone approach. It might be overwhelming, but at least you’ll have everything you need in one place.

This tonewood is nearly always seen in the material used for a fretboard on the neck. The various species of Rosewood add their own harmonic overtones with Indian Rosewood being the most warm. In general, Rosewood provides incredible harmonic complexity, personality, and resonance that’s worthy of stage and studio recording as can be seen on the solid Rosewood body of the Yamaha A3R A-Series Guitar.
Launch price: $1,427 / £999 | Body: Mahogany with maple cap | Neck: 3-piece mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Ebony | Frets: 24 | Pickups: Seymour Duncan JB humbucker, Seymour Duncan Jazz humbucker (EMG 81/60 reviewed) | Controls: 2x volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: EverTune bridge, Grover tuners | Left-handed: Yes (without EverTune) | Finish: See Thru Black, Dark Brown Sunburst

15 years ago a friend brought his in Miami i think. The guitar sounds amazing and the care for making it was awesome. The guitar have a cristal like sound and shines particulary well. Today i've acquire it from him by a fair trade: i purchased a new Falcon guitar, wich is the best brand here in Peru, and trade it for his Palmer. Is the best trade i've done. Not sure for him ;) My friend paid $100 for it 15 years ago and the model is PF20. Hope this information was helpfull
Working with Dimebag Darrell Abbot, Rex Brown, Mike Scaccia, Scott Shelby and others, this guitar master has had to work overtime to keep up with these guitarslingers' abuse. These guys make their guitars scream on stage, and it's King's job to make them sing again. "Everbody knows -- other than Scott -- that they're at my mercy when it comes to working on their guitar," he says. "That's why I'm not out on the circuit. I'm pretty picky about which guitar players I work with." (Although Darrel and Mike are no longer with us - may they ignite heaven with their notes - Scott is still tearing it up with Warbeast.) Rabid Flesh Eater, Warbeast, Rigor Mortis, Pantera, this guy has worked on some brutal guitars. "If you're going to buy a Cadillac, put the right parts on it" is one of his mottoes.
But note that guitars in this price range aren’t likely to be without their faults. You will probably need to take them to a local guitar pro for a set-up if buying online, as fret edges may be sharp and the action may be too high or low. Finishes can be a little rough in some places, and you won’t get anything in the way of luxury looks or features – there’s a lot more plastic used in the under $150 range!
The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.

(48 Contiguous U.S. States) Free Free Shipping With Backstage Pass 92118 2-Day Standard Ground {savingIsUpTo=false, MSRP=248.0, listPriceRange=false, isFreeShipping=true, download=false, isPriceDrop=false, salePriceRange=false, YourSaving=0.0, productId=site1prodJ40301, MSRPRange=false, enablePDPColorOption=true, showBrandNameWithProduct=true, usedAmount=131.12, restockStartAmount=null, listPrice=149.0, priceVisibility=1, usedCount=1, salePrice=149.0, isOnSale=false, showMSRP=true, restockCount=0}
As mentioned above, the versatility of multi-effects require complexity, and complexity requires longer learning curves. Thankfully, manufacturers have been continually improving the control interface and workflow of their units, so its never been easier to setup multi-effects units. Bigger display screens and good control positioning are important, but they also add to the overall size and bulk, so don't expect them on smaller units. Some even go as far as adding small LED scribble scripts to the footswitches, which removes the need to memorize or list down your presets.
The blues was my inspiration-specifically, the late-'40s solo recordings of John Lee Hooker. "Hobo Blues" is an excellent example of early Hooker on which his violent string slapping-clearly audible in a blend of amp sound, haunting vocals, and trademark foot stomping-creates an indelible realism and engaging intimacy. My recording of Paris Slim's "The Day I Met The Boogie Man" (see the sidebar "Selected Discography") was one of my early experiments with this technique. Since that time, I have used a discrete "air-guitar" mic whenever I have had an available track for it. Guitarists may initially be skeptical of such unusual miking, but it's always a treat to watch their faces light up as they listen to the monitors deliver the bright, transient sounds that they have been accustomed to hearing during their years of practicing their instruments.
But the question remains, was that environment good for the artists or for the equipment? Think of it this way: experienced chefs know very well the value of a seasoned pan or grill. Flip on any show from the Food Network and you’ll see cooks bragging about their 30-year-old griddle and how it imparts an amazing flavor to their corned beef hash. Preparing food leaves behind actual physical substances, unlike immaterial sound waves, so that comparison doesn’t work exactly. But the dirt and dust and grime could certainly effect the equipment. In a similar way, we have to ask ourselves, was that dirty studio, then, a source of inspiration or were the dirty, beer-smelling microphones actually improving the music? Regardless, the studio imbued the recording with an undeniable quality. Many guitar nuts can identify a particular instrument while listening to a song. Recording experts can do the same thing with studios.
Having lived in an apartment when learning guitar, it was painful. Using headphones works, but most days you just want to hear it from an amp like it was meant to be. Your only real solution is to try out some of those tiny lunchbox amps and see if they can fill that void. Another option is to start saving for a house, or find a friend who has one to jam out in.
Hoshino Gakki also had semi acoustic, nylon and steel stringed acoustic guitars manufactured under the Ibanez name. Most Ibanez guitars were made for Hoshino Gakki by the FujiGen guitar factory in Japan up until the mid to late 1980s and from then on Ibanez guitars have also been made in other Asian countries such as Korea, China and Indonesia. During the early 1980s the FujiGen guitar factory also produced most of the Roland guitar synthesizers, including the Stratocaster-style Roland G-505, the twin-humbucker Roland G-202 and the Ibanez X-ING IMG-2010.
You are eligible for a full refund if no ShippingPass-eligible orders have been placed. You cannot receive a refund if you have placed a ShippingPass-eligible order. In this case, the Customer Care team will remove your account from auto-renewal to ensure you are not charged for an additional year and you can continue to use the subscription until the end of your subscription term.

The Ibanez RG series is basically synonymous with shreddable metal music. Inspired by the classic JEM series of the glammy 80s rock years, this GRGR120EX guitar is perfect for the guitar player who aspires to be a real metalhead. The body is made of solid alder and it comes with a slick black binding. There are two super-high-output, extra-snarly Infinity R pickups that will respond well to overdrive and distortion pedals. Moreover, a rosewood fingerboard with classic Ibanez sharktooth inlays and sharp black hardware make this guitar look like the real deal.
The EB-28 bass was very similar to the guitar in appointments and controls. It had a 22-fret ebony fingerboard, 33.825″ scale, a DiMarzio P-style neck pickup and a DiMarzio J-style pickup at the bridge. It, too, carried a Schaller bridge and Schaller M-4 tuners. Around 4,854 each of these 28 Series guitars and basses were built between January 1981 and February 1982.
The first to go are the ultra-highs, and the lower the value of the pot, the greater the amount of signal that can escape to ground. This is why 500K pots keep your sound brighter than 250K: their higher resistance won't allow as much of the signal to bleed off. And a 1Meg-ohm pot has such high resistance that when wide open it sounds almost like having no control pot there at all.
Electri6ity is HUGE, like over 26 gigs, but it's like having Eddie Van Halen in your plugin bin once you figure out how to use it. The learning curve is steep, but there's no way I would ever be able to play guitar as well as I can program it not to mention afford the thousands of dollars worth of high-end guitars that are sampled. It also includes a very nice effects rack that is optimized for the library (although DI versions are included so you're free to run it through Amplitube or whatever you like).
In the Beatles' early days, George Harrison briefly billed himself as Carl Harrison in honor of his quick-picking hero. Perkins' bright, trebly style – which the rockabilly king picked up from blues players in Tennessee – defined the singles he put out on Sun Records ("Blue Suede Shoes," "Glad All Over") and influenced scores of players from Eric Clapton to John Fogerty. "He took country picking into the rock world," Tom Petty has said. "If you want to play Fifties rock & roll, you can either play like Chuck Berry, or you can play like Carl Perkins."
Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.
This guitar continues to rake in good reviews and recommendations, even from experienced players who are looking for a compact couch guitar. This says much about its build-quality, tone and production consistency. If you are just starting out and you are not sure what to get, or you're simply looking for an affordable grab-and-go guitar, then checkout the Yamaha JR1.
I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar.  I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best.  You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment.  You get treated like a valued customer.  Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars.  They have a great variety of quality instruments.  Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars.  A place like this is so rare nowadays.
The herringbone purfling (binding) was discontinued on style 28 guitars in 1947. The binding was made in pre-World War II Germany and was not replaceable from American sources. When the stockpile ran out in early 1947, D-28s (and all style 28 guitars) were bound with a new decoration scheme of alternating black and white celluloid (originally used on the Martin archtop C-2 model). Hence the term "herribone D-28" or "bone 28" is heard amoung Martin collections, signifying a pre-1947 style 28 Martin guitar.
This. There's genuinely nothing good about it. It makes a Squier Starter Pack and a Daisy Rock look like a PRS Private Stock. Pretty sure the description isn't even true. An old roommate of mine had one and it was the worst guitar I have ever played in my life and I'm not just saying that. Very seldom do I say that a guitar is just plain terrible. Even with other guitar brands that I hate (like Squier) I'll say, "well, everyone has their own preference," but this guitar is just inexcusable. http://www.indianaguitar.com/products/Scout-acoustic-electric-967.html#.VZNeJ1L3bCQ
This years new Guitar World Magazine Holiday Buyers Guide issue is full of great gear for the upcoming holiday season. The amazing new FU-Tone Design Your Own & the Titanium Bridges are featured and well worth checking out. Make sure you pickup a copy of the new Buyers Guide on news stands today and all of the beautiful women photographed don't hurt either!
The best thing about the guitar is the design and usability is perfect for the beginners, who have an idea that how to play the guitar. It also comes with a bunch of instructions that makes it even easier to use. Once you learn the basics and master it you can easily upgrade to a higher level guitar. It can give the right feel that required from a guitar.
Most of the guitars, banjos and mandolins my customers use and collect have been made by major manufacturers such as Martin, Gibson and Fender or a few superb handcrafters such as D'Angelico and Stromberg, but over the years, by far the greatest number of instruments purchased in the USA and worldwide have been lower-priced student models. Prior to 1970 most student grade instruments sold in the USA were made here by companies such as Kay, Harmony and Regal in Chicago or Oscar Schmidt of Jersey City, New Jersey, and Danelectro of Neptune, New Jersey. When I started out playing and collecting guitars in the mid 1960s, brands such as Harmony, Kay, Stella, Silvertone and Danelectro were the standards for student use. We saw very few Oriental imports.
Gretsch aggressiveness in the entry level market is at an all time high, churning out a wide selection of affordable alternatives to many of their premium guitar models. Continuing this theme is the Gretsch G5426 Jet Club, which is essentially a more affordable stop-tail piece version of the Electromatic Pro Jet Bigsby above. It features the same chambered body and high quality looks but with a basic humbucker and without a Bigsby.
Why We Liked It - Unless you’re looking for an electric guitar to play genres like heavy metal, chances are you would love this guitar. It just makes us happy and it’s hard to put it down. Fender is a good brand and they offer guitars of very high build quality. It’s available in green, blue and red, so you can really get a guitar that matches your personality and music.

Ritchie Blackmore: a variety of versions, each with a 22-fret neck, CBS large headstock with 1970s-style decals and two Gold Fender Lace Sensors; some variants have the neck set into the body rather than bolted on and a Roland GK2A synth pickup. Reintroduced in 2009 with a 21-fret maple neck, graduated scalloped rosewood fingerboard, Bullet truss rod nut with 3-bolt neck plate and Micro-Tilt neck adjustment, flush-mounted Jim Dunlop locking strap buttons and two Seymour Duncan Quarter Pound Flat single-coil pickups (the middle pickup is omitted, but the pickup hole for the middle pickup is still present).[15]
The Thunderhead guitars would be offered until June of ’72, with several model designation changes along the way. In ’70, the K-1360 became the K-1213, and in May of the following year changed again to the K-1233. At the same time, the vibrato-equipped models also changed, the K-1460 becoming the K-1214 and then the K-1234. The Tornado lasted until the end in January, ’73, but also went through the model number changes along with the Thunderheads, the K-1160 becoming the K-1211 and then the K-1231. The vibrato Tornados went from K-1260 to K-1212 and then K-1232.
By far the best bang for the buck. These guitars are beautifully made with good attention to details such as fret ends, bridge fit and neck joints. They also have wonderful finishing and are made from quality materials. The 'snob' factor is the only thing against them, they are not Gibsons. Martin's or Fender's, BUT they do play just as well and quite frankly, only those with a good ear and perfect pitch could tell the difference in a rock environment. I have Fender, Gibson, Taylor, Columbus, Washburn, Squire and Maccaferri Guitars, as well as Richwood. Sadly like the great majority of guitarists, the guitars themselves are more capable than I am, and I am happy to admit it. Having an exceptional guitar will not make you an exceptional guitarist, just as a more professional camera won't make you a professional photographer. The Richwood Artist / Master series of guitars are good, believe me! For the average guitarist, pro or am, you can buy more expensise guitars but not better as far ...more
Beautiful Teisco Electric Guitar refinished in sea foam green or Daphne blue color, it has a custom series parallel pickups toggle switch, nice low action, sweet sound, plenty of tonal possibilities. Buy with Confidence....... Blessings! Item will be well packed, shipped and insured to any of the 48 contiguous States, No Alaska, No Puerto Rico, No Hawaii, No International buyers.
By panning the distant mics to the opposite side of the mix from the close mic, you can create interesting panning effects for solos. "If it's a rhythm part, you get this huge sound because the whole thing is spread across the stereo spectrum." When double-tracking lead or rhythm parts, a useful trick is to reverse the panning of the direct and distant mics. "If there were two guitarists in a band, I would record them like that, so you got a wall of sound that had a transparency that would allow the drums and bass to come through."

Johnny Marr is a chief architect of the post-modern rock-guitar aesthetic. As the guitarist for seminal Eighties poetic pop stars the Smiths, he created a tonal palette and crisp stylistic approach that still forms the roadmap for much modern rock guitar playing. It was Marr who created the orchestral guitar soundscapes that enhanced the moody drama of Smiths singer Morrissey’s introspective lyrics and ironically detached vocals.
There are a lot of choices out there for the prospective buyer of a fine guitar. It's no secret; a handmade instrument can cost a lot. For that matter, any of the better guitars purchased from a quality manufacturer is going to command what most people would consider to be a lot of money. Are there compelling reasons to spend your money on a handmade guitar from a custom builder rather than from a brand name factory or custom shop? There certainly are! … [Read More...]
A well-rounded complement of inexpensive microphones for recording an electric guitar would consist of a Shure 57 (a must have), an inexpensive condensor mic or two (I like some of the AKG models like the C-1000 and the C-3000), and an inexpensive compressor/limiter (dbx makes a few models that are a great value). If you have, or can borrow these mics, it almost doesn't matter whether you're recording on a 4-track Porta-Studio or using a Mackie 8-Bus with 24 tracks of adat, your guitar will sound great.
Peavey - Hartley Peavey started Peavey electronics in 1965, it went on to one of the largest musical instrument and audio equipment manufacturer in the world. They offer a multitude of guitars, amps and related gear, and the price point they use are comparatively very reasonable. One of their latest guitars, the Peavey AT-200, has the guitar world talking about its innovative auto-tune feature.
A seasoned guitarist, however, makes use of restraint at the high end of the spectrum. What to an amateur sounds muffled and buried by the drums is actually the guitar sitting in its proper place in the mix, assuming the role of a rhythm instrument. When it is time for the guitar to jump forward, in a lead part for example, power and contrast can be now gained by unleashing a bit more treble. Here you can use your pickup selector, tone knob, volume knob (which also functions as a mild treble cut as it is rolled back), or a pedal such as an equalizer or overdrive.
{"eVar4":"shop: books sheet music and media","eVar5":"shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction","pageName":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books: guitar methods: guitar method books","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction","prop18":"skucondition|0||historicalgrossprofit|1||hasimage|1||creationdate|1","prop1":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"guitar method books","prop5":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books: guitar methods: guitar method books","prop6":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books: guitar methods: guitar method books","prop3":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books","prop4":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books: guitar methods","campaign":"gcdirectsourcecode1","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category4"}
I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL.
Lyle guitars are among the rarest brands of electric and acoustic guitars in the world. Produced during an indefinite timeline in the 1960s and 1970s in Japan, the history of the Lyle instrument brand remains somewhat of a mystery. Total distribution of Lyle instruments in the U.S. was very limited. The same company that produced many of them, Matsumoku, also produced the more popular Aria brand.

A towering figure in the Japanese underground beginning in the early ’70s, Keiji Haino plays guitar — often distorted to the point of pure sound — with such a wild diversity that it’s misleading to call him merely a “noise guitarist.” But he is very, very, very noisy. With personas that include blues-sludge hero, noise-blast deployer, and big-eared post-psychedelic improviser, Haino’s renown (and collaborations) spread far beyond Japan, most notably with albums recorded by Fushitusha, his all-improv/nominally rock outfit.


The thing is, if you aren’t a pro (and if you’re reading this, you probably aren’t) you don’t need to concern yourself with every element of the electric guitar. You just need a briefing on body styles and pickups, arguably the two most important pieces of a guitar’s build. More importantly, asking yourself a couple simple questions about what you’re after will help you immensely. We’ve got all that right here, plus a few great axes that should at least serve as starting points on your search. As for the Ziggy Stardust jumpsuit and the perfect rock-god pose…look elsewhere.

The SG Standard is Gibson’s all-time best-selling guitar. It was conceived in 1961 and originally released as the new Les Paul. It featured distinct horn-shaped cutaways, and the neck joint was moved three frets, which made the guitar lighter and allowed easier upper fret access. In addition to these changes, the body was slimmer than the Les Paul Standard and the neck profile was more slender. However, with Mr. Paul preferring the sturdier design elements of his original model and due to contractual complications, his name was ultimately removed. Where Les Paul saw a mutation of his original design, others saw genius—from ’63 on, the Les Paul name was removed and the SG, or “Solid Guitar,” was born.
Patti Smith famously described Tom Verlaine's guitar sound as "a thousand bluebirds screaming." Television's leader soaked up the flavor of favorite records by John Coltrane, the Stones and the Dead – then synthesized them into something entirely new on the band's 1977 debut, Marquee Moon, spinning out endless fluid solos in concert with fellow guitar aesthete Richard Lloyd. Verlaine has kept a low profile in recent decades, but he remains a model for generations of guitarists with a taste for both punk violence and melodic flight.
By the 1950's, brands like Gibson and Fender were gaining notoriety thanks to the popularity of rock 'n' roll and its stars weilding electric guitars. Guitarists like Dick Dale, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry and Chet Atkins could all be found carving their own places in music history with the electric guitar, and by the early 60's the instrument saw an extraordinary upsurge in popularity. Today, there are an endless amount of rock sub-genres, making no shortage of superbly crafted electric guitars from the world biggest brands, including Ibanez, Epiphone, and Danelectro, as well as Godin, Gretsch, Peavey and more. Whether you're into black metal or folk rock, you can be sure that there's an electric guitar that perfectly matches your own style and tastes, and it can easily be found right here, regardless of your skill level or budget.
×