Had gibsons, fenders, etc. Was really impressed with my washburn idol. Only downside is that there aren't many dealers, so you've really got to make an effort to get one in your hands. Dollar for dollar, one of the best brands out there. Quality can be spotty if you look on ebay, so I'd recommend craigslist... Buy em used, since they don't hold value like the big brands.

SOLD OUT : A real find this one is... not your average vintage Takamine you will soon see its also in amazing original superior condition .. this premium example was hand built by the finest Japanese Luthiers at Takamine Gakki. This prime example is the finest Exotic Brazilian Rosewood we have had in yet and we have had some duzies for sure this true Law Suit era Takamine F375S acoustic guitars we have ever had! wow.. and exact copy of the Genius original Martin design of the D-28 exotic....WoW.. the frets look almost new, Martin bone nut and saddle the "s" stands for solid construction and the Solid Sitka Spruce top is super nice amber with age now over the past 37 years and taken care of this California native guitar exhibits its premium exotic woods very proudly just have a look all round everywhere you look...from the amazing Brazilian rosewood sides & the back is A Gorgeous 3-piece back with intricate inlay work to the premium solid mahogany neck..fit & finish is simply put gorgeous. The neck is nice & straight with a perfect Martin like medium V profile 1-11/16ths @ the nut - the action is very good 3-16th @ 12th fret you can adjust either way to taiste no problem and with the bone nut and saddle this guitar has wonderful tone right up there with the Martin or Yairi this guitar is AAA professional grade vintage and is in 100% condition it is not new or mint with minimal dings its condition is JVG Rated as 9.5 / 10 - excellent vintage = beautiful and exotic... please see the pictures for the cosmetics..these Takamine are built as good or better than the Martin it copies the back is quad braced and the reinforced crossbracing of the top should make this finely built instrument last several lifetimes.. Your looking at the best of the best in Japanese vintage exotic & solid construction in astoundingly nice condition...you simply must play and hear this guitar we love it and so will you.. I can't amagain a cleaner example of this vintage you will not be sorry... exotic Brazilian Rosewood tone woods are the best of the best. No need to spend $3000 or even $5000 or more for such an exotic vintage 40 + year old Martin d28....Find it here Email: gr8bids@comcast.net ..
You finally bought that guitar you've been eyeing for a long time. You open the case, gently remove it from its plush cradle, and hold it in your arms. A fresh pick in your fingers, you begin an elegant and complex arpeggio that ranges across the fretboard. Suddenly, right in the middle of the run, the strings start buzzing. You check your technique and it's fine. So what's the problem?

Whether you're recording or just plain playing for the fun of it, a headphone guitar amp is a great thing to have. You can even choose headphone amps that will work with pedals, mixing consoles and other connections, giving you a ton of versatility in how you use them. If there's one thing that's universally true about these amplifiers, it's that no guitarist should be without at least one.


The first part of this book shows why Guthrie is such a great player, and dives into his mindset when it comes to teaching and playing. I really believe you should go buy this book, so I don't want to give too much away, but he covers great topics like how to avoid guitar injuries, setting goals for yourself, thoughts on technique, tone and gear, and general tips on how to practice.
In 1966 Vox introduced the revolutionary but problematic GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. The instrument's trigger mechanism required a specially-wired plectrum that completed circuit connections to each fret, resulting in a very wide and unwieldy neck. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, though this never panned out. According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative. The instrument never became popular, but it was a precursor to the modern guitar synthesizer.
Joan Armatrading, Roy Clark, Jim Croce, Kevin Cronin, Neil Diamond, Al Di Meola, Robert Fripp, Mick Jagger, Greg Lake, Adrian Legg, Paul McCartney, Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Jim Messina, Steve Morse, Eddie Rabbitt, Kenny Rogers, Richie Sambora, Tom Scholz, Seal, Bob Seger, Paul Simon, Rick Springfield, Eddie Van Halen, Josh White, and Nancy Wilson;[32]
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But…Don’t/Never Solder on to a Closed Circle!…Because…If a very strong DC Electric Current Reaches your Axe…It Could…Kill/Maim!..With a AC Current you may if you’re lucky just get your fingers burnt!…You’ve just got to have a Break Somewhere!..So that in The Event of an Electrical Overload!..The Excessive Load can..Drain Itself off!…It’s an Electrical Safety Precaution!…Just like a Fuse!
With Fender’s trademark quality and sleek playability, this model features the classic pairing of solid spruce on the top, with mahogany back and sides. The ‘Easy-to-Play’ mahogany neck is fitted with a 20-fret rosewood fretboard that is rolled for added comfort. The hardware is good for the price, and comes with several convenient accessories (depending on the marketplace you purchase from).
When Eric Clapton plugged his 1960 Les Paul into a Marshall Bluesbreaker in the mid 60’s (the set-up used to record Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton, the “Beano album”) he created a new rock tone that immediately became a standard.[15] Clapton played a 1960 Standard as a member of John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and in the early days of Cream. The guitar was said to have been stolen while Clapton was preparing for the first Cream tour in 1966, following the recording of Fresh Cream, and was long considered an iconic instrument by Clapton’s fans and Les Paul guitar admirers. Gibson announced production of the Clapton 1960 Standard, also nicknamed the “Beano Burst”, in 2010. Gibson says the instrument “accurately represents what Eric Clapton personally feels his 1960 Les Paul should be”, with Clapton consulting on the design of the guitar. Production is limited to 55 hand-aged instruments signed by Clapton (who was allowed to keep the first five of these instruments), another 95 hand-aged instruments, and 350 Vintage Original Spec instruments, but all five hundred instruments feature period-correct hardware, two Gibson reproduction PAF humbucking pickups, and subtly figured “antiquity burst” maple tops.
You have a 2 band EQ as well as independent gain and master controls as well as a headphone/line out jack for either silent practice or recording directly to your audio interface. There’s 10 watts of solid state power flying out of the 6.5" speaker so you’re covered for smaller gigs and practice sessions whilst the classic VOX grille cloth and chicken head knobs provide that unmistakeable VOX look. A fantastic amplifier that will provide you with lush tone and typical VOX reliability – you can’t argue with that for under £70.
With smaller combos, it is worthwhile experimenting with their position within the room, especially when a distance mic is being used. For example, raising the combo further from the ground will result in a different reflected signal path length for ground reflections. Placing a reflective material such as hardboard or linoleum on the floor between the amp and mic will emphasise any coloration this produces. Where a small combo or practice amp lacks bass end, you can try to exploit the boundary effect by placing a mic in the corner of the room, then facing the amplifier into the corner. If the added bass is too much, move the mic and amplifier away from the corner until the tonal balance seems right.
My fave...In love...I vowed not to purchase this game as I was done with Call of Duty but after I watched some YouTube videos and Best Buy was running a good deal on the game I decided to pick it up and give it a try....Number 1 game I really like cod games this is best one you have exo pack can run on walls co op campaign best mutiplayer u got xombies best graphics should be game of the year I price matched it got it at great price and im Gamers Unlocked Member every gamer should get the card for $30 dollars you cant beat that for 2 years
What made him truly special was that, unlike other guitarists of his time who stuck to one style of playing, Jimi combined styles and used strumming alongside licks and other additions to create a fuller and more organic sound. Amazingly, he also used his thumb to do do a moving baseline whilst he was playing chords – he wanted to do what no other guitarists were doing, or were able to do and he succeeded. The way he dressed his chords with so many different sounds and rhythms just shows how naturally talented a guitarist Jimi Hendrix was. His guitar was like an extension of his body, a part of his left hand that had no boundaries.
The Hi-Flier guitar, which was possibly built in the Matsumoku factory, underwent multiple phases during the course of its production. Each of the Hi-Flier’s four manufacturing phases came with a variety of feature changes, ranging from simply switching the color of the pickguard to actually fitting the guitar for humbuckers rather than the P90-style pickups it originally came with.
As with many of our services, we do more than just pull and replace your frets when doing a refret. Full refrets include a resurfacing of the fingerboard to proper level (even more precisely done than many factories), repair to any damaged fret slots, nut removal and reuse (when applicable), and full Calibration and Reset service (which includes a full traditional set up). Strat style tremolos add $10 to the price, Floyd Rose style bridges add $30.
Simon Stockhausen began his stellar musical career at the age of five. His multi-faceted and wide-ranging oeuvre has since embraced all manner of projects and styles, including jazz and improvisational collaborations, countless compositions for ensembles and chamber groups as well as work for major European theatre companies and orchestras including the Hamburg and Berlin Philharmonic Orchestras. In 2009 he further extended the range of his musical endeavors with the creation of a sound design company through which he produces sounds, patches and libraries for software synths and plug-ins, serving sound designers, musicians and post production professionals.
OK, so you're ready to try your hand at the electric guitar, but where do you start? A good place to start is with an electric guitar that's specifically geared toward beginners. And although many guitars cost over $1,000, there's no need to shell out that much dough for a student model/novice instrument. To help you sort through all the options, we put together a list of the best beginner electric guitars worth buying right now. So whether you’re looking to become a shredding metalhead, a cool jazz player or an all-American country star, one of these electric guitars will have you well on your way.

During the 1930s and 1940s several companies tried to produce a solid-body electric but none of them were commercially successful. Then Leo Fender released his design in 1950 with a single pickup under the name Esquire, then added a second pickup and sold it under the name Broadcaster but soon had to change it due to a lawsuit from Gretsch who were already selling a drum kit using that name. Thus the "Tele" as we know it today was born.
We think the reason this book is so good is because of its readability. That is, it starts very slowly in theory, and Tom does an excellent job of explaining the constructs of music theory in simple and understandable terms. From there, the concepts are set up in such a way that is easy to follow and very thorough. Mr. Kolb did a great job of laying out the sequence of the topics to make them understandable to someone picking up a guide to music theory for the first time.
Installing pickups and wiring mods can be complicated, but learning to do common pot and jack repairs is almost more important, as they can save you time, money and frustration, especially before or even during a gig. That said, it can be daunting to know what to buy when jumping into the world of soldering, but for less than $80, you can have tools that will last for years.
Featuring classic Fender design, smooth playability, and simple controls, the Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster '50s is a great first electric guitar. The fixed bridge and quality tuning machines ensure simple and reliable tuning stability—a potential frustration for new players trying to learn on poor quality guitars. Single volume and tone controls along with two bright-sounding single-coil pickups give the beginning player a wide range of tones that are easy to control. The Telecaster has been a mainstay in music for decades and is especially associated with great country, pop, surf and rock sounds.
Gibson Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar This iconic instrument is regarded by many as one of the best electric guitars in the world because of its looks, sound and feel. The 2019 Gibson Les Paul Standard features a figured maple top, mahogany back and neck, rosewood fingerboard with cryogenically treated frets, calibrated BurstBucker Pro humbuckers and an asymmetrical Slim Taper neck shape for total playing comfort.
Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
If you have ever played or listened to metal, you probably know about Ibanez. This brand has been around for a while and has become a patron saint of those who like harder sounding music. Built for speed, Ibanez guitars bring are finely tuned instruments which enable the player to explore the limits of their skill. On top of that, any Ibanez guitar is going to be great value for the money.
1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-44? Electric Guitar. 4 single coil Pickups. Great, original Black / Green burst finish. '57 Chevy style aluminum pick guard. "Shark-Fin" headstock. Rosewood fingerboard. Original 4+2 tuners with cast cover. 4-bolt neck joint with an adjustable truss rod. Bridge adjustable for height, intonation and string spacing. 4-Square pole pickups, 4 pots, 4 pickup selectors and a 3 position rotary wafer switch. Some of the pots do things and some don't either by modification or design. The rotary switch simply acts as an On / Off switch. Guitar works great the way it is, or could be configured other ways as well. We have not modified it since we acquired it 8 years ago. It's spent most of it's time in the box, until I decided to get around to listing it. Missing whammy bar as are most every Teisco we have ever owned. The bridge pickup has had one of it's mounting screws changed. The finish is in exceptional shape for a 40 year old guitar (while the photos make the guitar look black the finish is actually a dark green to black burst). Plays and sounds great. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in near new shape with virtually no wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, oiling the fingerboard, nut checked for correct height, neck angle checked, pickup heights checked and adjusted, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .008 when fretted at the first and the body (super low)) adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!) and cleaning and polishing entire instrument. This is our old shops standard $75 tune-up. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .009 strings. No case included.
The reason being that guitar manufacturers will usually look to keep costs down in the pickup department. This is particularly true for budget models, which will usually be fitted with stock pickups that do the job, but fall short of truly impressing. So guitarists with an affordable, but playable guitar may wish to upgrade their pickups, to make their favorite axe gig-worthy.
Beautiful Teisco Electric Guitar refinished in sea foam green or Daphne blue color, it has a custom series parallel pickups toggle switch, nice low action, sweet sound, plenty of tonal possibilities. Buy with Confidence....... Blessings! Item will be well packed, shipped and insured to any of the 48 contiguous States, No Alaska, No Puerto Rico, No Hawaii, No International buyers.
Although I’ve spent most of my life focusing on audio journalism, I’ve been active as a musician since taking up guitar seriously in the 1970s, and I have played lots of gigs with jazz, rock, and folk groups in New York and Los Angeles. I now play mostly double bass and ukulele; I currently play in three jazz groups in Los Angeles, and I sub regularly in a couple more groups. I also conduct more-or-less weekly jazz jam sessions at my home, where I accompany numerous guitarists of widely varying skill levels, toting all sorts of axes. Having conducted innumerable multi-listener comparisons of audio products over some 25 years, I have a good idea of how to make product tests fair.
In 1947, Jerry Wexler, a writer for Billboard Magazine described African American music as ‘Rhythm and Blues’ and its appeal was spreading fast and wide helped by the popularity of the radio DJ. People across the states would tune in to their favourite stations to hear the music they loved. Whether or not the song was performed by black or white musicians became irrelevant.
The Effect: Metal has become the prevalent genre when it comes to music that involves guitars. Dialing in a proper distortion can make or break the sound of your guitar as well as your entire band. Coincidentally, it’s so easy to go overboard with distortion, all while being certain you are on the right track. The very first step is to get a dist box that is suitable for metal. Something like Electro­Harmonix Metal Muff carries just enough punch to get the job done, but not enough to drown your tone completely with gain. You’ll find this to be a reoccurring theme with a number of great metal dist boxes. At the end of the day, it all comes down to your prowess and skill. Every good metal guitarist know that it’s all about the unity of equipment and knowledge. With that said, these pedals will get you started.
The first great thing about this guitar is its amazing look. It has a Paulownia body with the metallic blue finish and a bolt-on construction. It comes with a dean vintage tremolo bridge which works quite well compared to others. One more advantage of this product is its cost. It is one of the most affordable electric guitars out there. It has a three-way toggle dual dean humbuckers which give you great volume and tone controls.
Phase Three began in 1974, bringing some of the biggest changes to the series with it. Univox swapped in its own humbuckers, made unique in part due to their visible white bobbins. This change took the Phase Three Hi-Flier solidly out of the realm of Mosrite Ventures copy territory and into its own realm, considering the tone and high output changed the sound so significantly. The presence of these humbuckers – found on other Univox guitars of the same era – make the Phase Three versions some of the most highly sought after Hi-Fliers.

You can run up to six of the 112 built-in internal effects within the Boss MS-3 Multi Effects Switcher at the same time and integrate three of your existing stompboxes into that sound too. So, to say there’s a world of options at your feet is an understatement. You can use it with your hybrid MIDI gear and utilise it to channel switch between amps too.
A guitar amplifier (or amp) is an electronic device or system that strengthens the weak electrical signal from a pickup on an electric guitar, bass guitar, or acoustic guitar so that it can produce sound through one or more loudspeakers, which are typically housed in a wooden cabinet. A guitar amplifier may be a standalone wood or metal cabinet that contains only the power amplifier (and preamplifier) circuits, requiring the use of a separate speaker cabinet–or it may be a "combo" amplifier, which contains both the amplifier and one or more speakers in a wooden cabinet. There is a wide range of sizes and power ratings for guitar amplifiers, from small, lightweight "practice amplifiers" with a single 6" speaker and a 10 watt amp to heavy combo amps with four 10” or four 12" speakers and a powerful 100 watt amplifier, which are loud enough to use in a nightclub or bar performance.
For every guitarist who’s dreamt of combining the biting twang of a Telecaster® with the sleek, ergonomic contours of a Strat, we created this limited-edition guitar: The Whiteguard Strat. Tele hardware, electronics and playing feel? Check. Ash Strat body with lacquer finish and custom-shaped white pickguard? Check. The unique style and sound you can only get from Fender? You better believe that’s a check.
The Hal Leonard Bagpipe Method is designed for anyone just learning to play the Great Highland bagpipes. This comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide serves as an introduction to the bagpipe chanter. The accompanying DVD includes video lessons with demonstrations of all the examples in the book! Lessons include: the practice chanter, the Great Highland Bagpipe scale, bagpipe notation, proper technique, grace-noting, embellishments, playing and practice tips, traditional tunes, buying a bagpipe, and much more!.

The least expensive practice amps and basic combo amps may only have a single indicator light: an LED to indicate when the amp's power is on. More expensive amps may also have LEDs to indicate when the preamp has a signal present from the instrument (helpful for troubleshooting during set-up, because if the amp is not producing any bass sound even when the bassist is playing, and the "signal present" light is illuminated, this indicates that a signal is reaching the amp); when a limiter or similar speaker protection feature is activated (e.g., Peavey's DDT system); when clipping is occurring; or when the amp is in standby mode. Amps with a built-in tuner typically have several LEDs to indicate when the note being played is flat, sharp, or in tune.
Clapton is good… not gonna argue that he is an amazing guitarist… but no where near the best guitarist of all time…. Satriani can play ANY clapton riff, solo, song, chord progression, whatever.. Clapton can’t come close to playing any of Joe’s stuff. And most of Claptons best songs are JJ Cale tunes. Cocaine, Layla, After Midnight, etc,…. etc…. Oh and Clapton put out a whole album dedicated to Robert Johnson and admitted that most of the songs are redone and reworked because “the man” Clapton couldn’t play em anywhere near as well as Mr. Johnson.
Zactly!!!!!!!! Terry Kath, hands down the greatest ever! Hendrix is on everybodies list as the best, well Jimi said Terry was the best and if Jimi said it it's good enough for the rest of us. I just can't believe it took until Sept. 24th 2009 for someone to put his name down! To bad he valued the band concept more than his ego or he would be more well respected.
What’s the point in having these lists anyway? There’s always going to be anger over people who were left out/included on the list when they didn’t deserve to be… And to say that any of the musicians mentioned so far aren’t talented is ridiculous, there’s no limit in the world on how much talent there is, so why does this list have to be limited to 10? Just saying…
Likewise, six Folk/Country Western guitars were offered, with flat, corner-notched heads, belly pin bridges and tortoise pickguards. The 14″ GS240 Concert ($79.50) was a Spanish shape with natural spruce top, mahogany body, and dot inlays, presumably on a rosewood fingerboard. The 15″ GS350 Grand Concert ($99.50) was another Spanish with natural spruce and figured Brazilian fruitwood body, with diamond inlays and wood rope binding. The GS380 Grand Concert ($109.50) was the same as the GS350 except for a Brazilian rosewood body. The GS460 Country Western ($129.50) was a 16″ dreadnought with a spruce top in red sunburst, cherry-finished mahogany body, a black pickguard, sort of mustache bridge, diamond inlays and white binding. The 16″ GS570 Auditorium ($149.50) was another dreadnought with yellow spruce and full grained Brazilian rosewood body, diamond inlays and fancier rosette. The GS680 12-String Auditorium ($185) was another 16″ dreadnought 12-string otherwise the same as the GS570.
Considering that all of the other small-sized guitars we tested were much flashier, I was shocked when our teenage testers, Alana and Charles, both picked the Epiphone Les Paul Express as their favorite short-scale model. It turns out our younger panelists didn’t care at all about the style of the guitars, they cared about comfort—and for them, the Les Paul Express was as comfortable as an old sweatshirt.
Harmony was the largest US guitar manufacturer between the 1930s and late 1960s. At the height of the guitar boom in the mid-1960s, Harmony was building more than 1000 instruments per day. Not only were they producing Harmony-branded guitars, there was a time when the Chicago-based factory was making guitars for 57 different brand names and trademarks. At one point, Harmony was selling 40 percent of their guitars through Sears & Roebuck under the Silvertone brand.
Harmony Hollywood H38- OK, here's the one we will sell. She's about the same as above but with opposite color combo. This one has a nice vintage DeArmond Gold Foil Pickup. Action is medium, but if you would like a lower action, we will be happy to cut that bridge a bit down. Guitar is in  nice vintage condition. All original except the period style Rosewood Bridge and reproduction Harmony Pick Guard. SOLD
Hertz Guitar company was originated from Shanghai/China & North Korea. This brand of guitars produces electric and other wide range of guitars that can be used in studio recordings and live shows. This brand also manufactures guitar accessories. The starting price of guitar from this brand is 12,504 INR approximately. Anyone looking for an affordable electric guitar at a beginner and advanced level can buy this brand of guitar.

Think Eddie Van Halen in Eruption. Phaser effects create a swirling tone by splitting the signal and then moving each part in and out of phase with each other. Like chorus, it can sound dated, but it is great for adding a little bit of craziness to any riff or solo. Some pedals such as the famous MXR Phase 90 only have one control for the speed of the effect, while more modern designs also have controls for the depth and level of the phasing.
He’s sauntered down through the decades unfazed by stints in jail and hospital, heroin addiction, assorted femmes fatales, copious boozing, rampaging Hells Angels and assaults from fellow icons like Chuck Berry and Peter Tosh. Unconstrained by the grinding gradations of clock, calendar, public morality or legal prohibition, he has defined life on his own terms.
(Book). To mark the 60th anniversary of Fender, Backbeat's introduced a new, completely revised third edition of this bestseller. Fender guitars have long been the instruments of choice for artists such as Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan. This book tells the complete story of Fender guitars, detailing classics such as the Telecaster, Stratocaster & Jazzmaster as well as lesser-known models. Dozens of photos reveal Fender's storied craftsmanship, while the text includes collector details for all models. The reference section lists all models and their statistics. This new edition has been refreshed and updated, with 56 extra pages and over 60 new photographs. The main text has added material and has been brought up to date to cover Fender's ever-changing history amid the fascinating developments for the company and its instruments during the eight years since the previous edition.
Based on SGM-v2.01 (http://www.geocities.jp/shansoundfont/) with improved quality aoustic guitars (21mb) and basses (50mb) and also designed to run on apps such as Sweet Midi Player. This is a great GM SoundFont and the one I use on iPad/iPhone and PC.  You can comfortably run this GM Soundfont in Sweet Midi Player app on most iOS devices. For Windows PC you can install a new GM soundfont using the free program Coolsoft VirtualMIDISynth.

This is a no brainer, but a value that must be considered before any purchase no less. As mentioned above, your abilities on the instrument will likely affect the price range you’re looking at, which may have an effect on the brands you shop within as a consequence. For instance, if you’re not looking to buy a high end guitar, you probably won’t even bother testing out a Gibson, as their guitars will likely be out of your range. The reverse is true as well, an experienced player on the market for high end tone probably won’t be satisfied by many of Yamaha’s offerings.
SOLD OUT: Here we had a beautiful vintage 1972 Harmony Monterey Mandolin it's an A style and is totally near mint! Beautiful classic Teaburst sunburst on a AA figured solid spruce TOP its in top condition and has really great vintage patina look to it. It's burst color is perfect match to a 60s Gibson it's very Cool US vintage It's Top is nicely figured and has lots of 3-D Birdseye figured back sides & neck all it's bindings are clean with patina and it plays perfectly and has excellent volume and a nice woodsy tone everything is like new includes a hard shell case it's just $449.00 this is a real bargain for US vintage piece of history and is in such all round fantastic shape. It Plays as beautifully as she looks! ,,, Let me know if you may have an interest in it it's super nice..
While a high school degree is not necessarily required, it does provide an edge for graduates who wish to become guitar technicians. Students should concentrate on classes such as music, band, English, shop class and mathematics. A major part of any education should include guitar lessons. Techs often need to be able to play by ear and must be able to pick up on any nuances in an instrument's sound and tuning.
Explorer-style guitars dropped off the radar after the mid 1980s, but were revived again under the influence of late Pantera guitarist Dimebag Darrell Abbott toward the end of the ’90s. Weird shapes were back, if anything can ever be said to be “back.” What goes around comes around. There’s clearly an algorithm going on that originated back in 1958!
Les Paul created an early solid-body electric guitar in his spare time after work at the Epiphone factory in the early 1940's famously known as "The Log". It is believed that this was the first solidbody 'Spanish guitar' every built. He went on to develop the idea further until he took it to managers at Gibson sometime in 1945 or 1946 who immediately...
If anyone has earned the right to two spots on this list, it’s Fender. Sitting squarely at the top of the guitar and amp game, this Southern California company might be at their peak at this very moment – and that’s a very good thing for you, if you want to get into playing guitar. This Super Champ X2 amp is a hell of a value, boasting the welcome bounce of Fender’s signature sound in a package that wont break the bank. And what’s even cooler about it is that it has 16 different amp modeling selections – meaning you still get the warmth of tube amplification with the right amount of modeling amp versatility. It also comes with two channels that can be controlled via an optional footswitch, and it’s equipped with a USB port for easy and quiet recording.

• Now let's add some slap-back room delay. In the seventh insert (which, incidentally, comes post‑fader in Cubase, as does insert eight), go to Delay/StereoDelay. In the left channel, try setting Delay to 1/16T, Feedback to 6.5, Lo to 50, Hi to 15000, Pan to ‑100, and Mix to 20, and enable Sync, Lo Filter, and Hi Filter. Use the same values for the right channel, but with Delay at 1/16, Feedback at 7.3, and Pan at 100.
We would recommend that you, for your first guitar, spend between $500-$1000. This price range is good, because you know that you will be getting a guitar that is made for some serious music making (which the cheapest ones out there just aren’t). Of course you don’t want to spend this much money on something you’re not even sure you will be using a year from now, so if you aren’t that serious about learning to play the guitar it might be a good idea to go for an even cheaper option.
Description: Body: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Neck Attachment: Glued - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearloid block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Faded Cherry - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case, Certificate of Authenticity - Made In: America
The war over an electric guitar's tonewood, like the Princess Bride sword fight, has ranged all over leaving a wake of havoc whenever it's brought into a conversation. It's brought a few too many guitarists to the brink of insanity certainly. Regardless, everyone has an opinion about it and when the Internet comes into play, the world weighs in too.

Unfortunately there’s not really any good way to get around that issue. You can get strings that ease the pain on your fingers, like Elixirs or D’addarios that are coated but as for the guitar itself you’re going to have to tough it out and build up your callouses and endurance/tolerance. I had the same problem with my fingers, it would happen after playing for longer than an hour usual but over time it went away and now my fingers are rough and hardened. It’s worth the effort and pain, enjoy!
I have no idea what the set measurement is for the Authentics, and if it is any different than other guitars. Probably not. But guitars settle during their initial acclimation period and the exact bow of the neck and arch of the top can change. Actually it is almost certain to change some. There have been reports of all sorts of Martins with action reaching up near or over the maximum height within spec. But the same holds rue from brand of guitar that uses organic materials like solid wood.

Now, to answer your question I would have to point out a series of popular brands and what they are popular for. After that, you make a decision on which one is best for you. You might see where I’m going with this. There is no single best guitar brand the same way there is no single best car brand. But we do have the Ferraris and Lamborghinis, as well as the Toyotas and Nissans of the guitar world!
When you have signature models for two of the most impressive guitar virtuosos in the world, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, there’s certainly something you’re doing right. Such is the case with Ibanez. Started as a sub-brand beneath sheet music and music-product distributing company, Hoshino Gakki, Ibanez began in the 1920s, specializing in importing the guitars of respected Spanish builder Salvador Ibáñez. In the 1930s, they adopted the maker’s name as a show of respect. In the 1960s through the 70s, the brand shifted focus to making high-quality knockoffs of Fender and Gibson models, until Gibson’s parent company filed a lawsuit for copyright infringement. After settling out of court in 1978, the brand again began making original models, including signature guitars for the likes of Kiss frontman Paul Stanley (who plays a guitar similar in shape to the Iceman pictured above) and Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead. Now they specialize in precision instruments for musicians who like their music loud, hard, and fast.
For instance, during 1970s and early 1980s, Japanese manufacturer Tokai Gakki produced superb replicas of 1957–59 vintage Les Pauls, and replicas themselves were gradually highly regarded. In the 1980s, to respond to the high demand for vintage models, Gibson itself began to offer a line of “Custom Shop models”, almost accurate reproductions of early Les Paul crafted by the Gibson Guitar Custom Shops.
i am writing this now because i can't even look at this guitar without thinking about this experience, and still can't enjoy playing this very expensive and special vintage piece. i went to great lengths to get all the way to this shop, it was extremely difficult, several trains, a really long walk. then i waited a truly insane 3 months, and then went to the same lengths to pick it back up. he did say to me to bring it back, but that was impossible. never in my life, in NY or LA, or anywhere in between have had to wait more than 1-2 days for any service on any guitar. in my experience he takes on way more work than he can handle and apparently doens't do a thorough job. 3 months is obscene. 1 month is unacceptable. bad experience, 100% waste of time & money. if he refunded my money it would not come close to the amount of time i had invested in getting here & back. truly negative experience. waste of much time.
Chorus is useful for 'softening' rhythm guitar or synth pad sounds, but it does tend to push sounds further back into the mix, so it should be used with care. Adding more brightness to the sound can help compensate for this effect. Chorus also works well on fretless bass, but tends to sound quite unnatural on vocals. Phasing can be used in a similar way to chorus but, whereas chorus creates the impression of two slightly detuned instruments playing the same part, phasing sounds more like a single sound source being filtered, where the frequencies being 'notched out' vary as the LFO sweeps through its cycle.
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Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  1 Meg Ohm, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
“The V100MU is everything I want in a guitar. The variety of tones from the Wilkinson W90SK pickups combined with the vari-coil enabling me to go from single coil to quasi double coil whilst the roller bridge and ‘classic’ vibrola is something I’ve never seen before on a contoured topped guitar. It really is a thing of beauty not just to look at but to play.”

Distortion became more popular from the mid-1960s, when The Kinks guitarist Dave Davies produced distortion effects by connecting the already distorted output of one amplifier into the input of another. Later, most guitar amps were provided with preamplifier distortion controls, and "fuzz boxes" and other effects units were engineered to safely and reliably produce these sounds. In the 2000s, overdrive and distortion has become an integral part of many styles of electric guitar playing, ranging from blues rock to heavy metal and hardcore punk.


An Octaver is a cool little effect that will tune your original sound several octaves up or down in pitch. This effect can give you the ability to fill up the bass frequencies with your guitar. You can often see Jack White using this effect when he plays live with only one other drummer. He will turn on his octaver at certain points of the song to play bass lines.
Starting in the early '90s, music gear manufacturers began developing digital effects models that aimed to re-create the sounds generated by classic effects, instruments, and vintage amplifiers. This technology quickly expanded to include models of revered amplifier heads, speaker cabinets, microphones, and even specific microphone placements. Many amps and multi-effects units today incorporate a wide range of models, often grouped into categories such as stompboxes, amps, and mics. Over the last decade, Line 6, one of the leaders in this field, has even created guitars and basses that contain modeled sounds of famous vintage instruments. As the technology has grown more sophisticated, models have become more realistic, often very closely resembling the gear on which they’re based.

Search out any discussion about tone and tonewoods on the internet and you will quickly find a wide variation of opinions among players and builders alike. However, the majority will almost always list "tonewoods" and/or specific species of Spruce and Cedar as the key to getting the desired tone from a guitar. Indeed, many beginning builders agonize over wood choice combinations as they relate to tone, with more experienced craftspeople offering suggestions that seem to assure the correct … [Read More...]


First off I need to mention that there is a category of effects I will call “overdrive” effects where descriptive labels often overlap so it can be confusing. They are essentially effects that simulate amplifier tubes being overdriven to create distortion. These type of effects are can be called: distortion or overdrive or fuzz or metal. And the label is usually based on the amount of gain they produce. 
However, these two companies were not always in as direct competition as might be assumed; yes they both made guitars, basses and amplifiers, but both tended to play to their strengths; Gibson's expertise was it's luthierie; they stuck to high end electric-acoustics, semi-acoustics and skillfully made solid bodies, whilst Fender excelled at electronics; they made amplifiers and easily built solid body basses and guitars.
In a way, guitars are a lot like cars — spending more money can get you more performance through different specs and trims. The extra money usually goes into paying for better parts rather than more options; there aren’t a whole lot of places to add to a guitar (unless you want the ZZ Top spinner installed). Big bucks can get you better quality wood, a nicer finish, higher-end hardware, and fancier inlays. Some of these upgrades can alter the sound or simply make help playability. For example, the same guitar cut from poplar won’t sound as good as one cut from alder wood. Better tuners mean your axe will go out of tune less often. That said, some guitars will offer features that others don’t, such as tremolos and automatic tuning. Do your research and, as always, know what you need versus what you simply want.
That’s not to say Gibson always met expectations during its storied past. “I dreamed of having a Gibson guitar and I achieved that dream,” Hook said. “It was a hollow-bodied EB-1 [a bass guitar] but it was medium scale so it was a s--t guitar and it sounded like s--t and I had to put new strings and a new bridge on it. It still sounded duff so I copied the shape and amalgamated it with a Yamaha.”

At one point, Fender switched to producing guitars with the bridge pickup located farthest from the highest-amplitude portion of the vibrating strings, slightly “over-wound”, thus increasing the signal output from that pickup. Even more overwound pickups (“hot-wired” designs) became popular, either for all three pickups (a “hot” configuration), or for the bridge position only (so-called “Texas Hot” due to its popularity among Southern Rock guitarists).
This guitar is truly a practice friendly instrument, with its smaller body and shorter scale length of 21.25", this acoustic is definitely easy on the hands. The neck profile is specially beginner friendly, great for first timers who are looking to learn the instrument. The parlor style body makes it easy to handle and carry around, ideal for young players and students of the instrument who travel. The downside to having this smaller body design is the lack of low-end, but it does make up with articulation and comfort.
Absolutely love this guitar!! One great instrument for a great price. Ordering was easy and delivered before projected date. I am no professional by any means, but as I've progressed, I wanted a guitar I could grow with and play for years to come. This is it!! I've played a lot of acoustics ranging from Gibson to Taylor but absolutely love this Martin. The action is like butter and coming from the Martin collection, the sound and tone is at a minimum of FANTASTIC!! If you are looking for an outstanding piece of musical magic to add to your collection, or something to purchase to have for a lifetime without spending your life savings to obtain it, this is the one you are looking for.
The 110ce features a dreadnought body with modern cutaway that produces Taylor's signature open midrange and clear treble tone, it works really well with various styles of music. And since it comes with their ES2 under-saddle transducer system, this guitar is ready for the stage or for recording. While it may not be as affordable as we want it to be, the Taylor 110ce more than makes up with its quality and reliability. Mark your entry into the real world with this highly recommended acoustic-electric.
If you want free and private, other than the basic version of Eagle, there is KiCad, which is an open source tool developed by GIPSA Lab, which is a research institute out of Grenoble in France. Like Eagle, there are Windows, Mac, and Linux versions, whereas Circuit Maker is Windows only. There are also tools now being offered for free by some of the big component dealers such as Mouser.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.
The first type of distortion pedals were fuzz boxes. They produced a distorted tone that allowed guitar players to play singing leads. Like the name says, the tone was more "fuzz" than tube distortion, sounding like a damaged speaker cone. Still, fuzz pedals can be heard on countless recordings from the 60's (think of the opening guitar riff in the Rolling Stone's I Can't Get No Satisfaction or just about any of Jimi Hendrix's riffs.) Fuzz pedals remain popular today. 

Great website and very informative on readers experiences with Martin guitars. My 1995 Martin HD 35 has been nothing but a problem child since purchased new. The truss rod is frozen and the low e is fully 4/32 above the fret board at the 12th fret..nearly impossible to play fingerstyle. I bought a pak of new bone saddle material from the Martin 1833 shop and lowered it to playable height by making a new saddle…easier to play but considerable difference in tone experienced. String angle at the bridge changed I guess the tonal quality.
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Much of the difference between one make of guitar and another is in the player’s head. I doubt whether many people listening would really notice the difference and they certainly wouldn’t care. That said, there are differences in feel and in the player’s perception of the sound. I currently have four Gibsons and two Fenders, so you can see where my sympathies lie, but currently I’m more taken with either of my two Gretschs. One point of correction about scale length though. Over the years 25.5″ became standardised, probably by Martin. Fender copied this when it produced the Broadcaster/ Nocaster/ Telecaster since 25.5″ was the scale length for a guitar and Fender had no previous experience hence the poor neck radius and bad controls. Gibson, being actually considerably more innovative (I.e. the truss rod, the archtop, the raised finger rest/ scratch plate, controls for each pickup etc etc in fact most of the fundamentals we now take for granted) had worked out that scale length should be a function of body size. All of Gibson’s full size (17″ and up) guitars have 25.5″ scale lengths. Smaller bodies get shorter necks. So 24.75″ is only one of Gibson’s scale lengths sunce it has used shorter and longer as appropriate.
Beyond effects, some processors offer dozens of other capabilities including recording tools, rhythm track generators, plus sound models based on vintage amps, speaker cabinets, microphones, mic preamps, and much more. Many also have MIDI and USB connectors in addition to XLR and ¼” inputs and outputs, and are designed to work seamlessly with computer and iOS-based recording software and apps.
The Canadian firm Godwin is another popular name for producing best quality electric and acoustic guitars. (Have you heard of Seagull acoustic guitars? It’s the same brand.) Godwin outshines among the world of guitars due to producing high-end instruments with surprising variations. They even manage to touch bass too. Not only the Godwin guitars depict quality, but also reflect classiness.
A steel-string guitar tuned to concert pitch endures a tension of about 180 pounds (800 N) on the top of the guitar from the strings[citation needed]. The X-bracing system has been shown to be an efficient technique for preventing the top of the guitar from warping under this force. The braces are generally carved, scalloped and tuned to improve resonance and integrity of the guitar top, such capability being performed by skilled artisans and not readily reproducible by machine[citation needed]. This work is an important factor in determining the timbre of the guitar and a major determinant in the observation that rarely do two guitars ever sound alike, even though they are ostensibly identical in construction.

Rackmounts are most commonly used in recording studios and "front of house" live sound mixing situations, though professional musicians who play electric bass, electric guitar, or synthesizers may use them in place of stompboxes, to create a rackmounted head unit for their speaker cabinet(s). Rackmounts are controlled by knobs, switches or buttons on their front panel, and often by a MIDI digital control interface. During live performances, a musician can operate rackmounted effects using a "foot controller".[14] By setting up effects in a rack-mounted road case, this speeds up set-up and tear-down, because all of the effects can be connected together with patch cords (which can be left connected permanently) and all of the units can be plugged into a power bar. This means that a musician only needs to plug in the main power bar into AC Mains power and plug their instrument into the rack, and the last effect unit's output into their instrument amplifier and/or the PA system.
Another way to set up your pedals is by placing them within the effects loop of your amplifier.  An effects loop is an audio input and output loop that is placed after the preamp and before the power amp section of your amplifier, using the Effects Send and Effects Return jacks. On some amplifiers, these can be labels Preamp Out (Effects Send) and Power Amp In (Effects Return).  Not all amplifiers have effects loops, but those that do allow for you to place some of your effects within the loop.
An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitar player strums, plucks, fingerpicks, or taps the strings. The pickup used to sense the vibration generally uses electromagnetic induction to do so, though other technologies exist. In any case, the signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is fed to a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker(s), which converts it into audible sound.
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