Of course, this top-down lecturing is all very abstract without examples. Let me give you the worst case scenario. My school talent show, 2008. Two friends of mine performED an ambitious but utterly inappropriate Metallica cover in front of the other students, their parents and the faculty. It was excruciating. Although the solos (presumably the only thing they had bothered to practice) were technically flawless, the whole song was undone by their terrible rhythm. The timing of the song became displaced, the chords were so badly fingered that it was difficult to hear the riff and consequently the whole performance fell apart. They looked like morons. They had sacrificed learning basic rhythm and paid the price. Make sure you don’t do the same.
This is definitely the coolest music store in the Pacific Northwest. If you are a high end guitar lover, you need to go. If you are a pedal nerd, you NEED to go. James, the owner, has relationships built with the coolest vendors in the country, and manages to collect the coolest gear. Earthquaker Devices makes a custom line of pedals just for this store, for christ's sake. I've never seen so many pedals in my life, and that's really neat because not many stores focus on that. The staff makes you feel right at home. They are so knowledgable and pleasant to be around. No highbrow guitar store attitude to be found here. So all in all, you need to go check it out. It's a super fun place to play some quality instruments. Plus, their logo is a monkey in a cowboy hat, named "Monk Williams". I'm not sure how it could get any better than that.
The technique is often executed by the little finger of the guitarist which is wrapped around the volume pot of the guitar. When the note is struck the volume is increased from zero by a rolling motion of the little finger. Alternatively, the effect is achieved with a volume pedal. It is sometimes called "violining", because the sound is similar to a bowed violin. Allan Holdsworth pioneered the technique of the pedal swelling along with a delay unit to create a thicker sound that is more associated with the cello. - winner333

BOO TO AMAZON FOR CARRYING A MISREPRESENTED PRODUCT. Due to the description I thought we could use this for lessons. It is NOT an instrument it is a toy. It doesn't stay tuned for even a 1/2 hour lesson and the teacher won't allow him to use it for fear that it will hurt his ability to hear when a real guitar is out of tune in the future. I tried to return but they didn't respond for weeks and told me it was too late after they finally responded. The guitar has barely been used at all and won't be used since it is clearly doing more harm than good for a young musician! AMAZON you should drop this product, it is NOT what is presents itself to be!!!
Nicknamed - "Papa-Papa". DADDAD is common in folk music (Irish, Scottish), and for the execution of a rhythm guitar in "heavy" (alternative music) on 6th on the third string at the same time. To reach the tuning from DADGAD, Open D or Open D Minor, the G string is dropped to D so that the 3rd and 4th strings are tuned to the same pitch. DADDAD tuning is sometimes used on Dobro guitars for rock and blues. Notable users of this tuning include Billy McLaughlin and John Butler.
On these guitar tracks, I did use a little bit of the 1176. I don’t overcompress on these tracks, I just basically want to get a little bit more sustain out of the notes, so I have it setup so that there’s plenty of attack that comes through. I’m not trying to control that so much as I am the sustain of the note, and get a little bit more length out of it, though I’m pretty gentle with that. Then it just goes into Pro Tools and I record it as is.
Perhaps the most popular choice though is a paper in oil capacitor. I have tried so many brands and options, and truth be told, it's very hard to notice a substantial difference and you can, unnecessarily spend a lot of money on premium ones. I received so many requests for a PIO equipped harness, so in an effort to try and whittle my findings down to a good value, tight tolerance and good sounding paper in oil capacitor, I've settled with one made by WD Music USA which are superb. Compared to other PIO caps on the market, they're a reasonable price and importantly are tight tolerance meaning the key details about how it will react with a tone pot, is accurately presented. Again, no real right or wrong here, if your budget allows you to go crazy on capacitor choices, no one can tell you not too. But truthfully, just pay attention to the tolerances, as that will tell you the most about how it will 'sound'. 
2) The neck edges at the fret board are not rounded and tend to be rather sharp which can really start to hurt your hands if you play for awhile . Typically this is where guitar companies skimp on their budget models and Yamaha didn't disappoint. But it's an easy fix for a Luthier who will just take some sand paper and sand down the sharp edges and dress the end of the frets if needed. Also, its an easy fix for someone with a steady hand, good eye, and a women's fingernail file. It took me about 10 minutes to round the neck edges with a fingernail file and it didn't even require touch up paint thereafter as the fret board is solid wood and the same color all the way through. She feels like a dream now and I can play all day long without the sharp neck edge digging into my hand, and my hand just glides ever so smoothly up and down the neck as it should.
The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.
This guitar is one of the most popular choices for those looking for a quality acoustic guitar under $500. It comes in a dreadnought size or concert (smaller body) size. It also comes in a variety of colors (10 at time of writing). Some of the features of this acoustic are: Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, new scalloped bracing. Owners describe the sound of this guitar as full, bright, and balanced. It will surely bring a smile to your face as you strum chords for hours while learning new songs. See all the available color choices for this guitar here.
As can be seen from our reviews above, it clear that the best guitars are those that meet the needs of the player—whether beginner or intermediate player—the best electric guitar should be able to provide quality sound, last for a considerable time, easy to play and always reliable when needed. Although every single guitar listed here are of top quality, there are different guitar for every budget, style and genre of play.

American guitar manufacture was at its peak in the 1960s, with numerous highly-respected guitar companies making instruments at all levels; from the likes of Kay, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Fender and Gibson. But Harmony was one of the very biggest producers, at one point the biggest, selling guitars branded both as Harmony, and rebadged for numerous other distributors. In fact, in the mid/late 1960s, Harmony was said to produce more guitars than all other American guitar manufacturers combined. Most were entry or intermediate level instruments though, and although examples of most models are easy to find, examples in really good condition are rare.
Octave effects take the input signal and produce synthesized tones that are one or more octaves above or below it. They can be blended in with the input signal to harmonize with it in real time. The effect can be synthesized by monitoring the waveform of the input and multiplying or dividing the observed frequency by, for example, 2 (to go up or down an octave) or 4 (to go up or down two octaves). This takes advantage of the fact that tones that are an octave apart have a 2:1 frequency relationship; the frequency of the tone one octave higher than a root tone is always double the frequency of the root tone.
Fortunately, some of the best happy accidents have been preserved for posterity. For over 40 years Seymour W. Duncan has kept meticulous notes on the best pickups to cross his workbench. Many of these have been resurrected as Seymour Duncan models. For example, our ’59 Model is based on a particularly sweet-sounding ’59 P.A.F. in one of Jeff Beck’s guitars. Another of our models, the Pearly Gates, is inspired by another, rawer-sounding ’59 P.A.F. That’s just one example of two supposedly identical pickups from the same year displaying different musical personalities.
Delay – a time-based effect that sounds like an echoing of your guitar tone. A delay pedal creates a copy of your guitar tone that repeats like a fading echo. Delay pedals usually have a time knob that allows you to choose the time of the delay intervals, an effect level knob that controls the volume of the delayed sound and a feedback knob that controls how many repeats are sounded before the effect fades. See different types of Delay below:
hey i have a decca guitar 2 pick ups sight body damage. i bought it for 7 us dollars included amp (amp doesnt work).i put probably 50 dollars into repairs on other thing such as new strings. another repair i made was where the neck connects to the body of the guitar someone unscred that plate pulling the guitar apart shoved "wallpaper or tissue box pieces" in it screwed i back together. i cant find any similar guitars like this in shape. but it has the decca trademark. no model numbers or anything. my guess is someone took a fender body and replaced the neck, becausee the neck doesnt line up with the body. there is 1 tone dial 1 volume control 2 pick ups 6 strings a "whammy bar" which is held up by a thick spring about an inch long. the whammy bar does fold back to the guitar wich caused most of the scratches before i recieved this guitar. please email me if you understand what im saying and have something nice to say especially if it is worth more than $7.50. aain my email adress is nuckthebuck@aol.com. my name is Craig Nuckles.

Derived from standard EADGBE, all the strings are tuned lower by the same interval, thus providing the same chord positions transposed to a lower key. Lower tunings are popular among rock and heavy metal bands. The reason for tuning down below standard pitch is usually either to accommodate a singer's vocal range or to get a deeper/heavier sound.[38]

Jump up ^ "The first incontrovertible evidence of five-course instruments can be found in Miguel Fuenllana's Orphenica Lyre of 1554, which contains music for a vihuela de cinco ordenes. In the following year Juan Bermudo wrote in his Declaracion de Instrumentos Musicales: "We have seen a guitar in Spain with five courses of strings." Bermudo later mentions in the same book that "Guitars usually have four strings," which implies that the five-course guitar was of comparatively recent origin, and still something of an oddity". Tom and Mary Anne Evans Guitars: From the Renaissance to Rock. Paddington Press Ltd 1977 p.24
I have had Tracy do quite abit of work for me many times going back since the 90’s, however, now I am “on my own” living a long way from his shop. He is a super craftsman for sure and I wanted to watch how to do some minor things on my own as well as be able to help educate myself before finding someone locally to work on my guitars in the future. Great explanations and for my reference in future.
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The iconic helmet and armor. The legendary story. The heart-racing combat. Halo has defined a generation of action-packed gaming and online multiplayer gameplay for more than a decade. Now, you can re-experience the thrills, adrenaline and immersive storylines of the Halo franchise, remastered and revamped for the Xbox One. With The Master Chief Collection, you'll not only receive stunning visuals, white-knuckle adventures and deep, rich storylines, you'll have a chance to honor the iconic hero who has been central to so many of your gaming conquests. Featuring a remastered Halo 2: Anniversary, Halo: Combat Evolved Anniversary, Halo 3 and Halo 4, Halo: The Master Chief Collection lets you experience the legendary story of the iconic hero with the full Xbox One treatment. A total of 45 campaign missions and more than 100 multiplayer and Spartan Ops maps await you, as well as an all-new live-action digital series and access to the Halo 5: Guardians beta. Dive into the adventure with Master Chief in Halo 2: Anniversary, which celebrates the 10-year anniversary of the classic game. Lock and load for a fully remastered campaign, or switch between that and the original 2004 version with the Classic mode. Use all-new skills to blast through the campaign, and get ready for the 23 original multiplayer maps, as well as six re-imagined ones, for a thrilling online combat experience. Take advantage of the all-new Master Menu, which lets you play through all four unlocked campaigns, start to finish, or seamlessly jump around as you choose. Be one of the first to experience the next generation of Halo multiplayer with the Halo 5: Guardians beta access. Then, kick back and relax with a thrilling new live-action adventure featuring elite UNSC operatives exploring a strange and treacherous world in the Halo: Nightfall digital series, brought to life by 343 Industries, director Sergio Mimica-Gezzan and Executive Producers, Ridley Scott and Scott Free TV President, David Zucker. Get ready to experience the future — by fully understanding your past.
Whether it costs $100 or $1000, the build quality should feel worthy of the money. Naturally with budget models you will find more laminated woods compared the solid woods and exotic materials used in expensive guitars. However, a good model will have laminates that are put together securely and cleanly, with no excess glue or rough spots. Even a good budget guitar will look and feel great.
SOLD OUT: ASK we may have another in stock Here we have a wonderful example of the Alvarez answer to the classic Martin 000-18 now famously linked to the Eric Clapton version from Martin om guitar today. Imported to the US by Saint Lewis Music 36 years ago. This fine example of the Alvarez 5014 is in excellent vintage condition you will not believe that she is over 36 years old when you see this in person you will realize it has been amazingly well cared for these past 3.6 decades. Its fit and finish is excellent as is its play action / neck angle ... this guitar is a pleasure to play and is truly EASY on the eyes... The neck is 1-11/16" at the nut and very comfortable to play with very little visible play wear to fingerboard or frets one will notice that this example is WELL above average condition for this age of guitar its really rare to see. Its beautiful SITKA SPRUCE top is solid and the back and sides are excellent grade Mahogany as is the neck please refer to the pics ... with nice details like its herringbone rosette, celluloid tortis pick guard, exotic Brazilian Coral Rosewood headstock overlay this guitar is more fancy than the other 5014's we have had and is in near mint vintage condition. The woods are well aged and the tone and volume has nicely opened up and aged like fine wine it takes time... a lot of guitar for this kind of price. Crafted in Japan over 36 years ago and kept in Amazing condition all these years just for you... Nicely set up with a NEW Martin Bone Nut & compensated bone saddle here at JVGUITARS. get this gem before she's gone! questions let me know... jvguitars@gmail.com .
The sound quality is pretty excellent. Relative to the Zoom, Line 6, and Boss multi-effect pedals, the distortion on the DigiTech is surprisingly nice. The reverbs are absolutely gorgeous, which is no surprise given they are Lexicon algorithms. Chorus and delay also sounds great, and the effects’ parameters are easy to set up and adjust using the row of knobs below the display. We also find the noise gate works extremely well at taming any unruly noise issues caused by dirt effects. Overall, we’re impressed at how the RP500 replicates a lot of the “classics.” A quick note on the presets - they are less than stellar, so don’t judge this pedal by them. You’ll have to play with them a little bit to arrive at better, more usable sounds.
Here, we look at the third and final kind of mini-toggle switch, the “on/on/on” switch. After showing how the connections are made within the switch, and seeing the two types that can be found, we look at two uses for the switch: firstly to create a series/split/parallel switch for a humbucker, and secondly to use the switch as a three-way pickup selector.
Palmer is a Miami, FL based guitar maker. They have high end models made in the states and cheap models contracted out to the highest bidder like most guitar maker today. I would say that if you tried to sell one of these, you would most likely not get what you paid for it new because they are simply made cheaply in huge numbers. They eventually turn up at used music shops and garage sales around the country. I wouldn't pay more than $50 for one myself and did just that. They make good campfire guitars.
The USA-made variants of Jackson guitars are somewhat pricey, yet they are also custom-made. However, you can also find the same options bearing affordable price tags too. These inexpensive models come with slightly downgraded specs as they aim at the beginners and intermediate level guitarists. It means Jackson guitars provide an excellent opportunity to the metal players to choose any of the guitars that fit in their budget and meet their requirements.
A phaser pedal is similar to a chorus as it thickens up your sound but also adds a sweeping effect – almost as if the speaker within the amplifier is spinning around or moving up and down. If you pretend the speaker is moving away from you and moving closer and back again – you’ll get an idea as to how it sounds. You can change the length of the effect and how quickly the movements are via the pedal.

BOO TO AMAZON FOR CARRYING A MISREPRESENTED PRODUCT. Due to the description I thought we could use this for lessons. It is NOT an instrument it is a toy. It doesn't stay tuned for even a 1/2 hour lesson and the teacher won't allow him to use it for fear that it will hurt his ability to hear when a real guitar is out of tune in the future. I tried to return but they didn't respond for weeks and told me it was too late after they finally responded. The guitar has barely been used at all and won't be used since it is clearly doing more harm than good for a young musician! AMAZON you should drop this product, it is NOT what is presents itself to be!!!


This is the classic effect that many people first buy and overuse. Chorus works by inaudibly delaying each note to thicken and sweeten your original sound. If set too high it can make your sound overly ‘sugary’ so use it sparingly with electric or acoustic and it will provide some sparkle over a song section. With chorus’s you get what you pay for so the overall sound quality of a £25 unit might become irritating in the long run.


As a result of requests by audio engineers to reduce onstage volume, in the 2010s, in many large venues. much of the on-stage sound reaching the musicians now comes from the monitor speakers or in-ear monitors, not from the instrument amplifiers. Stacks of huge speaker cabinets and amplifiers are still used in concerts in some genres of music, especially heavy metal, but they tend to be used more for the visual effect than for sound reproduction.
At one point, Fender switched to producing guitars with the bridge pickup located farthest from the highest-amplitude portion of the vibrating strings, slightly “over-wound”, thus increasing the signal output from that pickup. Even more overwound pickups (“hot-wired” designs) became popular, either for all three pickups (a “hot” configuration), or for the bridge position only (so-called “Texas Hot” due to its popularity among Southern Rock guitarists).
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Their designs do not require them to have comparator inputs as with solid-state amps. The small amount of negative feedback in valve amps is only required to provide damping to the speaker. Valve Amplifier Design From physics we know certain things must be a particular order and size to be efficient and this is acutely so with valve amps. 60Watts is the minimum power capacity for an amplifier to bring quality speakers to life with full fidelity.
Do you have a short budget? Then we have included the Dean Vendetta XMT model in my top 10 electric guitars review list. This is very little known guitar and you’d be forgiven if you have never heard of it before. But we can tell you with confidence that once you buy this guitar it will exceed your expectations and this is very much pocket-friendly.
For some performances - those well controlled performances of an orchestral guitarist, let's say - machine notation can get a lot closer to producing a true sound than it will to the variations offered by a virtuoso jazz guitarist, blues master or metal thrasher jamming outside the box. In some cases, the machine sound might already fool some of the most discerning listeners -- if the performance does not test the limits of the mechanical emulation.
A true guitar polymath, Nels Cline has tackled everything from gothic country rock with the Geraldine Fibbers to a full remake of John Coltrane's late improvisational masterwork, Interstellar Space. He's best known, of course, as Wilco's gangly guitar hero, lurching into extended seizures ("Spiders [Kidsmoke]") or spiraling into lyrical jam flights ("Impossible Germany"). "Nels can play anything," Jeff Tweedy said. "We struggle with his spot in the band sometimes – but we always come to a place that's unique and interesting because we did struggle."
Although much less common, the second trick I have in store for you shouldn't be taken lightly. The idea is to double a more or less distorted guitar part with an acoustic recording of the strings of your electric guitar recorded simultaneously as the distorted part. As preposterous as it sounds at first, considering that the sound of an electric guitar without an amp is certainly not the most pleasant one, the overall result can be truly amazing! Indeed, well managed, this screeching sound has the particularity of adding a bit more dynamic relief to "trashy" sounds, providing the performance a more "organic" aspect, especially due to the accents produced by the pick. But just like with the first trick, you need to sub-mix this take wisely so that the listener doesn't end up discovering the trick.

Acoustic amplifiers are intended for acoustic guitars and other acoustic instruments, especially for the way these instruments are used in relatively quiet genres such as folk and bluegrass. They are similar to keyboard amplifiers, in that they have a relatively flat frequency response with minimal coloration. To produce this relatively "clean" sound, these amplifiers often have powerful amplifiers (providing up to 800 watts RMS), to provide additional "Headroom" and prevent unwanted distortion. Since an 800 watt amplifier built with standard Class AB technology is heavy, some acoustic amplifier manufacturers use lightweight Class D amplifiers, which are also called "switching amplifiers."
I must confess -- I am horrible at soldering. So after messing up another wiring harness with my soldering skills, I came across ObsidianWire and purchased out of desperation. Now I wish this would have been my first choice. The wiring sounds awesome, it was a breeze to install and the included switch and input jack completed the upgrade. I would HIGHLY recommend ObsidianWire harnesses." - Ross G Vintage 50s Wiring for Les Paul
Taylors have a "happier" sound and I like the feel of them. I am a novice but from what I have seen for a beginner with an acoustic guitar, they felt and sounded warmer and less tinny than the laminated wood ones. A good rosewood taylor isn't on the cheap side of things but it feels like you can play better than you can. And the model I looked at had strings that were nice and close to the frets so you didn't feel like you were pushing in deep like the keys of an old typerwriter. Go into a Guitar Center or somewhere you can actually feel what you are getting before you buy anything. I got a cheap Gibson online less than a month ago and got what I paid for when it came with the bridge completely missing and a brassy sound when it was played. Buy your stuff in person. I think that Gibson is probably still a good brand, but the quality control of the cheaper models they put their name on is something I might question from my first experience with them...
Without a doubt, dont even entertain the idea of getting one, I was given one by an unfortunate friend who bought one, to try and get it to at be semi playable.. the necks are not even straight, in fact , you could ski off them.....the frets stick out from the side of the neck, the strings are so far off the neck you cannot even fret them down.... There must be no quality control whatsoever in the factory..
Or course, you have a repulsive snobs on here that can't acknowledge the truth that the list above correctly consists of quality, popular choices. I'd never play a Dean, a Parker, or a Godin. I'm so glad you love them, but you're a minority. The Gibsons and Fenders are tried and true designs. That's why the majority play them. They're actually good guitars, at least the equal of the snobs-are-us suggestions above. Having limited funds to spend, and wanting to ensure that a quality guitar with quality tone is aquired, I would go with a Fender or a Gibson without hesitation. I'm not a snotty nosed rich brat like most of the above put-downs and belly achers; I'm a 50+ mature adult who knows how to play and I play good, thank you. Not because I say, but because that's what others say. Fender and Gibson are overall the best guitars on the market for the average person of means and talent, unless you're rich and can afford something above $5000.00. Otherwise, calm down, remove the pentangle from your rectum, and relax. Is it really that important to you? THEN OPEN YOUR OWN WEBSITE AND PREACH ABOUT IT. This has been a public service message...Billy
Even with tone control maxed some high frequencies get cut. To let all the frequencies through you can either get a no-load pot or make one. CTS makes them for Fender and what they do is simply break the connection between the wiper and conductive element when pot is maxed. Additionally, they have an indentation so once they reach maximum setting they “click” and it’s not that easy to turn them back. To make your own just cut (or cover with nail polish) the element near the end, so that resistance between the wiper and the opposite lug reads infinite when maxed, at lower settings it should read as usual.
While it’s not as popular as the two previous brands we have mentioned, PRS is on a level of their own. American owned and made, these guitars are an epitome of quality and great sound. They have a completely unique appearance and offer a tone which has a distinctive color. Best thing about this brand is the balance price and performance. You get a lot more than you pay for with PRS.
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when I started playing, if you wanted distortion, you "cranked up" the volume on the guitar and the amp. my old Gibson amp had reverb and tremolo. I used to play without reverb or tremolo. nowadays, in my old age, I use a little reverb for flavoring. I have pedals, but it's too much hassle to set everything up. so, I just plug into the amp with a little reverb. I'm happy and that's all that really counts. isn't it ?
At 10.8 pounds and 11.4 by 12 by 6.7 inches, the Crush 12 is one of the smallest amps we tested, so it’s easily portable and stashable—although with just 12 watts and a 6-inch speaker, it’s the least powerful of our top picks. It has a ¼-inch headphone jack but no line input, so you can’t connect a smartphone for play-along sessions. While our sample came in the company’s iconic orange color, it’s also available in black—although as Wirecutter editor-at-large Geoffrey Morrison put it, “Buying an Orange amp in black is like buying a sports car with an automatic transmission.”
Admit it. You’ve slow danced to Stairway To Heaven before. Page’s playing have influenced so many guitar players of today, and Led Zeppelin revolutionized Rock and Roll blending acoustic guitars, banjos, and mandolins while still staying with the same gritty rock image. His guitar riffs are forever etched into Rock and Roll’s hall of fame. How influential was he? Step into a guitar store, and you’ll see. Thousands of 12 year old kids across the globe are playing the intro to Stairway. Now that’s how you know you’ve made it.
What every great guitarist does, with respect to sound, is achieve a very high level of nuanced control over the sound, not by having a computer play his guitar for him. As a keyboard player, I would recommend you first concentrate on playing your synth with lots of use of pedals, velocity-sensitive changes in timbre, and left hand controllers. Then you can experiment with all sorts of synth sounds. This way, you can play as expressively as a gutarist, but without sounding like a bad copy. Instead, you can sound like something different, new, and this is really where synth lead work can shine (and actually add to our musical lexicon).
Chushin is still in operation today in Nagano, Japan and does business with guitar giant Fender. I believe that Chushin may have been a member of the Matsumoto Musical Instruments Association listed further down because both companies produced Fresher guitars during different periods....with Matsumoto beginning production and Chushin ending it (perhaps because the Association was disbanded?). During the 1960-1980 period they were responsible for badges Bambu, Cobran, El Maya and Hisonus as well as some Charvel, Fresher and Jackson badges. The company may have possibly made some guitars with the Aztec, Maya and Robin badges, but that is not verified. Guitars made by Chushin from this period are well-made and appreciated by guitar enthusiasts worldwide.

This workshop includes: lecture, demonstration and hands on experience in advanced guitar electronics.  Students will study alternate guitar wiring schemes demonstrated by instructor Scott Walker, and stereo wiring and Onboard Effects loop options will also be covered.  This class will focus on signal paths, diagrams, and component selection, in passive and active circuits.  Students will learn about basic preamp design.
Our production/assemble time frame: 15 - 25 working days since our professional Control Team and Supervisor Engineer will ensure that your ordered guitar is top notch considering the fact that this guitar is intricate to assemble and they check very carefully every detail such as the finish, fret work, pickups, strings. And also, they will test the sound quality. We do not rush up the process of manufacturing your guitar since we would like to deliver to you best quality performance.
Martin Guitars has a storied history that dates back as far as the mid-1700s when Christian Frederick Martin was born to a family of modest German cabinet makers. At the age of 15, Christian Frederick traveled to Vienna and took up an apprenticeship with a renowned guitar maker, where he flourished in his craft. Years later and after a feud with the Violin Makers Guild, Martin decided to move his business to the United States, opening up shop in New York City. More than 100 years later (and through many trials and tribulations), Martin introduced their signature Dreadnought acoustic guitar, the same shape as the one pictured above. Funny thing is, it was actually based on a defunct style created by another company years prior. Now the standard for acoustic guitar shapes, nearly every manufacturer offers a version of the instrument made popular by Martin. Currently, the brand is run by Christian Frederick Martin IV, the 6th generation of the Martin family – and they’re still making some of the best instruments in the world.
“Rock guitarists are incredibly conservative and traditional,” says Dr. Millard. “We like to think of ourselves breaking all the bonds and we go back to the fifties when rock and roll was revolutionary. It is not revolutionary. It is very traditional, very conservative, and musicians are really stubborn to change. We have a cultural understanding that old is better than good.”
48-HOUR RISK FREE TRIAL PERIOD (Includes guitars, effect pedals; excludes speaker cabinets and amps). Returns for 100% refund will be issued if the customer expresses their desire to return the item by email, phone or Reverb Message, within 48-hours of receiving the product. If done so, Moore Guitars will issue a FedEx prepaid and insured shipping label via E-mail at our expense. We require that the item be return shipped within 24 hours of contacting Moore Guitars of your desire to return the item. If the item is not shipped within the 24 hour time period the you will be moved to the next tier of our return policy. This is our "try it out in your own jam room" return policy. Just FYI, this is not a "Gig it, and Return It" Opportunity. Items purchased during Official Sales Events are not eligible. See "After 48-Hours" for returns on these items. AFTER 48-HOURS Returns after 48 hours and up to 14 days may be authorized and a full refund will be issued for any item, for the purchase price. Moore Guitars will issue a FedEx prepaid and insured shipping label via E-mail. If your purchase originally qualified for free shipping, the actual shipping charges will be deducted from your refund, as will any/all return shipping charges. Returns occurring between 15 and 30 days will be exchanged for 100% toward a trade of equal or lesser value of in-store product, OR 85% of the purchase price less shipping to and from the customer. All returns for any reason and at any time must be cleared through a Moore Guitars Representative. No exceptions. Any damage due to shipping must be reported immediately upon receiving the item. If an item is damaged due to shipping, we will refund the purchase price and the shipping costs to ship the item back to Moore Guitars. All returned items must be complete, unregistered and in the original condition and packaging with all accessories and complete documentation (Owner's Manual, Warranty Card, quick start guides etc.) No returns on Special Orders, Pre-orders, Trades, Close-outs, or Blow-out items. Return requests on all non-domestic United States shipped items must be submitted via email or phone within 24 hours. A full refund will be issued less shipping costs to and from the buyer on any item once we have received it and inspected it. No refunds will be issued for non-domestic United States shipped items after the 24 hour window has closed. ALL RETURNS ARE SUBJECT TO AN INSPECTION BY A MOORE GUITARS REPRESENTATIVE AND A REFUND WILL ONLY BE ISSUED ONCE WE DEEM THE ITEM TO BE IN THE SAME CONDITION AS WHEN WE SHIPPED IT. Our return address is- Moore Music, 301 North Royal Avenue, Evansville, Indiana 47715 Thanks, The Crew at Moore Guitars
These chords will form the foundation of your guitar playing and are, thankfully, rather easy to learn. With a little practice and patience you will find them coming together quickly. The beginner guitar songs use the chords below and introduce them gently. These songs are a great way to build up your guitar foundations to a level of solid competency. By playing through them in order and being patient with each one you will quickly develop your skills.
You may find a flood of several guitar brands in the Indian market. All of them claim to deliver the best products. Hence, it is a bit difficult for a newbie to choose the right one. That is why having prior background knowledge about all the brands is of utmost importance before you spend money on a guitar. Such know-how will help you to escape from the trap of words of mouth.
The Univibe effect was produced to also mimic the sound of the Leslie rotary speaker, but in a slightly different way from the new digital pedals previously mentioned.  They often combine slight amounts of all modulation type effects at the same time to approximate the rotary sound, but became a unique sound of its own.  Some pedals allow some individual tweaking of each modulator, but most typically allow the user to adjust the speed of the Univibe effect.
I listen to a lot of internet radio, from soul to death metal. I think it's good to listen to a wide variety of music, even if you're not particularly into certain genres. Each genre has its own qualities when it comes to guitar, so spend time just... listening. Listen to how rhythms, chords and solos are used. You may not know how they're doing it just from listening, but you might like the sound of something which you'll then be inspired to go and investigate independently.
Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.
I'm going to break this review into pros and cons. Pros: Top notch wood, electronics, wonderful bound neck and great machine heads. The action/fretboard are wonderful (after being setup). Sounds beautiful!, and more so if you take my advice. One last pro, all of the cons are easily remedied. Cons: The saddle, nut, and bridge pins are plastic (kind of like putting crap tires on a good sports car). I replaced the saddle and nut with tusk, and for the bridge pins I went with brass. It was like the volume went from a 4 to a 8, and the tone went from nice to beautiful and singing. It was about a 40$ upgrade, that made it sound like a thousand dollar guitar. This is the first time I bought a guitar before playing it. The gamble more than paid off. Been playing guitar for 25 years, and I
I have been playing guitar, banjo, and harmonica for 60 years. I started when I was ten-years-old. I have taught guitar and banjo for a number of years. My guitar of choice is a Martin D-41, an affordable guitar that is much like the D-45. The woods and construction are famous. There are other makes but none surpass Martin. My harmonicas are Hohners given to me by my father when he passed-on. Anyone can learn. I learned the fiddle after I reached my 70's. Just listen, play, and learn. Don't give-up. There are many good guitars, and banjos. Martin makes the best, and Stelling makes the best banjos. I started-out with a japanese banjo in the 1970's. A white Eagle, distributed by Alvarez.
This is a great local shop.  I bought a new Floyd Rose bridge for one of my electric guitars and brought it to Franklin Guitar to be installed and set up.  I got the guitar back within 2 days and it plays so well that I brought them my other guitar for a set up the next day.  Again, within 2 days I had it back and it plays exactly like the other one...awesome.  I had both guitars set up for a little more than half of what another shop quoted me just to install and set up the new bridge on the one.  High quality work at a fair price in a reasonable time...I won't go any where else to have my guitars worked on.  They also have a good inventory of guitars and amps for sale to fit any budget.
The other US-based manufacturers were from Chicago Harmony (formerly owned by Sears), National-Dobro (Supro/Valco) and Kay. Chicago was the largest guitar manufacturing area of the US at the time. The only other manufacturer of Silvertones during this period was the Japanese-based company, Teisco (or Teisco Del Ray as it was formerly called). Teisco created some of the wildest designs for Silvertones, in our opinion. The earliest model was the TG1. This was the first guitar to incorporate an amplifier and speaker into the body of the guitar. Although some people look down on the Japanese guitars we think they've got some really interesting sounds and innovations not found on American made guitars.
Fusion players such as John McLaughlin adopted the fluid, powerful sound of rock guitarists such as Clapton and Jimi Hendrix. McLaughlin was a master innovator, incorporating hard jazz with the new sounds of Clapton, Hendrix, Beck and others. McLaughlin later formed the Mahavishnu Orchestra, an historically important fusion band that played to sold out venues in the early 1970s and as a result, produced an endless progeny of fusion guitarist. Guitarists such as Pat Martino, Al Di Meola, Larry Coryell, John Abercrombie, John Scofield and Mike Stern (the latter two both alumni of the Miles Davis band) fashioned a new language for the guitar which introduced jazz to a new generation of fans. Like the rock-blues icons that preceded them, fusion guitarists usually played their solid body instruments through stadium rock-style amplification, and signal processing "effects" such as simulated distortion, wah-wah, octave splitters, compression, and flange pedals. They also simply turned up to full volume in order to create natural overdrive such as the blues rock players.

With over 100 effects, there's really no shortage of virtual stompboxes to play with, while the unit's complex signal routing capabilities allow for a wide variety of effects combination. Add to this Helix' acclaimed amp modeling features, which lets you mix and match 62 amp, 37 cabs and 16 mics. If that's not enough, you can also make adjustments to the amp models to better personalize your sound. To match its complexity, Line 6 designed the interface to be simple yet intuitive, courtesy of its color LCD display and colored LED rings.
This guitar has a maple neck which is coated with a thin satin finish and has a C-design which is easy for beginners to handle. It features an alder solid body. The vibrato design is enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding firmness to the tone. They also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Speaking of pickups, the PAC 112v is equipped with a 5-way blade pickup selector. There are master tone and volume controls for the neatest output. This guitar is available in seven finishes, natural satin, old violin sunburst, raspberry red, sonic blue, black, and silver metal.
The neck is also made of mahogany and is hand set into the body. Looking at the fretboard, we see a standard rosewood design with white binding and classic trapezoid inlays. Epiphone went with a set of Alnico Classic humbucker pickups. These are very close to what the original Gibson solution had to offer. Classic rock and blues just flow out of these, although you are more than free to crank up the gain and blast some heavy riffs.
Here you will find a list of beginner guitar chords. These chords are very commonly used through many popular songs and so learning them is a great foundation for your guitar future. With the chords below you will be able to play thousands of songs, including most of your favourites. And once you have learnt these chords and the changes between them you will find it very easy to learn new chords and add them to your repertoire.
Having perfected the modelling amp concept, Line 6 have become experts at delivering a huge variety of great sounds in a convenient, affordable package. Experiment with 12 different amp models, from classic 1960s Fender tone to the “Insane Red”, inspired by the mental Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, and sculpt your tone further with the seven built-in effects.
Polishing the frets is a whole instructable by itself, but I definitely recommend that you do it at least once a year. It makes the guitar look nice, and it gets some of the oxides off the frets(not sure if it really helps anything, but it sounds helpful, right?). Also, the tape pulls out some of the junk in the open pores of the wood(if your fretboard is rosewood).

It seems like Taylor have been around forever, but compared to most big name acoustic guitar brands, Taylor are a relative newcomer on the scene having been founded by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug in 1974. They started out as an acoustic guitar company and that is their primary focus to this day and are now renowned the world over for the tone and quality of their instruments..
The very first thing to remember about pickups is that the active option is not necessarily better than the passive choice, and vice versa. Each type brings its own set of drawbacks and benefits. Passive pickups might be limited in terms of signal strength and tone shaping, but they are much more expressive in comparison to the active pickups in terms of picking and strumming intensities.
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There are many, many variations of the electric guitar. Science has told us that in order for sound to be naturally amplified, there needs to be a chamber in which sound can resonate. Just look at the construction of the ancient amphitheaters, or the way that the human body has natural resonating chambers that allow us to use our voices, or a stand up bass, with its large, chambered body designed to amplify the resonating strings.

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This Hellraiser C1 guitar features a mahogany body and a quilted maple top and abalone gothic cross inlays. It looks and feels fantastic! A couple of things that make it sound even better are the locking tuners, that keep it in tune, and the EMG noise-cancelling scheme that makes sure that the only sound the guitar makes is the music you’re playing.
A very stylish black guitar by ENCORE with a great 'Humbucker' pickup.......The simplicity of this instrument makes it a joy to play and It sounds as good as it looks! Used....but in great condition and showing only minimal signs of use (no scratches, chips or dings) and is in full working order. The scale is full length (not 3/4 or 7/8)...but the body size is smaller and lighter than a typical stratocaster (see image for comparison), which makes this guitar perfect for a younger / smaller person or anybody who might like a very robust but lighter instrument. All reasonable offers considered.
When using subtle detuning to thicken a sound, I suggest trying values of between five and 10 cents and, where possible, adding both positive and negative shifts, to keep the pitch centre correct. Then combine with the dry sound and adjust the level to control the subjective depth of the effect. This is very effective for fattening up guitar solos or backing vocals.
The dual-DSP-powered Helix combines amp and effects models in a large, rugged floor pedal. There are a massive 1,024 preset locations onboard the Helix, organised into eight setlists that contain 32 banks with four presets each. Each preset can have up to four stereo signal paths, each made up of eight blocks populated with amps and effects. With the current count of 41 modelled amps, seven bass amps, 30 cabs, 16 mics, 80 effects and the option of loading speaker impulse responses, there's great potential for sound creation. Line 6 has implemented an easy editing system, complete with a joystick, and - get this - touch-sensitive footswitches offering a shortcut to parameter adjustment; you can even use these with your feet to select a parameter before adjusting it with the pedal treadle! There are some great sounds here, especially when you get beyond the factory presets and shape things to your own taste. The Helix's advantage lies in its comprehensive input/output and signal routing ability, which can facilitate just about any guitar-related studio or onstage task you can think of. However, if you don't need all that connectivity, and want to save a bit of cash, there's also the Line 6 Helix LT.
Gibson Les Paul and Fender electric guitars can retail for several thousands of pounds, but electric guitars for beginners are available for less than £100. One example of a cheap electric guitar is the LA Electric Guitar + Amp Pack, which features everything a beginner needs to start playing the guitar right away for under £90.00. It includes a 15 watt guitar amp with 6.5" speaker for practising, a guitar lead, a strap, a padded gig bag, a set of spare strings, a pick and a 2-year warranty. The electric guitar itself has a neck made from maple - the most common type of wood used in necks - which helps to expand on the treble sounds of a guitar due to its hardness. The guitar is capable of producing a wide variety sounds, thanks in part to its 3x single coil pickups with a reverse wound middle pickup, which enables users to experiment with playing different styles of music.
Single coil pickups utilize a single magnet. They also typically have a lower output than humbucking pickups, which means they aren’t capable of producing as much distortion as a humbucker equipped guitar. However, because they’re not intended to be used with extreme levels of distortion they have a very rich and musical voice when played with lower amounts of gain.
The Wildwood staff feels that they are some of the best instruments to see the light of day since the mid-60’s. We have worked closely with the Gibson Memphis factory to create unique special run guitars that take these iconic instruments to new levels while honoring the Gibson’s storied history. By producing everything from classic reissues to signature artist models, the Memphis factory is taking their game to a whole new level. We are proud to present our Gibson Memphis inventory, and we invite you to look around and fall in love with one of these superlative instruments.
"Our expertise is to customize guitars according to the specifications of our clients and we have our own factory that recreates all major guitar brands, boutique brands and collectible guitars. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. We take great pride in the quality and designs of our electric guitars and basses. From traditional to unique styles a U.S. Masters instrument rates with the finest in detail, woods, finish, feel, components and consistency. Our designs incorporate some advanced high performance features, some patented, to improve on aspects of sonic response and feel, upper fret access, the ease of playing, comfort and all designed to provide you with one of the finest responding instruments available. These guitars are of the finest, and yet it is only fraction of the cost that you would normally pay. You may be wondering how such an amazing product could be so cheap, It is possible because it has been manufactured in China, where labor is cheap. Cheap labor does not mean that has been compromised; all parts are of the highest and have been imported from overseas. When purchasing this guitar you can only stand to win. If you are satisfied, you have just saved yourself hundreds of dollars! So go on, treat yourself to the guitar you have always wanted. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!"

All electric guitars have this switch but it varies from guitar to guitar. it is called the pickup selector switch. It is used for deciding on which pickup to use on the guitar. On a les paul style guitar it can be used to select the neck (traditionally rythm pickup), bridge (traditionally used for lead) and both pickups together.\n. \n===\n. \nThat's what it is on a normal Gibson Les Paul. But on a Gibson Les Paul BFG, that is a "kill" switch that turns the guitar off completely. On many Gretsches, the toggle switch is a tone switch flipping between bassier and more trebly sounds. On most Fenders, that switch is down on the lower bout by the volume/tone controls (but on a Telecaster Deluxe, the switch is where it'd be on a Les Paul). Then there are oddities like the Italia Rimini, which has no pickup selector switch -- just individual volume controls for the two pickups.\n. \nEvery guitar has a different design. You'd have to look into every model.
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when I started playing, if you wanted distortion, you "cranked up" the volume on the guitar and the amp. my old Gibson amp had reverb and tremolo. I used to play without reverb or tremolo. nowadays, in my old age, I use a little reverb for flavoring. I have pedals, but it's too much hassle to set everything up. so, I just plug into the amp with a little reverb. I'm happy and that's all that really counts. isn't it ?
What most of us know as the classic ’60s Teisco line began in 1964. The year marked both the debut of many new guitar models, noted by a transition to a new headstock designs (which can help you date a particular guitar). As already noted, Teisco headstocks through the ’50s were mainly variants of the Gibson three-and-three. Indeed, these remained into the ’60s on Teisco hollowbodies.
Great condition. With the exception of the gold foil missing from the back pad, allowing the pink to show thru, the guitar is entirely original. Has a couple of small spots of edge wear, and a chip on the front, the size of this 'o'. Plays and sound fine. Has correct amount of neck relief (.010") at the 7th fret, when fretted at the first fret and the body fret. Includes original chipboard case.
Lolol lame azz I knew if I kept reading your BS comment you would start nameing all your crapy azz guitars haha lol no one cares or gives a flying fuck what you have or own.... (What you must of sounded like when you were 12 and lame as today) Oohhh I'm sooooo cool I have jimi's guitar and eric's guitar cause I'm their nephiew ya there my uncles hmm mm both of them I own and play with there guitars all the time woooo hooooo...............
This is the name given to the amplifier, separate from the speakers. It’s the pre-amp and amp in one box, which is usually placed on top of a cabinet or a stack of speakers. This is a common configuration for large venues, and it might be useful to have a separate amp head if you play a lot of festivals or “battle of the bands” events, where the speakers are generally provided by the organizer.
Because each of these requires duplicating your signal once or several times, you want to do it after you've added all of the other dynamic, filter-based, and gain effects. There is no sense in trying to get a distortion or equalizer pedal to react to a series of recombined signals when you can take care of that before hand. You'll get much higher quality and accurate modulation out of it this way.
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Notch filters (also called band-stop filters or band-rejection filters) are sometimes used with double basses. Notch filters are filters that allow most frequencies to pass through unaltered, while attenuating those in a specific range to very low levels. Notch filters are used in instrument amplifiers and preamplifiers for acoustic instruments such as acoustic guitar, mandolin, and bass instrument amplifiers to reduce or prevent feedback. While most notch filters are set manually by the user, there are also automatic notch filters which detect the onset of feedback and notch out the frequency before damaging feedback begins.
GuitarPCB.com – designs and sells printed circuit boards (PCBs) with a boutique look for classic and boutique pedal designs. Their active forum provides support for builders using the PCBs. A theme throughout their site is that you expensive boutique pedals are simply classic older designs with little or no modification, and you can easily build your own.
Different types of guitars have different sound aesthetics, e.g. different colour-spectrum characteristics (the way the sound energy is spread in the fundamental frequency and the overtones), different response, etc. These differences are due to differences in construction; for example modern classical guitars usually use a different bracing (fan-bracing) from that used in earlier guitars (they had ladder-bracing); and a different voicing was used by the luthier.
I am a beginner player and I am a bit disappointed in both Fender and Gibson. Both entry level guitars suck, for beginners like me. Why not they make the fret board neck nut a little more wider so that its easier for learning. In the last 5 years playing both Fender Starcasters and Gibson Maestro, I cann’t play chords properly. I am still looking for entry level guitar for my chord practice without breaking my budget ($700).
This is where you want to go! Steve is kind, professional, and supremely competent. just brought my Taylor 614ce for a neck adjustment and electronics work. Steve told me that he was running with about a two to three week turnaround period but then did a couple of quick fixes -on the spot- that made my guitar really sing for my next gig. I'll bring it back to him for some more in- depth repair soon but for now I am a very happy camper. And he didn't even charge me a dime!! I will be visiting Steve for all my guitar and mandolin service needs in the future.
The Rocker 32’s secret weapon is its stereo capabilities courtesy of two output stages and a mono out/stereo in valve-buffered effects loop – and it’s this that opens the door to some tantalising effects possibilities. It also features a half-power option incorporated into the front panel standby switch. The enamel control panel follows Orange’s classic 1970s ‘graphics only’ format, using pictograms to describe the control functions. The Dirty channel includes gain, bass, mid, treble and master volume controls, while the clean Natural channel has a single volume control. The Natural channel may only have a single volume control, but it’s perfectly dialled in to flatter practically any guitar and it sounds wonderful, with a glassy treble giving way to an addictive chime at higher volume levels. The Dirty channel’s gain control has a very wide range, allowing fine control of moderately driven sounds, with plenty of Dark Terror-approved filth at the top of its travel, making it ideal for everything from classic Brit rock and blues to modern metal. The Rocker 32’s stereo capability will make it almost irresistible to effects users. Plugging in a decent stereo chorus and setting the outputs to dry/wet sends a clean uneffected sound through one side and a fully wet modulated sound to the other. This wet/dry combination generates the chorus effect in the air between the loudspeaker and the ears, creating a real three-dimensional soundscape that swirls and breathes like a classic Leslie rotary loudspeaker.
A question which causes much thought and divide! Catch 22 to a degree: you can't play songs till you've learnt some chords, but just knowing some chords will mean you actually can (though you are not aware of it) play loads of songs. There is a plethora of songs out there with only three chords (some with only two!). Their differences are that the order of chords is slightly different for each - with the exception of the thousands of 12-bar tunes!
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This is a good list although after owning most of these brands or at least having played all of them, I would re-rearrange the order. Gibsons although a good guitar are simply no longer the quality of Taylor or Martin. They are lagging behind these guys. Yamaha and Epiphone despite online "reviews" are also not near a Taylor or Martin for that matter. So I would drop Gibson, Yamaha, and Epiphone down the list, and although Seagull makes a decent guitar, they are no better than Blueridge, so I would drop them down and bring Blueridge up. Of course this is all subjective, but here is my list re-ordered for what its worth.

First up we have the most widely used and most useful pedal ever created – the Distortion pedal! If you’re wondering “What is a distortion pedal” the clue is in the name with how this pedal sounds. It basically takes your signal (the guitar) and distorts it, adding volume, crunch and sustain to your sound and is basically used as a contrast to the natural sound of your guitar. Often used in the chorus of some of your favourite songs.
Featuring a sound engine derived from the bigger, premium-priced GT-100, the GT-1 contains 99 preset and 99 user patches each built from a chain of blocks that can draw from 108 effects, including 27 amp/speaker sims and a 32-second looper. The first two footswitches scroll through patches, while the third (CTL1) footswitch is used to turn an effect, or a combination of effects, on and off in a patch, or for tap tempo. Sonically, there's some great stuff here. Many of the presets are playable straight off the bat, but the wide range of effects means that you can get really creative with your own patches. As you'd expect from Boss, the modulation effects are a highlight, as well as the delays and reverbs, particularly the Tera Echo. We've heard better pitch-shifting though... While the COSM amp sims will give you an approximation of the real thing for recording, at this price, you don't get the playability and detail of high-end modelers. Likewise, the overdrives and distortions work really well when building a patch but, used as solo effects, have less of the impact of real analogue pedals. The acoustic guitar simulator is class, though. For live use, the GT-1 doesn't have the flexibility of bigger units where you can switch individual effects, although you could get 
by in a live situation with careful sequential use of your own patches and the CTL1 button.
For its tops (soundboards), Ovation used sitka spruce, a wood which Kaman engineers had been using in helicopter blades. In the 1970s, Ovation developed thinner sound-boards with carbon-based composites laminating a thin layer of birch, in its Adamas model, which has been viewed as one of the most radical designs in the history of acoustic guitars. The Adamas model dissipated the sound-hole of the traditional soundboard among 22 small sound-holes in the upper chamber of the guitar, yielding greater volume and further reducing feedback during amplification.[1] The Adamas design strengthened the sound-board, reducing the traditional design’s bracing and hence its weight. In the 1980s, another innovation was the introduction of shallow-bowl guitars, which appealed to electric guitarists.
The Step Ladder is a passive input attenuator using high quality components for excellent reliability. True-bypass mode provides the maximum signal level. The attenuator pot and two toggle switches allow for flexibility in the amount of signal attenuation when not in bypass mode. Treble bleed capacitors in the circuit retain crisp high frequencies even at maximum attenuation. The Step Ladder is ideal for anything from getting a slight boost while playing single-note acoustic guitar leads or for jumping from clean to overdrive in a high-gain electric guitar amp.
Guitar FX BOX is acting just like a good collection of analog effect pedals. Just plug your guitar into the sound card input and your guitar will sing and scream. You can apply a wide range of high quality effects to guitar, voice, and other inputs real-time - I/O delay is really low, almost undetectable. This is achieved using DirectSound, WDM streaming or ASIO for fast access to the sound card hardware and special DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Besides high sound quality, Guitar FX BOX features intuitive user interface, supports presets and hot keys for quick presets changing, MIDI/Game controllers pedals, configurable tuner, metronome, file input/output. Currently included effects: Overdrive/distortion, Amp&Speaker cabinet simulator, Echo, Pitch shifter, Reverb, Wah-Wah, Chorus, Tremolo, I/O Equalizers, Dynamic compressor, Phaser and Volume swell.
Response to the Marshall DSL1HR is overwhelmingly positive, with users praising it for its practicality and great tone. Most describe its tone as being true to the Marshall sound, while others use words like fierce and killer. A lot of bedroom rockers appreciate the amp's 1W and 0.1W switchable power rating, and complements it for being pedal friendly. Portability is also what prompted many users to get this amp.
Jackson is a well-known guitar manufacturing company that was set up in the year 1980. Jackson guitars are considered as among the best guitars on the planet. Their guitars are known for its slender and refined layouts. Jackson guitars are also popular for their typical pointed headstock. The Jackson JS32 Kelly RW is an electric guitar which has won the hearts of many owing to its stylish design and great sound quality. When it comes to the sound quality of the guitars, Jackson is the best guitar brand to have.
Here we have a great mid - late 1970’s Alvarez 5047 model its kind of rare and seldom seen and she is a wonderful example of Japan’s answer to the Martin 00028 with the Herringbone rosette and rosewood body and in this case they used a wonderfully high grade beautifully grained rosewood for its body back and sides and fingerboard and bridge at that it looks to be a rich looking Jacaranda Brazilian rosewood type you can be the judge of that just have a good look at our pictures, at any rate its workmanship is excellent as is its fit and finish work is all of a high grade. Well balanced sound board with good volume and a sweet tone with its gorgeously straight grained solid spruce top is beautiful and easy on the eyes as well and up close you can tell its genuine vintage with its thin skin finish its grain highs and lows are visible the Japanese truly were masters - experts at thin poly finish and this one has it. This is the famous S.L.M. model it was imported by Saint Lewis Music back in the Lawsuit era days the 1970's these were made especially nice for SLM as seen here. Bindings all round are excellent overall condition is JVGuitars rated at very good its not new of course its over 40 years old it has only minimal insignificant scratches or doinks true vintage in its own right yet - excellent used vintage and is considered above average for a played 40+ year old instrument. No cracks no buldges or warpage anywhere this guitar is straight no repairs and all original and was excellent when we took this in on trade.We simply cleaned - oiled and polished the entire guitar and it has a good set of Martin 80/20 phosphorous bronze strings set of 12’s… this guitar plays very well now with excellent string action, its neck is a really great one RARE for the Japanese with its more meaty V profile much like the old Martin. Condition, condition, condition, Easy on the eyes and that vintage tone and fun to play are 6 darn good reasons to own this ALVAREZ 5047 Japanese Vintage 0029 with that gorgeous rosewood… Any questions ask Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.

The two new Fender-style solidbody basses were the Precisely and Naked. The double-cutaway Precisely U1971 had a single pickup under a chrome cover, covered bridge/tailpiece assembly, Fender-style four-in-line head, dot-inlaid rosewood fingerboard, black-white-black pickguard with fingerrest, volume and tone. The Precisely had an outlined logo decal and a sunburst finish. The Naked U1971N was the same thing, natural-finished. Both cost $250.

On the plus side, the years of experience Line 6 has with amp and effect modeling really shines through here, and in the end we (and many other guitarists) feel this is one of the best sounding multi-effects unit money can buy, and definitely the best sounding of the ones on our list. For the guitarist that wants to just pick up and play without worrying about editability, the presets cover an enormous range and really flex this unit’s muscle. From very classic and recognizable tones, to some absolutely wild modulated stuff that would make Muse’s Matthew Bellamy jealous. The presets can be a little too on the crazy side, and seem to be made more for a “WOW” factor than being usable in the studio or with your band. The Line 6 POD HD500X does suffer some of the issues common to other multi-effects units, in that the fuzz, distortion, and overdrive models don’t sound as good as the rest of the effects, and the amp models aren’t completely convincing. Luckily you can bypass the amp modeling and use the original tone of your amp, only relying on the HD500X for its effects. For what it’s worth, this is our preferred use of it.

The original National and Dobro companies produced the most popular and most imitated acoustic Hawaiian guitars ever made, and Valco was no slouch when it came to their electric successors. Indeed, lap steels are among the most highly regarded of Valco’s products, regardless of the brand name on the headstock. The more affordable steels still command a respectable price considering their ubiquity, and the higher-end models usually match the equivalent Fenders and Gibsons in appraisal. This is particularly true of the National Grand Console, one of the staple steels of the 1950s.
The Dolce is a cedar-top, with mahogany back and sides, and the usual set of Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings. At 9 lbs and 38” this is a slightly shorter and lighter-weight guitar, which will be more appropriate for a smaller person. This guitar does not come with a gig bag or other accessories, so if you choose this guitar, prepare to make a list of what your instructor of choice says you need.
In the Seventies, Clapton’s work with Derek and the Dominos and his first solo albums added a slew of masterpieces like “Layla” and “Lay Down Sally” to classic rock’s repertoire. The Eighties also saw Clapton’s music featured in movies (The Hit in 1984 and Lethal Weapon in 1987) and commercials (“After Midnight” for Michelob in 1987), while a string of albums produced by Phil Collins established Clapton as a pop/rock icon.
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Richie Sambora: features an alder body, a 22-fret neck with maple fingerboard, mother of pearl “star” fingerboard inlays, Floyd Rose “Original” locking tremolo, 25dB active mid-boost circuit with active/passive switch, two Fender Texas Special single-coil pickups (neck/middle) and a DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker in the bridge position. Updated in 1999 with American Vintage hardware, dual-coil Ceramic Noiseless pickups and a 12dB active mid-boost preamp with “no-load” tone circuit and bypass switch. Also available as a “standard” version with a poplar body, rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium-jumbo frets, DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker with two standard alnico single-coils and a Floyd Rose II locking tremolo. Discontinued in 2002.


Stop tailpieces are usually paired with two types of bridges. The most basic is simply a wooden or metal bar with grooves that strings pass through. Most Gibson guitars come with another of the company’s early electric era innovations, the tune-o-matic bridge. Tune-o-matics have adjustable individual saddles for each string and are therefore more desirable for most players looking to control their instrument’s action and intonation.
So, I was looking for a single-ended amp. Say what you will about class A/B amps (and, to be fair, most of the great recorded tones in rock history are class A/B push-pull amps), some of them don’t really get singing until they’re too loud for the bedroom or studio. Sometimes you just need to hear that cranked tone without getting the knock from the neighbors. To quickly recap:
During the 1960s, many musicians[who?] preferred Martin guitars built beforeWorld War II to more recent guitars of the same model. The pre-War guitars were believed[citation needed] to have internal bracing carved more skillfully than later instruments, producing better resonance, and tops made from Adirondack red spruce rather than Sitka spruce. Additionally, 1970s Martin dreadnoughts suffered from poor intonation in the higher registers[citation needed]. Some luthiers and repairmen[who?] attribute this to a gradual trend of misplacing the bridge on these guitars: the same jigs for bridge placement were used throughout the history of each model’s production. As the amount of production increased from the Martin factory, the jigs eroded, resulting in inaccurate bridge placement[citation needed]. This was eventually identified and corrected.
Every guitar player loves pedals. We all have at least a handful in our collection and will always try a new one we come across. When you're starting out, you probably know when you need something, but you aren't exactly sure what it is. You may not even know what flanging or phasing actually does to your signal and how that's different from a chorus effect. We're offering below some great effect choices that will add some character without overtaking your sound, so you can really distill out what each of these effects do. While distortion and overdrive have their place (and are usually the effects beginners jump to initially), the following picks offer some other alternatives that will feed your creativity and help get you started.
Like Ibanez, Jackson is known for targeting the metal crowd. They have a variety of instruments available from affordable lower-cost guitars to high-end pro/enthusiast guitars. Jackson likes to keep their designs unique. Think of an 80s metal band and what they might be playing. If you thought of pointy guitars with sharp angles, Jackson might be what you’re looking for. Jackson not only sounds metal, it looks metal too. The Jackson King V, for example, is a staple instrument. If you know who Dave Mustaine is, you’ve heard of Megadeth. Because he was a co-founder and its guitarist. He is one of the people who made the Jackson King V as famous as it is. However, the design can be a bit too over the top for some people. Not everyone wants their guitar to be as “loud” as the sound it produces.

We are your Vintage Pickup specialists.   We have cornered the market of manufacturing the most accurate vintage pickup reproductions to which can not be equaled.  Our process is to chemically analyze an original pickup magnets and wire, then we reproduce them with the exact same magnets and wire.  We don't use stock magnets or wire.   We don't degauss magnets and say they are vintage.  Our magnets are only as strong as the elemental composition will hold.  Our wire is specially manufactured for us, we have many batches of wire with all different types of resistances and O.D.'s.  Our wire also is processed differently than modern conventional wire, these little details are what makes the Klein Pickups Reproductions the most accurate in the world.   We have a full array of models that we reproduce.  Check out our site for the full list of all of our offerings.   As a small business we always appreciate your business & support.  -Thanks
One of the all-time classic gigging and recording amps, in this new incarnation the Deluxe Reverb is arguably more practical than ever, thanks to the extra versatility offered by being able to utilise the tremolo and reverb on both channels.  Where original Deluxe Reverbs of the period would have had a Normal channel, sans tremolo or reverb, the new '68s have a Custom channel with access to those global effects and a new voicing, courtesy of a "modified Bassman tone stack" that's billed as being more pedal-friendly. Where you would have found a Vibrato channel, there's now a 'Vintage' channel with a more traditional voicing. There's a magic sweet spot between 4.5 and 6 on the volume control (depending on your choice of guitar), where the amp delivers a wonderful, dynamic dirty-clean rhythm sound at stage level that works as a brilliant core guitar sound for all manner of rock 'n' roll, Americana, blues and classic pop applications. Just add picking-hand dynamics and your guitar's volume control; there's so much range here. The onboard reverb and tremolo are wonderful, classic-sounding musical tools that push and inspire you to play in a certain way. Far more than a means of merely amplifying your guitar sound, this is a musical instrument in itself.

The company’s reputation and output continued to grow. Forays into mandolinmaking in the late 1890s and ukulele making in the 1920s greatly contributed to their expansion, and by 1928 they were making over 5000 instruments per year. The company remained family-owned and employed a relatively small number of highly trained craftsmen making instruments primarily by hand. By the early 1960s Martin guitars were back-ordered by as much as three years due to limited production capacity. In 1964, Martin opened a new plant that is still the primary Martin production facility.


Here's my attempt to catalog those songs. Note that these are not necessarily my personal favorites by each artist, although I think all of them are at least pretty good. I tried to stick to at least "acoustic-friendly" songs. They range from incredibly simple to fairly complicated, but nothing is near-impossible. I omitted several popular piano tunes that would be easy to learn on guitar. Also note that many if not most of these are intended to be sung simultaneously for full effect. And finally, yes, the songs are in alphabetical order because I thought of most by scrolling down my iTunes list
Now imagine the puddle again, but this time imagine some wood blocks (12 inch long 2x4's for those of you with rusty imaginations) that are placed on their sides in the puddle in the shape of a three-sided box with the open side facing the pebble's point of impact. The radiating lines go in to the box and bounce back or reflect off the walls. Soon, there are so many lines radiating around in that imaginary box that they all collide with each other and become a random, jumbled mess. Eventually, the size of the lines and the number of them diminish. That my friends is reverb.
I have to say I'm really impressed with the Obsidian HSS wiring harness, The build quality is top notch, and the simplicity to install really delivered.It only took a few minutes to connect and be up and running. I love to customise my guitars and love to play around, so having the ability to swap out pickups without a messy soldering iron is fantastic, and the wiring is super clean giving a professional finish. I'll be intending to use the obsidian wiring harness in future project guitars -I highly recommend- Guitar sounds great ( oh did I mention the extra guitars picks too. nice touch)" - Ricci Custom HSS Strat® Wiring
Rackmounted effects are typically built in a thin metal chassis with metal "ears" designed to be screwed into a 19-inch rack that is standard to the telecommunication, computing and music technology industries. Rackmounted effects may be one, two or three rack spaces high. When purchased from the store, rack-mounted equipment is not equipped with the rugged chassis features used on stompboxes and amps that are designed to be transported as standalone units, such as corner protectors. Rackmounted units are typically mounted in a rack, which is housed in a road case, a tough plastic case with removable front and rear covers that can be latched on during transportation to protect the knobs and switches and then removed during performances. A rackmount unit may contain electronic circuitry identical to a stompbox's, although its circuits are typically more complex. Unlike stompboxes, rackmounts usually have several different types of effects.[13]
It’s probably fair to say that drive pedals of all shapes and sizes outnumber the other types of effects. This is due to the fact that they form the backbone of your overall tone. It’s also probably fair to say that it’s one of the most subjective tonal changes you can implement. One man’s muff is another man’s screamer, so to speak. There are certain classics within the genre which may act as a gateway to stronger forms of grit though. Ibanez’ famous green Tubescreamer pedal is used by countless players on account of its versatility, whereby it can form the basis of a good quality blues tone. Or it can complement a distortion pedal by ‘boosting’ or tightening up the signal. Another favourite is the Electro Harmonix Big Muff, which has been used for decades by players looking to add a distinct fuzziness to their tone.
Washburn - With a long history that dates back to 1883, Washburn makes various types of guitar related products including electric, acoustic, bass, amps, banjos, mandolins and amplifiers. Their old acoustic guitars were involved with Delta blues back in the 1920s, while now, they are recognized mostly for their metal/rock friendly electric guitars.
While SG Guitars kits are sold in a number of different timber varieties, if you are looking to match the original as closely as possible you will be best selecting a model constructed with a Mahogany body and Maple neck with Rosewood or Ebony fretboard. * Gibson has recently transitioned from Rosewood to Richlite due to New CITES Regulations For All Rosewood Species.
What makes the RG421 particularly interesting is the neck. The Ibanez Wizard III neck used is thin, fast, and very comfortable. These aspects makes it suitable for shredding as well as playing rhythm guitar. The bridge is a simple fixed unit that is paired with an above average set of tuning machines on the headstock. Overall, the RG421 is capable of holding a tuning even if you go a bit wild with string bending.
The Hi Flyer was a thin-bodied reverse Strat-type with a German carve around the top, almost always seen in sunburst. This was identical to the Aria 1702T. The bolt-on neck had a three-and-three castle head, plastic logo, string retainer bar, zero fret, 22-fret rosewood with large dot inlays. A white-black-white pickguard carried volume, tone and three-way. Two black-covered single-coil pickups were top-mounted, the neck slanted back like on a Mosrite, with six flat non-adjustable exposed poles in the center. An adjustable finetune bridge with round saddles sat in front of a Jazzmaster-style vibrato. The plastic logo was still in use in 1971, though gone was the string retainer, replaced by a pair of little string trees. Dots had gotten smaller by ’71, and the Hi Flyer was available in three finishes – orange sunburst (U1800), black (U1801) and white (U1802). The Hi Flyer listed for $82.50 (plus $12 for case) in ’71.
A far cry from just another mass produced vintage looking guitar, the Kay Vintage Reissue Series successfully duplicates the original 50's models, within feel, playability and the legendary Kay sound. Complete with the company's gold chevron, flagship headstock design, displaying 3-D raised "Kel-von-a-tor" style emblem, to this day, the Kay Thin Twin Electric Guitar is probably one of the coolest looking guitars ever made.

Compression: A "limiter" is envisioned as a circuit which prevents the output signal from exceeding a certain limit. If it did this by clipping, it would cause distortion, but if it can do it cleanly by just progressively reducing the amplification of the incoming signal, then it may properly be called a compressor. A compressor reduces the overall dynamic range by "compressing" the gain of high amplitude signals while maintaining the design gain for lower amplitude signals.


Acoustic guitars vary by type. Some are designed for beginners, while others are customized for professional guitar players. Most of the major acoustic guitar brands are available in a variety of different styles, each designed to best suit a customers' specific playing needs. Ease and sound are certainly big factors to consider when choosing a new acoustic guitar.
We specialize in the repair and restoration of stringed instruments and Guitar repair in Nashville, and the surrounding area. Our services provide for stringed instrument repair and maintenance  of all makes and models.  We also sell stringed instrument related accessories. Contact us for all of your repair and restoration needs. We love rescuing injured instruments, and helping them make music again.

Cool! Yes, this idea is definitely stolen from G&L!It would be cool to see a picture or schematic, but it’s probably going to be really close to this, if not identical. Meanwhile: Don’t be scared to open up your guitar — they’re build for it! Just be gentle till you learn what you’re doing. I always stand by the Maker’s Faire credo: If you don’t open it, you don’t own it. 🙂
My Carvin SH575 is a semi-hollow body electric. The size is similar to the Gibson 336, but sounds totally different. When you play this guitar you can't put it down, Carvins are made with computer aid wood carving CNC machines the proto-type of the guitar is measured with lasers and programed into the computer so every guitar they make is to the 1000th to the original. The finish and the detail is awesome. It also is wired with hum bucking pick-ups, piezo acoustic pick-up and Roland GK synth guitar. You can get some beautiful hybrid tones from this thing and I never can stop finding new ones. Try one of these out if you ever go to California I think there is like 5 stores around the L. A. / San Diego area, you will see what I mean.
I didn’t use any guitar effects. I just used a straight into the amp, and I put the amp up pretty hot, though. The tweeds go up to 12 usually, and this one I had on 10 on the bridge pickup on the Strat. I was using a glass slide. Here’s the slide I was using. It’s like an old medicine bottle. I put some felt in there to make it a little bit of a tighter grip on my finger, but it’s the same slide that Dwayne Allman used.
Here, we look at the third and final kind of mini-toggle switch, the “on/on/on” switch. After showing how the connections are made within the switch, and seeing the two types that can be found, we look at two uses for the switch: firstly to create a series/split/parallel switch for a humbucker, and secondly to use the switch as a three-way pickup selector.

When playing the electric guitar, you’ll have to simultaneously use both hands. One hand will be responsible for fretting and the other hand will be responsible for strumming or plucking. Depending on which is your more comfortable side and whether the electric guitar is designed more for one side than the other, it will impact your play style and music quality.
NO BRIAN MAY?? The guy built his OWN guitar. He sometimes added piano wire behind the guitar strings, he was technical and had soul, and is an innovator. I personally find East Bay Ray from the Dead Kennedy's marvelous. I know he doesn't belong in this list, but any musician that has their own sound like these two deserves a mention……but yes, taste is subjective anyway.
Three full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by Dead by April (on some songs), Metallica in the song "Invisible Kid" from St. Anger, Asking Alexandria (G#) on their self-titled album, Damien Deadson, Love and Death, Architects and The Acacia Strain. Staind also uses this tuning (but with the 2nd string tuned up 1/2 step to emulate a 7-string guitar), as well as several other modified variations of this, such as one in which the 5th string is also dropped from D# to C#.
If you can afford to start on an amp in the sub-$200 segment, you will see an instant upgrade in the amount of power as well as additional features. In this category you are looking at very good practice rigs, although as power is still pretty low they may not be suitable for more than small casual performances. This is the first category where you will find both amp heads and tube amps, although the choice of these is very, very limited. One of the best amps you can grab for under $200 is the Marshall Code 25W. This combo provides a solid tone, 25 watts of power and plenty of amp voices and effects to play around with.
Although there’s no clear delineation for when Phase Two officially began, the Hi-Flier began to develop new features. While it maintained the P90-style pickups, other aspects of the guitar were changed. The fret markers shrunk and were made uniform in size, the rocker switches were replaced by three-way toggles and a plain white pickguard was made standard.

The Ibanez Artcore line is a beautiful example of modern guitar manufacturing. Normally, hollow-body guitars, even those from Epiphone, provide interesting challenges to companies trying to produce axes on a mass scale, and thus they have to charge a higher dollar. The Artcore series provides buyers with an option to shell out a fraction of the price for a really impressive guitar. The AF55 is a fully hollow option that will make you think you should have paid double for it.
When creating your tone with effects, understanding the order in which you connect your effects is very important. Creating an effects chain is a lot like making a sundae. The Ice cream is the base of your sundae, followed by toppings and finally sprinkles. If you put the sprinkles and toppings in before the ice cream, the flavours will still be there and it may still be a delicious sundae but it is a lot harder to see what extras you added underneath all that ice cream.
Here we have a wonderful vintage 1971 Yamaha FG75 Nippon Gakki this one is from the famous Red Label series by Yamaha well know for Quality Marty like sound made affordable by Yamaha Japan over 45 years ago this guitar has well aged woods not the Faux aged “gassed pressed” high Tech way they are trying to re-create the naturally sweet aged tone that “Old aged instruments can provide “ This one was aged the old fashioned way over decades of time and as a result a surprisingly big sound is produced by this smaller bodied Grand concert like size of the Gibby LGO- but sounds even better for less dough …..Just in Excellent vintage 45+ year old Vintage Red Label Nippon Gakki FG75 .. this baby makes an excellent Parlor style guitar thats fun to play because of its real good play action, and it sounds great... JVGuitars upgraded to Martin bone Nut and compensated saddle and upgraded fancy bridge pins that improved its resonance too .... not a crack, plenty of patina with minor superficial nicks or scratches and such as seen absolutely but no structural damages ... this one plays very nicely and is ready to enjoy .... for a song contact Joe to buy at Joe's Vintage Guitars at: jvguitars@gmail.com .

Wampler would be considered a boutique pedal manufacturer, which means they'll tend to be a little more expensive, but also more likely to give their products more creative attention and include features like true bypass, which you don't get with Boss pedals. It's also a unique blend of delay layers and reverb tones, which can really draw you in and make you want to deviate from the cheaper reverb pedals.


You might be playing guitar in a cramped garage or a poky bedroom – but it’ll sound like you’re gigging a cathedral when you step on a quality reverb pedal. Reverb brings a sense of space, depth and drama to even the most basic guitar parts, and as this video shows, few effects deliver more atmosphere for less effort. Using the BOSS RV-5 as our demo model, we’ll show you just how flexible reverb can be, running through key controls that adjust brightness, volume and more. Then, we’ll show how your playing can benefit from three different reverb types, whether that’s the vintage sound of spring reverb, the rock-club chug of room reverb, or the stadium-sized shimmer of hall reverb.
Thanks for the list. Michael Gurian was a luthier in NYC who began as a classical guitar maker then began making steel string instuments in the 1960’s , I remember seeing his instruments shortly after i bought My first Martin in the dog years of the 70’s along wi Don Gallaghers instruments. Recently acquired one of his jumbos in Brazilian rosewood made in 1971 still in remarkable condition. He was among the first to compete as luthier with the big boys at Martin and gibson , even before Bob taylor jumped in.

Martin’s re-entry into electric manufacturing is related to the association of Richard (Dick) Boak with the C.F. Martin company. Dick Boak, with dreams of being a luthier and constantly working on guitar projects on his own, joined Martin in 1976 as a draftsman. In 1977 Boak was assigned to the project of designing an electric guitar for Martin. This resulted in the development of the E-18, EM-18 and EB-18 guitars and bass. The first prototypes of this new electric guitar series were produced in 1978, ten years after the demise of the GT-70/75, and production commenced in 1979 with guitar serial number 1000.
SOLD OUT! Takamine EF406 RARE Here we have a RARE and GORGEOUS 1999 limited Edition Takamine acoustic-electric guitar, model EF-406. This instrument is a PREMIUM example of a New York or also called a Parlor guitar and is a Hand Crafted in Japan model an amazing example of Japans high Quality workmanship & fit & finish and is truly just as good as it gets. As you can see from the pictures, it is simply gorgeous to look at. It has a classic slotted headstock with Top Quality gold open gears and gold tuners with Pearl buttons. The Top- Back & sides are all a High grade choice AAAA FLAMED KOA with natural Koa color (there is no stain)and none was needed to bring out the AWESOME grain patterns of this Rare Native Hawaiian Wood. The top sound hole apears to be bound or painted and inside looks same as out /all Takamine internet information leeds to say the tops on this model is solid however we can not guarantee this as fact. The electronics are a GRAPH-EX pre-amp system: peizo transducer, with "exciter," volume, bass, treble, and mid controls. It comes with a deluxe, plush hardh shell case, note: In he picture close up of the ack of the headstock you may notice a dull spot running threw the center over the made in Japan tag area this is just a spot of waxed area that was inadvertently missed and not rubbed out... it is fine this guitar is in Excellent used condition. .

Developed by Martin in 1916, the dreadnought shape changed the landscape of acoustic guitars. Thanks to its punchy sound, loud volume and improved bottom end, dreadnoughts quickly rose to popularity and has since been copied by virtually every acoustic guitar manufacturer. Today, if you're thinking acoustic guitar, the most probable image in your mind would be of a Martin Dreadnought or one of its many clones.
Well that and the effects, but Ample Sound even admits that the effects aren’t the greatest and recommends using another plugin for effects. Them admitting that might put a sour note on your tongue, but when you’re buying a VI in this price range, often it’s better to go for a plugin that is a master of a few components instead of one that attempts it all.
I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.
Either today or tomorrow my SSS Mexican Stratocaster will be arriving at my local Guitar Center and I'm not sure if I should pay to get it setup. The guy that worked there, Jon, suggested I get my guitar setup as soon as I go and pick it up since its 50% off for a first time setup. He said the technician would adjust the guitar strings, double check the action or height of the strings or something. It sounds like something I wouldn't really need but then again I'm just a beginner - maybe some of you more experienced guitarists can let me know if Jon was trying to do me a solid or if he was just trying to make a sale. He also said they'd help me get my guitar in tune which was pretty cool.
Description: Body: Laminated Maple - Flamed - Top Wood: Laminated Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Ebony - Binding: White - Frets: 22, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid Thumbnail - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Rocking Bar - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Schaller Tuners - Pickups: FilterTron - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Orange Stain
Harmony Hollywood H38- OK, here's the one we will sell. She's about the same as above but with opposite color combo. This one has a nice vintage DeArmond Gold Foil Pickup. Action is medium, but if you would like a lower action, we will be happy to cut that bridge a bit down. Guitar is in  nice vintage condition. All original except the period style Rosewood Bridge and reproduction Harmony Pick Guard. SOLD
The Martin company is generally credited with developing the X-bracing system during the 1850s, although C. F. Martin did not apply for a patent on the new bracing system. During the 1850s, X-bracing was used by several makers, all German immigrants who knew each other, and according to historian Philip Gura there is no evidence that C. F. Martin invented the system.[2] The Martin company was the first to use X-bracing on a large scale, however.

When you’re starting to become serious about playing the guitar, the question of “what amp should I get” is bound to pop up. There’s quite a deal of variety out there, with many brands and models, and constant innovation adding new features to choose between with each passing year. It’s enough to baffle even an intermediate player, let alone a rookie who’s just getting started. To ensure that you get the right amplifier for your needs, you’ll first need to know a bit about how the amp’s specifications translate to real life.
I have played a ASAT Telecastor Bass for about thirteen years. I keep purchasing other bass guitars for many other reasons. But I have sold them all. I am down to just one bass that's all I need with my G&L, it very responsive, it has many opitions with pick ups and the action is good. It took along time for me to figure out how to use the pick ups because there is so many different ways you adjust it. They are built with better quality parts than a fender. They are numbered from the factory in america. But watch out for the Tribute series that is fake or cheap want to be G&L. A real G&L will be a little more expensive but the quality is excellent
For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.
Our basic no frills guitar Denny designed to go head to head with $1000+ guitars. Magazine reviews and customer testimonials say it actually outperforms many well known $1500 models. If you want the look, feel and sound of a high dollar acoustic with 50% easier playability this is the best guitar we offer. Shipped wholesale direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. 100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.

Let me tell you about the vintage look at why it is favored among so many musicians and aestheticians around the world. Well, I won’t be able to tell you much about the vintage look in this short text, but what I can tell you is the fact that some of the best looking items out there, and best sounding, are entirely vintage. Well the Vox MINI3G2CL Battery Powered Modeling Amp is one of the vintage looking but entirely modern technology employing amps that produce a great sound while looking positively scrumptious. This small amp avoids the problem of weak low tones that so many other amp have by incorporating a bass boost technology into its construction. As a result we get a small, portable amp with a handsome look and an incredibly well rounded sound, with expressive lows and expressive high both present. And the price point relative to some of the other options on this list makes it a required purchase, unless something else catches your eye that is.

Fender Kingman "C" Custom Shop Acoustic/electric in Fiesta Red, 1 of 150 worldwide. This was a limited production that came out of the custom shop in Hartford, CT. Has a Fishman pickup. Not a nick, ding or blemish will you find on this guitar, almost museum quality. Comes with original Fender case(perfect shape), Certificate of authenticity and other paperwork and allen wrench. Ships to the US only.
A sub-brand under the same umbrella as German brand, Behringer, Bugera has been flying under the radar for some time – though they make some surprisingly clever amplifiers. The BC15 is one such amp. Styled like its predecessors from the ’50s and ’60s, this vintage-inspired amp benefits from a single 12AX7 vacuum tube giving it a lot more warmth and character than for which you’ll pay. And don’t let its size fool you, either – while it only has a single 8″ speaker, it offers up a whopping 30 watts, making for a surprisingly loud little machine. For the price, it’s seriously difficult to do better than this.
Fishing some thin wires through the jack holes from outside can work. I use stranded wire and strip the insulation from the end. I’ll divide the strands and wrap them around the pot shaft. It’s a delicate balance — you want enough ‘wrapping’ to grip the pot for pulling, but not enough to get in the way of getting the pot shaft through the mounting hole.

On the plus side, the years of experience Line 6 has with amp and effect modeling really shines through here, and in the end we (and many other guitarists) feel this is one of the best sounding multi-effects unit money can buy, and definitely the best sounding of the ones on our list. For the guitarist that wants to just pick up and play without worrying about editability, the presets cover an enormous range and really flex this unit’s muscle. From very classic and recognizable tones, to some absolutely wild modulated stuff that would make Muse’s Matthew Bellamy jealous. The presets can be a little too on the crazy side, and seem to be made more for a “WOW” factor than being usable in the studio or with your band. The Line 6 POD HD500X does suffer some of the issues common to other multi-effects units, in that the fuzz, distortion, and overdrive models don’t sound as good as the rest of the effects, and the amp models aren’t completely convincing. Luckily you can bypass the amp modeling and use the original tone of your amp, only relying on the HD500X for its effects. For what it’s worth, this is our preferred use of it.
Before you start thinking your pickups can kill you, bear in mind this is a very small signal (2 volts) that requires amplification (this is where your aptly named guitar ‘amplifier’ comes into play). To put things in perspective, the little rectangle shaped batteries (D) found in distortion pedals are 9 volts…as mentioned it’s a very small signal.

Strongly influenced by Stevie Ray Vaughn, Albert King, and Johnny Winter, Garrett is also a longtime fan of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Allen Collins. Following the path that led Collins to his biting, cutting tone, Bo plays the same type of guitar as the Skynyrd legend, and gets tremendous versatility from his Gibson Firebirds. Incidentally, Winters and King are also notorious Firebird pickers. Bo says that his Firebirds (one of which is a rare collectible) allow him to go from nasty drive flavors to cleaner, Strat-like tones when he needs them.


If you choose, every hole is drilled for each component, including neck, bridge, pickguard and strap button mounting holes. If you choose the optional snap together wiring, then no soldering is required; all electronics connect together with easy to attach connectors. We have done most of the hard work for you! The body needs finish sanding only but should require no filling.
What if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order a guitar online? Our recommendation is that when you have read through our list of the best guitars, select a few that you’re interested in, and look them up on YouTube. There you can watch (and listen to!) great reviews where you can hear the guitar be played and get someone else’s opinion on it. Try listening to the different guitars directly after each other so you can determine which one sounds the best.
We all know the sound of this effect: It replicates varying degrees of the sound of playing your guitar in the gym showers, a cathedral, or Mammoth Cave, and it has proved itself one of the most atmospheric aural adulterations available. Since none of those locations is entirely gig friendly, however, our ever-handy techs have bottled the flavor in a reliable, portable form. This category covers both echo and reverb effects, since they are versions of the same thing. The term “echo” was used more often in the early days, and is sometimes used today to refer to the distinct and distant repeats of a signal, while “delay” refers to anything from the same, to the short repeats heard as reverb, to the complex, long, manipulated repeats of an intricate digital delay line. Either way, they are both really the same thing, just used differently.

Whether you have your sights set on a dreadnought acoustic or a classic Squire Strat, the guitar value packages found here consist of everything a player needs to make their guitar learning experience an exciting and enjoyable one. From Fender, Dean and Alfred to Jasmine, Ibanez and Martin, all the big names are here. You'll have no problem finding the perfect guitar value package that pertains to your specific music tastes.


Here we have a well aged Vintage Washburn D12/br from 1989 its a D-18 type with a cedar top and man does this cedar top sound great…it was surprisingly sound and deep for a late 80s it has a mature balanced tone…I like it with its pretty good bass response and all. Its structurally great no cracks and no playability issues what so ever its neck and alignment integrity is also excellent as the action is good and the guitar is as a result easy to play. Cosmetically this guitar has been around the block its no sissy its stood the test of time and its previous owner and still all in all with all its obvious nicks and scratches and various doinks man it looks pretty darn vintage COOL and I loved it I thought you might like it too just take a good look for yourself if your the type that likes a well warn in vintage guitar and you don't really mind that it has some extra character and soul this just may be a guitar you might appreciate….. its own beauty from life playing and enjoying the music experience this guitar has been well loved and played yet it is no where near warn out it has years of life left in her she just wants to really sing for someone and in my assessment she’s ready to be enjoyed for another 30 years or more! Very cool vintage Washburn Dreadnought guitar. Its neck is straight and has the proper relief its Tuners are real good sealed gears and doing an excellent job to this day, This one has the medium slim taper neck with the Diamond volute like the old Martin style…nice touch Washburn. Mahogany Back and sides and neck with rosewood fingerboard its neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut. This a a well built good player folks if you don’t mind it not being exactly mint cosmetically its actually beautiful in its own vintage appeal. Any questions or to make the purchase you can contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
To make frequency selective networks, we must use capacitors and/or inductors. Unlike resistors, both caps and inductors discriminate against some frequencies in favor of others. Capacitors preferentially pass higher frequencies; inductors pass lower frequencies more easily. Resistors help us set how much gets through, while caps and inductors select which frequencies get through. Inductors are big, heavy and expensive, so almost all tone controls use only caps and resistors.
Launch price: $799 / £826 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Pau ferro (rosewood reviewed) | Frets: 21 | Pickups: American Vintage '58 Single-Coil Tele, American Vintage '52 Single-Coil Tele | Controls: Volume (with S-1 Switch), tone | Hardware: 3-saddle American Vintage strings-through-body bridge | Left-handed: No | Finish: Faded Sonic Blue, 3-Color Sunburst
The really important player on the scene today in the low end and intermediate price bracket is Mainland China. Whereas Yamaha and other makers have produced guitars in Taiwan for quite some time, Mainland Chinese guitars were always noted as being of extremely low quality. In the past few years, however, that situation has changed dramatically. In the past ten years, China has moved rapidly toward entrepreneurial private ownership of business. The new leadership has pushed this process quickly. China now permits foreign ownership of factories and businesses as well as encouraging Chinese citizens both from Mainland China and Taiwan to set up their own ventures. Just as the Koreans were able to progress from very low-end student models with crude workmanship to remarkably sophisticated guitars more quickly than the Japanese had, the Chinese now have all the advantages of the prior experience of Americans, Japanese, Korean and Indonesian ventures. In addition it should be noted that while Chinese labor is remarkably inexpensive, with an average annual income in China today of under $1,000, Chinese labor is by no means unskilled. China has a very high literacy rate and its workers are skilled and motivated. In the past the world has had areas with cheap labor and other areas with skilled labor. China is a major force to reckon with because it offers cheap skilled labor. The Chinese today are producing instruments in many different settings, ranging from small workshops specializing in handcrafted instruments on up to huge industrial complexes with the latest automated technology. Only ten years ago Chinese-made violins were viewed as almost a joke. They were violin-shaped objects but certainly did not play or sound like one. Today we at Gruhn Guitars are selling beautifully crafted Chinese violins made with excellent wood and superb craftsmanship at very reasonable prices. Some of these instruments compare very favorably with European and American violins costing thousands of dollars. Gibson has set up a factory in China to produce Epiphone guitars and numerous American makers, both large and small, are having guitars, banjos and mandolins made there. Whereas it would be prohibitively expensive to make guitars or other instruments in Japan today using techniques similar to those employed by Martin and Gibson in the 1930s with assembly line production but still featuring a high degree of hand craftsmanship and human judgment, in China today it is economically emminently feasible to do so. The violins we import are beautifully crafted and even feature genuine varnish finish for a very small fraction of the cost that companies such as Gibson charge simply for the option of a varnish finish on one of their standard models. The Chinese are very rapidly taking over the student- and intermediate-grade markets. Not only do they produce fretted instruments, but they have taken over a large segment of the piano market as well as producing wind instruments. I have seen and played prototype acoustic Chinese instruments which rival American-made guitars by some of the same American manufacturers bringing in these imports. It will be most interesting to see how this develops.

In terms of sounds, jazz requires a balance of warmth and clarity. While many solid body guitars can do an approximation of a jazz sound using a clean tone played through the neck pickup, in reality a dedicated jazz guitar will offer this particular sound without becoming overly woolly when lines are played at any speed. Let’s take a look at our pick of the 5 best jazz guitars.
Can be useful after the distortion pedals to shape the sound, and they can also be used as a boost pedal. Remember that boosting here will increase the signal going into the following pedals, and in some cases this may cause 'clipping' (unwanted distortion if the input to a pedal is too high). I don't tend to use EQ much these days, but this is where I placed it when I did, just be careful with how much you boost.
Sound images are very similar to visual images. If you're in a large auditorium, but standing on stage right next to an actor's face, you will see every nuance of his face, pimples, pores and all. You will not see his whole body though, and you won't see him in the context of the rest of the stage or the room. If you move back to the tenth row, you will lose some of the facial detail, but you will gain perspective. If you move to the rear of the auditorium you'll lose all the detail of the actor's face, but you see the whole enchilada in perspective.
Unfortunately, there is very little documentation or early catalog literature on the Kingston brand, so it is nearly impossible to date their guitars or group them into series. However, we do know that these guitars were likely built by Kawai, Teisco, and/or Guyatone (other manufacturers are possible as well). At the time, Kawai was building guitars in the style of a Fender Jazzmaster as well as the uniquely shaped Burns double-cutaway. Your guitar has more of a Strat-shaped body and I have seen it called a “Swinga,” but I wasn’t able to find another exact comparison in my research. I think your guitar was made by Kawai in the mid-to-late-1960s, because Westheimer was likely done with Teisco when this guitar was built, and it doesn’t really look like a Teisco from that era anyway.
The tone knob is similar. Like the volume knob, the more you turn down the knob, the more of the sound you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier. But there is an additional trick involved. See, the current generated from each string is quite complex, like the sound characteristics it produces. Think of it like a continuum. On one end, the current is turned into low frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'warm') and on the other end of the continuum, the current generates high frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'bright').
20 pages, black and white with color front cover. In the middle of 1981, Rosetti took over distribution of the Gibson line in the UK. Rosetti were a very big name in Britain, having distributed Epiphone since at least 1963, as well as Hagstrom and others. This catalogue was produced at the tail end of 1981, and introduces a number of models to the UK, such as the MV-II, MV-X guitars and the Victory basses, the GGC-700 and the Flying V bass. Some of these models were so short-lived that they were actually never included in US brochures. The cover image (reproduced in part here) showed some of the earliest demonstration models, including a Victory with a highly unusual white scratchplate.
The interface does get the job done well, it’s just that I’ve seen better looking free VSTs. But for me, this is completely fine because while flashy interfaces are nice, problems like software issues and hard to see text occur.  None of that is here, and within a few hours, most users will feel fairly comfortable creating moderately difficult, but realistic sounding guitar parts.
While this isn't an exhaustive list, I think it covers the main pedals. Although others may disagree, beginners are unlikely to need to know about the others. We've tried to stock some of the most popular pedals in our store. So if you're still not completely sure what to buy, why not try one of those out? The pedals we sell are inexpensive but great sounding alternatives to those mentioned above.
Organ tones are sounded in one of three ways; in 'normal' mode, by pressing any string onto a fret; in 'percussion' mode, by fretting any string and touching the included brass plectrum (connected to a short wire plugged into a socket on the scratchplate) onto any metal part of the guitar; or by pressing one of the six 'open string' buttons. There is an option to silence the lowest two strings, and the organ section, as a whole, can also be switched off. There is a four-position octave selector, a six-position effect selector, a four-way selector for the percussion and a flute selector.
If you want to access some resources that will help dealing with a specific tonal pursuit, piece of gear or other questions related to your rig, I’d recommend giving Guitar Tricks 14-day free trial a test run - there’s no obligations and you’ve got nothing to lose - except two free weeks of one of the most comprehensive and thorough guitar education websites in existence.

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