Many compressor pedals are often also marketed as "sustainer pedals". As a note is sustained, it loses energy and volume due to diminishing vibration in the string. The compressor pedal boosts its electrical signal to the specified dynamic range, slightly prolonging the duration of the note.[92] This, combined with heavy distortion and the close proximity of the guitar and the speaker cabinet, can lead to infinite sustain at higher volumes.

We have done hundreds of guitar 'set-ups' / repairs / restorations over the years and know how to do them to a degree that 95% of 'players' will be very satisfied. We're not just changing strings and polishing. We'll check and adjust the neck for correct string height at the 7th fret (should typically be about the thickness of a .010 gauge 'E' string when fretted at the first fret and the 12th fret). We also check for a 'body bump' in the neck as if that can't be addressed to a 'playable' degree, then the balance of the adjustments will be for naught. As we're in a very dry climate, we will check for 'fret overhang' due to neck shrinkage and 're-dress' the frets accordingly. If it's a 'bolt-on' neck, we'll check for neck joint / screw integrity and repair as necessary. We check and adjust for correct intonation using our 'Peterson' strobe tuner and our other 'analog' tuner. Electrics are typically intonated with 'fresh', .010 strings installed (if you want it intonated with a different gauge, just let us know). We inspect and test the electronics, especially looking for any 'aftermarket' re-wiring / mods / incorrect repairs. We inspect the integrity of the tuning machines and repair as necessary. Of course we do all the standard cleaning, adjusting and test playing once the 'basic integrity' of the instrument has been addressed.
Boutique quality instruments, available at prices that the masses can afford. Andrew strives to innovate with what he does with his instruments, from his unique bracing techniques, to the selection on soundboard woods to find the best wood grains for sound production. From his top-of-the-line custom made creations, all the way down to his Production series of guitars, you get so much bang for the buck.
I hope the list is somewhat correct on peoples lists although it is just an opinion! and just a small thought and insight on angus young he might not make the top 50 for me he plays just a few chords and everything sounds the same, he is with a unique voice and a band who was made by bon scot that put ac/dc on the map!! I know of no really good guitar player that names angus young as their inspiration or was influenced by angus young it is just that his work was too simple!!
With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place. The core learning systems for beginners, for blues rock and country, the songs, the genre specific exercises, an active user forum and a series of tools. I specifically like the Jam Station tool. It includes a number of backing tracks in different keys and tempos for most of the genres being taught on the Guitar Tricks platform. With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place.Other useful tools included are a scale finder, a metronome, a chord finder and a fingerboard trainer. Guitar tricks is continually improving. A new interface has just been added that makes it look more modern and very attractive. The core learning system lessons are also updated on an ongoing basis. This allows them to incorporate the latest teaching methods and keep the lessons modern and relevant.
I have found, like others, that I'm very comfortable with a 9.5" radius Modern C neck. I prefer it if the neck is on the chunkier side of Modern C, but I'm OK with most of 'em. Wider string spacing is helpful too, but would probably be a detriment to someone with shorter fingers. I rarely play fast (OK, I can't really play fast) so a flatter thinner "shredder" neck holds no advantages for me.
I purchased a Dean Performer Plus -acoustic/electric with cutaway; the top is sitka spruce and the back & sides are mahogany;the fretboard & bridge are rosewood, the saddle is bone, the nut is tusq… now I am not saying this guitar sounds like my Martin – BUT – it does sound awfully good. I would highly recommend this for beginners & intermediates. The action on the neck is extremely good for a low budget guitar. They list for under $400. If you get a chance check one out… see how it matches up against your list of guitars. I hope this was helpful- especially for the beginners. Sincerely > George M.
I have owned a lot of amps over the years. I am also a dealer in music accessories. Please note that we do not sell these amps, so I am not endorsing and using something my shop sells. I recently have bought a couple of amps in a series (I bought one first and then bought another) and have been really impressed. The Vox AV series. http://www.voxamps.com/AVSeries
Another famous guitar shape, although we’d wager on account of it being many players’ ‘first’ guitar. We’ve all seen them. The nylon-strung small scale acoustics which many of us gain access to at an early age. The, as you progress, you learn that these particular guitars aren’t sent to test our commitment to the cause, but that in the right hands these can be amazingly intricate, highly technical instruments which have a wonderful sound and genre all of their own.
While tone and volume should be your foremost considerations, you should also determine what extra features you really need. Built-in effects are great if you want a no-hassle, all-in-one package, but they may not be as flexible as external effects pedals and processors. An effect loop is useful for effects like digital reverb and delay, but it’s not essential if your effects consists of a few stomp boxes. Line outputs with speaker emulation are helpful for home recording, and external speaker outputs are great for expanding your live rig.
My tak is an amazing sound an unforgiving strong clear medium to deep sound great feel it's a limited edition and kicks my buddies 3800 buck Taylor's ass my guitar was a bit pricey at 2800 but well worth it my 6000 price Martin is not as nice as my takemine maybe I got lucky and the guitar just turned out that way who knows it is the most amazing clean very vibrant and holds the notes so long I have played them all only one guitar has this sound and its this one only for deeper sounds I have my Martin and ovation has unique sounds and the Gibson is softer and Taylor sucks sounds like a osterizer blender if you tried my guitar you would be shocked by its sounds I have played the same model and the other ones sounded the same as each other I don't know why the one I own sounded so much different I guess I lucked out. I also have an old Hagstrom acoustic and it sounds phenomenal better than any Taylor I have ever played it sounds very much like a high end Gibson but not as soft. try a ...more
As an active musician in Los Angeles, I often hear guitarists marvel at how good the latest Squier by Fender guitars are for the price. The Squier by Fender HSS Bullet Strat is no exception. A few minor complaints aside, it’s simply a well-made version of a decades-proven design at a very affordable price. All of our panelists felt that it played well, sounded good, and in general felt like a more expensive guitar.
I'm sure its possible, I just don't know how easy it would be. I think EMGs are active, correct? So you'd have to have a place for a battery, plus figure out how to wire it. And yeah, they're expensive. If you could hold on for a while, I'd get the drum set. Then friends can come over and you can play together, instead of just being able to use just the guitar. It's up to you.
I only dealt with them directly on my SX Mahogany Strat w P90s. For $119 I got a really nice beginner guitar. I added cheap grover tuners, I filed a few frets and polished them, shimmed the neck, sanded (more scuffed really) the sticky finish on the back of the neck, and I've got a nice little beater that sounds awesome (to me at least), and has nice low action. I'm a relative newbie, but got some good experience with guitar setup and didn't risk trashing a expensive guitar.
PICK GUARD - KRAMER 450 - LO GIBSON - GOLDTOP - GIBSON SG CUSTOM SHOP - THUNDER JET - TAKAMINE - GIBSON 1959 - 450 12 - 66 ES-330 - 1972 - HAGSTROM F-300 RED LEFTHANDED - GIANNINI - BALLADEER - WHITE LES PAUL - HAGSTROM BRIDGE - CONRAD - LES PAUL 1953 - PROJECT - WASHBURN EA27 - KALAMAZOO KG - FRAMUS BASS - BASS VI - 1967 - ES-330 - HOLLOW - 1981 LES - BALDWIN BABY BISON - STELLA ACUOSTIC - MARTIN N-20 - VAN EPS - LES PAUL RECORDING - PIG - MARLBORO - HAGSTROM F12-S - FENDER STRATOCASTER 63 - LS 6 - HARMONY - J-45 - UNIVOX BASS

TASTING NOTES: When you add a second speaker, tones acquire texture and detail due to the phase cancellations between speakers. Tones also get more diffuse, with rounder highs and softer focus. Note how the 4x12 Marshall configuration has a muscular low-mid thump that the Fender configurations lack. That’s due in part to the closed back of the Marshall cab.


The reason: The dynamic range of music can exceed 60db (power ratio 1:1,000,000). Transients within the music can exceed 20db (power ratio 1:100). Therefore amps under 60Watts and ‘Single Ended Class A’ will not be discussed in this text. Valve amplifiers are used for applications such as guitar amplifiers, satellite transponders such as DirecTV and GPS systems, audiophile stereo amplifiers, military applications (such as target acquisition and radar) and very high power radio and UHF television transmitters
BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer.
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I feel that most of the bad reviews are due to inexperience with electronics. Frustration caused by not knowing what the parts are or how they work. Missing parts is never a good thing, so I guess I was lucky that my kit came with everything. If you do buy this kit and did not manage to get it working please understand that you have probably made a simple mistake.
Beyond those generalities, replicating a standard formula for the be-all-end-all tone isn’t possible. Why? Because some people will genuinely pass on a ’59 Les Paul and Marshall stack combination—they might prefer what sounds like a vibraphone under water. Sometimes, a certain “it” factor just grabs musicians and won’t let them go. Waara explains that even in a business as technologically advanced and specialized as Line 6’s tone research, “There’s no escaping that we emotionally say ’Man, that just sounds cool.’ ” Frequently, part of that “cool” factor is imprinted on our brains as a result of a component that we often overlook.
One of  the most widely used guitars in jazz, the ES-175 is a semi-acoustic, hollow-bodied archtop that comes equipped with two humbucking pickups. The ES-175’s deep body produces the thick, dark sound beloved of jazz guitarists and the thin neck allows for fast chording and soloing. The bridge pickup is capable of producing a less jazzy, thinner sound, and ES-175s can be used in blues and rock.
This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This amp gives a really nice full clean sound. I have recorded it on the edge of break up so the low velocity samples come out clean and the high velocity samples come out with a bit of nataural power valve distortion. You can add more distortion with effects if you need it dirtier. It is hard to get this natural break up sound with effects which is why I have recorded it that way and if you add distortion it still has the natural bite of a valve amp (except with more distortion). This makes it very expressive just by the difference in tones at different played velocities. The lowest velocity is muted samples. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them. The sound is suited to a lot of types of music. These guitars have been used for all sorts of music over the years. It has not much sustain and makes a bright clean sound.
In the second diagram, the two pickups are wired in series. The theory behind series wiring is that the ground wire of one pickup is connected to the hot wire of the other pickup. As a result, they become a kind of compound pickup, with one ground and one hot for both. When wired in series, the pickups combine their impedance (resistance) and the output is very high. If your Strat’s middle pickup is a reverse-wound/ reverse-polarity type (aka RWRP), you’ll get the same humbucking effect as you do when the pickups are wired in parallel—no changes there.
Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA32 guitar equipped with Metal Works Brushed EMG 57/66 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 3-Piece maple Wizard II neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard bridge Pearl dot inlay
^ “Pete Townshend: On Guitar-Smashing Regrets, Stylistic Evolution, and Becoming a Gear Aficionado”. “It’s interesting to think that the Marshall sound I helped Jim and his guys develop was built around the very low output and thin, surfy sound of the Rick. The sound I wanted was Steve Cropper, but very loud. The early Marshall with a Rick gave me that. The semi-acoustic body and a speaker stack feeding right into the guitar was what allowed me to refine tuneful feedback.”
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By the late 1960s, as electric guitarists in rock bands began using powerful, loud guitar stacks to play large venues, bassists needed a large, powerful bass stack to keep up in these performance settings.[3] The Acoustic 360 was a "200-watt, solid state head designed to drive the 361 cabinet, a rear-firing 18” speaker enclosure".[3] The engineers who designed the amp and cabinet in 1967, Harvey Gerst and Russ Allee, mounted the 18" speaker in a folded horn enclosure; the 360 amp had a built-in fuzz bass effects unit.[4] The Acoustic 360 and its 361 cabinet "...got the bass world ready for the Woodstocks, Altamonts and giant festival concerts" and it was used by notable players such as funk bassist Larry Graham, Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones and jazz fusion player Jaco Pastorius.[3] John Paul Jones used two of the amp/cabs in Led Zeppelin; Dave Brown used them with Santana; John McVie played with the amp/cab in the beginning years of Fleetwood Mac.[4] In December 1967, the loud sound of the Acoustic 360 led to The Doors getting "...arrested for noise violations".
Aside from tuning issues, new bass strings, especially roundwounds, can be very bright, and this may result in a lot of finger noise and fret buzz. If they’re changed a day or two before the session, and the bass is played a bit to break them in, there may be less likelihood of problematic noise. In fact, while many players think of them as old-school, flatwounds can sometimes be the best choice, when a fat deep bass sound is called for—it’s worth a thought.
The Effect: Loop pedals essentially operate as recorders that have the ability to infinitely spin the recorded bits and possibly alternate them in a variety of ways. The main function of any looper is to be able to record a musical part, and then automatically put it on loop until ordered not to do so anymore. Depending on the complexity of the pedal, loopers can offer multiple layers, overdubs, as well as options of recording more than a single instrument. They range from simple single-switch stompboxes all the way to powerhouse loop workstations. Check out our full reviews to see which one is your perfect match. If you are looking for the quick winner, the Boss RC 3 is a great contender.
Other high-quality specifications include a bone nut, a molded metal jack plate that is curved and makes plugging and unplugging a guitar cable hassle-free, retooled knobs, fretwire that is slightly smaller than what you’d find on most PRS electric guitars, and PRS’s double action truss rod (accessible from the front of the headstock for ease of use).

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Taylor 214ce A ‘best acoustic guitar’ list would be incomplete without a Taylor in it. This Grand Auditorium guitar with a cutaway from Taylor projects plenty of volume and has a bright and defined tone that many fingerstyle players love. If you’ve always wanted a Taylor, this one with a solid top will surely stick with you for many years to come.
I had this guitar handed down to me. It is in pretty rough shape. I think it is in good enough shape to restore to good condition/used shape. Before I attempt such a thing I would like to know more about the guitar itself. I know the history of Lyle and "Lawsuit" guitars so that part is done. The body has a cherry red finish with 2 "f" openings. The neck has had some stress on it, enough to have the wood lift a little on its grain pattern about 2 inches long from the nut to the fret board. I am not sure if injecting glue into this will keep the neck from breaking in the future. The fret board is loose at the nut but I believe I can glue it again. This is not the first restoration I have done. I have restored a flute and a grenadilla wood clarinet. Any comments regarding how to or if I am wasting my time will be welcome.

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Hidesato Shiino (1947–). Music-Trade.co.jp. Dai-Show Corporation. — The person who involved with a lot of remarkable Japanese guitars including: Yamaha FG, Fernandes & Greco models, Morris & H.S. Anderson (named after his son; well known as Prince's Hohner Telecaster), early ESP, Vesta Graham & Vestax (now known as DJ brand), Akai Guitar 1997 series, D'Angelico, etc.
Many consider the D-28 to be ultimate expression of the dreadnought form. ‘Reimagining’ such a guitar could be a poisoned chalice. Fortunately, you can still feel the gravity of that 184 years of history in its high-end guitars. The latest D-28 features forward-shifted bracing, a wider nut and vintage-style aesthetic changes, but it’s the new neck design that really makes this the most comfortable and accessible dreadnought playing experience we can remember for some time. The sound is balanced and maintains the very definition of an ‘all-rounder’. Notes ring out with sustain - that clear piano-like definition we love from Nazareth’s craftsmen. Harmonics come easy and, with strumming, the high mids and treble have choral qualities that don’t overshadow the lower mids. Despite the tweaks, our test model still largely feels like the acoustic equivalent of Leo Fender’s Stratocaster design. Just as that outline is most synonymous with ‘electric guitar’, so to the D-28 continues to embody the dreadnought in look and sound.

The Ovation Guitar Company founded by Charles Kaman based in the USA. The company primarily manufactures nylon-string acoustic guitars & steel-string acoustic guitars.These are the kind of electric guitars that are ideal for a recording in a studio and also great for stage performance. Their design incorporates, a wood top with a rounded, synthetic bowl shape instead of the traditional back and sides. CE44-RR is one of the most popular series of acoustic guitars produced by this brand. This is an expensive brand of guitars whose starting price is 31,555 INR approximately.


Seller: musiciansfriend (269,349) 99.5%, Location: Kansas City, Missouri, Ships to: US, Item: 163232174143 Home Guitars Percussion Accessories Alvarez RP266SESB Parlor Acoustic-Electric Guitar Sunburst Sunburst item# 1500000019429 New The Alvarez Regent Series is a high-quality, entry-level guitar line designed to provide superior instruments with many features and specifications you'll find in pro-level Alvarez models. Components such as the bi-level engineered rosewood bridge, scalloped bracing and PPS synthetic bone nut and saddle, work together to get the best tone and response possible. Regent Series has also been designed with the student in mind and has a slightly slimmer neck profile and nut, making it very easy to hold and fret. This guitar has a roadworthy, vintage vibe with a satin finish. This is a great looking guitar and for its size has a very open and warm voice. It is fitted with the Alvarez SYS250 from B-Band, a 3-band EQ with onboard digital backlit tuner. Shipping Orders are generally shipped the following business day after payment is received. For example, if your order is placed AND paid for at 1 p.m. Eastern Time on Friday, Musicians Friend will ship it on Monday. We are only shipping eBay orders via standard ground shipping at this time (3-7 business days for delivery once the item leaves our warehouse) Payment Musician's Friend only accepts payments for eBay orders through Paypal. Immediate payment is required upon selecting "Buy It Now". Sales Tax We are required to collect sales tax on all orders shipped to Alabama, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, North Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin. You will be charged the state and local sales tax rate for any orders shipped to these states. Colorado, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Louisiana, Rhode Island and Pennsylvania Residents: Musician's Friend is not obligated to, and does not, collect sales tax in your state. Your purchase is subject to sales/use tax in these states unless it is specifically exempt from taxation. The purchase is not exempt merely because it is made over the Internet or by other remote means. These states require that you file a sales/use tax return at the end of the year reporting all of the purchases that were not taxed on those purchases. Retailers that do not collect sales tax in these states are obligated to provide purchasers an end-of-year summary of purchases in order to assist them in filing their tax report. Retailers that do not collect sales tax in these states may be required by law to provide the Department of Revenue with an annual report of the total amount of all of your purchases above certain thresholds. Details on how to file this return may be found at your applicable Department of Revenue website. Store Policies If you’re not satisfied, neither are we. If for any reason you’re not completely satisfied with your purchase of a new item, simply return it in its original condition within 45 days of purchase (see exceptions below) and we’ll give you a full refund. It’s that simple. Returned items must be in original, brand-new condition, showing no signs of wear or use such as belt-buckle or pick scratches, scuffs, dings or scrapes on the instrument or collateral materials. Items must also include all original packaging, manuals, warrantees and accessories or your return may be subject to a return handling charge. Your refund will be promptly processed upon successful evaluation of your returned item from our trained category professionals in 2-3 business days. Refunds are made for product value only, excluding shipping and handling charges. If you received Free Shipping on your order, the value of the uncharged shipping cost will be deducted from your refund. Exceptions Additionally, the following items are returnable only if defective OR unopened - strings, reeds, computers, tubes, earbuds, earplugs, recorders, tin whistles, flutophones, "world" wind instruments, harmonicas, raw-frame speakers, drumheads, drumsticks, turntable cartridges, fog fluid, clothing/footwear, body jewelry, sheet music, cleaners, polishes and polishing cloths. Software/soundware, books, CDs, DVDs, and videos may be returned for credit only if they are in their original, sealed packaging. All returned woodwind and brass instruments incur a $10.00 sanitization fee. Returned bows are assessed a $4.00 restocking fee. Returned mouthpieces priced over $300 incur an $8.00 sanitization fee; the fee for mouthpieces under $300 is $4.00. Stringed instruments priced at $1999.00 or more, must be returned within 10 days of shipment. Should you decide to return your shipment, please follow the return steps printed on the back of your invoice and pack your return carefully to prevent damage in shipment. All returns must: 1. Include a Return Authorization Number; (Please contact us via eBay messages for an RA number) 2. Be in the original packaging complete with all collateral materials such as cases, straps, cables, care kits, certificates of authenticity, warranty cards, manuals, and any other materials that originally shipped with the instrument; 3. Be in brand-new condition, showing no signs of wear or use such as belt-buckle or pick scratches, scuffs, dings, or scrapes on the instrument or collateral materials. Condition: New, Brand: Alvarez, MPN: RP266SESB, Features: Features: Mahogany Top / Vintage Sunburst See More
However, in my opinion, the reason why two pickups in parallel sound so detailed is not because they do not loose high frecuencies, on the contrary, it is becuase they loose mid frecuencies by the phase cancelation that occur when two signals not 100% identical are sumed toguether. you get the same effect with two microphones combined. The slightly diferences in phase in both signals makes some cancelations, being higher in frecuency the closer together. Take a hum pickup as an example. If yuo wire it in parallel, the sound is similar to that of a stret in between position, but not equal. It is because the reange of frecuencies that gets cancelled are diferent because the two coils are much closer to each other. Cheers!
A. Many professional musicians invest thousands of dollars in high-end guitars made from expensive and rare tonewoods. A $100 student guitar made from spruce is not going to produce that level of tonality regardless of the player’s skill level. As a beginner, your main focus should be on skills such as chord formation, fretting techniques, and basic scales. Improving tonality and performance are long-term goals.
Fender released the first successful solidbody electric guitar, the Broadcaster, in 1950. (Remember, the original Esquires were problematic.) Gibson produced the first Les Paul 24 months later. And a mere six years after that, a small run of sunburst Les Pauls flowed out of Gibson’s Kalamazoo, Michigan factory. Originally just another instrument, those Les Pauls now occupy a mythic status in the minds of guitarists and collectors everywhere. The instruments, along with a small handful of Fender Stratocasters and examples from one or two other manufacturers from roughly the same era, represent the Holy Grail in guitar tones.

A great player knows a guitar is more than a few pieces of wood and metal.  Every Whalehazard guitar is handcrafted with incredible attention to detail and meets exacting standards of quality.  Each instrument is built in South Minneapolis by Andy Webber.  As a one-man operation, great care will be taken to make sure your custom guitar will take your playing and sound to a new level.  All materials and components are carefully selected for quality and longevity.  Designs are painstakingly contemplated and are constantly evolving.  From custom inlays to a hand-shaped bone nut, every detail of your instrument is studied and considered to make sure your Whalehazard guitar is a unique piece of craftsmanship that will stand the test of time.
Most users and experts agree that the Zoom MultiStomp MS-50G is a high quality and high value pedal. But it's not just about bang per buck, because many are satisfied with the quality of its effect and amp emulations. Even Music Radar is convinced of its performance saying, "While not all of the sounds are going to appeal to all players, there are enough usable tones here to make this a very practical item for just about anybody who uses effects."

Gibson guitars are usually equipped with dual-coil pickups. They have a higher output level than single-coil pickups and produce a fatter sound, which is usually an advantage for distortion, but not only! Gibson has many other successful models, like the Explorer (The Edge), the Flying V (Jimi Hendrix) or the ES-335 (B.B. King). Epiphone, founded in 1915, was bought by Gibson in 1957 and became Gibson's sub-brand, even if a few custom designs of the 1960's are still mythical (Casino).
Six slot-headed Classics were offered. The 133/8″-wide GN50 Standard ($65) had a yellow spruce top and mahogany neck and body. The 141/4″ GN60 Concert ($79.50) featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian Imulawood body. The 143/4″ GN70 Grand Concert ($99.50) sported yellow spruce and figured Brazilian fruitwood. The 15″ GN80 Auditorium (4109.50) was the same as the GN70 but with 4″ X 403/8″ dimensions. The 141/4″ GN90 Concert featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian rosewood body, with extra binding. The 14 1/2″ GN100 Grand Concert ($169.50) came in yellow spruce, Brazilian rosewood and ornate inlays. Cases were extra.
I've spent a few weeks on this kit - I will update with progress. Cutting out the headstock and finishing the guitar was fun and not too difficult. I chose to use TruOil and a natural finish, which takes a few weeks to finish. The body I got was made from 4 pieces of joined wood, and I wasn't careful about checking for glue spots, so there are a couple in the finish, but it still looks great. The neck fits nicely and feels good. It is straight and correctly set up for string tension (a little bit of bow before the strings are on).
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I like it especially as a studio companion for lead guitar players who have session clients that need melodies to come out perfectly on recorded tracks. Having a neck that's so thin makes it easier to play and get right the first time which will reduce the number of takes. Though the live performer will benefit as well, considering that improve playability has universal benefits.
Hi everyone! I have a quick question regarding string action. I have just gotten my 2003 Standard set up a few months ago, but I am having trouble with how low the action is; strings slip off of my fingers during bending now. If I just turn the screws on the Tune-O-Matic bridge to heighten the action a little bit, without touching or adjusting the truss rod, individual saddles, or tailpiece, will that screw up my intonation?
yeah i know the GSP has 2 EQ ( well 3 if i wanted to use up a slot in the OD section ) but i use both EQs on the GSP and i prefer a external eq, that i can adjust on the spot depending on that patch, rather then going in and changing the EQ each time on that patch. I use 3 different guitars each one is totally different in sound, so the external EQ really helps.
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PRS, or Paul Reed Smith, guitars are a high-end luxury guitar brand that broke into the rock and roll scene in the 1980s. Famous guitarists such as Trent Reznor and Vince Neil could be seen wielding these beautiful instruments. In fact, that’s probably one of the first things you’ll notice about PRS guitars. They are absolutely stunning. They use high quality wood and only use the best cuts whether it’s their cheapest or most expensive models. Even the slightest imperfections are too much for PRS. Another aspect of PRS to take note of is how they have evolved over the years. PRS is not afraid to evolve their models and most, if not all, of their models have seen changes. They take time and effort to find mistakes in the older models and improve them. From pickups to the neck shape, PRS will change it if they feel they can improve it.
Here we have a cool vintage piece. Made in USA and is highly Possible this is a Gibson Archtop. Great Original condition make this a great find...this one is a Solid 8.5/10 condition. This one still has the original tuners and pick guard too. The neck is straight and the frets are still OK...and wow what a supprise this one plays great!..nice vintage tone...no repairs or damages just natural play wear and dings etc associated with a true vintage player....EZ on the eyes see the great detailed bindings! and wow this baby sounds very nice...great for Jazz .
Another thing you might want to remember when getting your very first electric guitar is that you will need some other equipment to go with it. You might need a music stand, an amplifier, a mic for the guitar amp (click for full guide), different pedals, and so on. While these things are normally not included with you guitar purchase, you might at least get a nice case to keep and carry your guitar in.
If you are recording the output of a bass amp, try to use a mic that will capture more of the low-end than a typical stage mic. An SM57/58 will work, but a mic with a more extended low-frequency response would be a better choice. The Sennheiser 421 is often used, as is the classic kick drum mic, the AKG D112, which has a bumped-up response tuned specifically for low-pitched instruments. I prefer the Electro-Voice RE-20 (you know, the “announcer’s mic”)—it’s more neutral, and it has an extended low-end response, so you’ll get not just boom, but real depth.
Since this guitar is from Taylor it benefits from the company's quality consistency, which applies to all their instruments regardless of price points. While aesthetics and materials are more affordable, it gets the same level of attention to detail and quality as the more premium models. This gives budget limited players the chance to have a true Taylor acoustic that plays like a "dream", and not a watered down version that plays and feels different.
The primary difference in tone between the solid body and hollow body guitar is the high end bite one associates with the solid body guitar. From the biting rhythm of guitarist Nile Rodgers to the supersonic leads of Eric Clapton and David Gilmour, Stratocasters have found favor with so many guitarists because of their versatility and their timeless tone.
Next in line after pitch shift/harmonizer and envelope follower effects are pedals that directly interact with the pickups’ output levels, such as vintage fuzz, treble booster and Octavia/fuzz octave pedals. As with the dynamic filter pedals, placing any other effects that compress the signal in front of these pedals will limit their overall performance.
Of course, as with most signature guitars, it’s the looks that really steal the show. You do of course get the beautiful diving bird inlays that PRS are known for, and then the top has this beautifully clean look to it that just screams quality. The sound is still gorgeous though, with a really nice crisp feel to it that lends itself to more technical fingerwork that you’d expect of Lifeson.
Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Fulcrum Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Duncan Designed - Pickup Configuration: S-S-S - String Instrument Finish: Transparent Colors

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Here's my attempt to catalog those songs. Note that these are not necessarily my personal favorites by each artist, although I think all of them are at least pretty good. I tried to stick to at least "acoustic-friendly" songs. They range from incredibly simple to fairly complicated, but nothing is near-impossible. I omitted several popular piano tunes that would be easy to learn on guitar. Also note that many if not most of these are intended to be sung simultaneously for full effect. And finally, yes, the songs are in alphabetical order because I thought of most by scrolling down my iTunes list

Featuring a small scale neck, the Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar comes with three single-coil electronic pickups, with solid and intuitive master volume and tone control. The neck of the guitar is made of C-shape maple wood design, whiles the rosewood fretboard holding the strings and containing dot markings is designed in a manner that makes it easy to strum.


The Vox brand was also applied to Jennings's electronic organs, most notably the Vox Continental of 1962, whose distinctive trademark "wheedling" tone was immortalised by Alan Price on the Animals' track "House of the Rising Sun". In 1962 the Vox Continental was given to The Echoes to trial on stage and use on records they cut with Bert Weedon and Dusty Springfield as well being featured on their version of "Sticks & Stones" 1963 as well many other records, and later used by Paul Revere of Paul Revere & the Raiders, as well as Ray Manzarek on most songs recorded by The Doors and by John Lennon on The Beatles' track "I'm Down", both in the studio and live at their 1965 Shea Stadium concert. Doug Ingle of Iron Butterfly used it on "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" and other songs of the group. Mike Smith of The Dave Clark Five and Rod Argent of The Zombies also made frequent use of the instrument. Peter Tork of the Monkees can be seen playing the unusual looking Vox organs several times during the Monkees TV series (1966–1968). In newer popular music, the organist Spider Webb of the UK garage band The Horrors can be seen using a Vox Continental. A famous Vox organ riff can be heard on "96 Tears" by Question Mark & the Mysterians. Benmont Tench of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers has frequently used his vintage 1965 single Continental in the studio with the band since 1976 and still uses the instrument today. Another famous signature Vox organ sound was created by Augie Meyers when playing with the Sir Douglas Quintet, as heard in the songs "Mendocino" and "She's About a Mover."
ESP calls the body shape "Eclipse", which in the case of this guitar, is crafted from mahogany and paired with an arched flame maple top. The body is then wrapped in amber sunburst finish that complements the beautiful grains of the top. The guitar has a maple neck with a thin U profile and a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard. It is meant to play fast and smooth, with its 24.75" scale length and narrow 1.65" nut width. ESP opted for two Seymour Duncan pickups for this guitar, the '59 Humbucker for the neck and the hotter JB Humbucker on the bridge - both of which can handle both clean and high gain tones.

The octave pedal raises or lowers your pitch an octave. This makes a huge sonic impact as soon as it is heard. This pedal will make your guitar sound huge, broad and bass-rich or fierce and piercing - even both. It's best to look for a pedal with a “mix” knob, so that your original tone is not completely lost. One step and you can change the direction of the riff or the entire song. This effect was used extensively by Jimi Hendrix in combination with a fuzz tone, while more modern users include Tom Morello and Jack White.
When buying your first guitar, the cost is always a matter of consideration. Be careful not to let this become the focus of the search otherwise you run the risk of compromising on quality. Think about it, you don't want to learn on the shoddy piece of equipment. You can usually get a good value with proper research. If you have a friend who plays the guitar; find out if they are willing to give you the benefit of their experience.
This Fender Modern Electric guitar features an apine body and mini-toggle-coil-split-switch with modern humbucker pickups. It comes with a C-shaped maple neck, a maple fretboard with 9.5-inch radius consisting of 22 jumbo frets. It has a Stratocaster middle pickup, a three-ply pickup guide and a five-way pickup switching for maximum sound control and sustains.
I won't lie, I was VERY skeptical ordering this. But I figured that isfits not great, I could sell it. After getting it, this package is amazing for the money. I am definitely keeping it! I own/have owned $5,000+ models and some $100 "disposable" axes and I was shocked at this beautiful guitar. First off, the flamed top is gorgeous. It doesn't have a cheap look to it. The fret board is so so but you cant expect too much here. The frets don't have sharp edges and nicely done. The sealed tuners are smooth and after a minute of the inital tuning (with the included chromatic tuner), I played it for a few hours and it kept proper tune. The overall tone of the guitar is warm and projects well. I got absolutely no rattle or vibration. Then I plugged into the included amp. I will admit, the amp isn't great but but its a free practice amp. So I plugged into my Peavey and man....it sounds awesome. It also came with a so so gig bag, few picks, a strap, a truss rod key, sorta cheap guitar cord, an extra set of strings, and batteries for both the tuner and for the preamp on the guitar. Speaking of that, its a 3 band EQ with a gain control, volume and a battery checker. I paid $140 for all of this and I will say that this is one of the best deals I have gotten in almost 37 years of me playing. If you want a good practice guitar and can even play a show, don't pass this one up. The guitar alone is worth 3x of what the whole package costed me. I think I'll check out more Glen Burton guitars.
A Zoom G3X review is not complete without talking about the inclusion of a tuner and looper with built-in rhythm patterns. Just like all of this pedal’s functions, calling up the tuner is very easy; you just hold down the middle footswitch for a couple seconds. As we covered in our best looper pedal guide, a looper is an indispensable practice tool, and the fact that you get a pretty nice one in this unit is a huge plus in our book. The G3X gives you 40 seconds of loop time, which is ample time to record something interesting. You get 41 very basic drum patterns, and while they don’t sound amazing, it’s nice that they sync with the looper. Have a look at this 3 minute demo video of a performance using the looper and other Zoom G3X effects:
It also has an overwhelming amount of sheet music in it. These music sheets allow you to practice what is being taught in the given chapter, which is nice, but going through the books, I felt there was a lot left unexplained. This was probably a result of them trying to simplify things as much as possible, but this actually leaves holes in the padawan guitarist's knowledge.
by lexxus gomes The amp that you use can fundamentally change the sound of your guitar. For example, many "hard rock" musicians like the "chug chug" of a Marshall stack, while blues guitarists may like a Blues Deville. I kind of like the "clean" sound of a Fender Twin Reverb, myself, although I usually just record without an amp into my mixer, and use a guitar effects processor to simulate an amp sound.
Early electrics weren’t built for distortion. The idea was to create a loud, clean sound and, with a few notable exceptions, that’s what players who utilize this type of guitar are looking for today. But even without overdrive this design has one inherent problem: As the volume goes up, hollow-body guitars become highly susceptible to feedback. The next level of electric guitar evolution, the semi-hollow body, made a few strides in dealing with this issue.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.

Welcome to Silesia Guitars, the guitar repair shop in Shoreline that is dedicated to taking good care of your dear friend, the guitar. We are located in Shoreline, just 15 min north of downtown Seattle. Our work consists of repairs of anything from broken headstocks and  cracked guitar tops, through replacing/installing electronics and custom inlays. Just need a set up or a string change? No problem! We try to accommodate any needs, big or small. Usually, the cheaper the guitar, the more it would benefit from being professionally set up. Evaluations are free, so stop by with your guitar today and let's talk about how we can help you get the most out of it!


Acoustic guitars vary by type. Some are designed for beginners, while others are customized for professional guitar players. Most of the major acoustic guitar brands are available in a variety of different styles, each designed to best suit a customers' specific playing needs. Ease and sound are certainly big factors to consider when choosing a new acoustic guitar.
Ate you guys just starting, or just bored? Curious is all, its seems that the ?s and statements alike are from beginners, which all of us started out with, there are many pro sites that will give you better advice. Advice at least boogie gave good support. Another thing is always wipe your strings down Everytime you finish playing. The slinky's are easy to play but rust very quickly and lose tone. GHS has a decent set of steings, but it's like anything else you get what you pay for. Come on guys ur talking about strings that are $4.
Bring up the topic of electrics, and Martin is hardly the first name of recall. The term “electrics” is not meant to include the company’s many fine acoustic-electric guitars, many sporting top-notch electronics (which ultimately remain acoustic beasts), but rather electric guitars meant for country chicken pickin’ or raunchy rock and roll. However, beginning in the early ’60s, Martin has launched periodic forays into the electric guitar marketplace with some very interesting, if commercially unsuccessful, results (which explains why the Martin name doesn’t come immediately to mind). Most coverage of the Martin brand is focused, quite rightly, on their substantial acoustic achievements. For this essay, however, let’s take an alternative view and look at the company’s various electric guitars, its thinline hollowbodies and later solidbodies.
Ibanez 12 string Martin style, vintage Natural High Quality Japanese Ibanez Vintage Guitar ....This example is MODEL# V302 ...And it IS ANOTHER great find this one is in a Natural finish and is a REAL GEM ta-boot and it has a Beautiful aged Premium Solid German Sitka Spruce Top, WoW! what a nice glass like original finish to this one ...again High Grade woods used on this 80's Ibanez AAA Mahogany Sides-Neck & Back "see quality og the grain in the pics" . Lots of volume & is full-and rich tone from this baby.Pics show missing string done while we were cleaning her up they just snapped ... obviously old and so this guitar will come with a brand new set of Martin strings installed for the new owner no worries..... this one is ez to play & stays in tune well. It is a crafted in Japan guitar and it compares favorably to Gibson, Guild or Martin... at a fraction of that cost. Note: we also have a Sunburst V302 in stock in our listings please see that if you prefer the guitar in sunburst. Thank you for your interest, Joe.
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: I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
Mike Hedges also uses this idea a great deal, and explains how it really comes into its own at the mix. "You've got two or three tracks of guitar: one clean, one medium — say, half-driven — and then one really driven. As the song progresses, you might use the nice clean track during the verse, as you're coming to the bridge you fade in the heavier guitar sound, then back it off a bit, into the chorus with everything full on, then back to the next verse and drop it all out. It's all done on one guitar track, so it doesn't sound like you've done 10 guitar overdubs. It has a different quality, it sounds like a live performance, but you've got real dynamics in the sounds. It's a very effective technique."
A functionally solid-body electric guitar was designed and built in 1940 by Les Paul from an Epiphone acoustic archtop. His "log guitar" (so called because it consisted of a simple 4x4 wood post with a neck attached to it and homemade pickups and hardware, with two detachable Epiphone hollow-body halves attached to the sides for appearance only) shares nothing in design or hardware with the solid-body Gibson Les Paul introduced in 1952. However, the feedback associated with hollow-bodied electric guitars was understood long before Paul's "log" was created in 1940; Gage Brewer's Ro-Pat-In of 1932 had a top so heavily reinforced that it essentially functioned as a solid-body instrument.[2] In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company, making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him.
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