I have a hunch its a cheapo guitar and probably not worth a neck reset. Can't tell if it has a bolt on neck. my other guitars all have more warped soundboards though. The saddle is sort of cradled in wood by the bridge, the angle could be better, but I'm surprised there is any angle considering the saddle only pops out like a millimeter. The bridge curves down towards the pins to provide the angle. It probably has been set up in the past by someone who wanted an acoustic guitar to play like an electric, then it got reversed it later by way of the truss rod.
In the ’80s, with the advent of new digital effects units, the “refrigerator racks” appeared on the scene—custom rigs built for the studio and touring pros of the day. Effects loops in guitar amps also became commonplace—allowing guitarists to insert line-level effects after the distortion generating preamp stages of their amps, and before the power amp stage—a big tonal improvement when using time-based effects like delay and reverb.
From guitar faces to the different kinds of axes, here is the Top 10 Greatest Guitar Players. Squeezing the talent that’s blessed our ears for all these years into a list of 10 is just as difficult as choosing which limbs to lose or keep. The list is by no means definitive, but it’s an accurate representation for the uniqueness of the music the guitarist has made. In short, these famous guitar players have played the melodies that have made grown men cry, and probably gave you a taste of how your guitar face would look like pretending to play that solo. Of course many great guitarists may not have made this top 10 list, but feel free to add your own favorites in the comments.

Having said this, if it’s for a child under 12 we normally do recommend a nylon string as it’s easier for them to press the strings down. Some children can have tougher hands than others, so if you have a rough and tumble child, they mght be able to handle steel strings earlier than usual. Check out our buying guide for Choosing a Guitar for a Child for more information.


alright i think we all need to stop hating on john mayer. I don't think that he really would even call himself one of the best guitarists of all time, he's obviously not far enough into his career to be criticized about this stuff. But i love him, and he eventually will make it on this list. Oh, and for all you who say he sucks and whatever, if he is so bad then why has he played with so many of the people who actually should deserve to be on this list?
Why is Mesa Boogie so low?! Have Mesa Boogie ever made a bad amp? Look how many guys endorse their gear. Have you ever tried a Dual Rectifier or Mark V? It will tear you to shreds. They are AMAZING amps. Best part, they're all tube. Line 6, why the hell are they fifth. Why are they in the top 15? They are nothing but crap digital rubbish. Play a real amp like a Mesa Boogie, line 6, pft. Mesa Boogie is the best amp brand by far.
The twelve-string guitar is a simple variation of the normal six string design. Twelve-string guitars have six regular strings and a second set of thinner strings. Each string of the second set corresponds to the note of its regular string counterpart. The strings form pairs and therefore you play a twelve-string guitar in the same manner as you would a standard six-string.
The legendary ES-335 is a widely used element in practically every genre imaginable. Often equipped with double humbuckers, the ES-335’s semi-hollow body delivers a warm, woody sound. And when players like Larry Carlton or B.B. King get their hands on one, the sound can be likened closer to silk or butter. Despite being closely associated with blues artists like King, the ES-335 isn’t just a blues guitar. You can find them in the hands of just about anyone in any genre—from rocker Dave Grohl to Latino sensation Trini Lopez.
Featuring a tremolo tailpiece, the player is guitarist is guarantee weeks of sustain. In terms of playability, the Jackson JS22 features a rosewood fingerboard that is ultra fast with breathtaking jumbo frets, giving the player a comfortable chording experience and high speed runs with little or no effort. The basswood body features an arched top armed with dangerous looks to compliment its incredible sound, an ideal choice for you.

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Here we SOLD OUT: a real nice vintage 1986 Japanese crafted Ibanez LS-300 this is a unique classic series of hand built quality guitars made for a short era in limited quantities is a wonderful example of very good Japanese quality workmanship that were built with good quality materials these have stood the test of time ... post lawsuit era. This full size Dred has a classic sound and has quite nice articulate tone notes ring true & clear. This Mahogany neck is quite nice it has good and low finger play Action and has room to go either way with truss rod not maxed out at all , room to adjust to taste either way...body back & sides are also mahogany with some slight buckle mars on back but not to bad....it came in with fingerboard grime and a broken nut and old rotten strings so we started from scratch & cleaned & re-hydrated the woods especially the rosewood fingerboard was soaked and cleaned with lemon oil I just polished the frets most are showing little to no where and a few lower frets were polished down further leaving only slight signs of past play not taking hardly any off vintage frets and left its original integrity in tact, NECK WIDTH IS its 1-11/16ths nut width medium slim profile neck is very good its easy to play set up nicely...I did replace its nut with a compensated Martin bone nut and installed new strings....while doing this observing closely its overall condition to be excellent ....its top is nice and flat its made of beautiful straight grained Sitka spruce with some nice visible bear claw figure to it the Spruce is Solid it is center seamed 2 - piece, bridge is flat too with no cracks...x bracing is also tight...no cracks or separations, neck is straight to this day this is a great player folks...this tone is great for recording. Its noticeably fast pro feeling neck makes this one a pleasure to play. These pics were before new strings and clean & set up with new martin bone nut its even more beautiful now. any questions let me know thanks for your interest Joe, You can email me at: jvguitars@gmail.com.

Impossible to avoid this legendary American brand founded in 1946 by Leo Fender. Even if Leo Fender was not the first man to build an electric guitar — only hollow-body and Hawaiian solid-body guitars were available back in those days ─, his first model, the Esquire that became later the Broadcaster and then the famous Telecaster, quickly became a huge success for its versatility. The Telecaster and the Stratocaster, the other famous Fender model, would become standards that have been copied many times. You can hear them in some of the most famous classic rock recordings by the likes of Keith Richard (The Rolling Stones) and Bruce Springsteen (Telecaster), or Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix (Stratocaster).

We guitarists can be slow to come around to new ways of doing things, heck we still prize the 1904 technology of the vacuum tube in guitar amplifiers, so it's a huge testament to Ovation's success that they've managed to be so successful while breaking the most sacred rules of guitar material and construction. Great examples of this are their Celebrity Elite CE44 and their entry-level Applause Balladeer AB24.


We make our Tone Bars / Ferrule Blocks (tone slugs) out of 360 brass and use them on most all of our string through custom guitars. You will notice an enhancement in sustain and beauty.  The ones sold here are not polished. Go to shawwoodshop.com to purchase slugs that are polished. Please ask any questions you might have about the Slug. I offer quantity discounts.

Williamson went on to produce and play on Iggy’s classic solo 1979 album New Values, which features gems like “I’m Bored” and “Five Foot One.” The guitarist also played a key role on the follow-up disc, Soldier, anchoring a punk rock all-star lineup that included ex-Pistol Glen Matlock, Ivan Kral from the Patti Smith Band and Barry Adamson from Magazine. Shortly after Soldier, Williamson took a hiatus from rock to study electronic engineering, becoming Vice President of Technology and Standards for Sony.
This is a real nice D-18 it Booms quite nicely with Vintage Tone of that of a much more expensive Big Named guitar for a fraction of what you would pay..its Japanese crafted 29 years ago by the master craftsman in one of the finest Japanese builders factory.. the great Ibanez...the Label inside says... THE MARK OF QUALITY CIMAR Quality Produced under Strict Quality Control by IBANEZ "Made in Japan" Serial # 82110013k ... 1st 2 digits 82 that's the year...now not all Japanese Ibanez old guitars are so great not at all ..many were very low end guitars we saw in the 60's & 70's as a kid myself most were junk or we called them toys.. now that's not true for all of them though I can honestly say that... This is not a cheap guitar nor is it built cheaply ..this example was one of the good impressive one's they used beautiful grade woods on... This particular example it has a Strikingly beautiful straight grained Sitka Spruce Top ... it has ambered nicely now naturally with it's great patina created over the last 29 years . ya don't get that with a new Ibanez or even dare I say Martin with those white looking spruce top "yuck on thanks"... sorry back to this one ... The back sides & neck are all gorgeously grained AA higher grade Mahogany the fingerboard is dark Indian Rosewood with an ebony bridge..even the Original string Pins are aged beautifully amber tipped... I'm lookin pretty hard everywhere and I can not find a crack - separation or a defect to be found anywhere only the most minute microscopic its that clean.... JVG Condition RATED: @ better than average in Excellent used vintage condition wow!..This neck is arrow straight with a perfect medium slim taper neck feels great and action is EZ to play just about perfect...1-11/16ths at the nut very comfortable feel, frets are considered excellent vintage at lest 92%... Comes with a free Chip board case or an optional upgrade to a Hard shell case / ask... Just in.. no pics yet coming very soon stay tuned! Thanks for your interest.
“I like it because it’s light and simple,” Alana said, reflecting on its 5.1-pound weight. “It’s easier to get my hand around the neck on this one,” Charles noted. Both found the Les Paul Express’s rounded top shoulder to be more comfortable than the horn-shaped cutaways on most of the other short-scale models, and they felt the smooth finish on the back of the neck made it easier to play. The adults agreed. “I’m surprised—for a small guitar, it’s fun to play,” Ken Rosser said.
Beginning about 1975, Hoshino began introducing original guitar and bass models to the market. At first, their original designs were subtle variations on the copy models. For example, the "Custom Agent" (model 2405) was basically a Les Paul with a fancy scroll headstock, a fancy pick guard, and, yes, fancy inlays on the neck and body. The Professional model 2671 was a Les Paul with a "vined" neck and a fancy headstock. But soon, the overall shapes of the guitars changed, and models known as the "Weir" (after Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead), "Artist" and "Musician" were introduced. By 1978, Hoshino had ceased production of all of its copy models and was truly producing 100% original designs. These guitars are not just beautiful, but are some of the best crafted guitars of all time, by any manufacturer, and represent the pinacle of guitar-making skill and quality.
Chorus: Since this is still a repeating effect that has a tempo component, the chorus of a song tends to be a tough fit.Verse: The lower intensity and high emotion of most verses in Christian worship leaves room for some tremolo effect, depending on what the guitar is doing.Bridge: Short solos during the bridge are an ideal place for the tremolo effect, particularly if it hasn’t been used in other parts of the song.
Cadsoft Eagle is a very popular tool with pedal builders. A basic version can be had for free. There are limitations on board size and number of layers in the free version, but these won’t come in to play for the majority of basic analog effects pedals.  Element14  includes a host of documents and tutorials.  If you get into complex designs or full professional use later,  full versions of Eagle, at time of writing cost $575, and $1640.
With a body shape that looks like it could have been cut out by hand using a saw in your garden shed, this Kay Old Kraftsman Sizzler guitar manages to be crude and quite fantastic at the same time. "Old Kraftsman" was actually a brandname used on Kay guitars sold by Spiegel stores. The maple neck gives it a rather Fender-like appearance, but this is in fact a set neck and not a bolt-on.
Some early Valco instruments continued to make it into the marketing pipeline – early on, at least. Probably as a sign of the increasing difficulty in getting product, the Spring/Summer 1942 Sears catalog sported a full complement of Supro guitars, essentially the ’41 line, all labeled with the newly-chosen Sears brand name, Silvertone. Shown in the ’42 Sears catalog were the Supro Capitan and Supro Rio, now renamed the Silvertone Crest (carved torch logo) and Silvertone Spanish (no logo), respectively. The Capitan had a standard trapeze tailpiece rather than the Dobro variety, with permanent cord coming out of the top of the lower bout!
Yamaha’s also excel in terms of their playability, which is an especially important characteristic for beginners. Too many players sacrifice quality to save money on their first guitar, with the result being that they now have to deal with difficult playability that poses extra challenges to the learning process and can sour the learner’s experience with the new instrument. Yamaha offers an enticing balance between cost and quality.

Through the 19th century, guitars were part of a musical ensemble. As performance spaces increased in size, stringed instruments like guitars were hard to hear over other instruments, especially horns. As a result, the traditional Spanish-style acoustic guitar—wooden with a flat top, a symmetrical hollow body, a sound hole in the center, and gut strings—began to change in size, shape, and construction. For example, in the late 1890s, Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company, designed a guitar with an arched (or curved) top that was stronger and louder than the earlier flat-top design.
Then I remembered Kent Guitars. I thought it would be pretty cool to have a guitar with my last name on it. Although they didn't appear on the U.S. west coast very often, if at all, (I would remember them if they did), It turns out there is a whole crapload of them out there. Information is scattered around the internet in bits and pieces and nobody who was making them at the time is talking about it. So I have started gathering information, limiting myself to the 500,600,700, and 800 series models. The only ones I am interested in owning are the 700 and 800s. I have a 740, an 820, 823, 833, and 834. I may never get the chance to buy another.
The stompswitches take a couple stomps to cut on. There also some tape residue around the led lights where someone covered them. But its not a huge issue for reverb considering that the way I play, I always have a little reverb on to add texture and presence to my tone. Also, if you have a pedal switch looper that you can run all your pedals through it can stay always on that way too. But I'm going set the bidding price lower just because they don't work 100% properly and the tape residue. Other than the issue with the stompswitches the effect works great. Just clarify, you have to stomp on the switch 2 or 3 times and it cuts on.

"I'm the famous guitar player," the late Duane Allman said, "but Dickey is the good one." The two spent less than three years together in the Allman Brothers Band, but they established an epic rapport – jamming at length, trading solos and playing their famous twin-guitar leads. After Allman's death in 1971, the group continued with Betts, scoring with "Ramblin' Man" and "Jessica." For all his blues and slide chops, his roots are in jazz, and you can hear the influence of his clean-toned modal soloing in every Southern rock group that's followed.
My live rig for years has been a multi FX floor pedal (currently, and for the past seven years, using a BOSS GT-8) running the left and right outputs into the effects RETURN of a small amp on stage and through a speaker cab simulator (lately, a “CABTONE” by Digital music Corp, at other times a Hughes & Kettner “RED BOX”) We often play as a ten piece band, with trumpet, trombone, three saxes… and here am I with a 30 watt Behringer amp with an 8 inch speaker, my BOSS GT-8 and a CABTONE direct box/speaker simulator going to the PA. Sounds great. (I’ve substituted bigger amps at times… a Tech21 Power Station… but to my ears, the Behringer sounds better.) You’re probably thinking… a 30 watt Behringer? That’s a “toy,” right? It’s enough. Well, that and the fact that the other “direct” channel is in our monitors, making for a rich 3D stereo sound on stage between the amp and the monitors. I am looking to upgrade to a multi effect processor that allows different cab simulations per patch – maybe the Eleven Rack… (I would have a hard time justifying the expense of the Fractal system) but honestly, I’ve been very happy with the setup I just described. Been happy with it the past seven years, and before that, it was different amps (actually bypassing everything but the power amp and speaker) and different floor processors (Digitech, Rocktron, BOSS…) but the same idea… one output to the board, the other to a small amp.
The first National Dobro cast aluminum Hawaiians are probably relatively rare. They were probably only made for about a year, maybe less, from sometime in 1935 until sometime in 1936. By late ’36, the aluminum-bodied Supro laps (and the electric mandolin) had dropped from sight to be replaced by wood-bodied Hawaiians. The reason for discontinuing the aluminum steels appears to be related to the move. The aluminum castings and assembly were done in L.A. By late ’36, National Dobro had substantially relocated to Chicago (though an L.A. office was maintained until mid-’37), and it wasn’t economical to have them shipped all the way to Chicago. It was easier to make wooden bodies in Chicago, so after the move (by late 1936), National Dobro switched to wood-bodied Hawaiians.
The fit and finish are as amazing as one would expect, and the general aesthetics of the guitars are just awesome to look at. They aren't gaudy or try-hard, but refined and subtle in their expression. Strumming a single cord will tell you all you need to know about the tone quality of this guitar, which is what really matters. It has that Martin twang and a lot of it.
Though he was influenced by everyone from B.B. King to Muddy Waters to Chuck Berry and Bob Dylan, Hendrix’s complete artistic vision included elements of blues, funk, rock, psychedelia and utter chaos. His frequent use of effects like the wah and Octavia pedal, pioneering studio effects like “backward” guitar and flanging, and use of controlled feedback and the tremolo bar added another dimension to his music.

This is a similar model to the one we just talked about. However it’s a more basic version. Aside from a different finish and several other factors, it’s the same guitar. Tone-wise, everything is on point and you can dial in a variety of great tone colors. S series is definitely one of my favorite. I have a lot of hands-on time with them, and they are on my list of favorites.
3) Sound when not plugged in is surprisingly good for a little guitar. Of course, if you're expecting acoustic sound like a jumbo or parlor you will be disappointed because that's impossible for a 3/4 size guitar to match the acoustic sound of larger guitars. However, for a 3/4 size guitar in this price range, it's as good as it gets and I will put this little guitar up against any 3/4 for acoustic sound in this price range.
Kaman began producing guitars in 1966, and Charles went on the road to promote his new creation. His first stop was a visit to his old stomping grounds, Washington, D.C., where he showed his guitar to jazz guitar great Charlie Byrd. Byrd was impressed and felt the guitar – which was quite loud – had considerable potential. He later remarked that the guitar “deserved an ovation,” thus providing the guitars with a name.
1. Intonation: I have a brand-new Epiphone LP that will not completely intonate on the G, A, and Low E. Fretted notes remain sharp. I have replaced the factory strings with new Ernie Balls and tried every trick in the book to move the saddles as far away from the neck as possible. Many LP owners have this problem. Other than returning the guitar to Guitar World, my only other option is swap out the factory bridge with a wider one. You mention the latter option in one of your early comments, and I've decided to try it. I just bought a Gotoh one online. Hopefully, that will solve the problem.
Like many engineers, I learned the basics of recording guitars by doing live sound and occasional session work. But my "higher education" began when I was hired by a blues/R&B-oriented mail-order record company, and I "had" to listen all day long to recordings from the '40s, '50s, and '60s. No matter how primitive or poor the recording quality on those old discs, I was constantly amazed by the array of exciting sounds produced by electric guitar. Later, when I started recording blues sessions in my own studio, I learned firsthand about the key elements that contributed to the great tones that I'd heard on those classic recordings.
Being a sub-brand of Gibson, it is Epiphone's task to get the Les Paul design out to as many hands as possible, and they did just that with many various iterations of the classic single cutaway design. For this list, we chose Epiphone's tribute to Les Paul, who incidentally also worked with the company in the late 30's, which is a bit in the mid-tier price, but worth every penny.
Another swell new hollowbody for ’66 was the EP-200L (Teisco Del Rey EP-10T Deluxe). This had an offset double-cutaway body basically like a Strat, with offset waist and a groovy single f-hole shaped like a stylized T. It also had the hooked four-and-two head, dots, twin square-poled pickups, roller bridge and Bigsby, and an elevated pickguard and semicircular control plate on the lower bout. Controls included two on/off rockers and a third solo/rhythm rocker, with volume and tone.
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As a trained engineer I just don’t see how contemporary luthiers would be able to control only these three parameters in combination in order to make up a specific tone. There is simply no connection between these and the sonic impact they have–again, in combination. Did anyone ever change the shape due to the wood he uses? For instance wood would be lighter by 5%, stiffer by 8% (which would be very much, by the way, but it happens all the time even with the same species) so consequentially make the horn less thick by 3% and trim the tail by 5 mm. A rule like that would be plausible in case wood would affect the tone that much. But luthiers never do. Thy do not even take care of weight and stiffness.

Pitch shifter and harmonizer: A pitch shifter (also called an "octaver" for effects that shift pitch by an octave) raises or lowers (e.g. "transposes") each note a performer plays by a pre-set interval. For example, a pitch shifter set to increase the pitch by a fourth will raise each note four diatonic intervals above the notes actually played. Simple, less expensive pitch shifters raise or lower the pitch by one or two octaves, while more sophisticated and expensive devices offer a range of interval alterations. A pitch shifter can be used by an electric guitarist to play notes that would normally only be available on an electric bass. As well, a bass player with a four string electric bass can use an octave pedal to obtain low notes that would normally only be obtainable with a five-string bass with a low "B" string.
This affordable signature model for Iron Maiden guitarist Adrian Smith is an exemplary classic metal guitar for the money. It features a Jackson slim D profile neck with immaculately finished frets, while the oiled maple neck a joy to motor around on. Allied to the surprisingly good build quality, this imparts a premium feel to the SDX. Tonally, the body might not quite enjoy the snap and sparkle of Smith's alder-bodied American original, but basswood is a great tonewood anyway, particularly once you're piling on the gain. The bridge humbucker is plenty powerful, with just enough detail to prevent it sliding into the woolly morass suffered by many lower-end units, and the single coils give you more than a sniff of Strat flavour, making the SDX a versatile guitar indeed considering its heavy metal association. The Floyd Rose Special bridge also does a solid job of keeping you in tune, no matter how crazy you get. A versatile guitar capable of covering many bases, and perfect for nailing your favourite Maiden tunes? What more could you need, bar the white high tops and tight strides?
The body and neck are also slimmer than other Spanish guitar models, as well, so if you’re used to a steel-string, but gearing up to try a classical guitar, the Kremona Sofia is one to put on your list to try. The strings are Royal Classic Sonata strings, made in Spain, so add this to the guitar body’s manufacturing origins, and you will have a sound that is worthy of a professional, but affordable for just about everyone.

Two full steps down from normal tuning. Used by bands such as Queens of the Stone Age, Kyuss, Sleep, Spiritual Beggars, In Flames (until Clayman), The Black Dahlia Murder, Asking Alexandria on Reckless and Relentless, Bring Me The Horizon, Architects, First Signs of Frost, Dismember, Dethklok, Immolation, High on Fire, Cold, Dream Theater, Arch Enemy (since the Angela Gossow era), Entombed, Amaranthe, Nails, Cataract, and The Smashing Pumpkins.

Let me tell you about the vintage look at why it is favored among so many musicians and aestheticians around the world. Well, I won’t be able to tell you much about the vintage look in this short text, but what I can tell you is the fact that some of the best looking items out there, and best sounding, are entirely vintage. Well the Vox MINI3G2CL Battery Powered Modeling Amp is one of the vintage looking but entirely modern technology employing amps that produce a great sound while looking positively scrumptious. This small amp avoids the problem of weak low tones that so many other amp have by incorporating a bass boost technology into its construction. As a result we get a small, portable amp with a handsome look and an incredibly well rounded sound, with expressive lows and expressive high both present. And the price point relative to some of the other options on this list makes it a required purchase, unless something else catches your eye that is.


Schecter Keith Merrow KM7 MKIII Electric Guitar, 7-String   New from$1,699.00In Stockor 12 payments of $141.59 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone Limited Edition Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom-7 Electric Guitar, 7-String   New from$949.00In Stockor 12 payments of $79.09 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING ESP LTD SCT-607B Stephen Carpenter Baritone Electric Guitar, 7-String   New from$1,099.00In Stockor 12 payments of $91.59 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Ibanez FRIX7FEAH Iron Label Electric Guitar   New from$899.99Only 2 Left!or 12 payments of $75 Free Ground Shipping See All Electric Guitars: 7-String
Epiphone is regarded as one of American’s oldest and most revered musical instrument manufacture, which was founded in 1873 by Anastasios Stathopoulos. Their headquarters located in  Nashville, Tennessee, United States. Their produce amplifiers, mandolins, banjos, effect units etc. The company is owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Their guitars are the best selling one in Indian market. Available at Rs. 13,000/- onwards (approx). For more details, visit Epiphone.com.
But where do you start? What do all these different pedals do? In this guide we will give you a brief overview of what each different type of effect does so you can make sure you are looking for the right gear. If you're new to the pedal world, you might wanna check out our selection of best guitar pedals for beginners while you're here. And if you already have some pedals but want advice on which pedalboard to get, click here!

The long chord progression can be very intimidating, especially if you’re a beginning musician. Technically, you’re only dealing with four different chords, which are, A – G – D – A – F – G – A. Looking at it, it looks really scary, but if you listen to the chord changes on a piano or someone else playing a cover of the song, it seems less intimidating.

SOLD OUT : in AMAZING Top vintage condition, Plays with ease with nice low action. Solid Sitka Spruce Top amazing Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood back - sides -Fingerboard - bridge & headstock overlay, bindings are figured and flamed maple wow what a classic beauty. if you have been thinking of getting the late model Glen Fry F360 for $1700+ think again...OWN Vintage , matured aged exotic woods is what make the greatest sounding guitars this baby has it at a great price.. buy the new Tak and 2 years later its worth %%% less, not these exotic tone woods vintage guitars they are going up...mark my words you will do well with this baby... in top all round condition really well cared for and maintained. This guitar is in the upper percentile quality & workmanship just about as good as it gets and dare I say it ...this will give a Martin a real good run for its money folks... Get this RARE beauty before she's gone.. you will not be disappointed. Email Joe at JVGuitars@gmail.com .

If anybody needs a Bridge, I have a Teisco Roller Bridge for sale, it is a a copy of a Gretsch Roller bridge but includes a solid steel Base like a Rickenbacker Bridge Base. The string saddles are rollers which are adjustable side-to-side for proper string spacing, and each side of the bridge is adjustable for Height. It is in excellent condition, probably from 1965 thru 1968. On a scale of 0 to 10, it is a 8.

Washburn - With a long history that dates back to 1883, Washburn makes various types of guitar related products including electric, acoustic, bass, amps, banjos, mandolins and amplifiers. Their old acoustic guitars were involved with Delta blues back in the 1920s, while now, they are recognized mostly for their metal/rock friendly electric guitars.


Yamaha is the most revered and leading manufacturer of full-line musical instruments. With its wide range of guitars, the company has become a best seller and is easily one of the best guitar brands in India. The C Series are the popular and affordable nylon string guitars by Yamaha suitable for beginners and young learners. The electric guitars of Yamaha available in India are of the Pacifica and RGX series. The Pacifica series offers the most value for money combining affordability with performance.
Despite starting life in Turkey in 1873, Epiphone is actually one of America’s oldest and best-loved musical instrument producers, having moved to this side of the Atlantic in 1903. Although the brand had been making acoustic guitars since 1928, Epiphone was acquired by Gibson in 1957 and soon began producing wallet-friendly versions of Gibson’s most famous models.

Nice-4-Bass-V1.5 This is an sf2 simplified version of three different basses - all with 4 velocity layers.  It includes the 1958 Otto Rubner double bass played and mapped by Drogomir Smolken, recorded by Ludwik Zamenhof. The samples are exceptional and some percussive effects have been mapped to some high notes. Royalty-free for all commercial and non-commercial use. Copyright 2016 Karoryfer Lecolds (Karoryfer Samples). The original Meatbass sfz version for Sforzando has round-robin sampling and includes arco as well as pizzicato presets.  (http://www.karoryfer.com/karoryfer-samples).
We're just over the £300 price tag here, but for the shredders and jazz fans out there, the Schecter C-6 Plus in Electric Magenta is a great option, whether you’re a beginner or pro player. It’s one of our favourite cheap electric guitars, and one hell of a performer, featuring professional level appointments inspired by Schecter's  Diamond Series guitars  – this is a monster of tone, and well worth the extra investment.
Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.
Collectors grade 1964 Harmony H-59 Rocket near mint condition. These guitars are so hard to find in this excellent condition. This one is a 9 out of 10. Great action, straight neck, Gold Foil Pickups, and that rocket look too. She has a few very small edge nicks on rear of headstock, a few slight tiny cracks on center of back in grain, and one small edge ding. Also some very slight age checking but this guitar looks great! All are nothing to be alarmed about and not obvious when looking at guitar. This is the finest example of an H-59 we ever came across. Guitar is completely original with great color and grain. Comes with chipboard period case. Just reduced to $1,299.99 complete.

Along with Taylor, C.F. Martin and Co. sets the mark for top-level American-made acoustic guitars. They’ve been around since 1833, and today they make most of their guitars in Nazareth, Pennsylvania. They use premium materials to get the best look and sound out of their guitars, but they’re also a leader in understanding the environmental impact of over-harvesting tonewoods.
The tuner goes first. This one is pretty easy. It doesn’t want to hear an effected signal; it wants to see the direct input from the guitar. Another reason for putting the tuner first is that if you’re using any true-bypass pedals, the TU-3 will give them a buffered signal, which will protect your tone from loss of signal in the cables when other pedals are off. This is another one of the reasons there as so many TU tuners in pedalboards worldwide, even ones using nothing else but boutique true-bypass stompers.
A pedal itself can have an effects loop, but the most commonly used place is on the amplifier itself. You'll see on most amps (but not all) some form of output labeled as Effects Send or Preamp Out accompanied by an input labeled Effects Return or Power Amp In, respectively. Both sets of outputs and inputs refer to the effects loop that you can add between the preamplifier and the power amp section of your amplifier.
We are still in the testing phase with this system, and our representatives are still finding out how to give you the best possible experience. Therefore, it may happen that we do not understand you (please speak clearly in either German or English only), that equipment is being tried out by other customers temporarily, or that there are problems with the connection. Please do not hesitate to give us feedback whenever anything like this happens, so that we may learn from this and improve our service.
I can give my own story as why I decided to go direct at shows when the band I am in uses our own PA. In a 5 piece band, with dense guitar, a busy keyboardist/organist, a 5 string bass, 3 vocalists and a cymbal-happy drummer, things were getting loud onstage. Our singer would have the monitors close to feedback all night (and it would feedback several times in the night). Live recordings, both in the room, or miked on TV or radio were a mess of frequencies, since setup times were quick, and we hoped for the best. My amp, a Mesa/Boogie with 6v6s & EL84s sounded amazing. But everyone said they couldn’t hear the vocals. When we listened back, we heard what everyone else (didn’t hear). We were a sonic mess. We tried clearing it up with EQs and amp placement. It sounded clearer onstage, but microphone leakage and feedback were still a problem, and the band had internal ‘volume wars’ with each other. Truth is, we didn’t always have a great soundperson. We were carrying a lot of gear. The venues we played and the sizes of the stages and audiences varied wildly. After several poor sounding gigs that left my ears ringing (even with earplugs), I started investigating. The first decision was to go with IEMs. This would eliminate the bulky monitors (with 1 poorly placed handle, mind you) and stop the feedback problems. It would free up stage space. The next problem was realizing that the amps onstage easily could overpower the IEMs that were directed right in our ears. So I came to the conclusion that the only way past this problem was to get rid of all of the amps. 
Wah – a frequency-based effect that creates a sound similar to a voice saying “Wah”. A Wah pedal uses a filter that sweeps across the frequency band. In a pedal wah, pressing the toe down will make the guitar signal brighter; heel down makes the signal darker. The filter can be controlled either automatically by electronics within the pedal or manually by the use of an expression pedal giving the guitarist’s hands-free control over their tone.
There are two different Vox Shadows (the Shadow made between 1060 and 1965 and the White Shadow made in the early to mid 80's). The Shadow is a double cutaway solid body with six-on-a-side tuner headstock,with 3 single coil pickups, the hardware is chrome, it has a white pickguard, tremelo bar with a retangular cover over the bridge with the VOX logo on it. It also has one volume and two tone controls and a pick-up selector knob on the lower cutaway bout. This is based on information from the 7th Ed. of the Bluebook of electric Guitars....Hope it helps...John
A full step down from standard. Used by bands such as Korn, Paradise Lost, Dream Theater (on "False Awakening Suite" and "Illumination Theory" from the self-titled album), Emmure, Obscura, ReVamp, and Fear Factory (on most songs from Obsolete and Digimortal, "Drones" and "Bonescraper" from Archetype, "Moment of Impact" from Transgression, and most songs on Mechanize, The Industrialist and Genexus)
The Line 6 Spider IV is the most fully featured beginner amps out there, yet is surprisingly inexpensive, only edging out the Orange Crush PiX CR12L a little bit on cost. The Line 6 Spider IV 15 offers four amp models, six built in effects, a built in tuner, a headphone jack, and a CD/MP3 player input. Everything a beginner needs to practice in one compact package. These features aren’t completely necessary for beginners to have, but they do serve as a nice convenience and the Spider IV does not cost that much more in the process to add them. On top of that, the Spider IV still manages to be straight forward and easy to use, despite all the built in options.
The AX8 features the same core modelling engine as the Axe-Fx II for identical sound quality, but has different CPU power and offers just one rather than two amp blocks in its signal chain. It's still pretty potent, though, with 512 onboard presets that are built from a series of blocks. You get amp and cabinet blocks plus blocks for the most commonly used effects, and a looper. There are 222 amp models, over 130 Factory cabs, plus 512 User Cab memory slots and loads of effects. Everything has a massive amount of editable parameters to get the sound just right, either accessed from the AX8's physical controls or via the free editing software if you connect it to a computer. With rock-solid construction, the AX8 lays out its 11 footswitches in an easily accessible manner. All of them can be assigned to a host of tasks, all aimed at making your onstage experience go as smoothly as possible. Sound-wise, Fractal's realistic amp tones, carefully tailored cabinet models and crystal-clear effects give you tones that can stand up next to any conventional amp and effects rig. If you like the idea of an Axe-Fx II but aren't keen on the rackmount format or thought it out of your price range, the AX8 may be right up your street.
With Dave Matthews playing an electric guitar in place of his usual acoustic, the band delivered a performance of “Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin)”, the lead single from Come Tomorrow, their record-breaking seventh-straight album to debut at #1 on the Billboard charts dating back to 1998’s Before These Crowded Streets. You can watch Dave Matthews Band’s performance on Ellen below:

The Effect: Vocal harmonizer pedals are among the most powerful tools you can have as a singing guitar player. An average vocal harmonizer will use the input from your guitar, mix it with your microphone’s signal, and produce a harmonic background of your voice that is in tune with the chords you’re playing. More advanced models like TC Helicon Play Acoustic, are capable of doing much more than that. We are looking at complex processors that offer multiple effects, active vocal equalization and so much more. With that said, vocal equalizers come in a variety of flavors. Some are optimized for solo performers, while others are much more relaxed. The great thing about modern vocal harmonizers is that tracking is no longer that much of an issue. It is fair to say that most models you can find on the market right now, will get you pretty solid core performance.
Players who want to emphasize low volume and portability — especially the ability to discreetly pack their amp — will want to look for as small a unit as possible. Some of these can still create a decent sound, but you’ll find that their natural overdrive is going to sound considerably compressed, and there won’t be much dynamism in response to your picking or strumming pattern.
Dude I totally agree with you,Eddie Hazel was awsome.And Add Ernie Isley (he learned from Jimi Hendrix when he played with the Isley Brothers),And Carlos Santana(his oloder stuff,check out the Borboletta album from 1975),and if you like Hendrix and stevie Ray why isn't Robin Trower (Robin Trower Live) on this list ?Also the guitarist from the band Slave(he was17 when they cut the album with "Slide"on it).Most of these are Metal guitarists,I prefer a guitarist that can make the hair on the back of my neck stand up when they play.Someone that makes you feel different emotions when they play.Just because you can play super fast doesn't make you great.

The reason being that guitar manufacturers will usually look to keep costs down in the pickup department. This is particularly true for budget models, which will usually be fitted with stock pickups that do the job, but fall short of truly impressing. So guitarists with an affordable, but playable guitar may wish to upgrade their pickups, to make their favorite axe gig-worthy.
Standard tuning but with the 6th string dropped one full step. Utilized by bands and/or artists: Radiohead, Avenged Sevenfold, Arrowmont, Kvelertak, Led Zeppelin on "Moby Dick", Jack White on the song "High Ball Stepper", Rage Against the Machine, Prayer for Cleansing, Lamb of God, Underoath, Evanescence, Silverchair, Muse, Skillet, Helmet, Soundgarden, Metallica on songs "All Nightmare Long" and "Just a Bullet Away", Rammstein, Fugazi in some songs, Tool in all their albums (except Prison Sex which is Drop B in standard variation Tuning and Parabol/Parabola which has E dropped to B and A dropped to E), C3 Church on their song Breathe, as well as numerous songs on older albums Stone Temple Pilots in some songs, Audioslave, Filter, Foo Fighters, Porcupine Tree, Incubus in some songs, Guns N' Roses on the title track and "Better" from Chinese Democracy (most of the rest of the album was in E♭ tuning), Black Veil Brides (on the song "Knives and Pens"), The Devil Wears Prada, Nirvana in some songs, Zakk Wylde in some of his projects, Quicksand, Alesana, Eyes Set to Kill, and The Beatles on "Dear Prudence", Iron Maiden on "If Eternity Should Fail", Jorma Kaukonen of Jefferson Airplane on Embryonic Journey from the Surrealistic Pillow album, All Time Low on the biggest part of their discography.
Semi-hollow guitars are guitars which have an exposed opening, generally in the form of two f-holes on the top of the guitar’s body. The inner chamber of the guitar is then divided into two by a block of wood which runs through the body. A perfect representation of this type of guitar is the Gibson ES-335, which has been used at some point or another by musicians such as: Eric Clapton, Otis Rush, Warren Haynes, Dave Grohl, and B.B. King.
One last note concerning the use of compression: Be careful. Compression occurs naturally in overdriven tube amplifiers, and overly-compressed clean settings or direct guitar tracks can sound harsh, with an exaggerated picking sound. We hope that having read this article, you'll approach the process of recording the electric guitar with a new insight and fresh ears, and wish you the best in your quest for the ultimate tone.
Although Ibanez’s S series is designed to be far more versatile than the RG guitars, its Iron Label collection is built for one, brutal purpose: heavy metal. The SIX6FDFM represents exactly what we consider a ‘value-for-money’ guitar: It sports many premium specs, is skewed towards a single use, and, at a little under $1,000, won’t hemorrhage your bank account.
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Don’t be fooled by the lack of reviews for this guitar on Amazon. Dean makes some really solid guitars, they just happen to be a less popular brand than the other big names. I love this one because you’ve got 2 humbuckers for powerful rock and metal tones, but you get additional tonal versatility thanks to a push/pull coil tap. So, the C350 definitely isn’t a one trick pony. The flame maple veneer adds a nice finishing touch.
Fusion players such as John McLaughlin adopted the fluid, powerful sound of rock guitarists such as Clapton and Jimi Hendrix. McLaughlin was a master innovator, incorporating hard jazz with the new sounds of Clapton, Hendrix, Beck and others. McLaughlin later formed the Mahavishnu Orchestra, an historically important fusion band that played to sold out venues in the early 1970s and as a result, produced an endless progeny of fusion guitarist. Guitarists such as Pat Martino, Al Di Meola, Larry Coryell, John Abercrombie, John Scofield and Mike Stern (the latter two both alumni of the Miles Davis band) fashioned a new language for the guitar which introduced jazz to a new generation of fans. Like the rock-blues icons that preceded them, fusion guitarists usually played their solid body instruments through stadium rock-style amplification, and signal processing "effects" such as simulated distortion, wah-wah, octave splitters, compression, and flange pedals. They also simply turned up to full volume in order to create natural overdrive such as the blues rock players.

Although Ibanez’s S series is designed to be far more versatile than the RG guitars, its Iron Label collection is built for one, brutal purpose: heavy metal. The SIX6FDFM represents exactly what we consider a ‘value-for-money’ guitar: It sports many premium specs, is skewed towards a single use, and, at a little under $1,000, won’t hemorrhage your bank account.

When creating your tone with effects, understanding the order in which you connect your effects is very important. Creating an effects chain is a lot like making a sundae. The Ice cream is the base of your sundae, followed by toppings and finally sprinkles. If you put the sprinkles and toppings in before the ice cream, the flavours will still be there and it may still be a delicious sundae but it is a lot harder to see what extras you added underneath all that ice cream.
To start off our list (albeit rather difficult to choose a specific guitar first), let’s take a look at the Fender Telecaster, a high-quality electric guitar for the musician out there who is looking to improve their amateur status to accomplished guitarist. With the clear tone and quality range that the Fender brand is known to famously provide, the Telecaster is equipped with shielded body cavities meant to limit reverberation and focus in on the individual notes. The dual single-coil pickups allow the musician to vary between sharp tones and strong treble, providing a unique sound to fit various genres of interest. The flat surface of the of the fingerboard makes it easy to switch between notes and chords, while the alder wood used for the body of the guitar provides and even and bright sound. With a ‘C’ shaped design meant for comfort for long wear use, the Fender Telecaster is one of the best electric guitars for the money. The sound? Very classic, biting, and clear. You’ll have to hear for yourself in this Telecaster video, since we can’t really find adjectives to truly portray this beauty.
This is by and large the most common body type, and includes some of the most iconic axes ever made, like the Gibson Les Paul and Fender Statocaster. Solid-body guitars simply are capable of the widest range of tones; their construction also allows for reduced feedback and increased sustain compared to other guitar types. This style is extremely well suited to rock and alternative, but if you really aren’t sure of what music you want to play, you’re not likely to go wrong by picking one up.
A lot of amps, especially in higher price ranges, have a lot of effects and features. They catch an eye and are pretty fascinating, but in a lot of cases, they are … useless. Well, not all of them but I am pretty sure that if an amp has a hundred different features you won’t be using all of them or even half of them. Features on amps are like the stand at the registrar of a grocery shop. They just catch an eye and you want WANT WANT them (for no other reason than it is interesting and cool looking)! Well, if you are going for an amp is the $100 price range you won’t have as much luxury or freedom to choose from a lot of features. Most practice amps are pretty standard and basic (in the best of ways). And to be honest, I don’t think as a beginner you really need a lot more than the basic effects and functions.
Schecter Guitar Research is a company that has really established themselves as one of the best guitar brands out there in recent years. Many of their guitars are focused on the heavy metal market, but players of any genre can find a Schecter that meets their needs. With superb craftsmanship and high-end appointments you’d expect to find on much more expensive guitars, they are also among the best values in the guitar world.
After the dissolve of Kay/Valco in 1968, the Engelhardt-Link company bought the upright bass and cello lines[clarification needed] at the asset auction in 1969, and continue to produce the same instrument lines till today. Manufactured in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, Engelhardt basses and cellos are sturdy instruments, widely used by students and touring professionals. The ES9 Swingmaster bass (formerly the Kay S9 Swingmaster), is highly thought-of by jazz, swing, and bluegrass musicians.
Having Robert Johnson at the top is a joke. All the kids now think it's cool to like him because he was so "influential" but it's a complete myth. He was virtually unknown until the mid sixties and even then the whole "Robert Johnson is cool" thing didn't get going until around 1970, by which time most of the real pioneers were already well on their way.

Think "guitar god," and a particular image of Jimi Hendrix springs to mind: Hendrix kneeling, shamanlike, before his Fender Stratocaster, his hands seeming to coax flames from the instrument. Captured by photographer Jim Marshall at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, this image is burned into the collective consciousness of American rock culture in the same way that Hendrix's signature sound still echoes through the years. His defiant rendition of the "Star Spangled Banner" isn't quite a technical masterpiece -- one could almost play the melody with a single finger. What elevates the song is its sound. To get that dissonant wailing, Hendrix uses two effects: an Arbiter Fuzz Face and the Vox Wah-Wah [source: Trynka].

The heaviest heffalumps in this year’s roundup, share a few strands of DNA with early Mastodon, blending bludgeon and benign  in ambitious and unpredictable ways. Brady Deeprose and Dan Nightingale form the two-pronged guitar attack, leading these lofty compositions from blast-beaten brutality to doom-y sludge and back again. Their debut album Mire was released last month and is the sort of fully-formed statement that requires metallers to pack a spare pair of pants.
I don't have enough good things to say about this shop. Are you used your music shop being being run by snotty musicians who judge you based on the skinniness of your jeans or number of piercings? Well, this ain't that shop. James, the owner, is super helpful and knowledgeable, and stocks his shop with really top quality gear. I'd recommend this place primarily for pedals and amps, as well as for checking out some small batch electric guitar manufacturers (like their gorgeous Asher collection). That being said, they have a really nice selection of Breedloves, Rain Songs, Guilds, Martins, Gibsons in the acoustic section as well. They also do top-notch repair on equipment. I brought in my Princeton Reverb for a speaker swap, and the work was completely cheaply and flawlessly. They definitely have a loyal customer in me going forward!
When looking at the list above, it may be a bit overwhelming to see 50+ guitar riff song suggestions. You may not know where to start depending on your skill level. Below, is a short list of 5 songs you should start out with and learn the main riffs of as a beginner guitarist as well as 5 songs you can start with as an intermediate guitarist. Once you’ve learned these, feel free to head back up to the list above and start learning others as you wish.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Maple & Mahogany - Figured - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 4 - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 1x Volume Control - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Oil
In major-thirds (M3) tuning, the chromatic scale is arranged on three consecutive strings in four consecutive frets.[83][84] This four-fret arrangement facilitates the left-hand technique for classical (Spanish) guitar:[84] For each hand position of four frets, the hand is stationary and the fingers move, each finger being responsible for exactly one fret.[85] Consequently, three hand-positions (covering frets 1–4, 5–8, and 9–12) partition the fingerboard of classical guitar,[86] which has exactly 12 frets.[note 1]
Some single cabinets use mixed speaker sizes, although this is less common. Examples include MESA Engineering's 1x15"/4x10" cabinet,[8] Peavey's PVH 1516, which has 1x15" and 2x8" speakers.[9] and Traynor's TC1510 combo, which has 1x15" and 2x10". Other large single cabinets with speaker sizes other than 10", 12" or 15" are less commonly used, but they do exist. Examples include the 6x8" and 8x8" cab configurations. Users of two cabinets may use two 4x10" cabinets (more easy to transport than a single 8x10" cab), a 15" cab and a 2x10" cab, or other variations (e.g., a 2x15" cab and a 4x10" cab).

Some of the different aspects of the SG include its much thinner double cutaway body that offered players easier access to the higher frets.  This model is also significantly lighter than the Les Paul and was preferred by many players who wanted the heavier tonal offerings without the back and shoulder pain that can come after a 3 hour gig with a Les Paul.

Why We Liked It - Unless you’re looking for an electric guitar to play genres like heavy metal, chances are you would love this guitar. It just makes us happy and it’s hard to put it down. Fender is a good brand and they offer guitars of very high build quality. It’s available in green, blue and red, so you can really get a guitar that matches your personality and music.

Some guitarists find spectral overtone melodies inside sheets of feedback (see: Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music, Sonic Youth), but British wunderkind James Blackshaw uncovers them in careful stacks of 12-string acoustic guitars and bright orchestrations. Minimal in his attack and classical in his drama, Blackshaw bears the acoustic guitar torch in the 21st century, his pieces unfolding in slow, formal shifts until they beam like a burning light through stained glass.
The last rating is the value, which gives you an idea of how good a purchase the guitar is for the money. You’d expect most sub-$200 guitars would give you good value for money, while guitars in the $1000 have to work harder to justify their price tags. Finally it’s worth noting that each rating is relative to its overall price. Of course a $2000 Gibson is likely to play and sound so much better than a $150 Squier, but they may both receive a rating of around 8 for features because we keep the ratings relative to the price.
An excerpt: “The Dobro brand name has been identified with resonator guitars since 1929 and is currently owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Despite its registered trademark status, the Dobro name has at times been used generically to refer to woodbodied instruments with 1) an aluminum cone or “resonator” mounted so that the cone opens toward the top of the instrument and 2) an 8-armed spider assembly supporting the bridge.”
The three Teisco amps included the Teisco-88, the AMP-71R and the Miny. No details are available on these, but they were fairly rectangular cabinets with top-mounted controls. The Teisco-88 had “Teisco” and a big “88” on the grillcloth. The ’66 model was a tube amp, so this likely was, as well. I suspect the others shown were tubers as well. The Miny had the italicized T logo on the front. The AMP-71R had reverb.
This thing is awesome! For its price you can't find any other processor that can plug into your computer and easily navigate the pedals. To connect to your computer or laptop you will need a standard printer cable (I would pick up one of the amazon basic cables for cheap.) I bought a 10 foot one which is plenty to run from the pedal to my music stand. Also once you are connected to your laptop via the USBcable, all sounds from your laptop will run through your amp/headphones. That confused me the first time when my computer speakers sounded better, haha. If you are curious, It comes with a power supply.
The top of the guitar has the greatest impact on the tone quality of the instrument. The sound generated by the guitar's strings is transmitted by the bridge to the top where it is amplified. As discussed below under Tonewoods, the wood used for the top strongly influences the tonal characteristics of the guitar. The sound generated by the guitar's strings is transmitted by the bridge to the top where it is amplified. That is why, as mentioned above, the larger the soundboard, the larger the sound.
It can get a bit difficult trying to properly depict certain aspects of effects pedals to our newer musicians out there since much of music tends to be described in an intangible sort of manner which relies heavily the assumption of prior knowledge and personal tastes which is why we try our best to not get the pros out there the meat of the information they are looking for, but describe it in a way that players of even entry levels can comprehend. So with that in mind, one of the more complex aspects of effects pedals for newer musicians is their implementation of a signal chain.

The guitar offers a beginner some great features in sound and playability. For starters, it is technically a Les Paul (giving you a great “cool factor,” which is important when you’re first starting out). It cuts a couple corners that a Standard or Special Les Paul won’t, like the fact that it’s a bolt-on neck, and there are proprietary single coil pickups (as opposed to the standard humbuckers you’ll usually find in a Les Paul).

(Book). Backbeat's successful Handbook format applied to the world's most popular instrument. The Electric Guitar Handbook is the latest entry in Backbeat's best-selling handbook series, combining a two-part book and an audio CD in a practical lay-flat binding for ease of reference when playing. Part one of the book examines how different types of electric guitars are made, and why varying construction methods influence the way guitars sound. It also looks at the role of various pieces of guitar hardware, including pick-ups, tremolo set-ups, and bridges. Part two is a comprehensive, user-friendly course in playing the electric guitar, from the basics of posture and hand positioning to music and tab reading and advanced performance. Newly written exercises presented in the book and also on the accompanying CD take the learner through each step in the process, covering styles including rock, country, blues, soul/funk, indie/alternative, and metal. Author Rod Fogg also offers practical advice on everything from simple scales to complex chords, alongside short features introducing key performers and styles.

When Eric Clapton plugged his 1960 Les Paul into a Marshall Bluesbreaker in the mid 60’s (the set-up used to record Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton, the “Beano album”) he created a new rock tone that immediately became a standard.[15] Clapton played a 1960 Standard as a member of John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and in the early days of Cream. The guitar was said to have been stolen while Clapton was preparing for the first Cream tour in 1966, following the recording of Fresh Cream, and was long considered an iconic instrument by Clapton’s fans and Les Paul guitar admirers. Gibson announced production of the Clapton 1960 Standard, also nicknamed the “Beano Burst”, in 2010. Gibson says the instrument “accurately represents what Eric Clapton personally feels his 1960 Les Paul should be”, with Clapton consulting on the design of the guitar. Production is limited to 55 hand-aged instruments signed by Clapton (who was allowed to keep the first five of these instruments), another 95 hand-aged instruments, and 350 Vintage Original Spec instruments, but all five hundred instruments feature period-correct hardware, two Gibson reproduction PAF humbucking pickups, and subtly figured “antiquity burst” maple tops.
Sometimes a guitar cab gets mic'd up differently night to night, plus every voice is unique, and every snare drum "speaks" differently (just ask a drummer). All of these minute changes and differences can and will affect the EQ decisions you'll have to make. This is why I'm such a strong believer in ear training and learning how certain parts of the frequency spectrum present themselves outside of their source-specific applications. That being said, these tips can be helpful as a place to start your search, but are not gospel by any means. So without further adieu, let's begin.
In addition to choosing between laminate and solid wood, you also have to consider the type of the tonewood. Of particular importance is the choice of top wood, because it greatly affects the resulting sound. Spruce is popularly used for the tops of acoustics because of its punchy and bright tone. Mahogany tops on the other hand is preferred for its warm tone, with more emphasis on the lower mid frequencies. There are other types of wood that fall between the two, each one bringing a subtly different flavor to the resulting sound.
We’ve already shown you how you will sometimes want more than one mic on your amp to achieve ideal sound in your tracks. Many semi-distant and ambient techniques will be most useful, along with a close mic, but on a separate track, to retain the option of blending a more-direct tone to create your overall sonic picture. Any single-mic positions discussed thus far can be combined into multi-mic sounds in the mix when recorded to different tracks. There are also several other approaches to multi-miking that might come in handy now and then, and which are worth some exploration.
Another technology that is used in Delay units is a feedback circuit, consisting of a tracking oscillator circuit to hold a note of the last interval, and after amplifying the signal, send it back to the input side of the delay. While it was first associated with Boss DF-2 Super Feedbacker & Distortion, currently, the signal feedback circuit is employed by Delay pedals, and if used under "hold" mode (As in Boss DD-3) it will provide a sustain effect instead of a simply delay effect.
Apollo, Aquarius, Arbiter, Atlas, Audition, Avar, Ayar, Barth, Beltone, Black Jack, Cameo, CBS, Cipher, Concert, Cougar, Crown, Daimaru, Decca, Diasonic, Domino, Duke, Emperador, Heit Deluxe, Holiday, Ibanez, Imperial, Inter-Mark Cipher, Jedson, Kay, Kent, Kimberly, Kingsley, Kingston, Keefy, Lindell, Marquis, May Queen, Minister, Noble, Prestige, Randall, Recco, Regina, Rexina, Sakai, Satellite, Schaffer, Sekova, Silvertone, Sorrento, Sterling, Swinger, Tele Star, Top Twenty, Victoria, Winston
Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.
I started out doing pretty much what I do now on an acoustic and transferred it to electric when I was able to get a paper route and buy a crappy red electric guitar. I knew the value of working stripped down and I still do, although in this day and age I've made a lot of records with different sounds. I must say I really love what technology can afford you.
Original plate reverbs were mechanical in nature. There was a literal plate inside the amplifier, which would transform input signal into vibration. Then you would have a pickup located somewhere near the plate, that recorded those vibrations. Today, such a contraption comes across as relatively crude, but many still love the unique mechanical sound it produces. Spring reverb uses a pretty much exact same principle, only this time you have a spring in there instead of a plate. The biggest improvement a spring reverb offers is reduction in both weight and size of the device.
There are many, many variations of the electric guitar. Science has told us that in order for sound to be naturally amplified, there needs to be a chamber in which sound can resonate. Just look at the construction of the ancient amphitheaters, or the way that the human body has natural resonating chambers that allow us to use our voices, or a stand up bass, with its large, chambered body designed to amplify the resonating strings.
The basic function of the volume knob is to change the level of your guitar’s volume output in a smooth and even way. But there’s more to it than that. Some players use the volume knob as a means of boosting their signal to make solos pop out. For example, if you keep your volume dialed in at seven or eight and perhaps lean on your amp a little more for output, you’ve got two or three more notches to ride your loudness up via the knob when it’s really time to burn. No need to spend money on a volume pedal, and unlike distortion or overdrive pedals this doesn’t change your sound much.
Instead of thinking about the different woods (mahogany, maple, rosewood, etc), all the different pickups, necks, scale lengths, bridges, body types… all you have to worry about is getting the STYLE right. 95% of the time, that will get you the SOUND you want as well. Of course, that being said, get the highest quality wood you can. For example, most players agree that a “solid sitka spruce top” is probably the highest quality wood you can get for a “beginner” level acoustic guitar, without compromising tone.

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For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best selling electric guitars. And the new Les Paul Special VE—inspired by the Les Paul, the greatest electric guitar in rock—continues the tradition of giving new both players and pros a real Les Paul at a price anyone can afford.

Case sold separately.

Classic Les Paul profile
The Les Paul Special VE has a Poplar body with a sleek look thanks to the Vintage Worn finish and no binding on the neck or body. The Les Paul VE is cut to the same classic profile of all Les Pauls and has a comfortable and fast Mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1960's SlimTaper D profile. The Rosewood fingerboard has traditional Pearloid "Dot" inlays, a 24.75” scale, a 14” radius, 22 medium jumbo frets, and a standard 1-11/16” nut. Just below the headstock is the famed “bell” shaped truss rod cover found on every Les Paul since the early '50s with “Vintage Edition” in white. 

Epiphone Open Coil Humbuckers
The Les Paul Special VE features Epiphone’s world famous open-coil humbuckers with a warm 650R in the neck position and a slightly hotter 700T in the bridge or lead position.Controls include a 3-way pickup selector switch, a Master Volume, and a Master Tone control, each with traditional “Black Speed Knobs” pots with long lasting
500K Ω potentiometers.

All-Metal Hardware
Epiphone features all-metal rock solid hardware on all of its instruments. The Les Paul Special VE comes standard with the legendary Locktone Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece for easy set up. Tuning is fast and reliable with Epiphone Premium Covered tuners with a 14:1 ratio.The higher the ratio, the more accurate your tuning. The tuners are mounted on an Epiphone Clipped Ear headstock with Les Paul Model in gold and the Epiphone log in silver. In addition, a "2016" Edition logo is on the back of the headstock. 

All Epiphones come with a Limited Lifetime Warranty and Gibson’s world famous 24/7/365 Customer Service.", "value":"131.12", "priceMin":"131.12", "priceMax":"149.00", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"40", "inventory":"57", "brand":"Epiphone", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"4.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"8", "reviewHowManyReviews":"17", "usedOrNew":"used", "discontinued":"0", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"1", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "Best Seller", "checksum":"93895071200", "priceVisibility": "1"}


With sharp double-cutaways and the recognizable Rickenbacker body shape made from maple, the semi-hollow Rickenbacker 330-12 12-string electric guitar has proven to be one of the brand's most popular models since the 1960s. The 330-12 has been used for its jangly sound, perfect for pop and various other genres, by the likes of Tom Petty, Johnny Marr, and Peter Buck, to name a few.
This is a special edition by Boss, for one main reason, they’ve collaborated with Fender to design the FRV-1 (click for full review), a dominant manufacturer of guitars which everyone should have at least heard of by now.This pedal is an enhanced remake of its old classic release, the manufacturers have kept everything people loved in the original release, while adding more quality.

Gibson announced the new 2012 Les Paul Standard at Winter NAMM 2012. The new Standard features two Burstbucker Pro humbuckers with coil splitting, and Pure Bypass. Pure Bypass gives the option of bypassing the volume and tone potentiometers, sending the signal directly from the bridge pickup to the output jack. The 2012 Standard also features Gibson’s “modern weight relief” as opposed to the chambered body of previous Standards. Other changes include a phase switch and compound fretboard radius.


The Firebird did have some other unique features such as its banjo style tuners and mini humbuckers that produced a different sound than the full humbucker pickups Gibson typically offered.  Many notable players preferred the Firebird: Mick Taylor from the Rolling Stones used it on the album Exile on Main St.  Allen Collins would also use this axe on stage with Skynyrd alongside his Explorers.  The great Texan blues guitarist Johnny Winter was known for playing slide on his 1963 Firebird to great effect.  Dave Grohl, of Nirvana and Foo Fighters fame, used his white Firebird to create a modern rock sound.


I sold my fender squier stratacaster for this guitar.when I opened the box it was so beautiful nothing like what pictured showed. Easy to tune and the amp is wanderful. This guitar comes with great surprises as well. Gibson has done it again. This guitar is great for a beginner. The only flaw is that it doesn't have a pick guard but those are cheap to buy. Would buy again.

It might be a little overwhelming when you listen to the song being played by the professionals. Try not to listen to all the extra filler that these musicians put into their music and focus instead on the chord progression. Think about the chords that go into making these songs, try to memorize them, and listen to when the chord changes happen in the song.


Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Dean - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Metallic Cherry, Metallic Black, Transparent Red
The Ovation Guitar Company founded by Charles Kaman based in the USA. The company primarily manufactures nylon-string acoustic guitars & steel-string acoustic guitars.These are the kind of electric guitars that are ideal for a recording in a studio and also great for stage performance. Their design incorporates, a wood top with a rounded, synthetic bowl shape instead of the traditional back and sides. CE44-RR is one of the most popular series of acoustic guitars produced by this brand. This is an expensive brand of guitars whose starting price is 31,555 INR approximately.
There are no frills: a single channel controlled with a Volume, Tone and Gain knob. You can switch between 15 and 7 watts, and don’t forget that for an all-tube amp, that is a lot of volume! While not having effects may sound like a bummer, the stripped-down circuitry helps your guitar signal to maintain its purest tone. Simple, raw and with attitude, cool looks and a mere 5.5kg; be prepared to rattle your brain with an authentic “British” sound.
While it’s not as popular as the two previous brands we have mentioned, PRS is on a level of their own. American owned and made, these guitars are an epitome of quality and great sound. They have a completely unique appearance and offer a tone which has a distinctive color. Best thing about this brand is the balance price and performance. You get a lot more than you pay for with PRS.

First, let’s start with the switch. Like the Gibson-style switch, the Stratocaster’s is used to select between different pickups and combinations thereof. In this picture of Jimi Hendrix and his Stratocaster, the switch is just above the knobs. It’s a little hard to see because of the white pickguard, but if you have this type of guitar, you’ll have no trouble finding it on your own instrument.

Paul Reed Smith Guitars (better known as PRS) is a Maryland-based manufacturer, and relatively new in the world of guitars – founded in 1980, when they began making a series of hand-built guitars. Today they have a wide range of models, which are built in both Asia and America, as well as a full roster of artists playing their guitars; including Mike Oldfield, Dave Navarro, Carlos Santana, and Mark Tremonti.

Perhaps our favorite feature is a far more subtle aspect of this pedal's interior, which is a circuit design that runs your dry signal through an analog path, before reuniting it with the wet reverb signal, which is produced by a digital processor. This means your guitar's signal coming into the pedal is unimpaired by the digital components, giving you a far more pure and organic-sounding output. 
The size of your strings affects your playability, depending on the genre you're working within.  If you are a Blues player who is going to bend strings constantly, you may prefer a lighter gauge of string to offset your workload.  If you are a Jazz player who will never bend more than a quarter step, you can afford to play thick, flat, wound strings.
To fulfill the diverse requirement of our esteemed clients, we are engaged in offering them a wide range of Electric Spanish Guitar. This offered range of Electric Spanish Guitar is available with us in various shapes and size and can also be modified as per our clients requirement. Our clients highly appreciate our offered Electric Spanish Guitar for its

It comes in 3 versions. A 15W, a 30W, and a 60W. The 60W and the 30W have 2 channels (each with the 8 analog circuits) so you can set up 2 different circuits and switch between them and 2 12AX7 tubes (pre and post). The 15W only has 1 12AX7 and 1 channel (with 8 analog circuits). I own the 60W and 15W. I use the 60W with a band and I have no problem practicing over the drums with it. The 15W I use at home for practice. Cool thing is both have headphone jack and aux in. I use the aux in at home to hook up my iPhone and practice to certain songs. The 60W has an effects loop and an external speaker out.
Also in ’65, W.M.I. produced a Teisco Del Rey catalog that offered some interesting wrinkles in the story. For starters, the guitars shown are the same as in Teisco’s catalog, but the models were all renamed with a one or two-letter prefix followed by a dash and a three-digit number. Solidbodies were designated E- for stoptails, and ET- for those with tremolos/vibratos. Basses were labelled EB-. The numerical suffix signalled the number of pickups in the first digit; the ET-320 had three pickups, the ET-200 had two pickups, etc. Hollowbodies retained the original EP- prefix and either single or double-digit suffix. Amps remained as the Checkmate line.

When you first start out playing electric guitar, it goes without saying that it all begins with a guitar and an amplifier. Those are the two most basic parts of your setup, and they’re all you need for learning the fundamentals. Once you have a grasp of your foundation, though, you’re probably wondering how professional guitarists manage to get so many different sounds out of their instruments. Effects pedals are the answer to that question.

An instant classic, and an easy guitar song that offers a simple, repeated section of just a handful of dyads, or two-note chords. It is one of the most recognizable guitar riffs of all time and it’s great for beginners to learn. The entire section is played with just two notes per chord, and it’s a progression that keeps your fretting hand in just a single section of the neck. Once you learn this riff, it’ll be tough to stop, since it sounds so good, and it’s easy to play. 


As Tom Wheeler writes in The Soul of Tone: Celebrating 60 Years of Fender Amps, "It’s powerful, it’s loud and it’s sensitive to the player’s touch. It sounds great, responding beautifully across the frequency spectrum. It exhibits a sparkling, harmonically rich tone at low and moderate volumes. At louder volumes it thickens with a sweet distortion that only seems to get creamier the more it’s cranked. It is particularly well matched to certain popular guitars, especially the Stratocaster."
It's Mal - i posted the comment ref the muted G string on my Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute - thanks for your response it was very good of you. I'm going to be playing (when i say playing i really mean faffing with) my guitar later so i'll have a look at the saddle, though i have rubbed my finger over it to see if there were any obvious issues which there wasn't. I have also rubbed the graphite from my clutch pencil over it when changing strings - no improvement; i'll get magnifier out and take a closer look and let you know, i may take you up on your kind offer if i'm still stumped.

The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best electric guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.
In October 2017, Gibson announced plans to relocate its Memphis operations to a smaller location and plans to sell the Memphis property. Gibson opened its Memphis facility 18 years before, which occupies just a portion of a massive 127,620 square foot complex. According to the Memphis Daily News, Gibson plans to search for a new facility for its Memphis operations and will stay in the current spot for the next 18 to 24 months. The facility, which sits across from the FedExForum along South B.B. King Boulevard, is expected to list for $17 million.
The Dobro All-Electric featured a pickup purchased from the fellow who’d invented it in ’32, Arthur J. Stimson of Seattle, Washington (it was not invented by Dobro’s Vic Smith, as has been reported elsewhere). This was, as far as we know, the first modern electric guitar pickup, with the magnet under the pickup, rather than over the strings, as on Electro/Rickenbacker instruments (or the presumed “transducer” on the ’28 Stromberg-Voisinet). Stimson’s pickup had a large horseshoe pickup in the body with two coils, one for bass and one for treble strings, each with its own bar polepiece. A 1/4″ jack outlet sat on the top down near the standard stamped National trapeze tailpiece, next to a single volume control.
There is no real rule on what fretsize is best – it is purely personal preference.  To find out what size is right for you or for a specific guitar and application, you may have to try similar guitars with different fretsizes.  I have heard many differing opinions on fretsize over the years; some say tall wire is too bumpy for sliding into position or that tall wire causes them to play sharp (from overly pressing down the strings, these players are used to feeling fingerboard surface under their finger tips).  Some say that fretwire below a certain height is difficult to bend on.  Bending and fretting hand slurring techniques are easier when the string can be addressed towards the middle of the ball end of the fingertip so that it may be pushed and pulled from the side rather than fretted from directly on top by the lower part of the fingertip. Some folks like a low fretwire as it feels very smooth to them and they don’t do a lot of slurring techniques.
The Effect: Volume pedals are a simple, yet frequently essential piece of equipment for many musicians out there. This device’s function is quite self-explanatory – it allows the user to control the level of the sound output, allowing them to increase or decrease the volume of the instrument. Additionally, many of these products can also operate as expression pedals, or a control for some of the other effects on your pedalboard. These gizmos are typically known for being strong and sturdy pieces of gear, as they should since they get stomped on quite a lot. If you are looking for a proven solution, go for the Boss FV-500H, if not, check out our Best Volume Pedal reviews to find your perfect match.
The Squier Deluxe Stratocaster by Fender is another excellent electronic guitar for newbies. The body is made up of basswood which is a soft, light wood with some of the best mid and upper frequency production. A maple neck and fretboard further assists the mid and high range frequency sound. Its C-shaped neck guarantees the best comfort. This guitar features three single coil pickups. One is assigned for master volume control, one tone control for the neck pickup and one tone control for medium pickup. The five-way switch lets you combine these three pickups and produce the widest range of sounds ever!
Bobby Jo is number one on this list. Every artist has unknowingly been influenced by him. Starting in the Mississippi Delta, Johnson’s life is rife with myths, and allegory. His deal with the devil and death are full of folklore and mysticism, and it only adds to his haunting voice and groundbreaking guitar playing. His songs are just a pure expression of emotion with no bars held. He led the groundwork for early blues to be filled in and worked upon by all the artists on this list. He also worked on breaking down social barriers. A black man in the early 20th century was not exactly the best place to be. But his music was to add interest by white musicians and help the civil movements of the sixties. Politically or musically, Robert Johnson is deserving of number one on this list.

You may not have considered Orange Amplifiers before, but they’re a company with a history that dates back to the early days of hard rock. If you watch footage of rock bands from the 1960s you’ll see Orange amplifiers onstage almost as much as Marshalls. The British amp builder has had its ups and downs since those glory days, but today Orange is as strong as ever.
The frets are those thin metal bars running down the neck, which act as note separators, allowing you to play individual notes and chords. Most guitars will feature 22 frets, although those more rock and metal-inclined will sometimes offer 24, allowing you to reach higher notes. As a beginner it shouldn’t really bother you whether you have 21, 22, or 24 frets. It’s only as you grow into the instrument you’ll find what works best for you.

Solder the electronics. The pickups you purchased should come with a schematic that shows exactly how to connect these to the controls and to the input for the guitar cord. Follow this schematic, using an ordinary electronics soldering iron to complete the job. Wrap any wiring connections with electrical tape, unless the manufacturer’s instructions suggest another method.

The Loar guitars are crafted after the classic guitars of the 1920’s and 30’s. Cited by many owners as a great singer songwriter guitar, the LH 200 is a small body folk style acoustic. It does not have the volume of a dreadnought style body, but this guitar is described as having a warmer tone. It has a solid spruce top with mahogany back and sides. So if you fancy yourself a singer songwriter, this may be a great choice for you. It's the best small body acoustic guitar under $500, in my opinion.
I have been watching Marty, subscribe to many, but found Jonathan Kehew also a very good teacher with longer than most videos and a calm organized presentation . Would like to see what anyone thinks about Swift guitar lessons. I stated using his site as he allows downloads of pdfs of scales and other written material to accompany the videos. He also has three camera in camera closeups of chords and hand position. His appearance clothes, pale skin, open neck shirt, facial hair is a turn off but his content is good I think.
One line bouncing is an "echo." Many lines bouncing randomly is "reverb." If they bounce around for more than a second, it's called reverb. If they bounce around for less than a second, it's Kosher to call it "room ambiance." If the radiating lines are in a room with no reflective walls, they wouldn't bounce back at all, and the room would be called "anechoic." By the way, my imaginary room is only two-dimensional. Real-life rooms are three dimensional.

The Hi-Flier likely is among the first of Univox's guitars. For those who don’t know, the Hi-Flier takes after the Mosrite Ventures. This guitar gained significant influence in Japan, particularly because of the Ventures’s enormous popularity in the country at that time. The Ventures were an instrumental group who rose to fame worldwide in the ‘60s, and, despite their decline in the U.S. in the ‘70s, remained “Beatlemania huge” in Japan up until today. Along with the Ventures-esque guitar, a Hi-Flier bass was designed as well, which was nearly identical to its six-stringed counterpart.
Am I missing something? Few MIDI artists can document the finest details of legato expressed by some human performers, but such nuance is within the scope of current notational languages. If no human can or will produce such detailed documentation of existing performances, computational machines can, if not now, soon -- unless the inexorable march toward AI that can pass the Turing test is more exorable that it might appear.
That is true, but without the many fine guitarists of today, who will inspire the gifted musicians of tomorrow. Musicians are artists and it would be quite dull if they all copied each other and sounded the same wouldn’t it? Whether we like it or not the world keeps on spinning regardless of what we want, think or do. Enjoy the gifts that are shared today, because we’re not guaranteed a minute more.

G&L, owned by Leo Fender, is yet another brand producing quality guitars. (Of course, when it is owned by the same owner as that of Fender, one can expect the extent of quality of these guitars.) Many of the G&L guitars seem to relive the Fender classic designs with some improvisations in style. Thus, this brand can indeed be considered an excellent alternative to Fender. Instead, in many instances, you will find G&L outnumbering Fender.
The HX removes the amp modelling and condenses the rock-solid build, intuitive user interface and neat form-factor of the Helix series into a svelte multi-effects box that will fit on a Pedaltrain JR with room to spare. As on the larger units, editing is highly intuitive. Lightly touching a footswitch opens the edit menu for that patch, with the large rotary and left-right buttons used to switch patch and parameters. More complex functionality like editing signal flow isn’t far away from the user - a couple of clicks through the menu gets you there, and makes creating banks of your own a breeze. In terms of sounds, the same high-quality effects from the flagship units are present and correct, with a number of additional effects that have been developed in the meantime. The drives on offer are excellent, and into a small tube amp we also found the boosts allowed us to drive the amp into saturation, or up the ante for soloing. With a real drive in front, the unit was able to keep up, and the interaction between external drive, HX and amp was close to indistinguishable from stacking two real drive pedals.
There were differences between the pickups as well – the National had slanted units under enormous covers, while the Supro featured 8-string versions of the Alnico V pickups found on many Spanish-style guitars. The difference in tone proved to be minimal. The Supro has a more refined sound than its cheaper cousins with the famous string-through pickup, but it can still be raw and biting when required. Although it is a single-coil pickup, it has excellent hum rejection and sounds wonderful either overdriven or clean. The guitar has plenty of sustain and a surprising level of output, making it an excellent instrument for rock and roll as well as country music.

If you think you might build more than one of a pedal, it’s helpful to keep a list of your preferred parts and their specifications in a spreadsheet. In manufacturing this is called a BOM (Bill of Materials). Some online stores will let you import a BOM direct into their web store and will build a purchase order for you based on the information. It’s a big time saver each time you need to order parts, and lets you compare different vendors stocks easily.

Most 700 and 800 models, except for bass and probably 12-strings, were equipped with a vibrato bar. After 45 years or so the bar has gone missing on many of them. Some model 820s were equipped with a genuine Bigsby vibrato. The advertisement at left features the Bigsby-equipped Model 820. The advertisement on the right is identical except that it showed the stock Kent vibrato tailpiece. According to the catalogue of the time, the Bigsby was only available on the sunburst model 820.
The Orchestra Model (OM) shape, with its sleek look and versatile acoustic voice, is one of C.F. Martin & Co's most popular guitar shapes. A number of iconic guitarists prefer this particular line, including legends like Eric Clapton and his protégé, John Mayer. I for one own an all-solid wood Martin OMCPA4, and it continues to exceed my expectations. While I have no regrets over my guitar, I have to admit that if I had the funds, I would have gone for the definitive Orchestra Model, the OM-28 E Retro.
We round off this list with a relatively modern innovation in the world of acoustic guitars; the ‘baby’ acoustic. As usual, Martin and Taylor have led the way with these particular guitars, which are effectively shrunken down dreadnoughts which focus heavily on their portability and the wide range of musical scenarios in which they can be used. Martin had dabbled in this world before, with its rather odd looking Backpacker, but it was with the LX1 – and Taylor’s subsequent Baby Taylor – that the world began to take note.
This kit contains everything you need to build your guitar.  Just add your finish materials to the body and neck.  These kits aren’t just a collection of random parts- each neck has been custom fitted to the body to ensure a good, snug fit.  Includes a finished, predrilled body, fretted neck, all electronics and hardware. Wood is raw and unfinished, may require sanding and patching or other preparation prior to applying a finish.
His first solo album, Texas Flood, was released in 1983 and featured blistering renditions of “Testify” and “Texas Flood” as well as now-classic originals like “Pride and Joy” and “Lenny.” Several other successful solo albums followed. On August 27, 190, Vaughan perished in a helicopter crash while returning form a gig he shared with Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy, Jimmie Vaughan and Robert Cray.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Carved - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Richlite (Paper/Phenolic Resin Composite) - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Resomax - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Godin Tuner, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Cherryburst, Creme Brulee, Black, Burgundy
Many great players (including Hendrix) placed the wah before distortion... though many of the modern rock guys place it after distortion to make the frequency sweep cleaner. Personally, I prefer the Wah before distortion, but it's personal taste really. Depends a bit on the pedal too - how wide the frequency notch is and what frequency range it covers. I have my Wah on a G-Lab True Bypass Wah Pad, which I think is a great product... I have a few Wahs that I like, the Keeley Mod Vox Wah and the RMC3 are probably my first choices to try out.

The Ibanez Artcore AF75, PRS SE Standard 24 and Schecter PT, for example, are priced below $600 and have been highly rated. They’re not exactly cheap money-wise, but they’re definitely worth a lot more. Getting one of those from the get-go will make playing guitar a lifetime passion. “Cheap” guitars may seem more affordable at first, but many of these are poorly made and can be more costly in the long run because of constant repairs and replacements.
Play power chords easily with one-finger barre'd across two (or three) strings. Simply place your index finger over the sixth & fifth stings at the same fret. (You can also barre the 4th string, which is also a D, and will match the root of your chord one octave higher.) The resulting power chord is named after the note played on the sixth string. At the first fret, it's D#5, at the third fret, it's F5. For tunes blues-rock tunes that use a lot of 5 & 7 power chords, such as those made famous by Chuck Berry, Drop D tuning allows you to play those 7 chords as though they were normal power chords.
The more contact the bridge has with the body, the better the sound will be transferred into the body. On the other hand, we have non-vibrato bridges which provide an anchoring point but have no control over pitch or tension of strings. Both bridges have their own pros and cons but non-vibrato bridges provide better tuning stability and solid contact between the body and the strings.
SOLD OUT: This guitar is very familiar to me as I have had other guitars from another Famous Japanese guitar maker That was known to make this very guitar already I believe this to have been made by those responsible for the Takamine or Mountain ands Tak made for Washburn import, needless to say this is a high quality Well built Japanese copy of the Martin D-19 and is Identical to the Takamine F320. This example was well crafted over 32 years ago making this a true vintage guitar based on the classic These were quite well constructed by any standard fit and finish is excellent typical of this era Japanese crafted and were made with very nice woods too... The top on this guitar is Solid Spruce and is nicely figured and the back sides and neck are all Mahogany, The fingerboard = bridge & head-stock front overlay is rosewood. This combination is know for some sweet mellow tone & good volume...this example is in above average vintage condition its finish still shines like glass and with only a few minor doinks and with its true 32+ years of well taken care of age its natural patina is very nice in deed. This guitar has the 1-11/16ths nut width it’s a comfortable medium profile neck and it plays with ease and has good action, neck is straight with correct relief and frets are still good at 88%. Tuners are original and are working well, no splits or cracks warps or twists or issues of that nature structural integrity is excellent. Volume is very good, tone is sweet, this makes for a very good playing guitar That sounds great and is very enjoyable all round for the player. Vintage tone! .. thanks for your interest if wanted you can contact Joe at jvguitars@gmail.com . .

The pre-1945 braces have a scooped or "scalloped" profile, making them lighter in design and weight. Functionally this means a greater vibrating surface (the guitar's top), and provides stronger bass response. Why did the Martin Company change from the lighter scalloped braces to heavier braces? The answer is in the strings. Many guitarists of that time were using heavier gauge strings, and these heavier strings were tough on the lightly constructed scalloped-braced Martins (especially on D-models with the long 25.4" scale). Martin didn't make a heavier guitar to withstand the extra string tension, so they compensated by adding more rigid (non-scalloped) braces to the guitar's top.
A guitar recital may include a variety of works, e.g. works written originally for the lute or vihuela by composers such as John Dowland (b. England 1563) and Luis de Narváez (b. Spain c. 1500), and also music written for the harpsichord by Domenico Scarlatti (b. Italy 1685), for the baroque lute by Sylvius Leopold Weiss (b. Germany 1687), for the baroque guitar by Robert de Visée (b. France c. 1650) or even Spanish-flavored music written for the piano by Isaac Albéniz (b. Spain 1860) and Enrique Granados (b. Spain 1867). The most important composer who did not write for the guitar but whose music is often played on it is Johann Sebastian Bach (b. Germany 1685), whose baroque lute works have proved highly adaptable to the instrument.
You have a huge range of effects at your disposal, which can be applied to both vocals (thanks to the XLR inputs) and line level instruments such as your acoustic guitar. You have 2 compressors, a boost, 3 Chorus types, as well as 3 types of delay and reverb effects to suit a wide range of sonic palettes, all of which have been optimised specifically for acoustic guitar. However, it’s the Acoustic Resonance selectors, 80 second phrase looper and anti-feedback feature that the acoustic guitarists will really take advantage of.

There are two common types of 5-way selector switches in the guitar world – the Fender type and the “import” type. Both types are functionally identical but differ in physical layout. It’s easy to see which type you’re dealing with. The Fender-type switches viewed from below have two rows of 4 contacts, either side of the circular body of the switch. The import-type switches have a single row of 8 contacts in a line.


Let's begin by getting clear on what we mean by 'effect': an effect is a device that treats the audio in some way, then adds it back to a dry or untreated version of the sound. Echo and reverb are obvious cases, and you can use pitch-shift and pitch modulation in a similar way. 'Processors', by contrast, generally are those devices that change the entire signal and don't add in any of the dry signal. Things like compressors and equalisers fall into this category: as you'll see from the tips and tricks, processors can often be used as effects in their own right, or as part of an effect chain, but until you know exactly what you're doing and what the consequences are likely to be, it is a good idea to stick to these guideline definitions, as they dictate how you can connect the effects into your system.

Make your next guitar one of a kind. Every luthier set sold by OregonWildWood is visually unique and distinctive - even sets within the same species vary greatly in color, contrast and figuring. You'll find the largest online selection of guitar woods available - all special within their own right. All are exotic, beautiful, unique and superior. Each set is individually pictured giving you the opportunity to choose the perfect one for your next guitar.

this is a really cool product. at first i thought i was disappointed in the drum loop sounds becsuse i thought they sounded too cheesy and not real but when i recorded some music using them along with the songs ive been working on, it turned out sounding pretty good and im happy with it. Also, my bass that sounds to cheap and not so great recording in through my irig2 without any effects module , is drastically improved when i plug it into this NUX-MG20
In 2005, Gibson issued three Pete Townshend signature edition Les Paul Deluxe guitars, based on Townshend’s heavily customised “#1” Wine Red 1976 Les Paul Deluxe, “#3” Gold top 1976, and “#9” Cherry Sunburst 1976. These guitars were modified by Alan Rogan and used extensively on stage and in the studio with The Who. In addition to the two mini-humbuckers the guitar carried, Rogan modified Townshend’s originals with a DiMarzio humbucker in the middle. Toggle switches located behind the guitar’s tailpiece turned the pickup on and off and added volume boost. The control knobs were wired for volume, one for each pickup and a master volume. The reissues differed from Townshend’s originals in that the reissues had an inlay at the first fret while the originals did not.
The Ibanez JEM77WDP Steve Vai Signature guitar features a rosewood top on a mahogany body. The maple and walnut neck with a slim Wizard neck profile is topped with a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard with jumbo frets and Tree of Life vine inlays. This model also has a striking wooden pickguard and matching headstock, as well as wooden control knobs, earning it the nickname “Woody.”
ok thank you so much! Unfortunately, it’s not as loud as the other single coils of my strat. I tried splitting to the other coil but doesn’t split. I followed the wiring diagram bit by bit. =( Thank you so much for responding right away. I’m a session musician here in our country and this is actually my first time to mod my guitar. Thank you so much!
An acoustic guitar suited to bluesy rhythms. Has quite alot of fret rattle with the high velocities but also a certain amount of mid to high frequencies which helps to give it its own place in a mix. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them.

To fulfill the diverse requirement of our esteemed clients, we are engaged in offering them a wide range of Electric Spanish Guitar. This offered range of Electric Spanish Guitar is available with us in various shapes and size and can also be modified as per our clients requirement. Our clients highly appreciate our offered Electric Spanish Guitar for its


In addition to acoustic and electric guitars, the company now also makes mandolins and ukuleles. Their mandolins are highly regarded, they “more or less rule in the bluegrass market” in the United States.[5] As of May 2012 the company has about 85 employees and manufactures six to seven acoustic guitars, three electric guitars, two mandolins, and two ukuleles per day.[4]
Students and expert alike describe this guitar as a fun instrument, and goes further by commenting that it has exceeded their expectations. From its fast action playability to the quality of the finish, the Epiphone SGSpecial continues to rake in compliments. Several people even said that it comes surprisingly close to the feel and sound of a Gibson SG.
There are lots of adjustment points built into modern electric guitars. And unless you know what you're doing (and why), these adjustments can tempt you to mess around with your guitar and make things worse instead of better. With this book, you can avoid that trap. You'll find step-by-step instructions for setting up your guitar, replacing strings, changing string gauges, dealing with common electronics problems, and more.
In 1933, Dobro released an electric guitar and amp package. The combo amp had "two 8″ Lansing speakers and a five-tube chassis. Dobro made a two speaker combo amp that was on the market over 12 years before Fender launched its two-speaker "Dual Professional/Super" combo amp. In 1933, Audio-Vox was founded by Paul Tutmarc, the inventor of the first electric bass (Tutmarc's instrument did not achieve market success until Leo Fender's launched the Precision Bass). In 1933, Vega sold a "pickup and amplifier set" which a musician could use with her/his existing guitar. In that same year, the Los Angeles-based Volu-Tone company also sold a pickup/amplifier set. Volu-Tone used "high voltage current" to sense the string vibration, a potentially dangerous approach that did not become popular. In 1934 Dobro released a guitar amp with a vacuum tube rectifier and two power tubes. By 1935, Dobro and National began selling combo amps for Hawaiian guitar. In 1934, Gibson developed prototype combo amps, but these never got produced and sold. By 1935, Electro/Rickenbacher sold "more amps and electric guitars than all the amps and electrified/electric guitars made from ’[19]28 through the end of ’[19]34, combined".[1]
If the fuzz is the grandaddy, the Arbiter/England Fuzz Face (introduced 1966) is the grand-poobah of the grandaddies’ social club. A handful of other fuzzes came first, but this distinctive round, smiling box is the one most guitarists point to when identifying the fuzz tone of the gods. Why? Two words: Jimi Hendrix. Apparently he died and took it up there with him. Oh, and two other words: germanium transistors. When these fuzz fans point to the Fuzz Face, however, they don’t point to just any Fuzz Face. They point to a good one. The quality of these pedals varies wildly, mainly because the tolerances of germanium transistors themselves varies wildly and sorting out the good ones was more work than the makers could afford to put in (or, perhaps, knew was necessary). Contemporary makers from Fulltone to Z.Vex to Mayer take the time and trouble to laboriously sort their germanium transistors, and it pays in spades in terms of tone and consistency.
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