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First the lower line models were built for steel strings first. Like the style 17 in 1922, and the style 18 in 1924. Pretty much all models were built for steel by 1927-1929. But unfortunately there was no definative serial number or time line for any 1920s Martin style. This makes it difficult to determine if any particular 1920s Martin guitar is really built for steel strings. Martin didn't just implement steel string design at any one definative point. It was a transition, and apparently a very slow transition. And special orders for gut or steel complicated things.
I also didn’t mention a tuner, but that’s because a tuner really isn’t an effect. If you use one, the ideal location is in the very front of the signal chain right after the guitar as you don’t want the signal going into the tuner processed by any effects that might affect the tuner’s accuracy. Even better, get a loop switcher with a separate tuner output that keeps the tuner entirely out of the signal chain until you need to use it and that will mute the signal so the audience doesn’t need to suffer while you make adjustments.
Unfortunately, not many reference materials are available to document in complete detail, but we can hit some of the highlights, and illuminate a number of relationships along the way. If you have catalogs, ads or pictures of guitars that can help fill in some of the blanks, please let me know (Michael Wright, PO Box 60207, Philadelphia, PA 19102).
Wampler would be considered a boutique pedal manufacturer, which means they'll tend to be a little more expensive, but also more likely to give their products more creative attention and include features like true bypass, which you don't get with Boss pedals. It's also a unique blend of delay layers and reverb tones, which can really draw you in and make you want to deviate from the cheaper reverb pedals.
Like we said; if you’re just starting out in the world of electric guitar, a looper pedal is a great way to learn how to play in time and play with other musicians. As you can jam along with yourself, lay down a rhythm track and play lead over the top, you get to learn what works best. It’s also a great song writing tool as you can jam with yourself and create some killer tracks. You may not use it live but you’ll definitely use it!
Mic orientation, or the angle of the mic in relation to the speaker, becomes more critical as the mic is moved closer to the amp. Pointing the mic at the center of the cone will yield more active highs and better transient detail but fewer lows. As you move the mic toward the outer rim of the speaker, maintaining a 90-degree angle with the grille cloth, the low frequencies gradually increase because of proximity effect and other factors, resulting in a sound that may be warmer, softer, or more powerful. Many engineers like to blend these complex characteristics by angling the mic between 30 and 60 degrees off-axis from the center of the speaker.

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Make sure that only the notes you deliberately play actually sound. Guitar strings aren't isolated systems like the tone generators of a synthesizer; if you simply leave them open they may ring even though you've never actually played them. Always watch out carefully for such “rogue sympathetic vibrations” and make sure you properly stop strings that sound in unintended ways.
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Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst

The EB-18 was a bass version with a 33.825″ scale. According to Longworth, early versions had a single DiMarzio “One” pickup and Grover Titan tuners, while later basses had a DiMarzio “G” pickup and Schaller pickups. Expect to find various combinations of those. Longworth also mentions the possibility that some might have Mighty Mite pickups, but this is uncertain. EB-18 production began in ’79 and about 5,226 (about 1,300 a year) were made until the guitar ended in early 1982.
A well known South Korean guitar brand, cort guitars is swiftly rising up in Indian markets. This brand is famous for producing acoustic, bass and electric guitars at less cost. Its starting price is 10,000 Rs and comprises of some best models like VL, all the G and Aero series and classic rock. If you want to buy this guitar, then you may purchase from online website or firm official websites as well.
They are based out of Nashville, TN, and all of their products are made in the United States. The Gibson Les Paul is possibly the most iconic model of guitar ever made. It’s been used by many players throughout the years, and it’s suitable for everything from jazz to rock to metal. Famous wielders of the instrument include: Jeff Beck, Duane Allman, Chuck Berry, Jack Bruce, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Dave Grohl, George Harrison, Tony Iommi, B. B. King, Jimmy Page, and many, many more.

Never buy a guitar for its looks alone. You must buy a guitar only once you have started learning and know your fingerstyle and the genre of songs you will be playing. Most of the guitars last for more than a decade. This is the reason, you must keep all these tips in mind before buying a guitar. Look for the style of your playing before you buy a guitar. A few guitars have a thicker neck which may or may not be comfortable to you. In each brand of guitars, different layouts and designs are available. Look for the series and the design that provide you comfort while playing the guitar.
One look around our shop and you'll see that we're serious about offering our customers a large selection of instruments, equipment and gear. You'll find both new and used instruments, and our top-notch staff are here to help you choose exactly what fits your needs, preferences and budget. If you're interested in learning new skills and techniques, check out the group workshops we host on a regular basis. We cover a wide range of music topics, so stop by and see what class we're holding next. Can't make it in? Give us a call at 505-889-6300, and we'll be happy to answer all your questions.
One of the most impressive guitars on this list when it comes to style is this C-1 SGR from Schecter – a respected brand in the world of rock and metal. With a design that’s heavily influenced by their premium C1 models, this affordable alternative features a solid basswood body that’s arched and contoured for great comfort, allowing unhindered access to the 24-fret maple neck.
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Note: All versions and platforms of Rocksmith are compatible with the Real Tone Cable. It is a required 1/4-inch audio jack cable necessary for Rocksmith to detect and respond to your guitar playing. All versions of Rocksmith include the Real Tone Cable in the box, except downloaded versions and the Rocksmith 2014 Edition "No Cable Included" Version.
“If Gibson offers two pickups, let’s have three!”  This simple statement by Leo began a revolution in sound for electric guitarists by offering 3 single coil pickups instead of the usual 2 humbucking pickups that Gibson offered players.  These lower output pickups provided a thinner sound, but with more tonal variants.  Players could now have clear chunky rhythm tones alongside cutting trebly lead tones, while the inclusion of the middle pickup gave players access to the “spongy quack” distinctive of the Stratocaster’s “in between” positions.

This is called a ‘Rectifier’ or diode. Grid: A fine helix (spiral) wire called ‘Grid’ is placed between the Cathode and Anode. A small variable voltage (music signal) on the Grid varies the large current between the Anode and Cathode. The small varying input signal is now amplified to a large varying current. The result is very linear. Why this happens is a mystery. The fact that it works and the universe exists is a miracle. It pays to be humble. Transistors: (emitter base collector) are complementary to valves (cathode grid anode).

I haven't had the pleasure of owning an Andrew White yet, but I plan to. I've followed the company and Andrew for some time after noticing repeated YouTube videos featuring unique guitars with lush, exotic tones. Since then, every time I've had a question or comment it is Andrew himself that responds quickly with pleasant and enthusiastic answers. Andrew White guitars have something different to offer and Andrew himself seems to be a down to earth guy with the passion of guitar building in his heart.


If you’ve been playing for a while, chances are pretty good that you’ve probably already built up a collection of four, five or 10 stomp boxes, which now leaves you with the question of how to hook them all up and use them in your rig. Or perhaps you’ve hooked everything up and wondered why you get howling feedback, excess white noise, hum or silence whenever you engage two or more pedals at once.


Description: Body: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22, Medium - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tone Pros - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Duncan Designed - String Instrument Finish: Vintage White, Vintage Gold Top, Black
I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL.
It's interesting how one of the biggest brands in guitar amplification was built by a drummer! The story goes that professional drummer Jim Marshall was inspired by Pete Townshend, Ritchie Blackmore, and Big Jim Sullivan to develop a louder and better sounding amp. And he went about it by looking at a popular American amp design (i.e. Fender Bassman) and finding ways of how to improve it. After many prototypes, Jim and his team eventually came up with an amp that had their own "Marshall sound", this amp inherited the JTM label, an abbreviation of Jim's and his son Terry's names. The rest as they say is history, with Marshall being one of the most familiar amplifier brands, even to none musicians. Their brand is still the amp of choice for a long list of virtuoso guitarists, including Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Slash just to name a few. While their vintage and professional level amplifiers are still very much in demand, the company is not doing as great in the entry level to mid-tier market - which really is the bulk of where sales and reviews of come from. Still, their fans gave them enough good feedback to make it to this list, thanks to the improvements they are making to their entry level line of amps.
This is a great local shop.  I bought a new Floyd Rose bridge for one of my electric guitars and brought it to Franklin Guitar to be installed and set up.  I got the guitar back within 2 days and it plays so well that I brought them my other guitar for a set up the next day.  Again, within 2 days I had it back and it plays exactly like the other one...awesome.  I had both guitars set up for a little more than half of what another shop quoted me just to install and set up the new bridge on the one.  High quality work at a fair price in a reasonable time...I won't go any where else to have my guitars worked on.  They also have a good inventory of guitars and amps for sale to fit any budget.
All of the guitars on this list except for the Blueridge BR-160 are equipped with an electronics system that make them stage- and studio-ready. You can simply plug and play when you need to perform in front of an audience in a crowded or big venue where there’s a lot of ambient noise. If you don’t need amplification – for example if you’re just practicing at home – these guitars sound great unplugged as well.
This is a product of Colorado USA, every detail of this guitar was hand painted with waterproof organic non led based paint. It is brand new fully functional acoustic guitar. Become the center of attention on your party with this beautifull vibrant instrument. Perfect for a present (Christmas, Valentine, or b-day) for your loved one, family or a friend. Come in to the magic world of music with this beautifull hand painted acoustic guitar. Fill the positive energy of Marcy's artistic story through your song.  The artist Marcy Snow all the way from Colorfull Colorado presents you this unique hand painted acoustic guitar .
So I got this kit last week full of hope yet penssive knowing that these kits from over seas have lots of problems. On first inspection the kit was okay, Nothing, I thought at the time, a little TLC couldn't fix. Here I am getting ready to install the electronic today, level the frets, string it in and play. As I opened the pakage with all of the tone and volume pots I noticed one thing super wrong right away.
We’ve already shown you how you will sometimes want more than one mic on your amp to achieve ideal sound in your tracks. Many semi-distant and ambient techniques will be most useful, along with a close mic, but on a separate track, to retain the option of blending a more-direct tone to create your overall sonic picture. Any single-mic positions discussed thus far can be combined into multi-mic sounds in the mix when recorded to different tracks. There are also several other approaches to multi-miking that might come in handy now and then, and which are worth some exploration.
Purchase the required hardware. There’s a lot of variety in terms of the looks and capabilities of the parts you’ll need for your guitar. You can choose based on the kind that existing guitars you like use, or experiment with something new. You can easily buy the equipment you’ll need from most guitar shops or online. For an electric guitar, you’ll need:[3]
Frets & Necks did an AMAZING job on my RG7421. They installed my BKP Black Hawk p/u's and new tone/volume pots. Frets & Necks service was above and beyond, fast and super knowledgeable. I am very pick...y about who works on my guitars, I am beyond pleased that I chose Frets& Necks to work on my RG. I will be bringing my RG7421 back to Frets & Necks for future upgrades very soon. Be good to yourself and treat your guitar, give Frets & Necks a try. You won't be disappointed. Thank you F&N. See More
I found a Decca guitar lying in my woodworks shop at school, and my teacher let me take it home. My friend and I have been restoring it, and we nearly have it finished, the only thing missing is the tremolo spring. However the model of the guitar is kind of odd as we have not found any record of what type of guitar we own. Its a double cut-away archtop, with a tobacco sunburst and 3 single coil pick ups. We have looked everywhere and haven't been able to find any record of a 3 pick up Decca guitar. We're still looking...
The previously discussed I-IV-V chord progressions of major triads is a subsequence of the circle progression, which ascends by perfect fourths and descends by perfect fifths: Perfect fifths and perfect fourths are inverse intervals, because one reaches the same pitch class by either ascending by a perfect fourth (five semitones) or descending by a perfect fifth (seven semitones). For example, the jazz standard Autumn Leaves contains the iv7-VII7-VIM7-iiø7-i circle-of-fifths chord-progression;[80] its sevenths occur in the tertian harmonization in sevenths of the minor scale.[81] Other subsequences of the fifths-circle chord-progression are used in music. In particular, the ii-V-I progression is the most important chord progression in jazz music.
Unfortunately, it appears it is no longer possible to grab a Standard MIM Telecaster for under $500. Still, the Standard Telecaster remains a solid option when it comes to reasonably priced guitars, and it is a great alternative to the American Tele. However, if this increase doesn't set well with you, and you aren't digging the Modern Player Telecaster Plus, I suggest checking out what Squier has to offer.
In the late 1950s, Guitarist Link Wray began intentionally manipulating his amplifiers' vacuum tubes to create a "noisy" and "dirty" sound for his solos after a similarly accidental discovery. Wray also poked holes in his speaker cones with pencils to further distort his tone, used electronic echo chambers (then usually employed by singers), the recent powerful and "fat" Gibson humbucker pickups, and controlled "feedback" (Larsen effect). The resultant sound can be heard on his highly influential 1958 instrumental, "Rumble" and Rawhide.[17]
I’d like to think that I am a little more forgiving of slight finish errors than most, so most of the horror stories surrounding Gibson QC do not bother me too much. After all, one area of the body where the sunburst color doesn't fade at EXACTLY the same point all the way around? That sounds more like middle aged guys trying to save face around their buddies after their wives saw the credit card bill the next month and made them take it back.
The foot pedal is usually the only control on a wah pedal (especially on famous models like the Vox V487 and Dunlop Crybaby), but some come with controls to change the Q, or how wide the sweep of the wah is and how prominent it sounds. They are great for adding extra attitude to your bends and giving funky riffs some extra punch. The intro to “Voodoo Child” is probably the most recognisable use of a wah pedal. These are great fun and we’d recommend them to anyone – if lead guitar or funky rhythm is your thing you can’t do without it!
Our guide to guitar strings, the hope and savior of beginners across the world. We're going to cover the types of guitar strings, how they're made, the best brands, the standard gauges, how to pick the right ones for your instrument and style, what to expect in terms of cost, and much more. Take a ride with me through Ledger Note's guitar string guide...
All product names, logos, and brands are property of their respective owners, and are in no way associated or affiliated with The Top Guitars.  Product names, logos, and brands are used solely for the purpose of identifying industry-standard products and brands used by The Top Guitars for the business of post production sound, and any related awards or honors therein. Use of these names, logos, and brands does not imply any co-operation or endorsement.
The Epiphone Joe Pass Emperor II is the signature guitar of one of jazz music’s great guitarists. Joe Pass played on records with Ella Fitzgerald, and his influence has cemented his name among the greats of the genre. The guitar which bears his name is a fine example of a guitar geared precisely towards one genre. It won’t win any awards for versatility, but it is a fantastic instrument for jazz fans of any skill level. Featuring the classic hollow body arch top design of old but with two high quality Burstbucker pickups for a range of silky tones.
Bought an ovation a couple of years ago and it hasn't failed me yet. Mine's a fairly lower in the range Ovation Celebrity, but it's excellent. One of the most comfortable feeling guitars I've ever held, good projection, nice tone, even been known to out do a Gibson further down the neck. Plus bonus feature is that it does sound so much clearer and warmer out of the amp

3,000 to 8,000 Hz - Brilliance and Presence: This is the range that can add shimmer or allow a guitar to cut through a mix when boosted. It can also be where you make cuts to keep a guitar from conflicting with a vocal. If making boosts in this range, keep an eye (ear?) out for noise, as any noise present from distortion/effects pedals will very quickly be accentuated as well

In the event it does not work out, the next measure is to utilize automotive fine grade sand paper to decontaminate contact points. Once more, cover this around a Q-tip for jack inputs and replicate the contact cleaner procedure. By now, you should have confirmed any likelihood that the problem is caused by a cleanliness issue. All your equipment should be fresh and clean for your upcoming performance.
There’s a bolt-on thin U-shaped maple neck, with a rosewood fretboard, and 24 extra-jumbo frets, which makes fast playing and string bending a breeze. As we highlight in our full review, the EC-10 is voiced by two ESP-designed passive LH-100 humbuckers at the neck and bridge positions, which are loud enough to cope with rock and metal lead playing, although articulate and warm when playing without distortion.

The downside of going electric is that now you have to think about a soundboard, or at least an amp. And no self-respecting guitarist can live without a few pedals to tweak the sound. I mean you only need a volume pedal to control the level, a tuner might be nice, chorus is always appreciate, a nice delay pedal wouldn’t be bad, and you might need a clean boost for those solos. Then again, you might just want to plug straight into the soundboard and just enjoy that amplified acoustic sound.
Orville Gibson founded the company in Michigan and stayed a family business until the early 50's. Ted Mcarty ran the company from 1951 or so, and is the "father" of most successful Gibson electric guitars, the Les Paul, the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-335 and so on.. In the late 60's Gibson was bought by the Norlin Corp, who mainly were known for making refrigerators. Most feel Gibson adopted a quanity over quality approach to guitar making during this period and 1970's to 1980's Gibson electrics are considered less desireable by most guitar collectors, and considered outright junk by many others.. Cosmetic changes to Gibson models during that period apparently reflect the poor taste of the buying public during that era... and while a 1974 Gibson SG may look ugly compared to the classic 1961 or 1968 models, please remember this was the era of ployester liesure suits and Chrysler Cordobas.. In 1986 Gibson was bought by a group who understood guitar making, and is a privately held company to this day. Gibson quality has appeared to improve steadily from 1987 to present day, but it seems to be unanimous that todays models do not approach the craftsmanship of the late 1950's when Gibson apparently peaked.
Eddie is #1, or at least tied with Hendrix, who relies on reputation alone. Bon jovi's guitarist is a joke. For some reason, people (who have no idea what they are talking about) think Bon jovi is better than all of the other 80s bands that have solid guitar players that aren't on the list that are better in many ways, specifically the guitar. (definitely leppard, Guns N' Roses, Ratt, motley crue, etc.) Anyway Eddie Van Halens self taught style is the best that there is. This list is more of a popularity contest, a popularity contest where people who have no idea what they are talking about vote for the band they have heard 1 or 2 songs from. The electric guitar was played by many, for all those who can't get on the radio and name the band that is playing most of the time, better yet the album, shouldn't be voting. But if you can, vote whoever.
For our purposes, I’ll break pedals down into four overarching categories: 1) Boost, Compression, Distortion, and Fuzz; 2) Modulation; 3) Echo and Delay; and 4) Filtering and EQ-Based effects, and this series will focus on individual types that come within each of those larger categories (for example, Modulation includes many quite different effects, such as chorus, vibrato, phasing, and so on). This is not to say that some manufacturers or other writers couldn’t categorize things differently, and certainly a few examples below could be safely lifted out of the heading I have stuck them in and accurately described by another category. It doesn’t matter all that much. These headings are mainly a means of breaking down the sonic results of the enormously varied range of pedals that exists out there, and taking a brief look at what makes them tick.
The very first thing to remember about pickups is that the active option is not necessarily better than the passive choice, and vice versa. Each type brings its own set of drawbacks and benefits. Passive pickups might be limited in terms of signal strength and tone shaping, but they are much more expressive in comparison to the active pickups in terms of picking and strumming intensities.

Lastly, Capacitors. Now this one is a vast subject matter to cover as there is so much debate about which is the 'best', which is the most 'vintage correct' etc. If you're a member of any guitar forum, I'm sure you've encountered many a thread about this too. There's an awful lot of cork sniffing about this subject, it's pretty bad! but I'm going to keep it as civilized as I can sticking to facts and my findings/experiences.
Got this beautiful guitar less than a month ago and played a couple of solo acoustic gigs. People were wowed by the way the sound of this guitar fills the space ( I played it through a Bose tower). Loved the feel of the fretboard. Though the body is a jumbo, it doesn't feel like a dreadnought. The guitar looks very attractive too and I had one person come over during a break just to admire the guitar. So now here's why I have given it 4 stars. The electronics were faulty on my guitar. The tuner switch didn't turn off automatically after I hit them to tune the guitar. The light stayed on till the batteries were drained out. This happened twice to me after which I decided to send it back. I also noticed a big hum building up during my second gig with the guitar - I
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Considering a brand is only really important to a certain extent. Generally, certain top brands will have a reputation for being better at things than others, but given that most guitar brands now have a very wide offering, it’s really best to consider individual models. It’s worth doing a little extra research in some areas though, because there are interesting brand relationships that mean some more budget guitar brands have actually been designed by premium ones. Epiphone and Squier for instance are more affordable sub-brands of Gibson and Fender respectively, which means that you can often get a very high quality product that’s been made in Taiwan rather than the USA for instance. The Dove Pro is a good example of this.
G & L Guitars - Leo Fender founded this US Based guitar company with then-partner George Fullerton (hence the name G & L. They offer guitars similar to classic Fenders, but with some modern innovations. It is said that if Leo Fender stayed with Fender, their instruments will be upgraded to the G&L designs, which he considers as an upgrade to his classic guitar creations.
Just wanted to get back with a thank you note. I received the kit last week and installed it in my Stratocaster with Texas Special p'ups. It's absolutely brilliant. Not only is the Blend control a superb new addition to the tonal options, but the pots also feel so sturdy and smooth. Feels like I have some custom build now. Just amazing, thank you! In addition, the treble bleed mod is the icing on the cake. I’m no longer afraid to roll down the volume knob." - Andrei Custom Blender Mod for Strat®  
If a bold vintage look and a big vintage sound gets you excited, the beautiful Art Deco-inspired BG-2500 from Blueridge will be right up your street. Taking inspiration from the historic Gibson J200, this high-end model sports a jumbo 21” body made from quality woods, with a fit and finish that ensures the BG-2500 feels worth the hefty sum of cash.
The Badazz U1820 guitar and U1820B bass were essentially bolt-neck copies of the new Guild S-100 introduced in 1970, the so-called “Guild SG.” This was a solidbody with slightly offset double cutaways. It had a bolt-on neck with a Gibson-style open book head, outlined decal logo, block inlays, bound 22-fret rosewood fingerboard (rounded end), two of the 12-pole humbuckers with the narrow center black insert, finetune bridge, Hagstrom-style vibrato (as found on early Guilds), two volume and two tone controls, plus three-way. The bass was the same without the vibrato and with dots along the upper edge of the fingerboard. These were available in cherry red, orange sunburst or natural (“naked”). List price for the guitars in ’71 was $199.50 with case, while the basses cost $220. These pickups, by the way, while being somewhat microphonic (as with most early Japanese units), scream, if you like a really hot, high-output sound.
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The Neoclassical Speed Strategies for Guitar is another book we’d recommend more for the seasoned player. This one provides an excellent introduction into fingerpicking with helpful illustrations of exactly how to position yourself for the quickest and most efficient playing. It includes lots of helpful examples and exercises to make it easier to master.
Ovation Guitars, in conjunction with the DW Music Foundation (DWMF) will debut the RS Rockstar™ guitar. This six-string, “RS” model guitar will be donated to each Notes for Notes location along with a DW drumset and an LP cajon to equip each studio with professional level musical instruments. The DWMF will also work with other partnering charities to donate RS Rockstar™ model guitars to music education programs in underserved communities worldwide.
Two new models that would eventually become mainstays joined the Teisco line in ’65. Theye were two double cuts with slightly more flared horns, in a sort of tulip shape. Both had a single, wide, chrome-covered pickup with poles exposed along one edge. This was similar to the old MJ-1 but by ’65 would become the new SM series. Both had bolt-on necks with bound rosewood fretboards and the top-edge rectangular inlays. The E-100 had a bridge/tailpiece assembly, volume and tone on a small pickguard, and one of the elongated Strat-style heads. The ET-100 had a platform vibrato. As a sign of things to come, the Teisco Del Rey ET-100 had a regular Strat-style headstock, the first to appear on Teiscos, as far as I’m aware.
I have a Les Paul Gold Top copy I bought new in the mid 70's. It has no brand name anywhere on it. I have done all the research I can and have found no conclusive results.I'm at a loss. It plays great! I do have pics. if that will help. Thanks for any help' It was bought in Montgomery Al. Clarence Carter's guitar player bought one while I was in the store so I figured ...must be a okay guitar. So I bought it. On the little square plate on the back it is hand engraved #0059. Thanks
Amazing guitar for the price point. It's build is so accurate it requires no setup, just tune and it's ready to go. Great rich sound, very bright, great action up and down the neck. I can't put it down and I'm enjoying it more than my six string acoustics. There's something very forgiving about playing a 12 string vs a 6 string, the neck is slightly wider and there's more room for the fingers, and the pressure points on the fingers are wider too which lends to smoother playing.
The volume pedal is about as simple as a pedal can get. It is basically an external volume knob that you work with your foot. They are an excellent way to control the volume of your rig and can be placed at different places in your guitar chain. When placed first for example it can be great for volume swells (as we will see), reducing your amp gain by acting like your guitar’s volume knob. If placed after your gain section it will bring down your overall volume without reducing changing your tone or gain. You can really experiment with the placement of a volume pedal to see what matches your needs.
I've been asked why it took so long to make this record. Well, it didn't really take too long to make this record. It took six months to make it. What I'd been doing before that was hopefully a journey I can continue. I guess what we play is still indie or alternative, I don't know all the different terms these days -- I've kind of lost track about what label I'm supposed to be these days. But it's still the kind of music I started playing when I was a kid, really. I'm fronting a band I could have fronted at fifteen or sixteen, so that's quite cool.
A small number of bass units do not fit into the "combo" amplifier, standalone amplifier or separate speaker cabinet categorization or typologies. Some bass amp combos have a removable amplifier. With the amplifier unit taken out of the combo cabinet, the user then has an easily portable amp head (which can be taken to a recording studio for use as a preamp, to lay down bass tracks) and a separate bass speaker cabinet, which could be used with another bass amp head. As well, some amp heads have a small built-in speaker which produces enough sound so that it can be used as a practice amp, so that the bassist can practice when she/he has the head, but not the speaker cabinet. This way, a bassist in a touring band could practice electric bass using her amp head, even if her speaker cabinets were still locked up in an equipment van.
I bought this kit for myself. I wanted the satisfaction of building and playing my own guitar. The price was well within my budget. I did upgrade the electronics, put on a Bigsby tailpiece, a new roller tune-o-matic bridge, and planet waves self trimming tuners. The items in the kit were fine to use, but i wanted a one off guitar, that would have the sound and the look I wanted.

• Them Changes: Since the strings on acoustic guitars play a much more important role in projecting volume and clarity than strings on an amplified electric guitar, considering changing acoustic guitar strings often to keep an instrument sounding its best. Remember to wipe down the strings after playing and check for string damaging fret wear. Both can prematurely end a guitar string’s life.
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This is one of several Squier models available that offer a pretty good product for a reasonably low price. The pickups and hardware are sometimes suspect, and the workmanship varies from instrument to instrument, but for the price, these are a very good beginner guitar choice. Squier Fat Strats are similar in appearance to the much more expensive Fender Stratocasters, so the look of the instrument is appealing. 
The exact effect of the smaller cap depends on the other components in the circuit, including the guitar cable but for a typical humbucker with the tone control at max treble, volume at max and 470pF of guitar cable you get a 6dB boost peak at 3K rolling off at 12dB thereafter without the small cap.With the small cap, the peak shifts down to 1KHz and you get 10dB boost. This is because the capacitance of the guitar cable forms a resonant circuit with the inductance of the pickup then you add a further cap in parallel which shifts the resonance down in frequency. if you then roll off the volume to about 7 the peak drops to about 9dB of boost and shifts up a little in frequency because the resistance of the volume control decouples the cable capacitance from the pickup inductance.
I've only been playing guitar for 3 years but it seems like no matter what I do no matter what pedal I use I just can't get that real band sound like the heavy rock bands do on recording but when I tried a marshall that all went away. Marshall has the perfect distorted sound (overdrive) and for the price ha you just can't beat it. I'm getting a mg100fx half stack and it all totals out to only $400 plus this amp can get so loud you can play in a bar or club with only half volume
This is our top pick for the best dreadnought guitar under $500. It has the looks of something you’d see in a honky tonk bar. It is a really cool looking acoustic guitar. It is a classic with it’s sunburst color and decorated hummingbird pick guard. It is the more affordable version of the Gibson Hummingbird. It has a solid spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It also has a pickup so you can amplify it for gigs. Owners describe it as having a big sound with great playability. Nice low action will make playing much easier. The tapered neck is great for beginners and makes forming chords less difficult. See more pictures of this guitar here.
Myself, were my budget less than a thousand then I'm dropping a big name like Martin of my list entirely, and probably I'm dropping Taylor too. Seagull makes some solid wood instruments for around $700...no idea how much the electronics tack onto the price, but I'm betting a Seagull SWS guitar with electronics could be had at $900 or so with ...just the slightest of scratches or blemishes.
What worries Gruhn is not simply that profits are down. That happens in business. He’s concerned by the “why” behind the sales decline. When he opened his store 46 years ago, everyone wanted to be a guitar god, inspired by the men who roamed the concert stage, including Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Carlos Santana and Jimmy Page. Now those boomers are retiring, downsizing and adjusting to fixed incomes. They’re looking to shed, not add to, their collections, and the younger generation isn’t stepping in to replace them.
The key to getting a great guitar sound really is in the hands of the engineer, not his equipment. I've gotten great sounds in multi-million dollar rooms, and topped them in the smallest of home studios. You can do it too. The key is to constantly experiment and apply some basic physics. Try different mics, try moving them closer and farther, try different angles, try putting the amp in a corner, try putting the amp on a concrete floor, try it on a wood floor, try it on a floor with green shag carpeting, just try anything!
Guitar culture was pervasive, whether in movie houses (“Karate Kid” Ralph Macchio outdueling Steve Vai in the 1986 movie “Crossroads”; Michael J. Fox playing a blistering solo in “Back to the Future” and co-starring with Joan Jett in 1987’s rock-band drama “Light of Day”) or on MTV and the older, concert films featuring the Who and Led Zeppelin on seemingly endless repeats.
With the development of rock, the Tele inspired and sustained yet another genre. Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones has composed many classic riffs on his battered “Micawber” Tele. Iconic are also worn-off green and respectively white Telecasters of the two frontmen of Status Quo, Francis Rossi and Rick Parfitt. Another signature Telecaster player is Andy Summersof The Police. Jimmy Page used a psychedelic-colored 1958 Telecaster, (painted by Page himself, and also known as the “Dragon Telecaster”) on the first Led Zeppelin albums, and also for the lead solo in the 1971 song “Stairway to Heaven“. The guitar had been given to Page by his friend Jeff Beck,[7] who had also been using the Telecaster with The Yardbirds. Bruce Springsteen used a custom Telecaster (with an Esquire neck) off and on throughout his career, both solo and with the E Street Band. David Knopfler, rhythm guitarist from Dire Straitsplayed a sunburst custom Fender Telecaster with white ribboning when with the band.
Delay pedals are among the most popular effects around, and the reason is simple: A delay pedal not only gives your sound a professional sheen and adds a three-dimensional quality—even when set for a discreet, atmospheric effect—but it can also produce a wide variety of not-so-subtle sounds and textures, ranging from ear-twisting rhythmic repeats (à la Eddie Van Halen’s “Cathedral”) to faux twin-guitar harmonies and live looping.
One unique application of a fuzz pedal involves starving the pedal of voltage--which will produce a scratchy, velcro-like tone. This is desirable by some musicians because it is a highly unique sound and is often employed by more avant garde musicians. This sound can be achieved by purchasing a power supply with a sag output, or using a nearly dead battery, although the pedal won't last long when using that method.
If ever there were a forensic investigation to identify the true biological father of punk rock guitar, all DNA evidence would point clearly to Johnny Ramone. The guitar style that people most associate with punk—briskly downpicked barre chords executed with blinding precision at breakneck tempos and marshaled in service of concise catchy song structures—is the invention, progeny and proud legacy of the man born John Cummings on Long Island, New York.
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Their first flat-top acoustic guitar was produced some time shortly before 1910, but at that time their flat-tops were still a long way behind Martin in terms of popularity. It wasn't until 1923 that they began to seriously break into the flat-top acoustic guitar market with their signature Nick Lucas Special model and began to give Martin a run for their money.
Back again! I sold the Eagle Jazz bass copy, but have acquired a hollow body 3/4 bass that we believe said Lyle or Aria on the peg head (badge gone). Interestingly it seems like possibly a copy of a Kay design, florentine cutaway with a sunburst. Three of the tuners are missing the bushings, and I'd love to know how to get replacements! I may have to manufacture something, but don't own a metal lathe. Also found a Strat copy that says Mark II on the peg head, nice mahogany neck, in a dumpster along with a Jackson Dinky. Stole parts off the Dinky to make the Strat copy whole, and I like it better than the Mexi-Strat and Squier Affinity start I had, so I sold those, and the Jackson after replacing the bridge parts I'd stolen off it. Besides, I still haven't got all the magic marker off the pick guard on the Mark II (recently heard they were made by Cort, or whoever makes Cort). I bought a Telestar (believe it was made by Teisco) in a thrift store for maybe $12.99 or something like that. I love the pickup sound, but the neck doesn't get any wider as it approaches the body and the frets get closer together. I also have a San Antonio made Alamo like that, and sold off a Silvertone (made in Japan) tiny hollow body with that issue. The necks are hard to play! But I like that pickup on the Telestar so much I can't part with it.
But the guitar store? They always remember me and treat me like a guest even if I'm not there to buy shit. Everyone there is a genuinely good dude. They're all honest too, which can be hard to find in this industry. I took my guitar in for a check up and they told me doing anything to it would be unnecessary. They could have easily charged me $80 for a set up and taken my guitar.

Anything for which they are wired and/or programmed.  One great example is my first real guitar, a Carvin V220.  It had two humbuckers in a sorta heavy angular gibson explorer body.  Each pickup had volume and tone with a 3 way selector for either or both pickups to be on.  In addition, you could toggle switches to split coils on the humbucker to do a good approximation of a single coil pickup.  Further, you could toggle in/out of phase to get a Peter Green tone or other effects.   Tom anderson guitars have great configurations.  I have gone to lighter strats in recent years and usually replace the pickups with handwounds and customize my 5way switch depending on the guitar.   I love true single coils except that I prefer a humbucker in the bridge. 
The Tune-o-matic bridge was the brainchild of legendary Gibson president Ted McCarty in 1954, setting the standard for simplicity and functionality that has never been bettered. The 2008 Les Paul Standard features TonePros locking Nashville Tune-o-matic in a chrome finish, which has saddle adjustment screws on the pickup side, and pre-notched saddles for quick installation. The chrome locking stopbar tailpiece is also from TonePros. These parts come with locking studs designed to secure both components firmly to the body so that there is no lean, yielding a great union between the strings and body which results in excellent tone and sustain.
Fender has shown the spec sheets of its popular Mexican-built Deluxe Series Roadhouse Stratocaster model some love to create a reboot that comes seriously well appointed. The upgraded model features an alder body and bolt-on maple neck, with the option of maple and rosewood fingerboard, finished with satin polyurethane. Keep sniffing around and you'll find other features like the 'Modern C' neck profile, 22 narrow/tall frets, a contoured neck heel, synthetic bone top nut and a set of locking tuners with vintage-look buttons. While the previous editions of the Roadhouse and came with a 241mm (9.5-inch) fingerboard radius, the new model packs a flatter 305mm (12-inch) camber. Yes, the same radius as a Gibson Les Paul, making for easier string bends and lower action. The new Roadhouse features three Vintage Noiseless (1st generation) single coil-sized humbuckers wired to a five-way pickup selector blade switch, and master volume and tone controls. Lurking between the volume and tone knobs is the V6 preamp control, a six-position rotary switch that gives you access to a series of tweaked single-coil tones. Plugging in the Roadhouse reveals a slew of classic Strat tones. The pickups exploit the natural tone and woodiness of the guitar, while the Noiseless aspect lives up to their vow of silence, making them indispensable in a recording situation. As a result, bar metal, this is the best Fender electric guitar for just about all scenarios.

It comes with two 6.5-inch speakers, delving out 100 W each for a total of 200. Now, the small woofer diameter might make these units work less-than-perfect for rendering stomach-churning bass noise, but ZT Amplifiers never intended for them to be used as such. Instead, they are supposed to deliver loud and clear enough sounds in the treble and mid ranges to make the guitarist hold its own even when a loud drummer is present.    
In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.
Certain aspects of this thicker sound can only be achieved by using a bigger gauge of string.  Pat Martino, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and other guitar masters are a testament to this philosophy.  A bigger string will offer a bigger sound, if we are willing to make sacrifices in other areas.  Again, these sacrifices may be negligible depending on your genre.
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Everyone listens to music for different reasons. The transition of 'acknowledgment' to 'love' of an artist or song is an entirely unique experience, starting from smell, location, time of day, time of year, repetitions over time etc., that triggers interest. Obviously, anyone who bashes John Mayer is stuck on radio feeds and needs to explore his music before judging on pop tunes, and almost all Hendrix aficionados are late adopters that buy trends (a marketer's dream).
Guitar has a vicious tone, nice wood, great p[ickups. However the guitar I received has a problem with the volume control acting as a tone knob and also cuts out sometimes. The guitar chord had to be replaced because it was cheap and cut out like a bad phone chord. I have to take it in to a local guitar shop and have the volume control fixed. Not too expensive but some additional cost. I didn't want to send it back as I otherwise love the guitar and didn't want them to send me a different one rather than just repairing it. Plus I don't want to wait that long. But certainly a great guitar for the money. No question.

Description: Black Finish Model. Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Alder - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: C-Shape - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 21, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Black - Made In: Mexico
• Fade to Bleak: Since there are no pickups, juice or amps involved in acoustic guitar playing in its purest form, string composition – which affects how a string responds to being struck and the retention of tonal qualities – is particularly important for acoustic guitars. Bronze, phosphor bronze and coated strings tends to be the preferred varieties, ascending in price. Bronze strings start out the brightest, but lose their high voices relatively quickly. Phosphor bronze offers a darker tone, but still with a clear, ringing top and the phosphor allows the strings to produce their optimum sound longer. On acoustic guitars, coated strings trade a longer life for less brightness, but good warmth and presence.
An excerpt: “First let us dispel the popular, but completely wrong belief that ‘any guitar will do for learning to play.’ Your first guitar should be carefully chosen to be fairly easy to play and tune. It should also be versatile enough for you to be able to play different kinds of music on it. For this reason, and to avoid the complications and expense of an amplifier, an ‘acoustic’ (un-amplified) guitar is recommended.”
Hopefully, that explains the basic components and tools. As mentioned guitar electronics can be a little daunting and my best advice if new to guitar electronics is to avoid seeking out information on guitar related forums as you may leave your head spinning, feeling more daunted than you did in the first place. We will cover the basics here and in most cases that will be more than enough to help you put together a great guitar.
A soldering iron is basically a tool that allows you to transfer heat that in turn melts the solder which is used to join two pieces of metal. The heat is supplied electrically (this wasn’t always the case) and the soldering iron itself will have an insulated handle protecting you from the heat generated. For some useful tips on best practice for soldering click here: https://guitarkitworld.com/common-mistakes-to-avoid-when-building-an-electric-guitar-kit/
This can all get a little tricky and can become overwhelming especially if you have never tackled this type of job before. If this is the case, I strongly suggest starting with one of the easier models in regards to wiring e.g. Telecasters are significantly easier to work on as the scratchplate will often be pre-loaded with pickups. However, if you purchase a kit guitar such as an LP or you want to upgrade your electrical components (which is often the case with an entry level kit) understanding some basics about guitar electronics is useful.
Hybrid bass amplifier heads typically pair a tube preamplifier with a solid-state power amplifier. This provides the player with the best elements of both amplifier technology. The tube preamp gives the player the ability to obtain tube amplifier tone, which tube enthusiasts state is "warmer" than a solid state (transistor) preamp. As well, tube users state that tube preamps have a more pleasing-sounding, natural tone when the preamp's volume is pushed up so high that the bass signal becomes overdriven; in contrast, a solid state preamp that is pushed to the point of signal "clipping" can be harsh-sounding. Some hybrid amp heads have a bypass switch, so that the tube preamp can be bypassed, if the tube breaks or develops a technical problem. The tube preamplified signal in a hybrid amplifier head is then sent to a solid state power amplifier. Compared with tube power amps, solid state power amplifiers are more reliable, require less maintenance, less fragile and lighter in weight. A hybrid tube preamp/solid state power amp thus provides a bass player with the benefits of both technologies' strengths: tube preamp tone and solid state reliability for the power amp.
This processor is pretty good quality, unfortunately not too many parameters on the effects and you can only use one effect at a time, and some prefixed combo of 2 effects (if i remember correctly 10 different options). If you need it for reverb, or slight delay, tremolo or acoustic simulator its pretty cool, not able to add exact tempo on delay or tremolo though. Sound quality is very good, 24 bit A/D and D/A so no loss there either, and you also have stereo (same effect options on both though) and balanced and unbalanced outputs (if you use unbalanced the signal goes to both outputs so you also have the balanced output if needed). For the money is definitely the best option, imagine that a reverb pedal cost the same money (just reverb)...so if you have a controller it will fit on your gear. I am using it with ... full review
Generally speaking, the amp market tends to be less fueled than other categories by the year-to-year cycle of new product hype that kicks off at the annual NAMM show in January. While there are always hot new models and brands (Quilter amps being a good recent example), amp sales on Reverb are largely dominated by tried-and-true favorites and good deals on used gear.
So far I’ve only tried this on breadboard, though I plan to deploy it in a new “parts” guitar I’m assembling. So far it sounds … really good. A lot like a ToneStyler, actually, but with fewer parts and handpicked values. The only tricky thing was finding a good pot value where all the action wasn’t bunched up at one end of the knob’s range. A reverse-log pot worked best for me—I got nice results with both a C500K and C1M.

Why We Liked It - Unless you’re looking for an electric guitar to play genres like heavy metal, chances are you would love this guitar. It just makes us happy and it’s hard to put it down. Fender is a good brand and they offer guitars of very high build quality. It’s available in green, blue and red, so you can really get a guitar that matches your personality and music.
I just want to say I completely agree with the assesment of getting a non-shit Fender strat vs a Squire to begin with. I was on one of these cheapos and a 15w marshall amp for way too long. I became decent at playing, but in the end I didn’t feel inspired to keep playing. I recently bought a Maton MS503 Classic and a Fender Blues Deville 410 and playing that setup was like my body was on fucking fire. I wish I’d had more of that feeling sooner in my life. Those $200 for a squire goes a couple of years, but a $600 strat or other great guitar can go a lifetime. Amp matters heaps too of course.

These Gibson Les Paul Reissue guitars simply perform better than those made the year after or the year before. Gibson is aware of this and has been for quite some time. That's why they've decided to push out a series of Les Pauls which aimed to match the ones from 1959. Are they equally as good? Probably not since the old ones are legendary, but they're as close as you'll get for a brand new guitar.
Launch price: $499 / £279 | Body: Laminated maple, semi-hollow | Neck: Mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Alnico Classic humbucker (neck), Alnico Classic Plus humbucker (bridge) | Controls: Neck volume, bridge volume, neck tone, bridge tone, 3-way pickup selector | Hardware: LockTone Tune-O-Matic stopbar, Grover 18:1 tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Vintage Sunburst, Natural, Cherry, Ebony
This 248 page book is part of a series of similar volumes, including The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Formulas for Guitar Scales and Modes, The Guitar Grimoire: Progressions & Improvisation, The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Guitar Chords and Voicings, and so on. You get the idea. Master a few of these and you’re going to to be in excellent shape.

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In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.
By the late 1960s, as electric guitarists in rock bands began using powerful, loud guitar stacks to play large venues, bassists needed a large, powerful bass stack to keep up in these performance settings.[3] The Acoustic 360 was a "200-watt, solid state head designed to drive the 361 cabinet, a rear-firing 18” speaker enclosure".[3] The engineers who designed the amp and cabinet in 1967, Harvey Gerst and Russ Allee, mounted the 18" speaker in a folded horn enclosure; the 360 amp had a built-in fuzz bass effects unit.[4] The Acoustic 360 and its 361 cabinet "...got the bass world ready for the Woodstocks, Altamonts and giant festival concerts" and it was used by notable players such as funk bassist Larry Graham, Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones and jazz fusion player Jaco Pastorius.[3] John Paul Jones used two of the amp/cabs in Led Zeppelin; Dave Brown used them with Santana; John McVie played with the amp/cab in the beginning years of Fleetwood Mac.[4] In December 1967, the loud sound of the Acoustic 360 led to The Doors getting "...arrested for noise violations".
Chris Broderick (b. 1970) is the lead guitarist for Megadeth, formerly of Jag Panzer and Nevermore. His main guitar was a 7-string RG model. During the recording of Endgame, he started using 6-string Ibanez S series guitars, which are painted with artwork from various Megadeth albums. This is because Dave Mustaine didn't want Broderick to use his 7-strings in the studio. He has since switched to Jackson Guitars.
No guitarist should ever be without a trusty amplifier to plug in and rock out. Without the invention and evolution of the amplifier, the world of popular music would be a very different place. Lucky for all of us, todays amplifiers are louder and more raucous than ever, filled with effects and features that will take you on a musical journey that you'll never forget. Some of our top brands in this category include: Fender, Acoustic, Bogner Marshall, Vox, Orange, and much more.
We are going to start with a Fender amplifier. This Mustang I V2 is a 20-watt combo amp that has won over hearts of a lot of players because of its ease of use and versatility. With one channel that has 24 presets and eighteen amp models you won’t be scrambling for diversity. Apart from that, of course, you get some of the major controls like Gain, Volume, Treble, Bass, Master, Preset Select, Modulation Select, Delay/Reverb Select, Save, Exit and Tap Tempo. The size and price of this model really do not do it justice (I mean, don’t make it more pricey but still). You also will find that this amp features USB connectivity, chromatic tuner and black textured vinyl covering with silver grille cloth that accentuates the simple and elegant look of this model. While 20-watt, as you might know, is not much (unless it’s a tube amplifier) this baby is pretty great if you want it for practice.
Bass guitars (like guitars) in many ways are like cars. Their appearance is a major factor in your buying decision. But also like cars, especially for the first-time buyer, there are far more important factors to know about in order to ensure you buy a bass guitar that is both properly playable and that stays in tune, enabling you to make progress with it. 
What is electric guitar tone? Tone is the sound of your guitar. Listen to B.B. King. His tone is rich and thick. You know it when you hear it. A lot of guitar players use pedals and effects to create that tone. Some of you may not be able to afford all those fancy effects. The good news is, you can make use of your hands and the controls on your guitar to create a myriad of tonal possibilities. Robert shows you how to use these components in this electric guitar tone tips guide by showing you 3 incredibly useful and powerful tricks for tuning up your tone. Your volume and tone controls, your controls knobs, and the switch between your guitar pickups can be beneficial in providing lots of tone.
A detailed study on MIT physics students has proven that online classes really do work. Guitar Tricks results show that online lessons not only work for physics but also for learning the guitar. A GuitarTricks member survey in 2010 found that 98% would recommend Guitar Tricks. 80% reported that they were learning faster than with any other method that they had tried before. Most members found that their skills increased from 3 to 5 (on a scale of 1 to 10) within a short period of starting the online lessons with Guitar Tricks.
Ok, whoever downvoted me needs to explain their reasoning, since I clearly laid out my reasoning. The person said they're interested in punk/rock/experimental, and there's no possible way you can tell me that a multi-fx pedal is better than a Big Muff and/or a DD3 delay. I will laugh in your face and point if you suggest such a thing. You could get both pedals for the price of any multi effect pedal, they hold their value, and they sound great. If you don't like a Muff, whatever, swap it out for a Rat. – Dan Gayle Aug 1 '14 at 17:39
If you haven’t heard Colin Hay’s acoustic version of “Overkill” from his solo album ‘Man @ Work’, you haven’t really heard this song. This has been my favorite acoustic guitar song for some time now. I like the mainstream version, but this one blows it away. For a taste, try listening to it as a sample on iTunes or amazon. BTW, if you decide to download it, DO NOT get the much shorter edited version off of the ‘Scrubs’ soundtrack.

The D-18E was a mahogany dreadnought with the neck pickup and a second bridge pickup. The typical Martin pickguard had the front point cut off and a notch in back to make room for the pickups rings. A three-way toggle was mounted on the upper treble bout. Controls included one volume and two tones, with the big plastic knobs. D-18Es are the rarest of these early Martin electrics, lasting only from the ’58 prototypes through 1959. These began with prototype #163746. Around 858 of these were produced.
New too was “the popular Supro” Baton Guitar, sold with a matching Baton amp as the Supro Baton Guitar Outfit No. 200. This was basically the same shape as the old Avalon, but a short-scale (21″) student version now finished in a grained walnut finish. The silkscreened fingerboard sported diamond inlays. The Supro logo plate was on the slightly flared head. This had the new exposed-staggered-pole pickup with a rectangular handrest bolted on over the pickup, all mounted in the middle of a large square plate. The strings attached to a pyramidal tailpiece. Controls now included bakelite volume and tone knobs on either side of the end of the fingerboard. The back was covered in no-slip suede. It came with a natty alligator soft case. Based on the use of the description “popular,” which Supro almost always used to describe previously available models, the transition from the Avalon to the Baton may indeed have begun in 1940.
With modern recording systems, track counts aren’t usually much of a limitation any more. In addition to a mic’ed up amp or a feed from pedals into your interface, try to also capture a clean feed of the guitar signal if your amp or pedal board allows a direct output to be routed. If you record this as well as the amp / fx feed, you have another option to re-process the guitar recording in software if you decide the original feed isn’t right.
A little bit of history will make this clearer… The original Fender Stratocaster switches were 2-pole 3-way switches (that’s actually what I have on my schematic, I think you’ll see why in a bit) and were intended only to select either the neck, middle or bridge pickup. However these were “make before break” switches where, as the switch is moved across from one position to the next, the next contact is made before the previous contact is broken. People found that if you could get the switch to rest in between those three positions that you’d actually have both neck and middle or middle and bridge pickups connected at the same time and, most importantly, it sounded good! It became a common thing to rest the 3-way switch in between the positions, so common that in the 60’s people were filing notches in the detente mechanism of the 3-way switch. These became the “notch” positions. In the 70’s, Fender adopted this popular mod into their stock switch thus becoming what we now use and call a 5-way switch but is, in fact, a 3-way switch with 5 positions.
Taylor T5. Even the friend who bought it doesn't play it and it goes for around $2300. I was always looking for an acoustic that plays like an electric, so the T5 seemed optimal. It didn't play very well and I thought it sounded awful. Since it's got the Taylor bridge pickup in it, it sounds like a tinny can with a string until you EQ the fuck out of it. But for that kind of money, it should play and sound awesome (in my opinion), or come with indoor plumbing.
Frets on finished fingerboards may be tough to measure accurately when the finish has appreciable thickness (think Rickenbackers, 70s Fenders) as these manufacturers spray the finish over the fretted neck.  I have measured a finish chip from a 70s Fender maple neck refret that was .010” thick – lowering the fret height by .010” (25% in the case of the stock medium wire at the time) from just finish alone.  I recently refretted a 2008 Fender Eric Johnson Strat where the fret height prior to any work was .040”, yet the crown of the fret removed from the fingerboard was .045”.  I personally do not like this feel and so often I will suggest refretting over a finished fingerboard when working with them rather than under the finish.
To tell you the truth, in the first few years i started playing, after i learned the use of the switch, I was approach by a man that also a guitarist and asked, "YOur guitar sounds good, I believe it so expensive". Well, I bought the guitar only for $150 dollars, But, I toggled the switch to the right pickup on the right time, makes my guitar sounds like an expensive guitar.
The Octavia was created by Roger Mayer for Jimi Hendrix in 1967. It’s musical debut can be heard on “Purple Haze” on the Are You Experienced record. One of the many ground breaking sounds on this recording. The pedal produces a doubling effect an octave above the fundamental note. The octave is similar to a ring modulator in that it is kind of dirty and strange sounding.
Introduced in 1987 and discontinued in 1994, the Ibanez RG550 remains the childhood sweetheart of many players. Designed as a mass-appeal version of Steve Vai’s famous JEM777 model, it had character in abundance. For this reboot, Ibanez has skilfully managed to extract the very essence of what was so popular about the original RG550 and piece it back together in a way that enhances its legacy. The Japanese-made 2018 vintage is, essentially, a masterclass in everything that is good about shred and metal guitars. The neck feels lithe - your hand glides, rather than simply moving - while the Edge vibrato is rock-solid and the overall craftsmanship is exemplary. Tonally, the RG550 covers a lot of bases. It always did, despite its pointy appearance, meaning you could comfortably stray into all kinds of genres without too much fuss. The US-designed V7 bridge humbucker delivers the razor-sharp riff platform you’d hope it would, while the V8 neck ’pup offers a hint of compression at higher gain settings, which levels lead lines nicely. It is, in the best way possible, everything you remembered from the original, and that makes it one of the best shred guitars available today.

Most guitars have at least one tone control installed. They can be either assigned to a particular pickup (Strat or Les Paul) or work as master tone control (Ibanez and others). Electronically, it’s a variable low-pass filter. Lower the resistance, more treble gets cut which means that higher pot values will sound a bit brighter (typically 500K vs 250K). Capacitor values usually traditionally range from 0.022uF (22nF) to 0.047uF (47nF) but many people find these values too large and install much smaller caps instead. Values of 10nF, 6.8nF or even smaller are reported to work quite well (I used 10nF in my latest mod). To help you decide between cap values and composition, check out this site. It hosts a couple of useful videos with cap value and composition analysis.
This tuning may also be used with a capo at the third fret to match the common lute pitch: G-c-f-a-d'-g'. This tuning also matches standard vihuela tuning and is often employed in classical guitar transcriptions of music written for those instruments, such as, for instance, "La Canción Del Emperador" and "Diferencias Sobre Guardame Las Vacas" by Renaissance composer Luis de Narváez.
Many musicians find it helpful to be able to plug in and amplify their acoustic guitar. So, how does an acoustic-electric guitar work? These guitars boast the addition of a pickup system inside the body that turns the vibrations of the soundboard into electronic signals. These signals can be weak, so most acoustic-electric guitars use a preamp to make them stronger.
As we discussed in our post about cheap effects pedals, price does not always indicate quality. As with buying anything, simply picking out the most expensive item isn’t the way to ensure you get the best product for your needs. Sure, you might really want to own a Ferarri, but have you ever spent any time driving one around town to pick up your groceries? Fortunately, we live in an era of truly great, yet inexpensive, guitars. There are lower-priced riffs on old classics right alongside purpose-built value axes. You don’t have to settle for that rattling pawn shop special. With a few hundred dollars you can buy a guitar that will suit all your needs and last for many years to come.
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The Fender Stratocaster may be the most widely recognizable electric guitar and the one most associated with the rise of rock and roll music. It featured a distinctive double-cutaway design that allowed musicians to play higher notes by reaching higher on the fingerboard, three pickups (which allowed for a greater range of sounds since previous guitars which had two pickups at most), and a patented tremolo system that allowed players to raise or lower the pitch of the strings. In the hands of guitarists like Buddy Holly, Eric Clapton, Bonnie Raitt, and many others, the Stratocaster became an icon of American rock and roll that took the world by storm. The Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, and other solid-body electrics were nothing if not versatile, and rock guitarists were obsessed with versatility. Guitarists could not only change the tone, volume, and pitch, but they also could manipulate the sound by playing close to the amplifier, grinding the strings against things, and using special effects accessories like the wah-wah pedal. Jimi Hendrix was this instrument’s master of manipulation, influencing generations of guitarists to experiment creatively with their playing techniques and equipment.
While it is well loved for its HD amp models, it also packs quite a lot of effects (over 100!), applying the same HD modeling technology on actual stompboxes to get them to sound as close to the real thing as possible. The amp modeling and effects section together allow for a wide variety of tones, while the deep controls that you have over each amp and effect parameter allows for even more in-between tones, so you can craft your very own sound. The LED rings add to the unit's overall eye candy and improve the already intuitive interface of the unit. It also houses extensive input and output options, including having its very own mic preamp, so you can use it for a variety of instruments and even vocals. Other features include built-in 48-second looping, tuning and compatibility with Line 6' modeling instrument (Variax) and amps.
Leaving aside guitarists whose relative fame is debatable (such as Steve Hillage or Terje Rypdal), how can you have a wannabe like John Mayer on your list, but not Dr. Brian May, Jerry Garcia or Jeff Beck? And I’d have also swapped out Tom Morello in favor of Adrian Belew. Belew was making his guitar sound like “everything but a guitar” more than a decade before anyone had heard of Morello. Adrian played with Talking Heads, Joan Armatrading, David Bowie (that’s him playing the crazy solos on DJ and Boys Keep Swinging), and King Crimson back in thee late 70’s and early 80’s. And his song Oooh Daddy at least grants him one hit wonder status, as far as “fame” goes.
The easiest way to record bass is to just plug it straight into the console/interface—of course, using the correct instrument-level input or dedicated DI box, and not a standard line input. This will provide a nice, clean, deep tone, but it will likely lack the growl and grit that’s often desired—for that, you’ll want the sound of an amp. While you can always use a bass amp sim plug-in later, in the mix (see below), there’s nothing like the pants-flapping wall of low-end sound coming out of a real bass amp, if one is available. But most engineers will record both—a DI’d signal, and a miked-up amp. They can be combined later on, for the best of both worlds—the clean, round, depth from the DI, with the edge and midrange punch of the amp (but see below, for a caveat).
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