Yes, but not by a guitar center tech who realistically knows fuck all about anything he is adjusting. Find a luthier out independent repair person in your area. Even if it's an hour drive, the difference in the setup will be well worth it. You will also have established a relationship with someone who will know the right way to fix it if and when something breaks.

A few years ago I wanted a mini/parlor guitar. I tried a few, did not like what I heard in the Taylor line and I did not want another Larrivee. The irony of it is, I did buy a Taylor and now realize it was because it sounded like a Larrivee, bright and even. This is an anomaly Taylor, I know that now. I bought a Larrivee Parlor which is okay but I also have learned that I am not a parlor, mini fan. They, for the most part, do not deliver an even enough sound for me. I have played Lowden, Martin, Gibson, Guild, Olsen, Huss and Dalton. I recently played an Irvin guitar. Wow, what a beautiful line of guitars. I want one. It is my next guitar with its sustain, consistency, brilliance and ease of ...more
Played by people such as Paul Simon and Richie Havens, Guild has been a top-of-the-line Acoustic guitar manufacturer since 1952. While they originally stuck to archtops, they branched off into more complicated builds. They also make solidbody electric guitars and even some semi-hollowbodies. Guild is known for their commitment to quality and tone. They were bought by Cordoba recently, but the general consensus is that the buyout is a good thing. When owned by Fender, their electric lineup was neglected and now they’re making a comeback. An additional aspect of Guild guitars is their durability. They have a very solid build and can easily shrug off some wear and tear while still sounding like it was when it was brand new.
Several notable ranges of similar guitars were produced with different finishes and features; whilst some companies lumped all variants together with a single model name - i.e. a Fender Stratocaster is a Fender Stratocaster, irrespective of it's finish, in many cases Harmony split it's models, giving a different model designation depending on finish, inclusion of a tremolo etc.

In addition to pickup selection, most guitars will have controls for volume and tone. Volume controls simply regulate the strength of the output signal. Depending on the amplifier, this can control the tone as well as the volume. Most tone knobs control high frequencies and many guitars have separate tone controls for each pickup. This can vary a guitar’s sound between soft, warm, and mellow to a very bright, raw, distorted sound.


In the ideal scenario, once set, your saddles should neither be flush down on the bridge assembly of the guitar, nor extended so high they could go no further. This saddle height relative to the bridge assembly is a reflection of the neck angle. If the saddles sit flush, the neck angle is not set back very far and vice-versa. This is where you should decide if your neck angle is in need of adjustment ( if you have a bolt-on neck). Check the measurement at the 12th fret then progress up the neck, measuring every couple of frets. The string height should continue to gradually rise, if it doesn't the neck is set back too far and has to be tilted up just a little. This is a very sensitive adjustment and the thickness of a couple sheets of paper can make a big difference. Some Fenders have a neck tilt adjustment screw that is accessed with an Allen wrench through a hole in the neck screw plate. The strings must be loosened, then the neck screws, then the tilt adjustment screw is tightened or loosened. Never do this when the neck screws are tight! If you don't have a tilt adjustment, thin shims of wood veneer are fitted in the neck pocket to adjust neck angle. Uneven frets are also a possibility. If , after having followed all the above steps, you are still getting fret buzz, you must establish that the frets are all even. But this leads us to fret dressing, which is another story altogether.
If you do have lead solder, the melting temperature is much lower, making for easier connections, but remember to wash your hands after you're done, and not to touch your face while working - lead is poisonous. With lead-free solder, the rosin lets off toxic smoke, so use a small desk fan to blow it away from you while you work, and open a window if possible.
Most Fender guitars are equipped with single-coil pickups. They have a lower output level than dual-coil pickups but sound brighter and sharper, which is perfect for clean and crunch sound. Both the Telecaster and the Stratocaster generally have an ash or alder body, a maple bolt-on neck and a rosewood or maple fretboard. Some other Fender models were also moderately successful (the Jazzmaster, the Jaguar or the Mustang). Squier, a brand that originally manufactured strings, was bought by Fender to become a sub-brand and sell guitars manufactured in Japan from 1982 onwards.
Check out a set of Elixir strings for yourself to hear and feel the difference.  The coating actually reduces string squeaks as well, providing a consistent sound for close miking and recording acoustic players.  The squeak of the finger over the round wound strings of an acoustic has always been an intrinsic part of the instrument, but hearing the guitar performed without such extra squeaking may change your mind.
We don’t know about other early guitars, but Univox probably augmented its offerings with other offerings from the Arai catalog, similar to what Epiphone would do with its first imports slightly later, in around 1970. Evidence this might have been so is seen in the book Guitars, Guitars, Guitars (American Music Publishers, out of print) which shows a Univox 12-string solidbody with a suitably whacky late-’60s Japanese shape, with two equal cutaway stubby/pointy horns. The head was a strange, long thing with a concave scoop on top, and the plastic logo. This is the only example of this shape I’ve encountered, but it had two of the black-and-white plastic-covered pickups used on Aria guitars of the period, and the majority of later Univox guitars were indeed manufactured by Arai and Company, makers of Aria, Aria Diamond, Diamond and Arai guitars. These pickups have white outsides with a black trapezoidal insert and are sometimes called “Art Deco” pickups. Perhaps the coolest feature of this strange guitar is a 12-string version of the square vibrato system employed on Aria guitars of this era. You can pretty much assume that if there was a strange-shaped solidbody 12-string Univox, it was not the only model! These would not have lasted long, probably for only until 1970 at the latest, and are not seen in the ’71 catalog.
Intraday Data provided by SIX Financial Information and subject to terms of use. Historical and current end-of-day data provided by SIX Financial Information. All quotes are in local exchange time. Real-time last sale data for U.S. stock quotes reflect trades reported through Nasdaq only. Intraday data delayed at least 15 minutes or per exchange requirements.
Compared to, say, an Epiphone Dot, the Coupe offers a ‘woodier,’ more acoustic timbre. “Sparkly,” “bell-like” and “jangly” are descriptors often associated with the guitar and its stock pair of P-90s, and cranking the gain up elicits more a sizzle than roar. Be careful with the distortion, though—without a center block like those you’ll find on semi-hollows, the Coupe is still fairly susceptible to feedback.
While most single-coil pickups are wired in parallel with each other, it is possible to wire two or more of them in series, producing a fuller and stronger sound not unlike that of a humbucker.[26] This is a popular modification for instruments with two single-coil pickups like the Fender Telecaster and the Fender Jazz Bass. For the former, special 4-way switches are available to replace the stock 3-way switch and provide a series wiring position.[27]

T3 (2009) – The T3 shares the same body styling as the T5 with some electronic and structural differences. It is a semi-hollow-body because it has a solid center block in the body. It comes standard with a quilted maple laminated top, and has and electric style bridge. The electronics include multiple humbucker pickups, coil splitters, and push-pull tone and volume pots. The T3 is available with the optional Bigsby vibrato in the T3/B.
So, here’s the deal: the M5 is NOT an amplifier modeler (no Marshall or Vox recreations here), nor is it meant to replace your entire pedalboard. This is ONLY an effect modeling pedal, and contains over 100 effects, of which you can have active one at a time. In terms of “extras” it has a tuner and tap tempo. The Line 6 M5 is a perfect first pedal to buy, since with 100+ built-in effects you can play with all of them and find out what types of effects you really like. It’s also a perfect pedal to simply just have on your pedalboard, for situations where you need a certain effect and don’t have a pedal for it. Need a reverb in a pinch? It’s a reverb. Need a compressor? You got it. Need a phaser? Yep, it’s that too. It’s also really inexpensive for what it is, making it a great starting point that you can build upon.
A different take on the standard tone control is the Varitone circuit sometimes used on Gibson guitars (such as the Blueshawk). The Varitone is actually a variable notch filter consisting of one of several capacitors (selected with a rotary switch) in series with an inductor, forming an LC circuit.[15] When placed between the signal and ground, this circuit starts to attenuate frequencies around its resonant frequency, as determined by the following formula:
Kramer served a prison sentence on drug-related charges after the MC5 split up. When he got out, he teamed up with Johnny Thunders to form Gang War and later re-emerged as a solo artist on L.A. punk label Epitaph. Smith went on to lead the punishingly loud Sonic Rendezvous Band and married New York punk rock poet, artist, singer and originator Patti Smith. He passed away in 1994. But from the Clash to Fugazi, Crass and Green Day, the politicized wing of punk rock continues to fly the banner first raised by the Motor City 5.
One master's name that kept being repeated by the guitar experts was Roger Crisler of Crisler Guitar Repair in Carrollton. He's been in the business of repairing guitars for almost 40 years. Some of the best guitarists in the DFW area turn to him when their guitar is sick: Chris Watson, Bnois King, Zach Weeks, Drew Adkins, Smokin' Joe Kubek, the list just continues to grow. He's trusted, and his work is respected. "When you love what you do, it doesn't feel like a job," he says.
Because most “top 10 guitar posts” throw a bunch of guitars up there, tell you they’re “the best” and give you little information about them. That’s unhelpful on its best day and dangerously misleading on its worst. Because “best” and “top” are not concrete terms in this sense, unless you’re talking about sales figures, which they almost never are.

Along with these effects are 10 guitars: Strat Marshall, Valve ODX, Garcia Guitar, Bleeding Guitar, Blues Guitar, Power Guitar, Mondo Guitar, Synth Guitar, Clean Guitar, and Electric Sitar. The sound of each somewhat matches the guitar it’s supposed to be, but more importantly, there is a notable change in tone with each and since it’s free, I was happy just to have that.

Headphone amps are great for playing in a moving vehicle, at the beach, in a hotel room, or in the airport lounge, and they can even output the signal to tape or disc, suitable for recording. They start at around $200 and are well worth the price if portability, privacy, and authentic tone are important for your practice routine. The Korg Pandora (shown in the following figure), Scholz Rockman, Ibanez Rock ’n’ Play, and Zoom 9000 series are just some makes and models.
We supply different variants of Electric Bass Guitar, which is just an extension of the Electric Guitar. The only difference between the two is that the former comes with a longer neck and scale length. It also comes with an option of 4, 5 and 6 strings. The four string bass guitar is tuned in a way similar to tuning a double bass guitar. It is capable of
I like it especially as a studio companion for lead guitar players who have session clients that need melodies to come out perfectly on recorded tracks. Having a neck that's so thin makes it easier to play and get right the first time which will reduce the number of takes. Though the live performer will benefit as well, considering that improve playability has universal benefits.

We started finding that this type of construction leads to the neck bending (or bowing) after about 6 months. Unfortunately with the traditional method there is not an easy way to adjust it back to normal - once it is bent it's time to get a new guitar! This lead us to re design our classical guitars to use a truss rod. A truss rod is a much stronger example of the bar used in traditional manufacturing, but its main advantage is that it is adjustable. So if in the future you neck begins to bend it can easily be adjusted back into correct shape.


Proceed to the next two chords. The next chord you would play would be a power chord on the fifth fret of A three times. So you would play with your index finger on the fifth fret of A, your middle finger on the seventh fret of D, and your ring finger on the seventh fret of G. Then, simply shift this finger shape down one string so that your index finger is on the fifth fret of the E string with your other fingers on the seventh frets of the A and D strings. Play the chords in the sequence that they're highlighted with parentheses below:

I have 12 years whit my SL3 Jackson and 12 years whit my RG7420, so far I have replaced both POTs on the jackson, the frets are really worn out and FR chrome is peeling.. great guitar crappy components. oh, I havent had to replace anything on the Ibanez yet other than the stock pickups for something better. both are made in Japan =). So dont tell people that Ibanez sucks before actually owning one...


More expensive amplifiers may have a patch bay for multiple inputs and outputs, such as a pre-amp out (for sending to another guitar amplifier), a second low gain input, to use with active basses, an in jack to create an effects loop (when used with the pre-amp out jack), an external speaker output (for powering an additional speaker cabinet), and stereo RCA jacks or an 1/8" jack, for connecting a CD player or MP3 player so that a player can practice along with recorded music. Some amps have a 1/4" jack for connecting a pedal to turn the amp's onboard overdrive and reverb on and off or to switch between channels. Some amps have an XLR jack for a microphone, either for the guitar amp to be used for singing (in effect as a mini-PA system), or, for acoustic guitar, to mix a mic signal with a pickup signal.
Nylon strings are essential for any classical instrument, and if you are planning to play classical music or Latin styles such as flamenco, a nylon string guitar is the way to go. Steel strings are more appropriate for rock, pop, blues, and pretty much everything else that doesn’t fall under the classic umbrella. You can check out our article on the best classical guitars for beginners.
Guitar culture was pervasive, whether in movie houses (“Karate Kid” Ralph Macchio outdueling Steve Vai in the 1986 movie “Crossroads”; Michael J. Fox playing a blistering solo in “Back to the Future” and co-starring with Joan Jett in 1987’s rock-band drama “Light of Day”) or on MTV and the older, concert films featuring the Who and Led Zeppelin on seemingly endless repeats.

From rock to jazz or folk to metal, what separates the great guitarists from the rest is their mastery of the skills taught in this program. From basics like chords and scales to nuances like improvisation techniques, form, control, and inflexion, this certificate program will take your guitar playing to the next level. Few accomplished guitarists have reached their peak alone, and Berklee’s faculty is unparalleled when it comes to delivering the personalized instruction and feedback that will help you turn the fretboard into a playground packed with unlimited possibilities.


Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
Fretwire can vary from some makers as it is shaped by extrusion thru a series of roller dies and the dies wear.  I have observed actual Dunlop 6105 in my shop varying from .088” to .090” wide and from .052” to .055” tall.  Due to the inconsistent size and tang formation, I generally do not use Dunlop fretwire these days, instead preferring the more accurate German made Jescar or the Japanese made Stewart McDonald fretwires.  Both Jescar and SM have very well formed tangs and barbs and are very consistent. I will refer to the Dunlop numbers below but only for very general description – always verify actual sizes!
I love them both, have a Strat and Les Paul. they are such different animals. Each has it’s place in my music, each has a special sound. Used to own a Tele which I just didn’t enjoy playing so much, so traded in for the Les Paul. I later bought a modified Tele with humbuckers (I know it’s a sin) but damn it sounds so good, for heavy power chords, more like a PRS sound. I’ve been playing 27 years now and am a composer / songwriter. Played in lots of bands, and during my live work I have to say I prefer my Strat. It’s lighter than the Gibson, and contours nicely to my body. With a good valve amp and the right strings I can get some lovely fat sounds out of it. I use the Gibson mostly in the studio. When I moved countries, I needed a cheap electric to tide me over until my stuff got sent over. I picked up a $100 Mitchel (Made in China). The setup was awful, totally unplayable, so set it up properly, and to be honest it plays like a dream. The neck is amazing for a $100 guitar, and with some new pickups the sound is great too. The upshot here is that it doesn’t really matter what guitar you use to make music on, as long as you enjoy the instrument, a cheap guitar can go a long way. I find the discussions about which is better kind of like guys comparing their crown jewels, it’s purely academic and what matters is how you use the thing 😉
Perfect working condition Amp is an absolute beast, if you know anything about these AC30s you'll know that there tone is unbelievable. Make me an offer or trade These amps sell for close to 18k and well above that on oversees markets The amp does have some cosmetic ware but obviously does not affect the sound what so ever Gibson, fender, guitar Watssapp me 0737886874 Amp is based in Durban ...
I recall reading about one on a thread Gary was a part of. Much ribbing going on. Consensus was that it was pretty much a junker. Now, if you can get it to play and intonate well, I'm a big fan of junkers. I'm intrigued by the ladder bracing too. Very unique sound to that. In/re the bridge, I have an old Carlos that I've been considering doing that to. It's not worth a real neck reset, and the bridge is really high. Not the saddle. The bridge is fat and quite substantial. I could take it down by at least 1mm without it being as thin as a standard Martin bridge.
{ "thumbImageID": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Sunburst/516629000027000", "defaultDisplayName": "ESP LTD Deluxe EC-1000 Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Amber Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51273887999423", "price": "869.00", "regularPrice": "869.00", "msrpPrice": "1,241.43", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/ESP/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Sunburst-1273887999423.gc", "skuImageId": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Sunburst/516629000027000", "brandName": "ESP", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Sunburst/516629000027000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51273887999449", "price": "869.00", "regularPrice": "869.00", "msrpPrice": "1,241.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/ESP/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Black-1273887999449.gc", "skuImageId": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Black/516629000001000", "brandName": "ESP", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Black/516629000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Vintage Black", "sku": "sku:site51273887999287", "price": "899.00", "regularPrice": "899.00", "msrpPrice": "1,284.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/ESP/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Black-1273887999287.gc", "skuImageId": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Black/516629000011000", "brandName": "ESP", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Black/516629000011000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "See-Thru Black Cherry", "sku": "sku:site51273887999131", "price": "899.00", "regularPrice": "899.00", "msrpPrice": "1,284.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/ESP/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-See-Thru-Black-Cherry-1273887999131.gc", "skuImageId": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-See-Thru-Black-Cherry/516629000127000", "brandName": "ESP", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-See-Thru-Black-Cherry/516629000127000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
×