Sounds great. Compact and good looking. Easy to use. Extremely versatile! Make sure you read the instructions because there are so many things you can do with this. Only drawback is that if you plan to use it live, try not to have too many effects applied because it slows down the transition timing. However, best for recording if youre trying to produce specific sounds from your instrument.
You honestly could get a single multi-effects unit that will already have thousands of the most popular stompboxes built in, plug it into your PA or headphones, turn on one of the many built-in amp modelers, and you’re good to go. This is actually a solution that many touring musicians have gravitated towards, as it is so much easier to just carry around a single multi-effects unit compared to a pedalboard with several different pedals and a separate amp.
The characteristics of your Kingston are very similar to what other owners have reported: occasional scratchy and erratic performance of the electronics, intonation problems, and action that is hard to control (notably due to the lack of a truss rod). Although I can’t verify this, one estimate indicates that over 150,000 Kingston guitars were sold in the U.S. during the 1960s! It’s obvious that quantity trumped quality when it came to producing the guitars, and it isn’t surprising that the electronics have some issues after all these years.
The pre-1945 braces have a scooped or "scalloped" profile, making them lighter in design and weight. Functionally this means a greater vibrating surface (the guitar's top), and provides stronger bass response. Why did the Martin Company change from the lighter scalloped braces to heavier braces? The answer is in the strings. Many guitarists of that time were using heavier gauge strings, and these heavier strings were tough on the lightly constructed scalloped-braced Martins (especially on D-models with the long 25.4" scale). Martin didn't make a heavier guitar to withstand the extra string tension, so they compensated by adding more rigid (non-scalloped) braces to the guitar's top.
What if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order a guitar online? Our recommendation is that when you have read through our list of the best guitars, select a few that you’re interested in, and look them up on YouTube. There you can watch (and listen to!) great reviews where you can hear the guitar be played and get someone else’s opinion on it. Try listening to the different guitars directly after each other so you can determine which one sounds the best.
Therefore, if you are a beginner that is still struggling to find a product that comes shipped with other accessories, you should really pay attention to this model. Besides, although this is a full-sized guitar, previous buyers of the model have stated that the unit is not particularly heavy. Consequently, it can be used by teens without worrying about its size and weight.

Since a guitar’s sound is primarily determined by the interaction of the strings vibrating and the magnets in the pickup, you might wonder why wood makes a difference. In fact, the wood has a significant effect on the way a guitar sounds. The resonance from the wood determines how long the strings vibrate and the shape of their motion. Wood also allows the pickup itself to move. This combination makes wood an important factor in the overall tone of the guitar.


At the other end of the size extreme sits a shape called the parlour. Parlour acoustics are among the smallest in body size you can buy – not counting the modern ‘baby’ guitars – and are typically favoured by players of more low-key, less brash musical styles like folk and indie. Once again, the guitar’s distinctive shrunken body shape is another invention from the CF Martin guitar house, with the guitar’s neck typically joining the body around the 12th fret.
Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.
Enlarging/ Drilling Holes: Often required to upgrade tuners, or occasionally to change control pots. Enlarging a hole in wood seems simple enough, and it is. But it's also an easy way to ruin the finish of the guitar and worse. The problem is because there is no wood in the center of the hole, the edges pull upwards instead of cutting. It often results in large ammounts of chipout or worse. The answer is to run the drill BACKWARDS. This will ream the hole out without the risk of chipping. If the hole needs to be made significantly larger, it is often best to use a bit one size up from the desired hole size and run it backwards till the drill has gone just below the surface. Now you can drill the desired size hole normally relatively safely. The washers or dress rings will hide the slightly larger starting bevel that remains. Whenever possible, drill half way through from both sides or clamp a "backer board" in place. Do NOT use much pressure on the drill, let it do the work, excess pressure is usually due to dull bits, and almost always results in some king of damage. If you must drill through the finish where there is no hole use the same method as described for significantly increasing the size of a hole, but apply masking tape over where the hole will be drilled prior to starting.
At this time (and for a while now) the best guitars are made in Japan and Korea. However Japanese guitars carry a premium which you don’t find to the same degree on Korean guitars. So Korean guitars will offer the best value and quality for price. There is a Cort factory in Korea, however 1) The Korean Cort factory also makes entry level guitars and 2) Cort also have other factories in other countries which have much lower standards. There are some good/excellent Cort guitars but there are also many bad ones with shoddy workmanship. So Cort as a brand name isn’t enough to guarantee a well made instrument - you also need to check it’s made in Korea, and also that it’s one of the better models (price will probably be a guide). All the brands made at the largest factory, the World Instrument Co. one (which makes PRS SE and Chapman guitars among others) are built to a very high standard.
By contrast, tuning (or pitch) correction processors and plug-ins are normally considered processors rather than effects, but they do have creative uses. The idea behind these devices is to monitor the pitch of the incoming signal, then compare it to a user-defined scale, which can be a simple chromatic scale or any combination of notes. Pitch-shifting techniques are then used to nudge the audio to the nearest semitone in the user's scale but, because the amount of pitch-shift required is usually quite small, the result doesn't sound grainy or lumpy, as often happens when large amounts of pitch-shift are generated. Because pitch tracking is used to identify the original pitch, only monophonic signals can be treated.
With expiration of the Fender patent on the Stratocaster-style vibrato, various improvements on this type of internal, multi-spring vibrato system are now available. Floyd Rose introduced one of the first improvements on the vibrato system in many years when, in the late 1970s, he experimented with "locking" nuts and bridges that prevent the guitar from losing tuning, even under heavy vibrato bar use.
As mentioned, most of the ’50s Teisco guitars were heavily influenced by Gibson-style design. At the very end of the decade or just at the dawn of the ’60s, Teisco guitars began to change to double cutaways and exhibit a playful � if slightly frumpy � more Fender-oriented design aesthetic. This was almost in lock-step with American guitar industry trends. Gibson launched its thinline ES-335 in 1958 and, indeed, changed its single-cutaway Les Paul to the double-cutaway SG in ’61. American manufacturers such as Kay and Harmony quickly followed suit. The Teisco change was a part of the guitar Zeitgeist.
Play your guitar a while like this, and notice how much more ring, richness, and sustain you get out of it. The strings should now vibrate for close to the full potential of the instrument (which, of course, also depends upon factors such as nut and bridge type and condition, body style, neck and body woods, and so forth). Put simply, your tone is likely to sound bigger and fuller, and to bloom with a broader voice and a longer note decay than previously. If this as-high-as-you-can-hack-it setting is a little too much for every-day playing, try backing the strings down a hair at a time, and hopefully you can find a height that offers a healthy compromise. Sure, it’s also possible you preferred it the way it was before you adjusted it at all, and if your playing style involves a lot of speed riffing, hammer-ons and pull-offs, or extreme bending, you might simply require that as-low-as-it-goes actions (and will very likely mask its drawbacks with some judicious high-gain tone). With any luck, though, you’ll have discovered an easy means of achieving a fatter tone, without purchasing or modifying a single thing.
We have done hundreds of guitar 'set-ups' / repairs / restorations over the years and know how to do them to a degree that 95% of 'players' will be very satisfied. We're not just changing strings and polishing. We'll check and adjust the neck for correct string height at the 7th fret (should typically be about the thickness of a .010 gauge 'E' string when fretted at the first fret and the 12th fret). We also check for a 'body bump' in the neck as if that can't be addressed to a 'playable' degree, then the balance of the adjustments will be for naught. As we're in a very dry climate, we will check for 'fret overhang' due to neck shrinkage and 're-dress' the frets accordingly. If it's a 'bolt-on' neck, we'll check for neck joint / screw integrity and repair as necessary. We check and adjust for correct intonation using our 'Peterson' strobe tuner and our other 'analog' tuner. Electrics are typically intonated with 'fresh', .010 strings installed (if you want it intonated with a different gauge, just let us know). We inspect and test the electronics, especially looking for any 'aftermarket' re-wiring / mods / incorrect repairs. We inspect the integrity of the tuning machines and repair as necessary. Of course we do all the standard cleaning, adjusting and test playing once the 'basic integrity' of the instrument has been addressed.
This is one of our favourite cheap electric guitars and it certainly doesn’t suck thanks to its Alder body, comfortable “C” shape neck, snappy maple fingerboard and two Vintage-Style Single-Coil Tele pickups to provide that awesome tele twang. If you’ve always wanted a Telecaster and are just starting out in the world of guitar, this is a dream beginner’s guitar that is budget friendly and still completely high quality.
The guitar is built of full, all-solid maple that gives a nice clean tone and helps to avert some of the feedback prone to other fully hollow guitars. There’s a mahogany set neck to both help with longer sustain and to give you the premium fit and finish usually reserved for more expensive hollow-body instruments. The two ACH-ST humbuckers aren’t ultra-heavy metal pickups, so you won’t get a ton of snarling distortion out of the AF55, but you can push an overdrive sound to the next level if you want to. It all adds up to a sound that’s perfect for a player who’s looking to go for the jazz/blues vibe, or someone who’s looking to go for a singer/songwriter roots project. The trapezoid tailpiece also gives you a nice nod to vintage axes, too.
This. There's genuinely nothing good about it. It makes a Squier Starter Pack and a Daisy Rock look like a PRS Private Stock. Pretty sure the description isn't even true. An old roommate of mine had one and it was the worst guitar I have ever played in my life and I'm not just saying that. Very seldom do I say that a guitar is just plain terrible. Even with other guitar brands that I hate (like Squier) I'll say, "well, everyone has their own preference," but this guitar is just inexcusable. http://www.indianaguitar.com/products/Scout-acoustic-electric-967.html#.VZNeJ1L3bCQ
By placing two (or more) mics at different distances and angles from your speaker cab you will get two different sounds - and more variation will of course depend on whether these are the same model of mic, or different models. Mics placed further away will capture more room tone, and close mics are more upfront. Angled mics offer a less direct sound. Capture both feeds and blend or select from the two after recording.
Hendrix was known for a lot of things.The beautiful chord embellishments on Little Wing, the grit of the solo in Voodoo Child screaming off of his strat pickups, his cover of the Dylan song All Along The Watchtower, and the backwards solo in Castles Made of Sand, but known as a great innovative guitar player over and over again. His short but explosive career influenced numerous artists for many years past his death and continues to influence musicians today. To make such a difference in such a short amount of time truly earns Jimi a spot as number two. But…then you may ask, “Who is deserving of number one?!”
While many electric guitar amp cabs have "open back" designs (actually partially open back, as part of the back is usually enclosed in panels), open back cabinets are rarely seen in bass amp cabs, except in the smallest, least expensive practice bass amps. The reason that open back designs are not used with bass amp cabs is that open back designs make it hard to reproduce low-frequency sounds, which are crucial for bass cabinets. On electric guitar amp cabs, the reduction of some very low-frequency sounds may be desirable, as it makes the cabinet less "boomy"; however, for a bass cabinet, this loss of bass frequencies is generally seen as undesirable.
Fujigen went on to achieve lasting fame as the manufacturer of Greco guitars in the ‘70s and Fender Japan in the ‘80s and early ‘90s. But Fujigen’s work in the ‘60s is our focus. The Fujigen hardware is the easiest way to tell these guitars apart from Teiscos. For example, Fujigen embossed "mic 1" and "mic 2" into their metal control plates, while Teisco did not. This is just one example, but it requires a bit of reading and studying about the nuances of that hardware to positively identify the Fujigens for what they are.
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…
The semi hollow construction with sapele top and mahogany back body provide a warm tone that resonates nicely, especially when coupled with the Infinity R Humbuckers. The comfortable medium sized frets make the Ibanez 2017 Artcore AS53 Semi-Acoustic Guitar a great option for the jazz and blues players out there and the high-quality hardware such as ART-ST bridge and tailpiece are reliable and hard wearing.
Finally we have the good old Jackson JS22 Dinky. This is more or less Jackson’s default entry level model. As such, it brings the type of performance every beginner wants. Especially if they plan on playing metal. The pickups on this thing don’t have a whole lot of range, but I’ve managed to squeezer a light fuzz out of them. There wasn’t much range, but the consistency of tone was more than satisfactory.
A second common problem we encounter is a poor mechanical connection. When inserting a cord into a jack, the click you feel is the tip of the cord seating against the metal prong on the end of the jack. With use this prong may spread outward and loose a bit of it's tension. A gentle bend of the prong may be just enough to create a solid connection, however, metal fatigue can dictate the need to replace.
Its very obvious very few on this list have never picked up a guitar in their life as this looks like a what brand does my favorite band play list... Considering Gibson these days are garbage and only were good for a few style to begin with no way they're number one... Fender has very solid build quality, but to diversify them to play numerous styles takes heavy modification. As far as electric are concerned there is a number that can top the list, as schecter, esp and Jackson are too low on the list and I've heard good things about rickenbacker. Ibanez is also excellent. Its really a toss up for me...I haven't played much esp do I phased them out...I have extensive time with Ibanez schecter and Jackson... Ibanez is gone because the build quality is no better and the playability is pretty much the same as a Jackson but the Jackson gives you far more bang for the buck... As for schecter and Jackson they put out some fully loaded guitars that are only going to rock you maybe a weeks ...more

Austin-based John Grammatico is building some of the best amps available, and with his current range of products he’s managed to capture the spirit of legendary vintage amps while utilizing modern reliable components. The LaGrange is a small 15 watt amp that will sound great with either single coils or humbuckers. Expect a warm, woody sound with throaty mids and bell-like highs. The sound is transparent, harmonically rich and well worth the investment.
Since we’re talking about acoustic-electric guitars that look as good as they sound, I’d be remiss to not add the Fender Tim Armstrong Hellcat to this list of top acoustic-electric guitars. Based on the infamous 1960’s acoustic played by the punk rock legend Tim Armstrong of Rancid, I could devote an entire article to the artful styling on this guitar, which is why it consistently ranks at the top of acoustic-electric guitar reviews by players of all levels.
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Graph Tech Ratio Locking Guitar Tuners (3+3)   New from$118.96In Stockor 4 payments of $29.74 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Babicz Full Contact Strat Tremolo   New from$142.95In Stockor 4 payments of $35.74 Free Ground Shipping Gibson Vintage Tuners/Tuning Machines (Set of 6)   New from$89.99In Stockor 4 payments of $22.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Graph Tech Ratio Locking Guitar Tuners (6 In Line)   New from$118.96In Stockor 4 payments of $29.74 Free Ground Shipping See All Electric Guitar Parts
The Taylor Guitars factory tour takes guests through the steps of acoustic guitar construction. From wood selection to final assembly, guests will experience each process as a guitar evolves from raw wood into a finished instrument. You will also have an opportunity to visit the TaylorWare store. Here you will find everything for the Taylor fan, from apparel to gift items to replacement guitar parts. The tour lasts approximately one hour and 15 minutes and departs from the main building at 1980 Gillespie Way in El Cajon, California.
If, like me, you have a short fuse, you might find yourself cursing to yourself when unable to nail something on guitar. Indeed, you might get so frustrated that you feel like, literally, nailing something into the guitar. If you do get to this point, it's because you're trying to move too far, too quickly. Your mind and fingers will struggle to keep up with your expectations if you're too ambitious or impatient.
I know that you are used to seeing things like “the number 1, the number 2” etc. When it comes to stomp boxes I believe that I do not have to be that strict. If I am recommending 8 different pedals to you, then there is no 1st and 8th position. All of the pedals that we will review are worth checking out. If it is bad, we will just skip it. Never forget that you can combine your pedal with a good guitar amp with some built-in effects. Also if you do not see a specific model or brand, it does not necessarily mean it is bad, the market is just huge and very competitive, updating will take time!
Although the G&L Legacy electric guitar was released one year after the passing of Leo Fender, it is designed to the specifications of the original Stratocaster but with a few modern features specific to G&L instruments. The Legacy included, for instance, G&L's Dual Fulcrum vibrato and Schaller tuners and was available in a combination of different tonewoods. Even if the G&L guitars from before Leo Fender's death are more collectable, the Legacy electric guitar is still considered a high-quality instrument.
Portable- you can carry them in one hand to jam with friends, take to your guitar lesson, or even play at a small party. The Fender “Frontman” 10 watt weighs only 8.5 pounds and brand new costs only $59. Another fun amp is the Danelectro “Honeytone” that only costs $19.99 and is equipped with a belt clip so you can walk or roller skate around while playing your guitar.
Thank you Ola and David for this excellent article. The approach is totally scientific: you try to study the impact of one element of a system while keeping the rest of the settings identical (same pickups, same strings, same picking, etc.). The wood used modifies effectively the electrical spectrum composition and therefore the sound we hear. All the difficulty is that the wood is a part of a very complex system (woods combination, building type, pickups, strings, effects, amplification, restitution, etc.) and, without a solid knowledge or skills, it could be difficult to choose the right elements of the system to get what you want…
Gibson ES-335 Figured Electric Guitar The Gibson ES-335 thinline archtop semi-acoustic electric guitar is a popular choice among blues, rock and jazz musicians because of its warm tone and near-zero feedback. The 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured model features a thermally engineered chambered maple center block, a hand-wired MTC Premiere control assembly, an ABR-1 bridge with titanium saddles and all-new MHS II humbucking pickups.

So you want to learn how to play guitar but don’t know where to start? No worries. This how to play guitar for beginners guide will cover all the basic requirements to get you started with playing guitar. The guide is split into 2 sections: The Basics – where you’ll learn about the various parts of the guitar, how to hold the guitar and how to tune your guitar. Playing – where you’ll learn popular chords, strumming techniques, and how to read guitar tabs. This guitar for beginners guide is meant for guitarists just starting out, however there are also tips and
Choruses (Chori?) come in mono, stereo, and true stereo versions, and a good one will provide lots of control across the depth and speed of the modulation desired. In the case of a mono unit, the aggregate tone produced by the circuit is flattened and passed through a single jack, where as a stereo (sic) unit will pass wet and dry signals through different jacks. A true stereo chorus unit will produce a true stereo signal, where the effect is mixed properly into left and right channels.
Echo – There is some crossover between delay pedals and echo pedals, but as a general rule, you can think of echo effects as extended delay effects. It’s a brother of reverb pedals, producing the canyon-like echoing you would naturally hear in a wide-open space. With long enough settings, an echo pedal can even let you harmonize against your own notes as they repeat.
Tuning Instabily: Problems with tuning stability are almost always cuased by improper tuning technique (always tune UP to the note) or a binding nut. (There are RARE occasions where the string isn't seating correctly at the bridge, and we're not considering problems with set up regarding a tremolo) Even the cheapest geared tuners don't "slip" as a rule. If a geared tuner is failing it will make a "poping" type of sound as the gear jumps teeth. If the gears are loose, it is possible to pull a string flat with extensive (excessive?) use of a tremolo. If notes are going sharp it is due to the nut binding. What happens is excessive tension builds up between the tuner and the nut in order to overcome the binding. Then as you play the vibration of the string allows it to wiggle through the slot equalizing the tension, and making the string sharp. See above for info on a binding nut. If a fretted note is sharp it is an indication that the nut slots are not deep enough (or excessive presure with high frets/ scalloped or worn fretboard). If a string is going flat, it is always bridge related. Either a problem with the string seating fully (common w/ trapeeze tailpieces and ball ends in vintage tremolos (the reason they came up w/ bullet ends)) or binding on a rough saddle/ the edge of the trem block. Again, it is possible to cause a tuner to back off with extream tremolo, but rare.
However much you swap your guitar’s pickups, strings, and wiring configuration, tweak your amp, or revamp your pedalboard, you will never achieve the golden tone that rings in your head if you don’t take one tip to heart: it all starts with the wood. Sure, these are electric guitars, and all the electronic components in the sound chain will affect what comes out of the speaker, but they are acoustic machines first and foremost. Hit the strings with your guitar unplugged, and it still rings and resonates, and the sound you hear—even with no electronic devices attached—still defines the core of your tone. And to make sure this is the right tone for you, or to avoid fighting a tone with endless component tweaks that never seem to satisfy, you need to understand a little bit about how all that wood sounds.
A Phase Shifter creates a complex frequency response containing many regularly-spaced "notches" in an incoming signal by combining it with a copy of itself out of phase, and shifting the phase relationship cyclically. The phasing effect creates a "whooshing" sound that is reminiscent of the sound of a flying jet. This effect dominates the sound in the song Star Guitar by Chemical Brothers. The song was not played with any guitars but you can hear the phasing effect. The instrument being phased was actually a synthesizer. Some electronic "rotating speaker simulators" are actually phase shifters. Phase shifters were popular in the 1970s, particularly used with electric piano and funk bass guitar. The number of stages in a phase shifter is the number of moving dips in the frequency response curve. From a sonic perspective, this effect is equalization-oriented. However, it may be derived through moderate time-based processing. Some phaser pedals include:
Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, Diecast - Pickups: Humbucker - String Instrument Finish: Black Metallic, Pewter Grey Metallic, Emerald Green Metallic

Introduced in 1948, the Fender Deluxe was praised for its dynamic, harmonically rich overdrive and compression. It was offered in numerous configurations and designs over the years, but the most desirable model is the 5E3 narrow-panel Deluxe, built from 1955 to 1960 and offered in a tweed-covered cabinet. The circuit runs at higher voltages than other models and features a split-phase inverter and driver that add a little gritty breakup at the start of the output stage.
Buying an electric guitar is a very personal process, with many things to consider before you make your final choice. It’s not just a case of picking something with a nice color – you are usually parting with a substantial chunk of hard-earned cash, ranging anywhere from $100 to $2000 – or more – for some guitars, and therefore patience is required to find something that really suits you.
JS32 Dinky is one of those old school models that has stuck around, and for a good reason. The guitar is similar to the SL2, however it brings a much more neutral experience. It’s all about that Floyd Rose style tremolo bridge, two kicking humbuckers, and a fretboard that is built for speed. While I wouldn’t say it’s the best guitar I’ve ever played, Jackson JS32 Dinky gives its competition a run for their money.
Richard Thompson has been one of rock's most dazzling stylists since his days with Fairport Convention, a British folk-rock band that veered into English traditional music. Shooting out life-affirming riffs amid lyrics that made you want to jump off a bridge, he combined a rock flatpick attack with speedy fingerpicking. His electric-guitar solos, rooted less in blues than in Celtic music, can be breathtaking, but his acoustic picking is just as killer; no one knows how many tears have been shed by players trying to nail "1952 Vincent Black Lightning."

Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
The roots of effects pedal usage can be traced back to early into the history of the electric guitar, but two people immediately come to mind who really pushed its usage out there:  Roger Mayer and Jimi Hendrix.  We’ve come a long way since those early days and it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the insane amount of options out there.  From good old standbys to newer boutique options, it can be a chore to know what effects pedals could be right for you.
I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.
Unlike the piano, the guitar has the same notes on different strings. Consequently, guitar players often double notes in chord, so increasing the volume of sound. Doubled notes also changes the chordal timbre: Having different "string widths, tensions and tunings, the doubled notes reinforce each other, like the doubled strings of a twelve-string guitar add chorusing and depth".[38] Notes can be doubled at identical pitches or in different octaves. For triadic chords, doubling the third interval, which is either a major third or a minor third, clarifies whether the chord is major or minor.[39]
Juszkiewicz, 64, is known for being temperamental, ultracompetitive and difficult to work for. A former Gibson staffer recalls a company retreat in Las Vegas punctuated by a trip to a shooting range, where executives shot up a Fender Stratocaster. In recent years, Juszkiewicz has made two major pushes, both seemingly aimed at expanding a company when a product itself — the guitar — has shown a limited ability to grow its market.
Yamaha is the most revered and leading manufacturer of full-line musical instruments. With its wide range of guitars, the company has become a best seller and is easily one of the best guitar brands in India. The C Series are the popular and affordable nylon string guitars by Yamaha suitable for beginners and young learners. The electric guitars of Yamaha available in India are of the Pacifica and RGX series. The Pacifica series offers the most value for money combining affordability with performance.
* The guitar comes with very light bendy strings. This is probably due to market data that tells Epiphone that the bulk of buyers for this guitar are teen Guitar Heros who think that string bending every note is an essential aspect of shredding and wailing. If you plan to put heavier strings on the guitar (like 12-51s for example) for jazz or other styles of music then you will probably need a truss rod adjustment to compensate for the added tension. If you don't know how to do this, ask someone who does. You can ruin a guitar, permanently, by being too aggressive with a truss rod adjustment.
Having tried out this technique, I have to say that it's something of a revelation to hear the enormous range of radically different sounds it makes available. When you start inverting the phase of a mic, it sounds like the most extreme EQ you've ever heard, which means that you can substantially reinvent guitar sounds at mixdown without using any heavy processing. For even more sonic mileage, you can also take a leaf out of John Leckie's book and process each of the three mic signals independently.
Altium is known for it’s high end PCB development application called Altium Designer which starts at around $7000 and there’s a yearly subscription fee too. Gulp! Altium Designer is used by many industry professionals for product development. Altium just recently released Circuit Maker, which has many of the features of Designer and is, Gasp!…. Completely free!  The trade off at this point seems to be that it’s designed around a community and apart from a couple of private slots, you have to share your work, so it’s not very useful for completely proprietary projects.

The LP-100 is among the most affordable, but also the most popular Epiphone models. It is the quintessential beginner guitar. Epiphone Les Paul-100 brings you that classic aesthetic in a package that is affordable and capable of sounding rather great. While it’s not something you’d want to do a world tour with, this Epiphone is perfect for beginners and intermediate players.


Kaman began producing guitars in 1966, and Charles went on the road to promote his new creation. His first stop was a visit to his old stomping grounds, Washington, D.C., where he showed his guitar to jazz guitar great Charlie Byrd. Byrd was impressed and felt the guitar – which was quite loud – had considerable potential. He later remarked that the guitar “deserved an ovation,” thus providing the guitars with a name.

Like so much else, analog delays were first made possible by a shift in the available technology in the mid 1970s, in this case the advent of affordable delay chips. Techies call these “bucket brigade delay chips” because they pass the signal along in stages from the input pin to the output pin—with as many as from 68 to 4096 stages. Inject a signal, govern the speed at which it gets passed from stage to stage, tap the output and, voila, you’ve got echo. It’s clear from this that the more stages in the chip, the longer the delay the circuit can achieve. The longer the delay, however, the greater the distortion in the wet signal, so most makers compromised to keep maximum settings within acceptable delay/noise ratios.
Lyndon Laney established his brand in 1967 in Birmingham (England). In those days, he was also playing in a band with a couple of guys you might've heard of: John Bonham and Robert Plant. You might also know Tony Iommi (Black Sabbath) who happened to be one of his first clients. The LA100BL is a must among heavy-metal guitarists, while the KLIPP aims to be more versatile. The AOR (Advanced Overdrive Response) series provides more gain every time, contributing, in part, to the brand's constantly growing reputation. Among Laney addicts, we could mention Ace Frehley of Kiss and Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits.
Whoever first got the sound down on tape, vinyl, acetate or whatever, it’s hard to imagine that adventurous, pioneering electric guitarists like Charlie Christian, Lonnie Johnson, T-Bone Walker and others didn’t crank up that brown electric suitcase to see just what it could do. Even if they were banned from such sonic mayhem on the bandstand or in the recording studio, you can bet a few juke joints and basement jams rang with the sound of distorted guitar right back into the 1940s and even the ’30s. Do you doubt it? Plug a fat-sounding Gibson ES-150—with its beefy ‘blade’ pickup—into an EH-150 or BR-1 amp wound up to max. Dirty? Damn straight. As for distortion, there are no more ‘firsts’ to be claimed. For sheer variety of sounds, however, the modern guitarist has it all over his predecessors.
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 How to Order Custom Guitar: THIS IS A PRE-BUILD PRICING. You will receive the custom guitar exactly as pictured. Please make sure to choose the required options marked with the RED ( * ) asterisks and it will compute automatically the options you choose. We also offer Optional Upgrades but they are not required. And then once you hit on Buy Now button, go to the top most portion of the website and you can see a cart image logo and click on that then you can see VIEW CART and CHECKOUT to determine the total cost of the guitar including the shipping and the discount.
This is obviously the most important value when it comes to any musical instrument. If the guitar doesn’t sound right, none of the other values will be able to make up for that. Guitarists are notorious for their attention to tone, and many players will form a tight allegiance to the brand they feel provides the perfect sound. The Gibson is sought after for its full bodied overdriven sound in rock circles, while others swear by Fender’s classic offerings. It all comes down to a matter of preference, so you will want to be well acquainted with the sounds of each brand. Look up your favorite guitarists and see what they play. That will likely put you on the right track.
The effect of amplifier coloration can be emulated using a parametric EQ, where you'll probably find you need to add some upper mid-range boost to get the same brightness as from an amp. Note that, if you're using a software amp modelling plug-in, you'll still get the best results if you feed your guitar via a high-impedance DI box — plugging it straight into a soundcard's line input is likely to result in a drop in level and may even affect the sustain and high end of the guitar sound due to the pickups being loaded by the impedance of the input circuitry. This does not apply to active pickup systems which, in effect, function as a combination of pickup and DI box.
Anyway, this little beast didn’t need much work. This is one of the pleasures of working on a Champ-style practice amp. They have so little in them, there’s simply not much to go wrong or fix. This one, it turned out, only needed a filter cap job, a new preamp tube and one coupling cap. Piece o’ cake. Twenty minutes of soldering and one $4.00 7F7 tube later, I had a monster little Champ-esque amplifier (actually it sounds a little more like the Gibson Skylark than a Champ, but that’s cool by me) for under $80.
I’m also going to go out on a limb and suggest the earliest Univoxes also included the ‘Lectra, a version of the one-pickup Aria 1930 violin bass (made by Aria). These were basically violin-bodied basses originally inspired by the Gibson EB-0, and popularized among imports by Paul McCartney’s use of the Höfner violin bass, copied by EKO. This was a hollowbody with no f-holes, Cremona brown finish, single neck pickup, bolt-on neck with position dots along the top of the 22-fret bound rosewood fingerboard. Strings anchored to a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly.
Upgrading the components in your guitar’s control cavity should give you significant improvements in tone and component life. If your guitar has single-coil pickups, buy 250K pots. If it’s packing ’buckers, go for the 500K jobs. If your ax has humbuckers and single-coils, I recommend 500K pots. This could make your single-coils sound a bit brighter than normal, but it will unlock your humbuckers’ full potential. For this job you’ll also need a soldering iron, solder, safety goggles, wire cutters, and a camera, to help you keep track of your original wiring connections (your cellphone will work just fine for this).
Adding to their already good value, most multi-effects come with built-in features that are essential to gigging and practicing, first of which is a built-in tuner. Looping is also a good feature to look for, thankfully it now comes standard for most units. Having the ability to record straight to a computer is another handy features that should be considered, as well as the ability to edit the settings via your computer or mobile device. Built-in metronome/rhythm is also a nice plus, especially for those who want to take their skill to the next level.
In 1980, however, Martin had hired another guitarmaker, one John Marshall. Marshall had studied lutherie with Eric Schulte whose base of operation was in the far western Main Line suburbs of Philadelphia around Frazer, PA. Schulte himself had worked with the legendary Sam Koontz, who was responsible for Harptone and some Standel guitars, as well as his own. After learning the tricks of the trade from Schulte, Marshall became involved in the ill-fated Renaissance guitar company of Malvern, PA, just up the road from Frazer. Renaissance, you’ll recall, made those exotic plexiglass guitars and basses in around 1979 (plus a later series in 1980 designed by John Dragonetti). These were designed by John Marshall. Marshall left Renaissance to join Martin, where he was hired to work on the electric guitars which would become Martin’s 28 Series.
The D-18E was a mahogany dreadnought with the neck pickup and a second bridge pickup. The typical Martin pickguard had the front point cut off and a notch in back to make room for the pickups rings. A three-way toggle was mounted on the upper treble bout. Controls included one volume and two tones, with the big plastic knobs. D-18Es are the rarest of these early Martin electrics, lasting only from the ’58 prototypes through 1959. These began with prototype #163746. Around 858 of these were produced.
I once did a setup on one that belonged to a friend but it was really wrecked so it wasn't perhaps a fair representation. It seemed to be well built though and the neck was nice enough. The tone was decent too although not exciting - exactly what you'd expect from such a guitar. Overall I'd say it was better than the cheaper squiers (SEs, Affinities etc).
Taylors are okay as guitars go, but... I've owned three, sold them all in mint condition and lost considerable coin in doing so. I think they belong on this list because they charge hand made prices for MASS PRODUCED guitars. Don't believe me? Take the Taylor that you own and do a search for it on eBay. That's right, at this very moment there are hundreds of guitars just like yours for sale on eBay. And that's only checking this one sales venue! These guitars are worth half of what you paid because the market is saturated with them. Taylor cranks out hundreds of them per day and 100's of thousands per year. If you're shopping and seriously considering a Taylor, you can get comparable quality and far better value elsewhere. Choose carefully and you'll see your investment go up in value. Aside from some special, collectable models of Taylor, you will loose money on this brand.

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This is a guitar that feels alot like a pre-CBS Fender strat. It has all the tones. If you didn't already know, G&L stands for George and Leo. As in LEO FENDER. The headstock is a little different, but the pickups are great, not Noiseless but definitely not NOISY either. Mine is a physically heavy guitar. It sounds heavy too - in a good way. Still, I can get all the tones I need from all the pickups. I believe that the neck pickup is superior to the Mexican Made Fender Strat. The pearloid pickguard is pretty. These Indonesian made strats sound great. They're made in the same factory as the Squiers but definitely sound different.
SOLD OUT! Takamine EF406 RARE Here we have a RARE and GORGEOUS 1999 limited Edition Takamine acoustic-electric guitar, model EF-406. This instrument is a PREMIUM example of a New York or also called a Parlor guitar and is a Hand Crafted in Japan model an amazing example of Japans high Quality workmanship & fit & finish and is truly just as good as it gets. As you can see from the pictures, it is simply gorgeous to look at. It has a classic slotted headstock with Top Quality gold open gears and gold tuners with Pearl buttons. The Top- Back & sides are all a High grade choice AAAA FLAMED KOA with natural Koa color (there is no stain)and none was needed to bring out the AWESOME grain patterns of this Rare Native Hawaiian Wood. The top sound hole apears to be bound or painted and inside looks same as out /all Takamine internet information leeds to say the tops on this model is solid however we can not guarantee this as fact. The electronics are a GRAPH-EX pre-amp system: peizo transducer, with "exciter," volume, bass, treble, and mid controls. It comes with a deluxe, plush hardh shell case, note: In he picture close up of the ack of the headstock you may notice a dull spot running threw the center over the made in Japan tag area this is just a spot of waxed area that was inadvertently missed and not rubbed out... it is fine this guitar is in Excellent used condition. .
The full-size electric guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul SL, Ibanez GRGA120 Gio, Indio 66 Classic, Indio Retro DLX Quilted Maple, Jackson JS11 Dinky, Squier by Fender Affinity Series Jazzmaster, Squier by Fender HSS Bullet Strat, and Yamaha Pacifica PAC012. The short-scale guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul Express, Ibanez GRGM21 Mikro, Jackson Dinky Minion JS1X, Jackson Rhoads Minion JS1X, and Squier by Fender Mini Strat.
In nature, reverb is an extremely fast series of echoes that reduce in volume over time.  Depending on the size of the environment, the number of repeats and the timing at which they occur will change.  Digital reverb pedals are very good at replicating the differing types.  Basically, you can take small tiled bathroom and the Grand Canyon (and everything in between) with you to your gigs.
Being a PODHD user for many years now, I am but one of the many who commend its balance of versatility and sound quality. Like many reviewers, it allows me to gig and record conveniently, often times plugging straight to PA with great results. I've also seen a number of professionals using PODHD500X's in their concerts, so it's not surprising that even experts at Music Radar were convinced, saying: "The modelling is excellent throughout, with authentic-sounding amps and quality effects".
Description: Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 5-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-S-H - String Instrument Finish: White, Black, Red, Sunburst
If you can afford to start on an amp in the sub-$200 segment, you will see an instant upgrade in the amount of power as well as additional features. In this category you are looking at very good practice rigs, although as power is still pretty low they may not be suitable for more than small casual performances. This is the first category where you will find both amp heads and tube amps, although the choice of these is very, very limited. One of the best amps you can grab for under $200 is the Marshall Code 25W. This combo provides a solid tone, 25 watts of power and plenty of amp voices and effects to play around with.
Lutherie has been my life's work since the beginning. After graduating from Roberto-Venn School of Lutherie in 1992, I set up my first shop in a rental garage, and began designing, building, repairing, and restoring fretted stringed instruments. Aided and abetted by 13 years of employment as a staff guitar repairman at Seattle's Trading Musician, I gained an extensive knowledge of the inner and outer workings of a vast array of instruments.
When gluing a set neck guitar it’s important that you don’t use an excessive amount of glue. The glue should be applied to the base of the neck and base of the neck cavity. Try to limit the amount of glue so that it doesn’t come into contact with the edges of the neck or pickup cavity as this can impact on the tonal quality of the guitar and sustain.
Further down the Seagull line, looking at models outside of the Artist Series, the components and woods aren’t the same but we still see an impressive attention to detail. The Seagull S6 Original is a bare-bones acoustic, perfect for beginners and intermediate players. This is a guitar worth checking out if you need a solid acoustic and don’t want to break the bank.
Alembic | Baldwin | BC Rich | Burns | Crucianelli | Danelectro | Egmond | Eko | Epiphone | Fender | Framus | Futurama | Gibson | Goya | Gretsch | Guild | Guyatone | Hagstrom | Harmony | Hofner | Ibanez | Kalamazoo | Kay | Kent | Kramer | Levin | Martin | Magnatone | Microfrets | Mosrite | National | Ovation | PRS | Rickenbacker | Silvertone | Supro | Teisco | Yamaha | Valco | Vox | Wal | Zemaitis
Rosewood back and sides, abalone (pearl) inlay around top edge and soundhole (but not on top around the fingerboard like a style 41,42,45 would have), inlaid bridge pins. Fancy backstripe of horizontal lines between two rows of diagonal lines (like style 45). Most style 40 models made were hawaiian style with flat fingerboard radius, flat flush frets, high string action, and no bridge saddle compensation. Most popular was the OO-40H (though they did made 2-40, 0-40, 000-40 and 000-40H models prior to WW2). Sometimes these are converted to regular "spanish" style guitar (fingerboard radiused, refretted, neck reset, bridge saddle angled). Made from the 1860s to 1917, then 1928 to 1941, then 1985 to present.
Notch filters (also called band-stop filters or band-rejection filters) are sometimes used with double basses. Notch filters are filters that allow most frequencies to pass through unaltered, while attenuating those in a specific range to very low levels. Notch filters are used in instrument amplifiers and preamplifiers for acoustic instruments such as acoustic guitar, mandolin, and bass instrument amplifiers to reduce or prevent feedback. While most notch filters are set manually by the user, there are also automatic notch filters which detect the onset of feedback and notch out the frequency before damaging feedback begins.
Ovation, Roundback, Adamas, Legend, Custom Legend, Elite, Applause, Celebrity, Balladeer, Ultra, Thunderbolt and Lyrachord , The Roundback body shape, Roundback design and Roundback Technology, Guitar Bowl Shape, Fingerboard Inlay Design, Sound hole Rosette Design, Adamas Peghead Shape, Bridge Design, Epaulet Design, Soundboard and Sound hole designs, Guitar Tuning Head are protected by one or more US and Foreign Trademarks and Patents.
“I was trying to help Henry and shoo him away from areas that he was spending a whole lot of money in,” Schon says. “All this electronical, robot crap. I told him, point blank, ‘What you’re doing, Roland and other companies are light-years in front of you, you’ve got this whole building you’ve designated to be working on this synth guitar. I’ve played it. And it just doesn’t work.’ And he refused to believe that.”
I want to combine an LED circuit with the 5 way selector so that it switches LED colors based on the pickup selected. Position 1 = Red, Position 2 = Purple (1+3), Position 3 =Blue, Position 4 = Green (3+5) and Position 5 = Yellow. The questions I have are: 1. The LED circuit has a 9V battery to light the LED. Would this affect the tone of the guitar. 2. I’ve also heard that this might introduce noise in the guitar circuit. Is this even possible?
Here we have yet another fine 1971 Yamaha FG75 made in Japan Nippon Gakki Red Label Grand concert like Gibson LGO-1 but sounds better for less New Arrival: Be sure to ask for "Clean Boy" This example is just like our other 71 FG75 Nippon Gakki but this guitar is much cleaner and is JVGuitars rated in very good + condition- Excellent vintage for a 42+ year old Vintage Red Label Nippon Gakki FG75 .. its one of the nicest we've seen, this baby makes an excellent Parlor style guitar thats fun to play because of its good action, and it sounds absolutely great... upgraded to Martin bone Nut and compensated saddle and upgraded fancy bridge pins .... for a good volume transfer and superior tone over the old plastic parts,,,, we dressed the frets as well. not a crack anywhere to be found, great vintage patina but no structural damages or abuse or neglect this instrument has been well taken care of as one can tell from its condition and playability ... this one plays very nicely and is ready to enjoy .... for a song Original Specifications: - Year(s) Sold: 1968-1974 - Top: Spruce- Back / Sides: Agathis - Neck: Nato - Fingerboard: Indian Rosewood - Bridge: N/A - Notes: Folk Guitar Classic Type - Upper Bout - 11-1/8” - Waist - 9-5/8"- Lower Bout - 14-5/8" Ok so thats what the official specs are but here is what we se and have seend with 2 other fg75;s we have had, one I had to refinish its back and when sanding off the mahogany finish it was blond flamed maple sides and back,,, as this one surely looks to be just look at that flamed back and sides this example is kind of special looking. She;s got it going on just check her out. Yamaha Nippon Gakki guitars are highly respected at being well made and of great value and after 40+ years this example has stood the test of time and is still a formidable player you can compare its sound to a much more expensive guitars tone they are simply wonders to find one this nice is RARE… get her before she’s gone. Any questions or to buy it contact Joe: JVGuitars@gmail.com Thank you for your interest..
Essentially the 28s looked very similar to the E/EM/EB-18s. They had the same offset double cutaway body outline and the modified Viennese three-and-three headstock. Instead of maple laminate bodies with glued-in necks, the 28s had mahogany bodies and necks in a neck-through-body design. The basically slab bodies of the E-18 had gained a carved top, with a deep contour in the upper waist. The brass nut had become a Micarta nut. Fingerboards were now ebony. Finishes were sunburst.

: But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
The book provides examples of simple mathematical models for the complete signal chain consisting of the electric guitar and related accessories. Several do-it-yourself books have been written with the emphasis only on building a pre-specified circuit according to step-by-step instructions. This book takes one step further and brings up the designer perspective on guitar electronics. The importance of mathematics as a tool for design and analysis is emphasised throughout the text. Often in similar publications the use of mathematics is avoided as much as possible, but the fact is that mathematics provides ways to analyse circuits before spending time and money on random prototype builds. For more information on the contents of the book, check out the table of contents and the Google Books preview
Clearly if you need a Gibson but have to count your pennies Epiphone should be your top choice. However, Some people don’t realize that Epiphone was once a competitor with Gibson, and even today some of their semi-hollow and hollow-body guitars are worth mentioning with the top brands out there. The Dot is well known as an affordable version of the Gibson ES-335, but there are also guitars like the Casino, Wildkat, Sheraton and Broadway.
SOLD OUT: This guitar is very familiar to me as I have had other guitars from another Famous Japanese guitar maker That was known to make this very guitar already I believe this to have been made by those responsible for the Takamine or Mountain ands Tak made for Washburn import, needless to say this is a high quality Well built Japanese copy of the Martin D-19 and is Identical to the Takamine F320. This example was well crafted over 32 years ago making this a true vintage guitar based on the classic These were quite well constructed by any standard fit and finish is excellent typical of this era Japanese crafted and were made with very nice woods too... The top on this guitar is Solid Spruce and is nicely figured and the back sides and neck are all Mahogany, The fingerboard = bridge & head-stock front overlay is rosewood. This combination is know for some sweet mellow tone & good volume...this example is in above average vintage condition its finish still shines like glass and with only a few minor doinks and with its true 32+ years of well taken care of age its natural patina is very nice in deed. This guitar has the 1-11/16ths nut width it’s a comfortable medium profile neck and it plays with ease and has good action, neck is straight with correct relief and frets are still good at 88%. Tuners are original and are working well, no splits or cracks warps or twists or issues of that nature structural integrity is excellent. Volume is very good, tone is sweet, this makes for a very good playing guitar That sounds great and is very enjoyable all round for the player. Vintage tone! .. thanks for your interest if wanted you can contact Joe at jvguitars@gmail.com . .
In August 2014 Vox released two Night Train limited editions, both of which were cosmetic updates to the NT2H set and the NT15C1 combo respectively, that recall a more traditional Vox aesthetic. For the Lil' Night Train NT2H-GD-SET, Vox supplied the NT2H head with a matte gold coloured tube cage and black control knobs, and then covered its V110NT cab with a retro-traditional “Brown Diamond“ grille cloth and basket weave covering (since there was no "G2" version of the Lil Night Train, this limited edition NT2H seems to mark the end of the line for this model as Vox makes no further reference to it). For the NT15C1-CL (Classic) combo amp Vox applied a similar treatment with the installation of a gold logo badge and trim on the front of the NT15C1 combo as well as adding the “Brown Diamond“ grille cloth.
The headstock is located on the end of the neck opposite the guitar body. It is fitted with tuning keys, also known as tuners, tuning pegs, or machine heads. These adjust the tension of each string, changing their pitches. The nut is a small strip located where the headstock meets the neck, that is grooved to guide the strings onto the fretboard. On an acoustic guitar, the nut is commonly made of plastic, but it can also be bone, graphite, or any number of other materials.
While the other digital amplifiers we tried (the Blackstone ID:Core Stereo 10 V2 and the Line 6 Spider Classic 15) offered a similarly wide range of good sounds, most of our panelists preferred the Champion 20 simply because it was easier to use. Lynn Shipley Sokolow preferred the simplicity of non-digital amps such as the Vox Pathfinder 10, but she said, “The Fender is the best of the digitals because it’s easy to understand the controls.”

Johnny Thunders’ snot-nosed New York take on Keith Richards’ cool is one of the pillars on which punk rock was built. An Italian-American guy (birth name John Anthony Genzale Jr.) from Queens, he was born a little too late to be part of the Sixties rock explosion. But the bands of that era were his influences, and he put his own spin on them in the early Seventies as the New York Dolls came together with Thunders on lead guitar.


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According to the Amazon page for this guitar, the item weight is 18 lbs, but that’s likely due to the inclusion of the case. There are no other reviews of this instrument, but just keep in mind that with a spruce top guitar, you’re going to have higher, clearer treble sounds than with a cedar top. Also, compared to higher-priced guitars from the Ramirez workshop, this particular model—considered an “entry” model—is a bit more affordable, which was Amalia Ramirez’s aim in reviving the 3N series.
Just start out small, when i first started playing guitar I wanted to learn every metallica song there is, and sure enough I did, it took me about 5 years to get there and a bunch of different gauges eventually with time you start to develop the feel for what gauge satisfies you the best. Now I mostly use hybrids ranging from 10-13's, but just like everyone I started out with softest strings that are out there in existence but I used to break them alot so there were many beers out there that I didn't get to drink because the will to play guitar was stronger hahaha. But in the end it was worth it cause now I get to have all the fun on the guitar, and all the chicks are digging it hahaha, no they're not. And one more thing never obey the rules it's just something that stuck up guitarist make up because they don't want to be outdone find out what pleases you the most and keep on doin that.
For a guitar that sits comfortably in the mid-range segment of the market, Yamaha RevStar RS420 packs a decent punch. Body shape is more reminiscent of a PRS than anything else, but Yamaha definitely infused it with their unique details. The sound is tight, very flexible, and I had no issues dialing in the type of tone I was looking for. A well rounded model, that’s for sure.
Interesting cosmetics and great playing 4-string, Factory, but "custom re-built" Fretless bass. Appears to be re-finished. I had to buy this, as I recognized it immediately as a great "player", fretless bass. Adjustable P-J passive / dynamic pickup configuration sounds great. Separate volume and tone controls. Appears to be a "re-finish", in interesting "Fleck-Tone" gray paint. We think it is not the original finish, but it could be original. Someone did an incredible job it if is a re-fin, as the routed edges are perfectly finished and all parts had to have been removed with room made for the extra finish thickness. No worries about finger prints with this one. Un-bound, graphite? or other synthetic material, ebony black fingerboard  w/ dot inlay side markers on a solid mahogany neck with a 4-bolt neck joint. Black anodized tail piece perfect and rust-free. Finger board near new condition. Features 4 high quality, "sealed" tuning machines that work perfectly and hold tune. Plays and sounds great! Lots of fun. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!). 34.5" scale length. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .040 "Round-wound" strings (yes I know flat wounds are more correct for fretless, but I prefer a bit more brightness. You are free to install flats once you own it). No case or bag included.
Searching for Guitars market values? You have come to the right place! IGuide?is proud to host the online Guitars Price Guide.The price guide is maintained by Jon R. Warren, whose price guide books have been the authority on collectibles values since 1985. The searchable database consists of detailed reports on a ever-growing list of items. Each report includes current market values in ten different grades, as well as a section for "Real Market Data", actual prices fetched at auction. The database is updated daily.
A lot of EBay sellers have been calling the Hagstrom solid-bodies of the time Hagstrom-Kent. They are not. If it says Hagstrom on the body, it’s a Hagstrom. If it is one of the Hagstrom guitars that was sold as a Kent, it’s a ‘Kent, made by Hagstrom’. I wonder if the sellers think they can get more for a guitar by associating the Kent name with it. I don’t see how. Perhaps the fact that there are so many Kents floating around, the sellers wanted a more familiar name to hang on the Hagstrom.
In some ways, the Champion 20 isn’t quite as versatile as the other digital amps. For example, the Line 6 Spider Classic 15 has two effects selector knobs, allowing a guitarist to mix modulated effects such as phaser, flanger, and chorus with different types of reverb and echo. However, our panelists generally felt the Champion 20’s ease of use outweighed this disadvantage, and the Champion 20 does offer 12 different amp models as opposed to 4 on the Spider Classic 15. The Champion 20 also doesn’t play as loud as the Stage Right 611800, but all of our panelists thought it played plenty loud enough for beginners.
Wherever you play you're going to run into one of three sound setups: a full PA, a partial PA, or no PA capacity beyond vocal mics. The PA (Public Address system) is the primary sound system in any venue. A full PA has the board space and amplification capabilities to allow a sound engineer to apply a dedicated microphone to every instrument, amplifier, and drum head, as well as the cymbal spaces.
The amp has the usual basic controls: Volume, Bass, and Treble, plus a Gain knob that adjusts the amount of distortion. Once you start turning some of the Champion 20’s other knobs, all sorts of additional tonal possibilities arise. The Voice knob accesses simulations of different amps: Tweed (1950s-era Fender amps heard on early R&B records such as “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” and “In the Midnight Hour”), Blackface (mid-1960s Fenders, often used by Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan), British (reminiscent of the classic Vox amps used by the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and U2), and Metal (somewhat like the sound of the Marshall amplifiers favored by rock and metal players from Jimi Hendrix to Slash). Each of these four simulations has three different variations that alter the tone a bit.

Clock maker Matthias Hohner began crafting harmonicas in 1857, assisted by his wife and a single employee. 650 were made in the first year.[1] Hohner harmonicas quickly became popular, and in his lifetime Matthias built the largest harmonica factory in the world.[2] During the American Civil War, Matthias Hohner distributed harmonicas to family members in the United States who in turn gave them to the soldiers.[3]


On Thursday, mere days after launching a news site for women called the Lily, the Washington Post published a story by Geoff Edgers that mused on the supposed death of the electric guitar. Sales are down at places like Sam Ash and Guitar Center, big guitar makers like Fender and Gibson have seen their revenues decline, and in 2010, acoustic guitars began to outsell electric guitars. Why? According to the piece, it’s because male guitar heroes are dying off and aspiring musicians have no men to look up to. Sad!
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I have a hunch its a cheapo guitar and probably not worth a neck reset. Can't tell if it has a bolt on neck. my other guitars all have more warped soundboards though. The saddle is sort of cradled in wood by the bridge, the angle could be better, but I'm surprised there is any angle considering the saddle only pops out like a millimeter. The bridge curves down towards the pins to provide the angle. It probably has been set up in the past by someone who wanted an acoustic guitar to play like an electric, then it got reversed it later by way of the truss rod.
I am new to guitar but had played Baritone in grades school thru high school in a small school with a band teacher who went on to Iowa State. So I wasn’t finding where notes were and started watching guitar/music theory and found several who headed me to learn my Pentatonic E minor scale before I have finished with chords. I wanted to know where notes are on fretboard.
Before doing a setup, I’d recommend you put a new set of strings on the guitar. Specifically put the type of strings on that you intend to use in future, since different gauges (and sometimes brands) can require a slightly different intonation setup. If you don’t know how to restring a guitar, then have a look here: http://diystrat.blogspot.com/2011/08/stringing-guitar.html

In 1942, Valco unveiled a new Hawaiian lap steel, the Irene, which was offered as a Silvertone in the ’42 Sears catalog. Clearly inspired by the Supro’s first wood-bodied Hawaiian with the pear-shaped body from ’36-37, the Irene had a slightly narrower body and more squared-off corners, and was covered in white pearloid. It also featured a light-colored, painted-on pickguard with dark position markers. Basically, this had the same pickup and control plate as featured on the Clipper.


“I like it because it’s light and simple,” Alana said, reflecting on its 5.1-pound weight. “It’s easier to get my hand around the neck on this one,” Charles noted. Both found the Les Paul Express’s rounded top shoulder to be more comfortable than the horn-shaped cutaways on most of the other short-scale models, and they felt the smooth finish on the back of the neck made it easier to play. The adults agreed. “I’m surprised—for a small guitar, it’s fun to play,” Ken Rosser said.
In the early 1960s the Brothers Grim became the first American group use Vox Amplifiers. Joe Benaron, CEO of Warwick Electronics Inc. / Thomas Organ Company, the United States distributor of Vox, along with Bernard Stockly (London), importer of Challenge pianos to the United States, arranged for the boys to have full use of the tall Super AC 100 Vox amps (4×12" speakers). The solid-state version of this amp (known in the USA as the "Super Beatle") was produced to cash in on the Beatles-Vox affiliation, but was not nearly as successful as the valve AC30 and AC15 models.

I have a Fender Chinese made Telecaster from the Modern Player Series. The finish is spectacular, and while it sometimes feels like they just used a lot of gloss to cover it, it plays and sounds well. I have played it through many amps and it does the job of both a Telecaster and a Strat style. With a humbucking pickup, a lipstick and a strat pickup, this is a satisfying guitar and moddable for people looking for something they can work on without fear of screwing up and wasting a thousand dollars.

Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 6 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: S-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Five Alarm Red, Desert Sun Yellow, Magenta, Black, White
Honestly, a couple of years back I never looked at Fender for acoustic guitars because everyone was always talking about Taylors, Gibsons, Martins, Takamines, Paul Reed Smiths etc. Despite being a very good electric guitar company not to mention the inventor of the no. 1 guitar in the world, the strat, everyone always looked Fender, alongside with Ibanez and Washburn (good electric guitar brands) as bad acoustic manufacturers. I was one of them too. For me, Washburn and Ibanez might be a good budget acoustic guitar manufacturer but they don't deserve to be high in this 'top acoustic guitar brands' list. But for Fender, these past few months my mindset about them changed. I never realized how authentic and good sounding fender acoustics were way back then but I'm happy now that I changed my mind about them. I love them now. It's not about having vintage acoustics, or having high end prices. Fender don't set their prices as high as taylor, martin or gibson but they must not be judged ...more
What every great guitarist does, with respect to sound, is achieve a very high level of nuanced control over the sound, not by having a computer play his guitar for him. As a keyboard player, I would recommend you first concentrate on playing your synth with lots of use of pedals, velocity-sensitive changes in timbre, and left hand controllers. Then you can experiment with all sorts of synth sounds. This way, you can play as expressively as a gutarist, but without sounding like a bad copy. Instead, you can sound like something different, new, and this is really where synth lead work can shine (and actually add to our musical lexicon).
When used with the human voice, it is important that the pitch correction doesn't happen too quickly, otherwise all the natural slurs and vibrato will be stripped out leaving you with a very unnatural and robotic vocal sound. If only a few notes need fixing, consider automating the pitch-corrector's correction speed parameter so that it is normally too slow to have any significant effect, then increase the speed just for the problem sections. This prevents perfectly good audio from being processed unnecessarily.
Morris D-41 copy vintage 1980s Japanese high end hi class Exotic Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood tone woods body it has detailed fancy inlay perfling and in in amazing condition. Here we are proud to present to you a Classic dreadnought high quality Guitar made of vintage aged tone woods with impeccable workmanship and top quality materials fit and finish rivals the best of the best. This guitar was made by the premier custom shop builders of Japan in the Terada factory and are well known for making Ibanez's top of the line series guitars like the Artists - musician- the George Benson line as well as many others Some of the great Aria's top of line guitars and a few other makers they have the great woods and skills to make some of the finest instruments made period and this Morris is one of them. Just have a good look and you'll see for yourself. One of the finest D-41 type guitars made She's approaching 40 years old and in superb vintage condition I'm looking for dings still and don't see them it's really in sweet condition WOW it's rare to find such fine examples like this all round nice I suspect this beauty will not last long. She is currently in our JVGuitars shop for a full set up and will receive a JVG-Martin upgrade which consists of new fit Martin bone nut & compensated saddle set a full fret dressing and polishing and a beautiful resonant set of solid ebony bridge pins with brass ring and inlaid Abalone detail as well as a new set of Martin 80/20 phosphorus bronze strings and a full body polish. Just in pics soon to come. To enquirer contact Joe: jvguitars@gmail.com .

Shortly thereafter, the American instrumental rock band The Ventures asked their friend, session musician and electronics enthusiast Orville "Red" Rhodes for help recreating the Grady Martin "fuzz" sound.[18] Rhodes offered The Ventures a fuzzbox he had made, which they used to record "2000 Pound Bee" in 1962.[19] The best-known early commercial distortion circuit was the Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone, manufactured by Gibson, released in 1962.[20]

"Bring up one mic at a time and get it to optimum level on your board. To check that they're all in phase, make sure the signal is adding and not subtracting as you add in the other mics. If not... reverse the phase. Then start to put up each mic, one at a time... as you move the faders back and forth, you'll hear the greatest EQ, because of the phase relationship... Then if you flip the phase on one of the mics, you can really have some fun — it'll act like a filter."
I have an old 1964 60watt Australian Goldentone which I love and will keep. Had a Marshall 800 Lead at one time (head and quad box) when I was in a band but let that go when I stopped gigging. I tried a 50W ENGL combo as I was looking for an amp that was easier to cart around than my old Goldentone and I was blown away with the sound and the build quality. The ENGL should be in the top ten.
It’s quite interesting to look into the psychology behind our behavior when it comes to how much we pay for things in connection with how good we think they are. In one experiment, restaurant guests got served the same dish. Some of them payed a high price for their dish and some a normal lunch price. Did the guests think that their food tasted differently? Yes, they did. The guests who payed the high price thought that their food was much better than the people who got it for cheap.
Roger McGuinn's sparkling, chordal 12-string Rickenbacker riffs on the Byrds' early hits were the sonic bridge between folk and rock – and an irreplaceable color in rock's palette: Every indie band who's more interested in beatific strumming than screaming solos owes him a debt (the striking break in "Bells of Rhymney" could be on a Smiths record). McGuinn could do a lot more than chime, however, as demonstrated by his still-astonishing psychedelic-raga-Coltrane licks on "Eight Miles High."
Even with the myriad finish options, this latest model looks very much like the original Strats from Fender's original production line. As a testament to how effective the original design is, most of the specs and even the hardware design are followed even to this day. Speaking of specs, the current iteration features the same double cutaway alder body and bolt-on maple neck with a scale length of 25.5", narrower nut-width of 1.685" and SSS (Three Single Coil) pickup configuration. Giving this guitar its authentic quack and chime are three V-Mode Strat Single-coils.

Our fretwork is one of the things we are most proud of. We go to the extreme to make sure that your guitar is going to play the best it can. The fingerboard is planed under tension. The fretting process is done with epoxy fretting. We use a special blend of epoxy that makes re-fretting very easy without messing up your fingerboard. This process is used for multiple reasons. One of the advantages to this type of fretting is that you lose the hollow gaps under the fret that you find with the traditional way of fretting. In traditional fretting, with each fret you put on, it is like driving a wedge into the fingerboard, which causes back tension on the neck. With epoxy fretting, all of these issues are eliminated. The epoxy under the frets helps to transfer string vibration throughout the neck to the body, and relieves all stress and tension on the neck that occurs with traditional fretting. This results in a stress-free neck, which allows the truss rod to work properly and to adjust the neck accurately.


Since treble frequencies pass through a capacitor, what would happen if you routed the positive lead THROUGH the capacitor rather than having it ground out frequencies?  The answer: just the opposite - the signal from you pickups would pass through the capacitor and only treble frequencies would get through.  Aha!  A new type of tone control.  The illustration below shows this type of wiring in a bit of an advanced concept.
In the earlier days of My Chemical Romance, Iero mainly used Gibson SG's & Epiphone Les Paul guitars (most notably his white Les Paul nicknamed 'Pansy' which proved popular amongst his fans but has since been broken while onstage) and Marshall amps. He has since switched to using Gibson Les Pauls (with the Neck Pick-up removed) and occasionally uses a Gibson SG. He also used a Fender Stratocaster in the Desolation Row video. He has recently collaborated with Epiphone to design the Wilshire Phant-O-Matic guitar which he used onstage for the My Chemical Romance 'World Contamination' Tour, the Honda Civic Tour and for the Reading and Leeds festivals.
The Fender Stratocaster is one of the most iconic electric guitars in music history, and its equally distinctive sound is down to its selection of pickups. Although you’ll occasionally find a humbucker, traditionally a Strat will feature three single-coils – one each at the bridge, middle, and neck positions. They offer that sweet, bright, chiming single-coil sound that’s perfect for all styles of soulful music – from blues and country, to classic rock – and are perfect for lead guitarists, as they slice through even the densest mix. There are some excellent Stratocaster pickup sets around, although be sure to check out the Lace Sensor Blue-Silver-Red set on our chart for something with a little extra edge.
Description: Black Finish Model. Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Alder - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: C-Shape - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 21, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Black - Made In: Mexico
Second in your chain are usually wah or EQ pedals. These tend to do well when directly affecting a distorted signal, and without much else in the mix. If you plan on using a compressor you have a choice: for a more natural rock tone, the compressor works best right after the distortion or wah/EQ effects. If you’re going for that thick classic country sound however, try putting your compressor right at the end of the chain so that it squashes everything.
Our congratulations and deepest thanks on making Ibanez your choice of instrument. Ibanez standards are second to none. All Ibanez instruments are set up to our strict quality control standards before shipping. The purpose of this manual is to explain how to maintain your instrument’s finish and to keep your guitar playing as well as it did when it...
After the wah, we have a compressor. A compressor improves the sustain available to your guitar by increasing the overall volume of any signal you feed into it. At the same time it helps to soften out any big volume spikes by clamping down the volume if it gets too loud. The ME-80 puts the compressor close to your guitar because any other effect placed before the compressor will be boosted in volume which will make the effect a lot harder to control.
Guitars by José Romanillos, Robert Bouchet, Daniel Friederich, Hermann Hauser I, Hermann Hauser II, David José Rubio, Dominique Field, Francisco Simplicio, Enrique Garcia, Pascual Viudes, Enrique Coll, Santos Hernandez, Domingo Esteso, Ignacio Fleta, Marcelo Barbero, Arcangel Fernandez, Hernandez y Aguado, Manuel Reyes, Enrico Bottelli and 1950's Ramirez.
The D-18E was a mahogany dreadnought with the neck pickup and a second bridge pickup. The typical Martin pickguard had the front point cut off and a notch in back to make room for the pickups rings. A three-way toggle was mounted on the upper treble bout. Controls included one volume and two tones, with the big plastic knobs. D-18Es are the rarest of these early Martin electrics, lasting only from the ’58 prototypes through 1959. These began with prototype #163746. Around 858 of these were produced.
He or she might even graduate to an acoustic guitar with steel strings long before ever obtaining an amplifier for the acoustics in question, let alone an electric guitar to plug into it. And who are the heroes of the guitar? For the last 50 years it's been Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, and Tom Morello, to name just a few innovative names. All of these players made their reputations on electric guitars pumping through amplifiers, and at least one of them–or one like them–is likely the reason you picked up a guitar in the first place.
Your first step should be to think about what you’d really like to add to your sound. If you like the clean tones you get from your amp but can do without the buzzy onboard distortion, consider adding an overdrive or distortion pedal to your rig. If you’d prefer to experiment with chorus, a phaser or a pitch shifter, start there. There are no wrong answers when it comes to effects, and the units you choose and how you decide to use them are part of the creativity of playing guitar.
Kay was best known for its mid-priced guitars, (i.e., quality guitars priced below top-of-the-line instruments like Gibson and Gretsch models) as well as its budget instruments. Kay made guitar models for its own brand name and guitars branded as Silvertone for Sears, Sherwood and Airline for Montgomery Wards, Old Kraftsman for Spiegel, Custom Kraft for St. Louis Music,[2] Truetone for Western Auto,[3] 'Penncrest' for JC Penney, etc.[16] Also, Kay produced a line of archtop acoustics called Kamico.
Following the lead of Electro, which was having some success with their cast aluminum alloy bodies, Dobro – still a separate company – introduced its first cast aluminum Dobro Hawaiian electric lap steel guitar, probably in late 1934. Along with the aluminum lap, Dobro also debuted the Standard Guitar, and the Mandolin. Accompanying these was the Dobro Amplifier. All four listed for $67.50. These are all shown in the ’35 Tonk Brothers catalog.

pedal bass fender stratocaster electric amp left handed guitar fender telecaster gibson les paul telecaster ibanez epiphone martin guitar fuzz prs taylor guitar gretsch electro acoustic guitar les paul gibson sg marshall stratocaster fender precision bass tokai rickenbacker free fender bass fender jazz bass resonator guitar 12 string guitar fender amp fender jaguar


There’s always been something special about playing a great guitar riff. Riffs that are memorable, get stuck in your head, and that everyone knows are actually in many cases are relatively easy to play. That’s because most people remember simple melodies that they can hum along to. I don’t think many people would be able to hum along to “Through the fire and flames”.
Twelve-string electric guitars feature six pairs of strings, usually with each pair tuned to the same note. The extra E, A, D, and G strings add a note one octave above, and the extra B and E strings are in unison. The pairs of strings are played together as one, so the technique and tuning are the same as a conventional guitar, but they create a much fuller tone, with the additional strings adding a natural chorus effect. They are used almost solely to play harmony and rhythm parts, rather than for guitar solos. They are relatively common in folk rock music. Lead Belly is the folk artist most identified with the twelve-string guitar, usually acoustic with a pickup.
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