In the following years both Dobro and National built a wide variety of metal- and wood-bodied single-cone guitars, while National also continued with the Tricone for a time. Both companies sourced many components from National director Adolph Rickenbacher, and John Dopyera remained a major shareholder in National. By 1934, the Dopyera brothers had gained control of both National and Dobro, and they merged the companies to form the National-Dobro Corporation.
The two ’71 piggyback bass amps included the 1060 Bass Amplifier System ($530), featuring seven tubes, 105 watts, two channels, four inputs, volume, bass, middle and treble controls on each channel, presence, variable impedance, and a cabinet with one Univox 15″ speaker with 22-ounce dual diameter Alnico magnet and 2″ voice coil, plus a fully loaded reflex cabinet with true folded horn principle (you ampheads may know what the heck that means!). The grille had two large square cutouts with rounded corners. The 1245 Bass Amplifier System ($385) offered five tubes, 60 watts, two channels with the same controls as the 1060, and two 12″ Univox speakers with 20-ounce Alnico magnets and 2″ voice coil.
I play a Breedlove and it compares very favorably with Martin, Taylor, and Gibson while I prefer it to Fender acoustic guitars (I think Fender electrics are much better). Beautiful tone, and in one place where I play I'm not allowed to plug in. At that place, my Breedlove is the only one of my guitars I can get sufficient volume from. My other guitars are a Martin, an Ibanez, and a Schechter. Breedlove should be in the top ten.
Now that you’ve learned how to purchase a guitar, how to play guitar chords, and the basics of playing a guitar, you’ll just need to maintain practice! Use the ChordBuddy device as long as you need to, removing tabs as you progress. You’ll be ready to perform for your family and friends in no time at all. When you see how easy it is to finally practice and play the guitar, you’re not going to want to give up! See how ChordBuddy works, and discover how beginners, teachers, senior citizens, people with arthritis, and those with disabilities can play the guitar. To contact us, click here or call 877-947-2641.
If you’re reading this guide, you probably need help purchasing a first acoustic guitar or electric guitar for yourself, a friend or a child. We're here to help you understand the key specifications and features to look out for. We'll explain the differences between acoustic, acoustic-electric and electric guitars. We'll also recommended six of our best beginner guitars and two beginner guitar value packs. 
Moreover, it can hand a wide range of musical styles and techniques. In most cases they're more popular with classic rock and blues fans, perhaps the Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Clapton enthusiast. However, there have been players over the years who have used Stratocasters in much heavier styles of music. Billy Corgan and Jim Root are just a couple that come to mind.
Most people who use this alternate tuning method change the pitch of the sixth string only, the low E, from E to D. This is frequently used for Rock songs when you want a darker tone, such as with Heavy Metal. In addition, dropping the E string two steps to D means that you can play power chords with one finger. Some people also drop the first string (high e) down to D, resulting in D-A-D-G-B-D.
While most effects pedals can drastically alter your sound, there are some that add more subtle elements to your signal to create a more pleasing sound. They may not be as exciting or fun to play with, but they can be the difference between pretty good and truly great sounds. As your collection of effects grows and opportunities to play with bands increase, some of these will become important additions to your rig.
Acoustic guitarists can sometimes get left out in the cold when it comes to multi-effects pedals. Fortunately, the team at Boss have been listening to your requests for an innovative multi-effects pedal for acoustic guitar, and ended up creating a complete live performance option for players of all levels. In fact, they’ve crafted the best multi effects pedal for acoustic guitar that you could find in the Boss AD-10 Acoustic Guitar Effects Processor.
To quote the super-helpful legendarytones.com, "The Hiwatt DR103 is notably louder and can also run much cleaner than 100-watt Marshalls when needed, and they also have tremendous headroom available. Playing a Hiwatt at a loud volume is, well, an experience." The site adds, "The Hiwatt DR103 design is based around the use of four EL-34 power tubes and four 12AX7 preamp tubes. The transformers are set up so that the amp can be used with various line voltages around the world and speaker impedance can also be set to 4, 8, or 16 ohms with two speaker outputs wired in parallel."

IN STOCK:,Vintage well built!...Premium build quality by Lyle crsfted in Japan, solid spruce top, high grade quality Mahogany neck see pics. Neck profile is medium profile very comfortable..NEAR MINT JAPANESE VINTAGE GUITAR ...this guitar is like having a new 38 year old guitar it looks so newish... its finish is still very glass like and has been well taken care of over the years well preserved for YOU. The neck angle is PERFECT , frets still are like new still. The action is VERY nice & low and it plays with ease you will be very pleased indeed with its overall condition this is exactly what we look for at JVGuitars to bring you the best near mint vintage. The back and sides are also not your average run of the mill grain but very beautiful vividly wavy grain looking like some exotic woods for sure stained cherry like they would do with mahogany... very nice detail & binding and perfling work overall..this guitar is a real pleasure to play too and sounds wonderful. Anyone would be very pleased and proud to own this nearly 40 year old beauty..
I personally use Vegas, Sonar, and REAPER. I would not recommend Vegas or Sonar for live playing, if for no other reason than both have crashed on me during recording sessions, and I do not easily forgive that. REAPER (Audio Production Without Limits) never, ever crashes. It’s not as full featured as some DAWs, but what it does, it does well. I use it for all my recording.
The phaser is an interesting pedal that has a surprising mix of uses across genres. What a phaser does is add an out of phase version of your signal with your original signal. This gives your sound a swirling effect that has many sonic possibilities. Eddie Van Halen famously used a phaser set a a low rate to add some “movement” to his solos. In funk, phasers are fundamental in creating the bright and terse rhythm sounds.

The focus has always been to start with sound and top it off with a bold, boutique-inspired appearance. When Michael Kelly launched, we, in fact, only offered mandolins and acoustic basses. These two markets had been under served and consumers could not buy a great sounding instrument without breaking the bank. The Michael Kelly Dragonfly collection of both acoustic basses and mandolins quickly became popular and hard to get. Musicians were drawn to their decidedly custom appearance and then fell in love with their sound and performance.
Welcome to The Guitar Store, an owner operated store with big box selection and pro services. Offering expert amp and guitar repair. Do you like effect pedals? We have 9 cases full of over 400 different pedals to choose from. The largest stock of PRS, Fender, Mesa Boogie, Gretsch, Breedlove, Earthquaker, EVH, Strymon, Reverend and other guitar and amplifier brands in the northwest! We not only offer a diverse selection of high quality new and used guitars, but you can learn to play a ukulele, banjo, or mandolin here too. We have 5 teaching rooms with lessons daily. Check us out on social media outlets to find out about upcoming workshops and live in-store visits by local or national touring acts. We love what we do and it shows. Come on in today and get the help from professionals. You deserve it.

Values? Well, with the prices of 1960s American and British guitars through the roof, collectors and musicians turn to the next-best-thing, and that would be European and Japanese guitars. In general, any made-in-Japan solid-body electric guitar in good cosmetic shape, that's complete and playable, is worth at least $100, and any acoustic-electric, at least twice that. The more pickups it has, the more elaborate the controls, and the more flashy the pickguard, the more it's worth. Same goes for the body and headstock shape. The standard shapes that copy Fender and other manufacturers aren't as desirable as some of the weirder shapes. A Decca solidbody with an unusual body shape, with 3 pickups and an unusual original finish would probably be in the $250-350 range to the right person. An acoustic-electric with the same specs would probably be worth $100 more than that. I've seen some of the exceptional Teisco solidbodies go for $500-600, but that's uncommon. In about 2006, I saw a Teisco (one of their Mosrite copies) from about 1967 that was in flawless condition for sale in an instrument shop in Tokyo for 200,000 Yen (about $1,900). I wouldn't be surprised if it sold for that.


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Delay pedals are among the most popular effects around, and the reason is simple: A delay pedal not only gives your sound a professional sheen and adds a three-dimensional quality—even when set for a discreet, atmospheric effect—but it can also produce a wide variety of not-so-subtle sounds and textures, ranging from ear-twisting rhythmic repeats (à la Eddie Van Halen’s “Cathedral”) to faux twin-guitar harmonies and live looping.

Kramer Guitars is the manufacturer of electric guitars & basses originated from America. Inearly’s off origination in 1970’s, they produced aluminum necked electric guitar& basses & in later 1980’s they started producing wooden-necked guitars catering to hard rock and heavy metal musicians. This is the brand of guitar that challenges the quality of guitars made by Gibson. Made of maple wood and aluminum inlays, this makes one of the finest make of bass and electric guitars. These are highest priced electric guitar which starts from 90,000 to 1.5lacs. These are one of the most powerful ranges of electric guitars used by professional musicians.
Beyond effects, some processors offer dozens of other capabilities including recording tools, rhythm track generators, plus sound models based on vintage amps, speaker cabinets, microphones, mic preamps, and much more. Many also have MIDI and USB connectors in addition to XLR and ¼” inputs and outputs, and are designed to work seamlessly with computer and iOS-based recording software and apps.
What can we learn from these restaurant guests? The lesson is that we are very easily tricked into liking things we pay more for, even though they might not be that good after all. We get a particular feeling from thinking that we’re treating ourselves to something luxurious. If we, on the other hand, haven’t spent very much, we usually assume that it can’t be a good product.

Non Locking Tremolo TRÉMOLO FAT/SAT INSTALACIÓN DE LA PALANCA DEL TRÉMOLO La palanca del trémolo se puede poner y quitar muy fácilmente. Introduzca la palanca en el orificio de la placa base del trémolo. Tire hacia arriba de la palanca para extraerla. AJUSTE DE LA PALANCA DEL TRÉMOLO (SAT PRO) Para ajustar la altura de la palanca, retire la tapa de los muelles del trémolo en la parte posterior de la guitarra y, con una llave Allen de 3 mm, gire el tornillo de...


The Hi-Flier guitar, which was possibly built in the Matsumoku factory, underwent multiple phases during the course of its production. Each of the Hi-Flier’s four manufacturing phases came with a variety of feature changes, ranging from simply switching the color of the pickguard to actually fitting the guitar for humbuckers rather than the P90-style pickups it originally came with.

Gibson seems to have the features that diminish the drawbacks in the Fenders series. The USA Company comes with the humbucker pickups that reduces the noise and humming concerns and produces a warm sound. This makes Gibson mainly fit for the rock players. Unlike Fender, Gibson guitars have a shorter scale length of approximately 24.75 inches. It decreases the string tension. Thus, the easy bending produces a warmer and smooth sound, which is characteristic for the brand. You can certainly go for a Gibson guitar to enjoy a Fender guitar quality on short strings. Additionally, the use of mahogany further jazzes up its performance.
When two pickups are wired in series, a good portion of the treble frequencies is lost because the long pickup wire works like a resistor. Any resistor in the signal path will suppress the signal. The formula works like this: The longer the wire, the higher the resistance, and the more treble is lost. We all know this from guitar cables: When you use a very long guitar cable, the sound isn’t as detailed and transparent as it is with a shorter cable. A long cable acts as a resistor.
The blues was my inspiration-specifically, the late-'40s solo recordings of John Lee Hooker. "Hobo Blues" is an excellent example of early Hooker on which his violent string slapping-clearly audible in a blend of amp sound, haunting vocals, and trademark foot stomping-creates an indelible realism and engaging intimacy. My recording of Paris Slim's "The Day I Met The Boogie Man" (see the sidebar "Selected Discography") was one of my early experiments with this technique. Since that time, I have used a discrete "air-guitar" mic whenever I have had an available track for it. Guitarists may initially be skeptical of such unusual miking, but it's always a treat to watch their faces light up as they listen to the monitors deliver the bright, transient sounds that they have been accustomed to hearing during their years of practicing their instruments.
Im sure are techs at these stores that aren't bad AT ALL, but when you don't know who they are, I wouldn't trust them with a truss rod while you're not there standing over trheir shoulder watching them. I may just be paranoid, but hey, better safe than sorry is the way I look at it. I've done my own setups. And I plan to keep doing it until the day comes when I order myself a custom bass that I worked my ass off for, then I'll be willing to spend $50 on a 'properly' done setup. I dunno
We considered more than 20 amps for this guide and gave the 10 most promising models a hands-on test. Our testing panel agreed that any of these amps would at least be good enough to get a beginner started, and that for reasons of personal taste, some players might prefer one of the ones we didn’t pick. Here are the others we tried, with a couple of notes about our panelists’ impressions.

You planned out your hardware but it is best to make the purchase after you know you have the body and neck built and made sure they will fit together. If you have made it to that point, you are ready to put in the hardware components. Realize that you may need to do some basic soldering. If you need some guidance in that area, you can get it in a free course on metalworking.

Your first step should be to think about what you’d really like to add to your sound. If you like the clean tones you get from your amp but can do without the buzzy onboard distortion, consider adding an overdrive or distortion pedal to your rig. If you’d prefer to experiment with chorus, a phaser or a pitch shifter, start there. There are no wrong answers when it comes to effects, and the units you choose and how you decide to use them are part of the creativity of playing guitar.
We took another detailed look at all acoustic-electric guitars priced under $500 available from major American online retailers, and for this update, we shortlisted 78 of them for closer analysis. We then collated over 7700 ratings and reviews from forums, videos, retailers, blogs and major music gear publications and processed those data with the Gearank Algorithm to produce a Gearank score of out 100 for each guitar. Finally we selected the highest rated guitars in two of the most popular price brackets, sub $300 and sub $500. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.
Most beginners find that during the process of learning (after a year or so) you will figure out your own sound. You will naturally be drawn to music that features guitar in it, and great guitar parts. So what usually happens is that your own musical tastes will change and with this change the type of instrument that suits your sound the best will also change. So when you’re ready to take the next step, you will have a much better idea of what you really want.

Gibson and Fender have been ripping the public off for years, they're not even close to being worth what they charge especially Fender with such a mass produced bolt on neck and lame finishes design. Carvin is a superior guitar in every way and what people fail to mention is that you can choose what wood and finish you would like as well as bolt on neck, set neck or neck through designs and their pick up's are impeccable. A truly great guitar co. With excellent customer relations and real musicians will all show respect for Carvin when mentioned if not already owning one.


The neck is also made of mahogany and is hand set into the body. Looking at the fretboard, we see a standard rosewood design with white binding and classic trapezoid inlays. Epiphone went with a set of Alnico Classic humbucker pickups. These are very close to what the original Gibson solution had to offer. Classic rock and blues just flow out of these, although you are more than free to crank up the gain and blast some heavy riffs.
Once you have the height of the strings over the fretboard adjusted, you can fine tune the intonation setting with an electronic tuner. If the saddle locations are already close to where they should be (based on your measurements), your saddle height should not have to be changed very much as you make the final intonation adjustment. If this is a tremolo bridge and it is blocked, tension the tremolo spring claw to the correct setting( this adjustment will be the subject of a separate article).
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This is an absolutely stunning OM acoustic in MINT/As New Condition. This has been in my personal collection for a few years. In the words of Bill Kraus, the builder: An OM model in my favorite combination of woods: Red spruce top, Honduran rosewood back and sides, curly Koa bindings. I first heard about Bill Kraus from my good friend, Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music in Buffalo, NY. Scott has been a factory authorized Martin repair center since 1979 and has seen the finest 6 figure pre-war Martins. Scott was raving about Bill Kraus, his knowledge of tonewoods, and the insane quality of his guitars. I also learned that Stan Jay of Mandolin Bros. was equally impressed with Kraus Guitars and had started carrying Bill’s guitars in his store. Every Kraus guitar at Mandolin Bros. has sold!
There were few things more powerful than Stevie Ray Vaughan with a guitar in his hands. Though he was deeply entrenched in the blues idiom, he took it to an entirely new and original level. Heavily influenced by Jimi Hendrix, his triple string bends and lightning fast double stops were things of absolute beauty. While every one of his songs is an electric blues guitar masterclass, perhaps his most impressive performance is in the song “Texas Flood.”
Being the go-to instrument of popular guitarists like Hank Williams Sr. Neil Young and Jimmy Page (just to name a few), the current production model D-28 continues the Martin Legacy in terms of build and sound quality. Finally, all these features are provided without the inherent maintenance issues and crazy price tags of actual vintage models. If you're looking for a true traditional acoustic then your best bet is to go for the Martin D-28. The MSRP is $3299 but you can get it online for around $2,629.
In 1958, Gibson made a radical design change to their Junior and TV models: with the design change came cosmetic changes to these guitars that would later take on enormous importance. To accommodate player requests for more access to the top frets than the previous designs allowed, Gibson revamped both these electric guitar models with a new double-cutaway body shape. In addition, the Junior’s fresh look was enhanced with a new cherry red finish, while the re-shaped TV adopted a new, rather yellow-tinged finish for its new design.

Add bite or presence by boosting between 2kHz and 6kHz, depending on the tone you're after. Little over 4-5kHz is produced by a guitar speaker, though going for a brighter DI'd clean sound is quite legitimate for artistic reasons. Similar-sounding electric guitars that may be conflicting within a mix can be separated to a limited extent by adding bite at different frequencies, though choosing two different-sounding guitars and/or amp sounds and examining the arrangement carefully usually works better. As a rule, single-coil guitars are best for cutting through a busy mix without taking up too much space, while humbucking pickups create a thicker sound which may be beneficial in recordings where there is only one guitar part.


The 10.5mm string spacing allows for easy picking across strings, such as string skipping and hybrid picking. The snap and hold tremolo arm socket can makes it easy to load a tremolo arm, and the arm torque adjuster enables fine torque adjustment without any tools. The stud lock screws lock the stud bolts in place, for better tuning stability and resonance. The 2-point floating tremolo system allows for super smooth tremolo motion when either raising or lowering the pitch.
From its beginnings in 1970, Mesa/Boogie was beloved for its small-but-powerful Mark series amps; in 1989, however, the company decided to take its game to a new audience. The result was the Rectifier range of bigger and beefier Dual and Triple Rectifier amps. Since then, the Dual Rectifier has become one of the most popular rock amps on the planet.

This page is a work in progress and as new information is revealed it will be added to the list. But I can't do this alone, folks. See a guitar not listed? Tell me! Listed below are the major manufacturers, known badges and suspected badges to the best of my knowledge in written and list form to make it easy to find out WHO MADE YOUR GUITAR! In some cases I won't know because the badge you have may be extremely rare and virtually unknown to even seasoned collectors.


I have tried many different wiring schemes as well, with 3-way switching, 3-way with coil taps, and even bypassed the tone control (since I never dial back the tone in my playing anyway). I have played this guitar through high-gain amps (Carvin V3, all three channels, Carvin Vai Legacy), through VOX AC15, Vox AC30 (both with Greenbacks and with Celestion Blues speakers), and an Orange 2x12 combo. In all of these excellent amps where my Carvin SC90 guitar sings and sparkles and does whatever I want it to, this Frankenstrat with Duncans or with Carvin P'ups sounds like a fart after 12 glasses of cheap Charles Shaw wine.

What people may not know is that they have a very affordable line of entry-level guitars.  This line continues the legacy of craftsmanship and prestige that comes with owning a Taylor. Whether you look into their line of Baby Taylors – 3/4 sized guitars that play better than many full-sized budget guitars, or you look into their entry full-sized acoustics, Taylor will not disappoint you.


Perfect working condition Amp is an absolute beast, if you know anything about these AC30s you'll know that there tone is unbelievable. Make me an offer or trade These amps sell for close to 18k and well above that on oversees markets The amp does have some cosmetic ware but obviously does not affect the sound what so ever Gibson, fender, guitar Watssapp me 0737886874 Amp is based in Durban ...
A. Many professional musicians invest thousands of dollars in high-end guitars made from expensive and rare tonewoods. A $100 student guitar made from spruce is not going to produce that level of tonality regardless of the player’s skill level. As a beginner, your main focus should be on skills such as chord formation, fretting techniques, and basic scales. Improving tonality and performance are long-term goals.
I've been a lazy person in terms of writing product reviews, but had to chime in on the Epiphone LP purchase. First of all, I did research on new guitar options at the local Guitar Center website and settled on this instrument. They had it for $199, so for kicks I looked on Amazon two nights before I had planned to test and buy at our GC on a Sat. Amazon had it for $159 and $199 for lots of extras. I already had a case and nice Marshall Amp, so only needed the guitar. The best part, it arrived on Sat about the same time I would have purchased locally. The reviews were so good, I was not worried about testing live before purchase and it was a great choice.
A Customer brought this guitar into us in horrible shape. He had stored this guitar in the basement for a number of years with no issues, however in the fall of 2007 a large flood swept through our area filling his basement, and in turn his guitar, with water for almost a week. Needless to say, by the time he was able to get the guitar out it had been heavily damaged. When he brought this guitar into us it was completely covered in mud and river residue, the electroics were completely shot, and the hardware had begun to oxidize. We began by completely taking apart the guitar. We thoroughly cleaned each part of the guitar, inside and out. Once completed we were actually able to save all the original hardware from the guitar and the finish had withstood the flood. The electronics had to be completely replaced however. Staying true to the guitar we used as much era specific parts as we could find. As you can see, by the time we were done with the guitar you could hardly tell anything had happened to it!
We indicate and report to EMS Worldwide Express mail service that the guitar is sent with a lower declared value than the purchased price and as a gift so that there will be a possible exemption on custom clearance fees, taxes or you may need to pay a little amount but it is necessary, or the custom will open the package and revalue the guitar. Based on our experience, the custom fees in the Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and Asia are very minimal since we declared the guitar as a gift and lower purchased price in order to lessen the custom fees or even possible exemption and we have not received complaints from our valued customers regarding custom fees, taxes and tariffs.
The foot pedal is usually the only control on a wah pedal (especially on famous models like the Vox V487 and Dunlop Crybaby), but some come with controls to change the Q, or how wide the sweep of the wah is and how prominent it sounds. They are great for adding extra attitude to your bends and giving funky riffs some extra punch. The intro to “Voodoo Child” is probably the most recognisable use of a wah pedal. These are great fun and we’d recommend them to anyone – if lead guitar or funky rhythm is your thing you can’t do without it!
Nitrocellulose lacquer is one of the great original-era Fender electric guitar finishes, and is still used today on select instruments. Thin, porous and delicate, it’s a premium finish prized for sonic qualities that let body woods breathe with their true tonal character, and for an appearance that ages and wears in a distinctive way appealing to many players.
Also included was the GP, an equal double-cutaway model with a mahogany body, flamed maple carved top, glued-in neck, fine-tune bridge and stop tailpiece. The only models I’ve seen, which were also advertised, had twin humbuckers and conventional electronics. One source refers to a GP-1, which by nomenclature would suggest a single humbucker, but it’s not known if this ever actually existed. Also, it’s not clear if the GPs came in parts or fully assembled.
 Great, low priced, vintage Japanese project guitar. May be Decca, Teisco or similar. Has "P90" style, Japanese pickup installed which is not original to the guitar. Solid Mahogany body and neck with Brazilian rosewood fingerboard. Body is perfectly flat and is a thin 1.25" thick. Back of neck profile is very "flat". Top of original bridge is missing and has a wooden one laying in it's place. The pickup is wired directly to the output jack as there are no pots. 3 of the original tuning machines have had their gears changed. All work fine. The headstock logo is missing. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Would make a great vintage, Japanese, project / player guitar.
As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.

Roland has come a long way from its humble beginnings back in the early '70s as a rhythm machine manufacturer. The company grew to produce various other instruments and amplifiers, and is now one of the biggest music gear manufacturers in the world. With so many guitar brands under their name that could produce amps for them - like Boss and Line 6 - they still take the effort to build their own branded amps, and the success that they are enjoying is proof that they are doing the right thing. Their most popular amp is still the Roland Jazz Chorus, as used by artists like Albert King, Andy Summers, Metallica's James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett, Robert Smith of The Cure, Jeff Buckley and many more. These days they have a variety of amplifiers in the entry to mid-tier market, most of which continue to garner great reviews.


Here we have another very Beautiful and rare "The Aria Model" Vintage Japanese F style Mandolin with such amazing tone!!! nearing 40 years old these are AMAZING! This is the rare " The Aria" Model M700 as seen on the Classic inlay in the headstocks Gorgeous Brazilian Rosewood veneer is a super beautiful Japanese example of the highly revered F style mandolin made famous by Gibson. These older models were put out during the 1970s this example was 1973. These premium examples have become so popular with Players & Collectors over the past several years now. The inlays on the neck and headstock and the classic violin sunburst on this model are simply gorgeous! The top is solid tight grained old growth Sitka spruce and the back & sides are premium AAA figured & flamed maple, the neck is Mahogany This particular M 700 is in very good condition with some minimal wear from playing please refer to the pics for those details. The original case and pick guard are also still present and do come with this fine instrument the guard is simply off for now. With the resurgence in popularity of Bluegrass and other music styles utilizing the wonderful Mandolin sound in recordings and live performances these rare Gibson Replicas vintage mandolins have been steadily increasing in popularity and in value because players are catching onto the great old high end vintage Japanese instruments now so the demand has risen accordingly. If you're looking for a great Vintage Mandolin that is extremely well made with top craftsmanship utilizing top the grade AAA woods that have now aged and have a wonderful vintage patina to them these are the affordable Japanese vintage F Mandolin alternative choice to a $5000.00 - $10,000 vintage Gibson F-5 ..thats why many Pros today are seeking the best vintage for a great deal. This Old Aria M700 is simply a great one!.
Honestly, a couple of years back I never looked at Fender for acoustic guitars because everyone was always talking about Taylors, Gibsons, Martins, Takamines, Paul Reed Smiths etc. Despite being a very good electric guitar company not to mention the inventor of the no. 1 guitar in the world, the strat, everyone always looked Fender, alongside with Ibanez and Washburn (good electric guitar brands) as bad acoustic manufacturers. I was one of them too. For me, Washburn and Ibanez might be a good budget acoustic guitar manufacturer but they don't deserve to be high in this 'top acoustic guitar brands' list. But for Fender, these past few months my mindset about them changed. I never realized how authentic and good sounding fender acoustics were way back then but I'm happy now that I changed my mind about them. I love them now. It's not about having vintage acoustics, or having high end prices. Fender don't set their prices as high as taylor, martin or gibson but they must not be judged ...more

INSTALL "UNDER SADDLE" PICK UP - $100.00 and up. Expand endpin hole to accommodate jack. Wire pickup to pre-amp and jack. Fit and re-size old saddle for proper action and contact with pickup. May require new saddle and re-rout of saddle slot(additional). There are other variables relating to pre-amps which must be individually quoted. Condition of bridge and neck angle may be factors in the appropriateness of an under the saddle pickup.


There were differences between the pickups as well – the National had slanted units under enormous covers, while the Supro featured 8-string versions of the Alnico V pickups found on many Spanish-style guitars. The difference in tone proved to be minimal. The Supro has a more refined sound than its cheaper cousins with the famous string-through pickup, but it can still be raw and biting when required. Although it is a single-coil pickup, it has excellent hum rejection and sounds wonderful either overdriven or clean. The guitar has plenty of sustain and a surprising level of output, making it an excellent instrument for rock and roll as well as country music.

After all, we each have our own favorites, whether it be a particular player, style or era. However, that doesn’t mean such a list can’t be based on some element of objective reasoning. To some extent, the proof is in all of us: anyone who picks up the instrument borrows at least a handful of techniques and stylistic tendencies that someone else brought to the table. The key is determining which guitarists have had the most impact among the larger number of players—in other words, who has contributed most across the board to the way we approach the instrument.
The problem that had led to Martin and the idea of making guitars in the first place also led Kaman to the idea of using synthetic materials in guitars. He realized he could use a composite fiberglass to “improve” two aspects of guitar construction. He could solve the problem of cracking due to wood shrinkage caused by changes in heat and humidity, and he could improve vibration transmission from the back because fiberglass actually resonates at frequencies similar to many woods, but is more efficient (wood actually absorbs some of the instrument’s vibrations).
This guitar was first introduced in 2014, and has since been one of their more popular acoustics - thanks to its USA hand-crafted quality which you can own for a relatively accessible cost. The guitar is built using North American tonewoods that include solid walnut back and sides, along with a solid Sitka spruce for the top. This configuration, along with Gibson's premium build quality results in a balanced and full sounding acoustic voice, that elegantly matches the vibe of the instrument.
The ultimate rock/metal electric guitar instrument is here! Shreddage II covers the entire range of lead AND rhythm playing – every fret, every string, and tons of articulations. A powerful interface allows for easy playing and deep customization. With the included Kontakt Player and ReValver HPse, you’ll have everything you need to SHRED. Now includes Shreddage 2X update!
Rickenbacker basses have a distinctive tone. The 4001 bass has neck-through construction for more solid sustain due to more rigidity. The sustain at the bottom end is particularly striking, and by routing the two outputs from the stereo “Rick-O-Sound” output, the brighter bridge pick up through a guitar rig and the bassier neck pickup through a bass setup, a particularly distinctive bass sound is produced. The 3000 series made from the mid-1970s to mid-1980s were cheaper instruments with bolt-on 21 fret necks. There was also a set neck4000 version in 1975 and 76 (neck set like a Gibson Les Paul) which had a 20-fret neck, dot inlays, no binding (similar to the 4001S) but only a single bridge position mono pickup. (more info needed)
The Ibanez GRX20ZBKN is part of the GIO series developed for players who want Ibanez quality in a more affordable package. The guitar is suitable for all types of music, but often a favorite of rock, metal and shred lovers. It features an alder body and a maple neck which feels sleek and fast. Great for moving quickly up and down the neck for those fast riffs and licks. A solid good looking low budget guitar for the beginner and intermediate.

I wish both of them bankrupt and disappear from the face of the earth to give way for new innovative brands with better pricing towards beginner musicians. I don’t care they are made on the blueridge mountains of Tennase or the shanty town in Shanghai. If they cann’t make a guitar to the new musicians for their liking, tradition or not they are garbage.
Back in the good ol’ days, guitarists had to crank their amplifiers to eleven in order to obtain a nice and creamy distortion. Today, this is no longer the case. Thanks to overdrive pedals, you can basically drive every clean amp into overdrive – at any volume – and choose the amount of gain and shape the tone precisely as desired. The overdriven or crunch sounds are commonly used for rock, to slightly get that “breakup” clean tone or to play blues licks and solos. During the last two decades, guitarists found out that overdrive pedals are also perfect for boosting the crunch channel of their amps into total distortion – a technique often used during guitar solos, to give the sound that extra weight and girth – or, as with the famous Tubescreamer, to tighten up the bass response of the amplifier gain channel. The Boss SD-1 is a very popular choice for overdrive pedals, capable of great sounds. The legendary TS9 by Ibanez is also worth a mention – even considering that it’s available in Mini and Deluxe formats. And while we’re at it, why not give the Harley Benton Ultimate Drive a try? This little screamer can boost your amp into full overdrive at a very competitive price.
The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar features a solid mahogany body that guarantees durability, along with a set-neck having ultra access. There is hardly a guitar which sounds great in regular, single-coil configuration, also in humbucker mode, but that’s what the Schecter does; having excellent sustain. The set of this guitar was great out of the box, while the fingerboard is good, smooth and quick.
If you are looking for a guitar that is not only surpassing quality levels but also looks classy, Gretsch is the one you require. The company certainly makes some genuinely beautiful instruments that appeal your eyes. Although, some Gretsch guitars come with a considerable price tag, yet they certainly worth the money. Likewise, you can also find several hollow and semi-hollow body guitars at Gretsch that are quite affordable. It means every player from all levels will surely find something of their interest over here.

In the ’66 American Teisco Del Rey Catalog, the small, humble EP-9T was left over from before (formerly EP-9), with the quasi-Gibson style head and triangular control plate. The only thing new was the Bigsby (thus the T). In the ’66 Japanese catalog, the small thinlines were represented by the EP-2L and EP-1L. The EP-2L looks for all the world like the EP-9T, with the large rectangular pickups with black inserts, controls on the triangular lower bout plate, and a long-armed trapeze vibrato with a curved handle. The EP-1L was the same except for having a single metal-covered pickup at the neck.
‘Power' Chords are used in most styles of music but are particularly useful for rock guitar; they even sound cool on acoustic (check out Nirvana's Unplugged album for an awesome example). The basic idea is that you only have to learn one chord shape, and that one shape can move around the fingerboard to make other chords. It uses no open strings, and muting the unused open strings is a very important part of the technique.
You might be wondering: “Why the glossy finish?” Having a gloss finish can mean the difference between your guitar cracking—or not--in extreme temperature changes.Of course, like all Cordobas, there is a truss rod with which you can change the string relief, so you’re not having to press the strings down so hard, making it easier for beginners to learn.

I have been a bass player and still am however I started on guitar at 12 and went back to it about 12 years ago. There really isn’t too much difference of perfecting your craft on either instrument. The most important thing to realize is when to play and when not to. I spent years learning how not to be a busy bass player and now that I have such a passion for playing guitar, I’m learning how to sound busy without really being busy.
The EB-18 was the first electric bass the Martin company produced in 1979. The single-pickup EB-18 was a partner to Martin’s E-series electric guitars. Its scroll-shaped headstock was reminiscent of the Stauffer-style pegheads of early Martins. The EB-28 was added to the line a year later. It had a mahogany body and PJ pickups. Both models were discontinued in 1983.
When the Fender company invented the first widely produced electric bass guitar (the Fender Precision Bass) they also developed a bass amplifier, the Fender Bassman, first produced in 1952. This was a 26-watt tube amplifier with a single 15" speaker. In 1954, the Bassman was redesigned to use four 10" speakers. This speaker cabinet was an open-back design; as such, it had poor low-frequency efficiency and was prone to blowing speakers when used for bass because of the lack of damping. Somewhat ironically, it became very popular as an electric guitar amplifier. The circuit design also underwent repeated modifications. The "5F6A" circuit introduced in 1958 is regarded as a classic amplifier design and was copied by many other manufacturers, such as Marshall.
Also, if your slide playing includes any fretting at all, FORGET IT. While it certainly raises them well away from the neck, the strings are lifted to a height that makes trying to fret them pull them off pitch well before you reach the fret... and there is NO adjusting it. I used one on a wide neck 12 string strung for six. A neck designed for the tension of 12 strings easily takes the tension of a heavy gauge set in a raised open tuning. The "Slide Guitar Extension Nut" is ideal for such an application (if you don't want to even try any fretting) but I doubt Stewey Mac's sells very many of them.
Acoustic guitars that have been fitted with a pickup can be recorded using the same techniques as standard electric guitars when plugged into an amp. Interesting sounds can be created by mic’ing up an acoustic guitar and sending the sound through an amp. This can be done live – although you should be aware of feedback – or a previously recorded acoustic track can be re-amped and used exclusively, or mixed with the original acoustic track. You can get some really gnarly and original ‘electric’ sounds with creative use of overdriven acoustic guitar; it’s especially good for slide playing.
Large-diaphragm condenser microphones set to cardioid or omni mode work better for ambient purposes at distances of 2-3' or farther, introducing more room sound and coloration. Ribbon microphones, which are also (usually) dynamic, have become a popular alternative for guitar-cabinet recording in either close or distant miking situations. They combine good, detailed sonic reproduction with the capacity to withstand intense levels of sound pressure (a characteristic of their dynamic brethren, as well).
• Library content : Choose from 154 patterns covering a wide range of realistic riffs, arpeggios, alternating intervals and chords. The patterns are conveniently grouped into 31 well-coordinated set of presets, suitable for everything from modern pop music to electronics. Autochord mode and convenient presets allow you to execute or program convincing batches of electric guitar, regardless of background music.

Sweep picking provides you with a more economical way to pick one-note-per-string or combos of one-note-per-string and two-note-per-string instances up and down the string register. Not to be confused with raking, the idea here is to fret and ring out every note clearly (no cheating!). To do this, it’s of paramount importance you approach this technique slowly and be very critical of each note’s clarity. When starting to sweep pick, start with a locked wrist and don’t be afraid the experiment with varying pick widths.

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