A sub-brand under the same umbrella as German brand, Behringer, Bugera has been flying under the radar for some time – though they make some surprisingly clever amplifiers. The BC15 is one such amp. Styled like its predecessors from the ’50s and ’60s, this vintage-inspired amp benefits from a single 12AX7 vacuum tube giving it a lot more warmth and character than for which you’ll pay. And don’t let its size fool you, either – while it only has a single 8″ speaker, it offers up a whopping 30 watts, making for a surprisingly loud little machine. For the price, it’s seriously difficult to do better than this.
In 1883, a german immigrant named Frederic Gretsch started a small instrument manufacturing company in Brooklyn, New York. On a trip to visit home in 1895, he died unexpectedly, leaving the company in the hands of his 15-year-old son, Fred. The company flourished for generations, especially due to the popularity of their hollow body guitars with rockabilly, blues, and jazz musicians. In 1967, however, the brand began to falter after the Gretsch family sold to then music industry giant Baldwin. In 1985, Fred W. Gretsch bought the company back from Baldwin and began restoring it to its former glory – coinciding with the rise of one of their most prolific artists, Brian Setzer of the Stray Cats. Today, their guitars, like the USA Custom Shop White Falcon pictured above, are used by a wide array of musicians from all walks of life, including Billy F. Gibbons of ZZ Top, Tim Armstrong of Rancid, Band of Skulls, and Portugal. the Man.
Takamine has been known for their high quality and highly affordable guitars for years. Their GD51CE comes in just under $500, and is a cutaway dreadnought. It is my top pick if you are looking for the best cutaway acoustic guitar under $500. It has a slim neck for great playability, something that beginners and experts both love. It has a spruce top with rosewood back and sides. You will also be able to amplify this guitar, as it is an acoustic electric. It comes in natural or sunburst finishes. Owners describe it’s sound as loud and balanced, which is expected of a dreadnought cutaway. You can’t go wrong either, as it has an onboard tuner. See more pictures and reviews of the guitar here.
A note on acoustic guitar pickups (piezo, in particular): Making crazy 10 dB cuts? Contemplating making some absurd boost? You're probably not wrong – the acoustic pickup world can be the Wild West when it comes to tone. Some are great, and some are downright questionable. There are too many variables to even begin suggesting frequencies, so use your ears to guide you home on this one.

Rickenbacker: From making world’s first electric guitar to making the most iconic guitars of Rock’n Roll, Rickenbacker has a history of innovations in guitar industry. Their guitars are still made in the old way. Owning a Rickenbacker is pretty much like owning a classic muscle car, yes there may be more modern guitars out there but no one’s got the mojo of a Rickenbacker.
Acoustic and electric archtops are identical in design with the only difference being the addition of electro-magnetic pickups and pots. Archtops can either be full-bodied or thinline. The full-bodied archtop retains good volume and acoustic resonance when played unplugged though feedback may be an issue when amplified. The thinline body minimizes feedback by sacrificing acoustic volume and resonance.
Nickel trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
This website is not affiliated with the Samick Musical Instrument Mfg. Company in any way. We do not deal in the buying or selling of instruments of any kind, nor do we offer evaluation services for your instruments. Most prices listed are MSRP, taken from catalogs and price lists, and have not been adjusted for inflation (unless specified) and do not reflect the actual street value a model may have sold at. More on prices here: MSRP.
It might be a little overwhelming when you listen to the song being played by the professionals. Try not to listen to all the extra filler that these musicians put into their music and focus instead on the chord progression. Think about the chords that go into making these songs, try to memorize them, and listen to when the chord changes happen in the song.
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Electric guitar necks vary in composition and shape. The primary metric of guitar necks is the scale length, which is the vibrating length of the strings from nut to bridge. A typical Fender guitar uses a 25.5-inch (65 cm) scale length, while Gibson uses a 24.75-inch (62.9 cm) scale length in their Les Paul. While the scale length of the Les Paul is often described as 24.75 inches, it has varied through the years by as much as a half inch.[citation needed]
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To create a thicker rhythm guitar sound, overdub the same part one or more times. Depending on the desired effect, the overdub can be treated as one mono signal and mixed to the same stereo position, or panned left and right for a stereo double-tracked sound. Alternatively, treat the original track with an ADT (Artificial Double Tracking) effect. This can be done with a digital delay set to around 40 milliseconds. Again, the delayed signal can be panned or mixed as one with the original guitar track.
Another tone option for a guitarist is to put a pickup out of phase with another pickup, producing a thin "inside-out" squawky kind of sound. When 2 pickups are in phase, they work together and reinforce each other. When they are out of phase the 2 pickups are working against one another and the resulting sound is the "leftovers" from these cancelations. The closer the 2 pickups are, the greater the cancelations, the thinner the sound and the lesser the volume. Therefore, the neck and bridge pickups out of phase is the best choice for this type of sound.
For players who want an incredible palette of tones for a low entry cost, this is the amp for you. Experiment with 128 tonal presets, or create your own sounds with digital models of over 200 amps, cabs and effects. If you’re into playing different styles of music and you don’t want to invest in different rigs, look to this versatile solid state amp first.
I like it especially as a studio companion for lead guitar players who have session clients that need melodies to come out perfectly on recorded tracks. Having a neck that's so thin makes it easier to play and get right the first time which will reduce the number of takes. Though the live performer will benefit as well, considering that improve playability has universal benefits.
Older 1800s Martins are a challange to date (since they don't have a serial number like 1898 and later Martins). A "New York" stamp does not immediately suggest that the Martin guitar is from the 1830s for example. To accurately date pre-1898 Martins you must be familiar design and ornamentation appointments and the changes that took place in each model throughout the 1800s. Most useful though is the stamp, but you can only use the stamp on the INSIDE of the body on it's center backstrip (visible through the soundhole) to date a guitar. And even then you can only date to a period (and not to an exact date). For example if it says on the center back strip, "C.F. Martin, New York", then the guitar is pre-1867. If it says, "C.F. Martin & Co., New York", it is between 1867 and 1897. Note 1860-1890s Martins have a date (year of manufacture) penciled on the underside of the top. Check with a mirror, looking just below the soundhole and between the braces.
Whilst we’re on the subject of practice amps, we have to talk about the amazing BOSS Katana-Mini Guitar Amplifier. This little powerhouse of tone makes our best cheap amps that don’t suck list due to its immense sound, portability and inspiring tones within. Coming straight out of the acclaimed BOSS Katana series, the Katana-Mini uses the authentic multi-stage analog gain circuitry which allows you to select from three classic sound settings - Brown, Crunch, and Clean and enjoy a selection of fantastic sonic options. On top of that you have a classic 3 band EQ to dial in your perfect sound as well as an onboard tape-style delay.
The double-neck guitar is designed so that two guitar necks can share one body. This design allows the guitarist to switch between either neck with ease. The double-neck guitar will normally have a standard six-string neck and a twelve-string neck. Other combinations, such as a six-string neck and a fretless neck, are available. The double-neck guitar may be used in live situations when a guitarist needs a twelve-string guitar for the rhythm part and a six-string guitar for the solo break.

So when you plugged your guitar in and tried to play it electrified, you couldn't get any bass tone out of the guitar-the bass strings didn't go over the polepieces of the pickups! When you tried to fret notes along the low E string, your fingers would fall off of the fretboard. That one error turned an otherwise beautiful, comfortable and very functional instrument into something that played and sounded like crap.
Extremely eclectic, Page has a diverse array of guitaristic influences, which includes blues guitarists Otis Rush, Buddy Guy and Hubert Sumlin as well as early rockabilly guitarists Cliff Gallup and Scotty Moore. He combined these influences with a strong interest in the occult and plenty of his own studio savvy to paint a musical landscape within every Led Zeppelin song. Page’s landmark use of echo effects in tracks like “How Many More Times” and “You Shook Me,” bizarre tunings in cuts like “Friends” and “Bron-Y-Aur Stomp,” and excursions with a violin bow in songs like “Dazed and Confused” yielded textures that were unparalleled at the time.
List of guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson and more. This list answers the question, 'What are the best guitar brands?' Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.
Like effects pedals, multi-effects processors are used to modify and alter the clean signal of your guitar to produce a large variety of effects (reverb, wah-wah, overdrive, distortion, chorus, etc). Unlike a simple pedal that gives you one or two options for modifying tone, a multi-effects processor has a full load of effects and sounds that allow you to play music with a rainbow-colored tonal palette. There are processors for modifying guitar, bass, and even units for vocalists with pitch-correction tools and harmonizer effects.
This particular model is a cutaway acoustic-electric hybrid with European spruce top and Indian rosewood back and sides. The electric system is from Fishman-Presys with an onboard tuner. The GK comes with Savarez Cristal Corum high tension strings, and thanks to the low-relief neck, the action itself is easy to handle, making the guitar easier to play. The GK Studio Negra has a deeper, bassier sound than the usual sharp brightness of a “blanca” guitar. Watch the video on the Amazon listing to really get a good idea of what you’ll experience playing this instrument.

This is a tricky one, because I’d hate to see anyone miss out on a bargain. Unless you really know what you’re doing, buying a used guitar is a risky venture. Definitely, you shouldn’t buy a second-hand guitar without seeing or trying it out. Again, sticking with well-known brands is wise. Look carefully for worn fret boards (pitted holes under frequently-played notes) and grooves in the frets themselves. Check along the neck to see if it’s not too bent— it’s supposed to be slightly curved. Getting problems like these fixed professionally can be expensive and you might as well buy something new in the first place. The bottom line here is that high-quality instruments that have been properly maintained don’t lose any value. A good second-hand guitar should cost you as much as a good new one — but yes, those bargains are out there, too.
One half step down from standard Drop A. Used by bands such as Trivium on some songs from Silence in the Snow and The Sin and the Sentence, Destrophy, TesseracT, Brian "Head" Welch, After The Burial on some songs from their Rareform, In Dreams and Dig Deep albums, Within the Ruins, In Hearts Wake and Periphery. Jim Johnston used this tuning for the song "I Bring the Darkness (End of Days)".
This 248 page book is part of a series of similar volumes, including The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Formulas for Guitar Scales and Modes, The Guitar Grimoire: Progressions & Improvisation, The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Guitar Chords and Voicings, and so on. You get the idea. Master a few of these and you’re going to to be in excellent shape.
The process of setting up an acoustic guitar is not exactly the same as it is for an electric. New strings are usually added, and the amount of relief in the neck is adjusted as required, but the bridge adjustments are very different from the setup of an electric guitar. At the bridge of an acoustic, the strings are raised by a piece of plastic or bone that is known as a saddle, and are then anchored by individual pegs that are made of a similar material. When the intonation needs adjustment it usually means that you need to replace the entire saddle. Luckily this is a cheap and easy endeavor that isn’t likely to add to acoustic guitar setup cost. The saddle can sometimes be shaved at the bottom in order to lower the strings’ height (or “action”). Only someone with experience should perform saddle shaving, as it is very important that the saddle bottom remains even and flat. The cost of guitar setup for an acoustic is similar to that of an electric setup, though it may be cheaper at times due to the less complicated bridge.
Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.

Nitrocellulose lacquer is one of the great original-era Fender electric guitar finishes, and is still used today on select instruments. Thin, porous and delicate, it’s a premium finish prized for sonic qualities that let body woods breathe with their true tonal character, and for an appearance that ages and wears in a distinctive way appealing to many players.
This tonewood isn’t a very common wood used. But, when it is used on a solid-body guitar, you’re definitely going to have access to deeper, richer, and woodier tones. However, pair it with a Cedar top and you can have bright and warm overtones. Paired with a Spruce top, you can play to get an aggressive bite on the trebles with a definite presence on the low end.
Although the electric bass was invented in the 1930s by Paul Tutmarc, his new instrument did not sell well. It was not until Leo Fender developed the Fender Precision electric bass in 1950 that this new instrument took off in the marketplace. Unlike the upright bass, a solid-body electric bass does not produce acoustic sound from a hollow body; while an upright bass player often benefits from using a bass amp, a bass amp is a necessity for an electric bass player.
Extra Features: This is where we’ll bucket a bunch of extras that could be important to you, depending where you are in your guitar playing journey, and what gear you might already have. Some multi-effects pedals include handy tools like a tuner, a looper pedal, a built-in expression or wah pedal, an input for an external expression pedal, the ability to double as a USB interface, the ability to be powered by batteries, and so on and so forth. It comes down to personal preference, but we generally like to see the inclusion of a tuner, and looper pedal, since both are extremely useful tools for most guitar players no matter their skill level.
It has been said that Barney never played his signature Kays. On the contrary... Barney Kessel has been photographed in concert with the Kay K8700 Jazz Special on multiple occasions, has made appearances at Waldo's Jazz Club on the television classic "Johnny Staccato - Television's Jazz Detective" and has been confirmed by son Dan (who also recorded with the Artist on several famous recordings) to have used the Artist to record countless rock, pop, r&b and blues hits with the most popular performers of the early '60s.

Kay was indeed one of the earliest American manufacturers of electric guitars. Things progressed, and by 1934, the company was officially known as the "Kay Musical Instrument Company". The company became larger and more successful over the years, leading to the addition of a new factory in Elk Grove Village, Illinois in 1964. But somehow by 1965, the company had hit rough times and was bought by Seeburg, a jukebox manufacturer that sold Kay to Valco in 1967.
Modulation, in general electronics, means the altering of signal strength. In audio devices, modulation is a control feature that varies the strength of some effect over time to alter tonal properties. Some modulation effects mix ("modulate") an instrument's audio signal with a signal generated by the effect called a carrier wave.[70] Other modulation effects split an instrument's audio signal in two, altering one portion of the signal and mixing it with the unaltered portion.[71]

EQ or equalization effects work by boosting or cutting specified frequency bands within the sound signal. From treble or high-end sounds such as the sizzling sounds of a riveted cymbal to low-end sources such as the thump of a bass drum or bass guitar, EQ effects don't change the pitch but rather alter the timbre or quality of the sound. Depending on the application, EQ control can be quite precise or very simple.
This guitar is based on Loar's U. S. Pat. 2,020,557 (filed 1934, awarded 1935), in which electric amplification is combined with an acoustic guitar body. The design offered a player the option of switching between electric and acoustic amplification, or combining both, with metal posts through the bridge that transfers vibrations from the strings to the bar-armature. With the posts raised, the bridge comes in contact with the soundboard for exclusively acoustic amplification; with the posts lowered to contact the metal bar-armature, both acoustic and electric amplification is engaged, and with the posts lowered completely, the bridge is lifted off of the soundboard and supported only by the bar-armature for exclusively electric amplification. The back of the guitar, made from arched spruce, with two f-shaped soundholes, incorporates another of Loar's ideas, covered more extensively in U. S. Pat. 2,046,331 (filed in 1934 but awarded in 1936), to use the back of the instrument as a second soundboard by transferring bridge pressure from the top.
Fender vs. Gibson is really not the issue. It has more to do with the weight factor as well as hard-tail vs. vibrato bar. A Telecaster will probably give you the same tuning stability and basic tonal range as an SG, but you might just as well consider an Ibanez or Charvel and get the result you want. A good guitarist can play ANY guitar and get a good result. A bad guitar, conversely, will sound awful no matter how well it’s played if the intonation, electronics, and tuning stability are bad. A Telecaster can be a large guitar. A Les Paul will generally seem lighter, maybe be more comfortable with a shorter scale length, but cost more. A Stratocaster will sound lovely to Strat fans, but then you have a lot of tuning and quirky pickup issues you won’t get with a hard-tail. You may find the Ibanez with a Floyd Rose vibrato bar may give you the best of both worlds, stability and dive bombs. The guitar I recommend for beginners is the Gibson SG, because it is comfortable in size and scale length, achieves both bright and thick tones, and is generally affordable. For prospective Whammy-bar shredders, I would lean towards a Charvel or Jackson at first, and maybe consider a MusicMan. The premium Strat or Les Paul is very desirable and very playable for anyone who has the fingers to bring out the sounds, but if you don’t have the fingers, imo, wait until you do.
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You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 
On the same topic, if you do apply some compression during recording, be careful not to overdo it. At this stage, you don’t need to hear any effect, it should just transparently control peaks. If you apply the amount of squeeze that may be needed for the mix as the part is going down, it might cramp the player’s style—better to leave that for later. Plus, if the signal is over-compressed here, it may bring out the normal squeaks and finger & fret noises so much that it becomes difficult to eliminate them later—this is especially true if the player is really a guitarist who also moonlights on bass. Guitarists who try their hand at bass parts often haven’t mastered an experienced bassist’s technique for damping the strings, and the little playing noises I referred to, as well as distracting undamped harmonics, can end up overpowering the recording if heavy limiting/compression brings them up (I recently struggled mightily to deal with a bass track that suffered from this flaw).
Okay, it is a single-cut and dates back to a similar era, but this single-cut is very different to a Les Paul. The Pro Jet has a basswood body with an arched maple top, and like many of Gretsch’s solidbody electrics, it’s chambered, making it lighter, and, they say, more resonant. It sports a pair of Gretsch’s Black Top Filter’Tron pickups, giving you a bright snap and twang that’ll cut through any mix. In short, it’s incredible. Uncanny, even. For here we are in 2018, and yet you fret a couple of doublestops on the Pro Jet Electromatic and all of a sudden it’s like you’re the Fonz, just waiting for Richie, Joanie and Chachi to show up. The cleans are sharp and jazzy, but just take your amp into overdrive and you’re in rockabilly heaven. The tone is so hot you could grill hamburgers by wafting it in front of the speaker cone. Tex-mex shuffle, country, blues, jazz, rockabilly... You name it, and it’ll play it, retro-style. if you want the versatility and the kudos that comes with a Gretsch, it’s hard to look past that finish, that build, and that tone.
Marshall are king when it comes to stacks and rock where fender leads with combos. Marshall offer a wall of sound with punchy lows, strong mids and aggressive highs. But it's not all shrill highs,dial back the trebble a little and you can also get really nice cleans and some real grunt as the crunch sets in. The classic Marshall sound is so coveted that there the market is saturated with imitators. - Antmax
My rule of thumb, whenever possible, is drive the input and route the modulation. I.E. - I put compression, over drive, distortion, fuzz, and wah/filter effect on the input; and then I route flange, phase, chorus, and delay through an effects loop. I do this for a couple of reasons - 1.) I don't have 15 effects ganged together hitting my input which can effect tone, clarity, and volume; and 2.) I can shape the tone and dynamics of my guitar going the amp's input while maintaining definition, tone, and volume to my modulated effects through the buffering provided by an effects loop.
ACT TRMOLO ERSETZEN DER SAITEN Das ACT Tremolo erlaubt zwei Arten der Saiteninstallation. 1) Die Saiten werden durch Einsetzen des Kugelendes in den Saitenschlitz und Einhaken des Kugelendes unter dem Saitenfänger an der Rückseite der Tremolo-Einheit angebracht. 2) Die Saiten werden durch Einsetzen des Kugelendes in den Saitenschlitz und Einhaken des Kugelendes unter dem Saitenfänger an der Unterseite der Tremolo-Einheit angebracht.
The OM-28 E Retro is one of the more recent guitars to come from Martin's OM line, and it is the consummate '30s era style acoustic guitar. The company took their time to carefully replicate vintage OM-28 guitars, from the aged solid sitka spruce top and solid East Indian Rosewood back & sides, down to the smallest appointments - resulting in a guitar that not only sounds amazing, but looks museum-level amazing as well.
The Uni-Vibe was released in 1968 and became an immediate favorite of Jimi Hendrix, David Gilmour, and Robin Trower. It is actually a phase shifting effect, but what makes it groundbreaking is its use of an LFO (low frequency oscillator) to create the sweeping effect. It also uses a photocell to control the speed of the sweeping effect. That is basically a little light bulb inside the unit that will pulse at whatever speed the rate knob is set to. Also the brighter the pulse of the bulb the more dramatic the effect.
Some pedals, such as clean boost pedals and transparent overdrive pedals merely provide a much powerful signal to feed into the preamp section of the amp, causing natural overdrive. Overdrive pedals can provide both a boosted signal and an already distorted signal. Distortion pedals have different kinds of circuits that provide different kinds of distortion; the pedal provides an already distorted signal. Digital overdrives and distortions rely on electronic means of producing the signals, with some resorting to modeled sounds.
This string overview is useful for understanding what choice to make that suits your play style the best.  As players, we are always searching for the highest possible functionality, while balancing tone and playability for the genre we play.  Check out what brand and gauge your guitar heroes use to help you zero in on your perfect string set and keep on rocking!
Hartley Peavey built his first amp in 1957 and decided to establish his own company in 1965. Ever since, he has been the head of one of the biggest audio gear companies in the world. Eddie Van Halen collaborated in the design of the famous 5150 amp, a legendary amp that is still heralded by today's enthusiasts. However, the collaboration stopped in 2004 and the brand had to rename its amp to 6505. Born in the 1970's under the name Vintage, and with a completely different style, the Classic series is still very popular among blues, jazz and rock guitar players. The brand has also developed solid-state amps (the Bandit series) and, more recently, some modeling amps (the Vypyr series).
Small amps can benefit from being placed on a stand, rather than the floor, as reflections from the floor can muddy the sound. A stool or something similar will do if a stand isn’t available. For the same reason, when using larger stacks or combos with several speakers, try mic’ing one that’s furthest from the floor. Placing an amp against a wall will increase the bottom-end response, and placing it in a corner will emphasise the low end further still. A mellow tone can be achieved by pointing the amp into the corner and mic’ing from behind.
When the Fender company invented the first widely produced electric bass guitar (the Fender Precision Bass) they also developed a bass amplifier, the Fender Bassman, first produced in 1952. This was a 26-watt tube amplifier with a single 15" speaker. In 1954, the Bassman was redesigned to use four 10" speakers. This speaker cabinet was an open-back design; as such, it had poor low-frequency efficiency and was prone to blowing speakers when used for bass because of the lack of damping. Somewhat ironically, it became very popular as an electric guitar amplifier. The circuit design also underwent repeated modifications. The "5F6A" circuit introduced in 1958 is regarded as a classic amplifier design and was copied by many other manufacturers, such as Marshall.

The Uni-Vibe was released in 1968 and became an immediate favorite of Jimi Hendrix, David Gilmour, and Robin Trower. It is actually a phase shifting effect, but what makes it groundbreaking is its use of an LFO (low frequency oscillator) to create the sweeping effect. It also uses a photocell to control the speed of the sweeping effect. That is basically a little light bulb inside the unit that will pulse at whatever speed the rate knob is set to. Also the brighter the pulse of the bulb the more dramatic the effect.
After the wah or EQ, try throwing in your phasers, flangers, chorus or vibrato effects. Because they’re following overdrive/distortion, wah and EQ, you will find that modulation effects gain a richer and more complex sound than they would have on their own or toward the front of your chain. But annoyingly, putting them right at the end of your chain can also be somewhat limiting because these types of effects tend to overpower others that go before it. Modulation effects work best right in the middle of the effects sequence.
Portable speaker chambers represent another viable solution. These units are thick, reinforced wooden boxes outfitted with both interior and exterior insulation, housing a built-in speaker and an adjustable microphone stand, along with speaker and microphone cable connectors. Think of a miniature portable iso-booth. They're used professionally in the studio and on stage, preventing unwanted leakage and greatly diminishing stage noise, with excellent results.
The 700-series guitars had removeable (loseable) bridge covers. Many of them for sale now are missing those covers and the vibrato arm. There are fewer 800s missing those vibrato arms. If I ever get a 700-series missing the cover and bar, I'll take a look under the bridge and see if any wood was removed. Maybe I can replace the bridge and tailpiece.
What can you expect from a shop whose exterior is painted in Eddie Van Halen stripes? Everything! Their selection of pedals was astounding. One of the largest selections I've come across in any store. I left having bought about a dozen things. Dangerous place! They are obviously a big dealer in PRS guitars because they had a nice selection of the USA made guitars. The Guitar Store represents Seattle right with an awesome staff and a vast selection of great guitars. With an ongoing series of in-store events and appearances by notable musicians, there is always a reason to stop in. Last year the shop hosted a monthly "build your own pedal" workshop--how cool is that?
A great debate has raged hot and heavy throughout the guitar playing world since George Beauchamp and Rickenbacker invented the electric guitar. It's a debate that's ignited feuds, torn apart families and has surely broken some hearts and continues to this day. What debate drawn from the innocent depths of guitardom could illicit such a foul and unexpected response?

When playing seventh chords, guitarists often play only subset of notes from the chord. The fifth is often omitted. When a guitar is accompanied by a bass, the guitarist may omit the bass note from a chord. As discussed earlier, the third of a triad is doubled to emphasize its major or minor quality; similarly, the third of a seventh is doubled to emphasize its major or minor quality. The most frequent seventh is the dominant seventh; the minor, half-diminished, and major sevenths are also popular.[79]
In fact, at the beginning of this article I mentioned John Mayer’s song, “I Don’t Trust Myself.” The way that guitar tone is achieved is by using a filter pedal called the AdrenaLinn III. That effect is a beat-synced filter effect, meaning it has the ability to sync up the sweeping filter with the rhythm of a song. This is accomplished by either tapping in the tempo on the pedal, or setting the tempo with the tempo knob.

I’m getting a bad hum that almost goes away when I turn the volume up completely….gets loud as I turn it down. Someone rewired the guitar with 2 pair wire…..they attached a ground to the vol and tone pots everywhere the wires went….and also the body of the switch. I think it’s a bad ground loop problem….I’m going to change everything to single strand wire. I’m guessing there’s a voltage difference somewhere and it gets close to normal when I turn it all the way up on the volume pot.
Another thing to bear in mind is pot taper. Two most commonly used tapers are linear and logarithmic. Linear taper, as name suggests, linearly increases resistance throughout it’s range. That’s ok for some applications, but not for volume pots. Our humanoid ears work in logarithmic fashion, so volume pots need to have logarithmic taper in order for us to hear smooth transition between quieter and louder settings. If volume jumps suddenly in the first 20%-30% of volume pot range and then does almost nothing in the rest of the range, it’s likely that you got a linear pot instead of logarithmic.
 How to Order Custom Guitar: THIS IS A PRE-BUILD PRICING. You will receive the custom guitar exactly as pictured. Please make sure to choose the required options marked with the RED ( * ) asterisks and it will compute automatically the options you choose. We also offer Optional Upgrades but they are not required. And then once you hit on Buy Now button, go to the top most portion of the website and you can see a cart image logo and click on that then you can see VIEW CART and CHECKOUT to determine the total cost of the guitar including the shipping and the discount.
The Meisterklasse is a high-end harmonica on the modular system, made in Germany, featuring chrome-plated cover plates, an anodised aluminium comb, and extra thick 1.05mm nickel-plated reeds. One other feature that sets the Meisterklasse apart from most other Hohner harmonicas are its full-length cover plates, which extend all the way to the ends of the harmonica's comb rather than sharply angling down before the ends to form an adjoining surface parallel to the reedplates and comb. The only other Hohner harmonica possessing this quality is the curve-framed Golden Melody.[25]

The Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ theatrically coiffed guitarist has several grueling jobs, among them holding down the trio’s entire melodic structure and holding his own against one of the most dynamic frontwomen of our time. His signature see-saw call-and-response lines leave plenty of room for tension and release, war cries, and tears, and the kind of grand, clanging chords that’ll turpentine your ears clean.

The Yamaha FG830 uses a well-engineered combination of woods to create a solid body and neck suitable for pro-level performance. You simply cannot go wrong with this guitar; the workmanship of this guitar is a cut above other acoustics in its class. Owners love the gorgeous dreadnought sound, describing it as rich, resonant, and well-rounded. One satisfied customer boasted that in a room full of acoustics, his Yamaha would “float to the top” of the din.
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
To answer your question directly, yes, but only from a strictly physical point of view. According to guitar enthusiasts, electric units are easier to handle than their counterparts. The main motif for this has to do with the fact that the acoustic models come equipped with what many describe as heavier gauge strings. Because of this feature, their strings are more difficult to pick and press down.
One oil finish that many luthiers use and recommend is Tru-Oil, which was originally formulated for finishing gun stocks. It is the oil finish that Luthier's Mercantile carries, and if you Google for Tru-Oil you will find plentry of information about using it on guitars including some very good instructions. And those instructions will help you with Danish Oil as well.
Three full steps from standard tuning. Used by Dream Theater, Adema, Asking Alexandria on From Death to Destiny and The Black, Boris, Cannibal Corpse, Morbid Angel (on several songs starting with their album Covenant), Father Befouled, Sepultura, Jeff Hanneman of Slayer (on "War Zone" and "Here Comes the Pain" from God Hates Us All and "Not Of This God" from World Painted Blood. Kerry King used a 7-string for those songs), Mutoid Man (Stephen Brodsky started using the tuning during the recording of the Helium Head EP to fill in the low end of the sound, in an attempt to make up for their lack of a bassist at the time), American Head Charge, Nickelback (on "This Means War" and "Gotta Get Me Some" from " Here and Now" and Nevermore (when band switched to 7 strings).
You may be questioning why we’ve not covered bass pickups in this article. However, to keep things simple, we decided to stick solely to guitar pickups. If you are looking for a new tone or more power for your beloved bass, check out our dedicated articles on Jazz Bass pickups and Precision Bass pickups for all you need to know, as well as recommendations.
What if you could get a wide variety of sounds from your acoustic guitar, including complex effects and virtual (MIDI) instruments, without having to use an external amp? That would certainly be a game-changer, as it could essentially turn your guitar into an all new instrument, and by adding to your available 'soundscapes' without needing to be tethered to a plug, it could also convert acoustic performances into rockin' ones.
While larger frets do seem to result in a rounder tone, perhaps with increased sustain too, they also yield a somewhat less precise note than narrower frets—at least, as examined “under the microscope.” Unless it is very precisely shaped, and frequently dressed, the broad crown of that jumbo fret can “blur” your note ever so slightly, which might even be part of the sonic appeal for some players—the way, for example, a tweed Deluxe is a little blurrier or hairier at most volume settings than a blackface Deluxe. Be aware, however, that the phenomenon can work against some sonic goals too.
A more advanced technique with the volume knob is called swelling. Play a chord or note with the volume knob off and gently roll it back (many players use their pinky on the side of the knob) to let the sound pass through again. Experiment rolling up the knob fast or slow and see what happens. This takes practice but can produce awesome sounds when used while playing.
To finish, here's one damn good last trick: doubling an electric guitar with... anything else. I know that's pretty vague but I must say that I had a hard time putting it any other way. The goal is to listen to your guitar sound and analyze it to find out what it lacks. Then you "only" need to find a sound that can fill this "hole." For instance, a friend of mine once told me he doubled a crunchy guitar sound with a sample of a lightbulb being rubbed on his boot with the goal of emphasizing the strumming sensation. Much less arcane, there's the famous example of the particularly "fat" riff on Radiohead's Airbag. If you listen to the intro, you can hear that the riff is being doubled with a cello, which obviously adds a lot of the breadth to the sound, as I'm sure you'll agree. I would love to keep on giving you more ideas in this regard, but the scope of this method is so wide and open that the only thing I can tell you is to let your imagination fly, experiment and have fun!
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The other guitarish plugins that contribute to the best most real guitar VST include amp emulators to get that warm, liquid sound of tube amps, along with VSTs for almost any other effect ever hauled on stage. Those amp-and-effects VSTs might be used by actual guitarists as well, in various straight-to-computer workflow setups - either through a DAW host or otherwise maybe straight through some standalone VSTs to amp, headphones, recording device or onboard speakers.
2. You have me to help you out! I’ve sorted through a bunch of the top acoustic-electric guitars and come up with a list of what I think are five of the best acoustic-electric guitars under $1000. I’ve been playing for almost 30 years, so I know a little bit about guitars. But just in case you don’t believe me, check around for yourself. Every one of these instruments is highly rated and top quality.
Planning for this review started right after the January 2018 National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Anaheim, California. We didn’t notice any significant introductions in the under-$200 electric guitar category during our time there, but new guitars can appear at any time. We’ll be watching out for them, and we’ll get our hands on them as soon as we can.

High-end solid-state amplifiers are less common, since many professional guitarists favor vacuum tubes.[citation needed] Some[who?] jazz guitarists favor the "cleaner" sound of solid-state amplifiers. Only a few solid-state amps have enduring attraction, such as the Roland Jazz Chorus.[15][16][17] Solid-state amplifiers vary in output power, functionality, size, price, and sound quality in a wide range, from practice amplifiers to combos suitable for gigging to professional models intended for session musicians who do studio recording work.
In its classic form, the guitar is simply constructed, with the neck and fingerboard comprising a single piece of maple, bolted to an ash or alder body inexpensively jigged with flat surfaces on the front and back. The hardware includes two single coil pickups controlled by a three-way selector switch, and one each of volume and tone controls. The pickguard was first Bakelite, soon thereafter it was celluloid (later plastic), screwed directly onto the body with five (later eight) screws. The bridge has three adjustable saddles, with strings doubled up on each. The guitar quickly gained a following, and soon other, more established guitar companies (such as Gibson, whose Les Paul model was introduced in 1952; and later Gretsch, Rickenbacker, and others) began working on wooden solid-body production models of their own. A large chromed cover, often called the “ashtray”, was fitted over the bridge for improvedshielding, but this is rarely seen as most players find it impedes their style.
It is famed as the producer of some of the intriguing piece of guitar around like arch top ones, the SG series, Flying V, ES175, Firebird and more. In fact, the ES 175 was the first popular electric guitar around the world at the time. Another peculiar offering under them is the Les Paul Melody Maker, which has been the go-to option for many around the globe.
Made of mahogany, just like the classics, the DT520 Destroyer's iconic body style has attracted many artists. Ibanez's biggest leap forward will continue to be appreciated by today's player: namely the mahogany slim neck grip and set-in neck that offer ultra-smooth playablity. No matter what the setting, the DiMarzio Air Norton pack this axe with a rich tonal palette. Gorgeous old school pearl/abalone block inlays make for a path back to one of rock's most dynamic chapters. The original Ibanez Tight-Tune bridge provides improved transfer of string vibration and better tuning stability.
Like the others, you also have a doubled signal path and like the flanger, you have a short delay. This time you have a bit of a longer delay which causes a more subtle effect. As its name suggests it offers a choir-like effect that adds a certain level of depth to your tone. It also gives it a unique wavering quality that suits a lot of different styles of music.
New, used, nylon or steel string — or electric — for your first guitar take your time, choose carefully and never be afraid to ask for advice. Best of all, search for a good music shop near you and actually pick up the guitar, pluck the strings, listen to the sound. The people behind the counter want to help you, so that you come back for another guitar — and another, not to mention strings, string cleaner, capos… Don’t forget, this isn’t just buying any old guitar. This is the beginning of your dream coming true.

The Epiphone LP Special II has a mahogany body and neck. The fretboard features dotted inlays and is made of traditional, unfinished rosewood – a standard choice that yields a sound consistent with the aesthetic standards of a Les Paul. If you want a Les Paul but you don't want to pay a fortune for it, this mahogany beauty is worth your consideration.
Guitars in the JS series made in Japan have plates with a 6-digit numeric serial number which indicates the sequential number of JS production. These plates provide no other indication of the year of production. The early versions of these JS number plates (starting from around 1990) have a "J" prefixing the number, but the character was dropped some around J002700. The first 15 J number plates were set aside, with J000001 being used for a 1993 model which is currently in the Hoshino USA collection.[2]
The primary difference in tone between the solid body and hollow body guitar is the high end bite one associates with the solid body guitar. From the biting rhythm of guitarist Nile Rodgers to the supersonic leads of Eric Clapton and David Gilmour, Stratocasters have found favor with so many guitarists because of their versatility and their timeless tone.
If you’ve never listened to Chet Atkins, you should do it right now. The rockabilly player was a skilled instrumental guitar player, playing most of his songs without any backing from other musicians. For a great sample of his talent, give a listen to his version of “Mr. Sandman.” His alternating thumb rhythm and syncopated melodies are marvels of beauty and precision on the instrument.
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
1960's Harmony H-54 Rocket 2 Redburst- Here's another excellent example of rock-n-roll to jazz all rolled up in one. For not much coin the Harmony Rocket was a great choice of hundreds of thousands from music stores to Sear Catalogs. This guitar is in very near mint condition as you can see. There's just limited amount of wear on tips of headstock with a amlost perfect back. Two great sounding DeArmond Gold Foil Pickups power this baby. Guitar has a 4 bolt neck which was the better neck from Harmony. It's all original, except for the pick guard, which no one can detect. Condition excellent for this great 50 year old beauty. SOLD
Founded in 1902, Gibson began life producing mandolins and other instruments, before making hollow-body electric guitars in the thirties. Their first solid-body guitar came in 1952 – the Les Paul, which remains one of the most iconic guitars in the world. They are also well known for pioneering some classic guitar shapes such as the SG, the Explorer, and the Flying V. Used by everyone from James Hetfield to B.B. King, Gibson’s are manufactured in three American factories – two in Tennessee and one in Montana.
Once again a British company. It isn't hard for this brand to attract attention thanks to the (would you believe it?!) orange color that envelops most of their products. The first models saw the light of day in the late 1960's with the OR series. Its first renowned users were Fleetwood Mac and later Jimmy Page... The crunch sound and the mid-frequency range are the brand's main attributes. Orange even managed to outclass Marshall in the 1970's thanks to its prestigious endorsers. In the 90's, Noel Gallagher from Oasis was the best-known Orange fan and he even collaborated in the development of the OTR head. At the start of 2011, the brand surprised everyone and launched the OPC, a workstation for musicians — actually a PC and a guitar amp in a single unit.
A mysterious and unstoppable force threatens the galaxy, the Master Chief is missing and his loyalty questioned. Experience the most dramatic Halo story to date in a 4-player cooperative epic that spans three worlds. Challenge friends and rivals in new multiplayer modes: Warzone, massive 24-player battles, and Arena, pure 4-vs-4 competitive combat.* *Online multiplayer features require Xbox Live Gold membership (sold separately).
Guitar from Spain is the best online store to buy the best spanish guitars online: Classical guitars, Flamenco Guitars, Acoustic Guitars and electro acoustic guitars made in Spain from the best spanish guitar makers at spanish local prices. These unique guitars will be delivered from our warehouse or from the manufacturer's bench to your door, avoiding extra costs or double margins. Because we only sell guitars from the most reputable Spanish manufacturers, you will be assured to buy only the best spanish guitars available with 2 years warranty and certified from origin. Spanish guitar brands like Alhambra Guitars, Raimundo Guitars, Ramirez Guitars, Admira Guitars, Camps Guitars, Rodriguez Guitars or Prudencio Saez Guitars are among the most reputable and best sounding guitars in the world. These guitars are manufactured in Spain, the land of the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar. At Guitar From Spain you can also buy steel stringed acoustic guitars, western guitars and electro acoustic guitars made with the same traditional craftsmanship and know how acquired through centuries of guitar making. We also have special guitars as Bandurria (Spanish mandolin), Laud (Spanish lute), Cuban tres, timple canario and special sized guitars as Cadete (guitar 3/4) Requinto (Guitar 1/2) and Senorita (Guitar 7/8). Compare our Spanish Guitars with any other "asian made guitars" at the same price and you will be amazed with the diference in quality and sound that you can get. Do not settle for imitations, buy the original, buy Guitars from Spain.
Cort, a South Korean manufacturer of musical instruments was founded in 1973. Cort specialises in Electric guitars, Bass guitars and Steel-string acoustic guitars. The hallmark of the company is its elegant series of Electric guitars. The Classic rock series, G, M, CR and X series guitars, Sunset series and Zenox series form part of the list. These guitars not only deliver high performance, but also have a great look and feel. It has established its brand name in Indian market by offering high-class products at affordable prices. The company is amongst the best guitar brands in the country.
by pedalhaven Black & white board from  @alexjacob_ ! Here’s the signal chain: Boss TU-3 Chromatic Tuner EarthQuaker Devices Palisades Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Hotone Nano Legacy BritWind (Effects Loop) Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Joyo D-SEED Digital Delay TC Electronic Arena Reverb Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
In attempting to amplify acoustic guitars, inventors and musicians alike soon discovered an issue that is still problematic for many of today’s acoustic guitarists — feedback. Hence, the evolution of solid body electric guitars, spearheaded by Vivi-Tone in 1934. Rickenbacker followed up by distributing the Electro Spanish in 1935 (Electro Spanish later being shortened to ES by Gibson for their line of hollow body and semi-hollow electric guitars), and the Slingerland Songster 401 was introduced in 1936. But some guitarists — mainly jazz and blues musicians — came to miss the warm, full-bodied tone that can only be generated by the free-space resonance of tops and backs made from quality tonewoods. And so it is that we also have the hybrid design of semi-hollow body electric guitars.
The honest truth lies with the listener’s ear and capability to identify a sound with an individual player.  B.B. King was known for his tone and only later revealed his secret mentioned above.  It wasn’t even really a secret; it was more of a physical shortcut that allowed him to express himself.  You should choose what feels and sounds best for your own musical expression.

These are world class guitars and have got probably the best feel any guitar can give apart from that u can play everything on these guitars from classic rock to jazz and blues followed by metal. the main thing that these guitars are known for is their finish and there unique necks which are really fast and not too thin which keeps your tone and feel in place. I would say that these guitars definitely deserve a place in the top 3 and definitely do watch out for the petrucci signature models


The two piggyback guitar amps included the 1010 Guitar Amplification System ($605), which offered 10 tubes, 105 watts, two channels, four inputs, volume, bass, middle and treble controls for each channel, presence, reverb, tremolo, variable impedance, and a cabinet with eight 10″ Univox Special Design speakers with 10-ounce ceramic magnets and epoxy voice coils. The cabinet grille had eight round cutouts. The 1225 Guitar Amplifier System ($435) had eight tubes, 60 watts, two channels with the same controls as the 1010, and a cab with two 12″ Univox speakers with 20-ounce ALNICO magnets and 2″ voice coil. The grille had two large round cutouts with two small round cutouts on the sides. The amps had handles on the top, the cabs handles on the sides, to make life easier for your roadies.
The specifications of the neck and string setup dictate the guitar's overall playability. As such, it is important to get a handle of important specs which include scale length (the length by which the string is stretched from the bridge saddle to the nut), nut width, fingerboard radius, and neck profile (shape of the back of the neck). Beginners normally want guitars to play easier, and will prefer those with shorter scale length, thin nut width and neck profile, and flatter fingerboard radius. On the other hand, experienced players will have grown accustomed to a specific neck configuration, if this is your case, you will want your new guitar to have similar specs to what you already like.
Based on Mesa's flagship Mark V, the Mark Five: 25 head is small, perfectly formed and typical of Mesa's superlative design and attention to detail. Two independent channels, each with three very different voice presets, combine with Mesa's iconic five-band graphic EQ for a choice of 12 sounds. You can footswitch between the channels, with the graphic on or off for quasi four-channel operation and preset 25 or 10 watts per channel. One of the best features lives on the back panel: a CabClone speaker-emulated direct output, with a speaker defeat for silent recording or practice, using the built-in headphone socket. Despite the Mark Five: 25's long feature list, it's very easy to use and its tones are sensational. The rhythm channel covers the shimmering clean tones of the modern Boogie and the fatter 'blackface'-inspired midrange of the fabled Mark I, while the Mark V crunch voice is so deep and three-dimensional you could record an entire album with it. The lead channel is equally inspiring, with a perfect rendition of the Mark IIC's overdrive tone (arguably the most coveted Boogie sound), along with more modern distortion effects that sound unbelievably good when tweaked with the graphic. The Mark Five: 25 is one of the best small Boogies we've ever heard, which means it's one of the best small amps there is.
I was buying my first acoustic guitar ever in my life, and I'm happy to say I picked this store. When you walk in you pretty much feel that you're in another world filled with music and color in contrast with the cloudy days of Seattle. I researched a little on their website before coming in to see what guitars were within my price range, what type of finish and strings. I said to the guy who greeted me at the door: "I'm looking to my buy very first acoustic guitar." And felt a little nervous not knowing anything about playing. Handed him my note card of guitars and he led me into a practice room where he brought the guitars I was interested in and played them for me (since I had zerrrrrooo experience) so I could hear the tone of the guitars. He was very professional, and also took his time making sure that I picked a guitar that I liked. Even gave me a little history about where they are made and how the company sources their wood, etc. Very nice! I forgot his name, but he had curly blonde hair. (If you read this, Hi! And thank you). In addition, an instructor, Ted, who works there also offered me a free first lesson and have been taking lessons since then. The people there are all welcoming and have a real passion for what they do. It's always fun going by their store. Check it out! Please respect their bag policy if you are asked to leave it with them while you are in the store... if you don't feel comfortable, then leave your guitar at home. Easy.
One thing that is worth trying is combining different delays with different reverb effects. You can get some seriously beautiful sounds with a reverb and delay effect that sound good together. Some manufacturers have even gone so far as to create reverb and delay combo pedals. It is truly a perfect combination of effects, kind of like peanut butter and jelly.
Martin’s first truly electric guitars were the Style F thinline archtops which began in prototype stage in 1961 and entered production in 1962. The F Series consisted of three models, the F-50, F-55 and F-65, all with bodies slightly less than 2″ thick and made of maple plywood with bound tops. All three had shapes roughly reminiscent of the dreadnought that made Martin famous, though slightly exaggerated with a wider lower bout. The cutaways were fairly wide and radical, cutting out at almost a right angle from the neck. The glued in necks had unbound 20-fret rosewood fingerboards, dot inlays and the typical squarish Martin three-and-three headstock. Necks joined the body at the 14th fret. Each bore an elevated pickguard and had a distinctive moveable adjustable bridge made of clear plexiglass.

More often than not, we always find it interesting to see and hear if there is any possible way an entry level electric guitar can outshine or even just come close with an expensive guitar model. These comparisons would mainly starts on looking at how they are built, time spent making them, where it is made and components used on the whole guitar. Having those as criteria in mind and as reality of it. So far it is given that it is going to be all in favor of the expensive models by a margin.
The guitar is an instrument capable of truly heavenly tones but capturing this sound in a recording is never as straight-forward as you'd think. Here at Prime Loops we've been changing strings, tweaking amps and adjusting mics to deliver only the finest tone imaginable to your DAW! We used a 1985 Gibson Les Paul electric and a Martin DC-16RGTE acoustic with Fishman, Marshall and Orange amps, recorded through an AKG C214 microphone, so STUDIO GUITARS guarantees to make the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end!
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Im wanting to build my own 8 string fanned fret with a 30" scale length and a bit more string spacing than a standard 8 string. My Ibanez rg8 has about 9mm from center of string to center of string. I figure I will build a few with cheap lumber from home depot without expecting to play it at all. I want a neck through style as well. Does anyone know where to find some info on building something like this and specifically how to properly set up the frets?
Great playing and sounding bass. The Ibanez BTB series in a 'very playable' 4-string version. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. We believe the pickups are actually made by Bartolini. 'Locking' 1/4 jack. Solid wood, natural finish body. Rosewood fingerboard on maple neck. Tuning is accomplished via quality, 'sealed' tuning machines. Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up great! Currently has 'nylon wound' strings for a softer 'jazz' tone. Frets show virtually no wear. Body finish has VERY little wear. Includes gig bag.

Seagull S6 Original Acoustic guitar is one of the best gadgets for the beginners in the list. It comes with the beautiful texture of domestic wild cherry back and sides that give it a unique tone. In addition to that silver leaf maple neck with a rosewood fretboard lets the fingers to have a perfect grip and easy tuning. It’s a power pack guitar to get you the best playing experience and hands on many of the tricks you are looking for.
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