Postscript: About that “capacitor type doesn’t matter” statement: Them’s fighting words in many online forums, especially in the stompbox realm. You’ll often see the inclusion of some rare “mojo” capacitor cited as a selling point for a particular product. I used to think I sometimes could hear a difference—until I built a couple of effects with quick-change sockets for comparing cap types. The audible differences were negligible, no more meaningful than the variations between two caps of the same value and same type. My advice is, if someone tries to sell you anything based on cap type, proceed with much caution. I now strongly believe that cap type is of no importance, at least in guitar and analog stompbox applications.
Yes, try learning licks before school in a crowded home. Or late at night. Do you want to play or not? Is the simple question. I think I learnt guitar because I could do that all day without bothering anyone. I don't like headphones. Very small amps are OK. But no amp? Yeah. I still do practice scales and stuff unplugged. As a kid I figured out I could brace my guitar against the wardrobe door and it would resonate, great!
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Firstly, they are cheaper than their tube counterparts, which is why most beginners will end up starting on a solid-state amp. They are also much more efficient, easier to maintain (no need to change tubes), lighter to carry, and less fragile. While the tone of modern-day solid-state amps can be incredible, they don’t tend to be as fluid or responsive as tube amps. For more on solid-state amps, check out our dedicated solid-state amp page.
Even when using noise-cancelling pickups, guitars tend to be relatively noisy sound sources, especially when used in conjunction with high levels of overdrive, either from a pedal or an amplifier. High levels of gain are needed to produce overdrive sounds, so any source noise will be increased accordingly. If an attempt is going to be made to remove some of the noise by electronic means (such as a gate, expander or single-ended noise-reduction unit), it may be best to leave this until the mixing stage, so that an incorrectly set gate or noise filter doesn't ruin a good take. However, gates should be used before delay or reverb effects to prevent the tail end of the sound being shut off abruptly when it falls below the gate threshold. If you simply have to record with delay effects, a dedicated guitar gate pedal placed before the delay unit will probably work best. If you are also using an overdrive pedal, then the gate should come after this so that it can deal with circuit hiss as well as hum from the guitar pickups. Note that all-in-one floor units tend to include gates at an appropriate point in the signal path, between the overdrive/amp section and the effects.
I knew what it is that I need to do. The friend who worked on it with me said when we were finished, "Oh right, it sounds like all your records all put together." I guess that got the job down. Without getting too technical about it or elitist, it kind of does the job of a Gretsch, sonically, and a Rickenbacker, sonically, but I play it like a Fender. It's kind of handy, really. I used to it pretty much exclusively during my time with Modest Mouse. And totally exclusively during my time with the Cribs. I've used it nearly entirely on the new solo record.

The steel-string beauty is crafted from solid Sitka spruce on the top, which features solid Indian rosewood back and sides, and a slim mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard. You’ll notice some impressive decoration on the BR-160 (as we mention in our full review), including an exclusive Dalmatian-style tortoiseshell pickguard, accurate 14:1 butterbean-style tuners, and an elaborately decorated motherof-pearl headstock.
Very nice. I'd love to hear it. 12 strings seem to emphasize the difference among guitars, the 335-12, the Firebird 12, etc. I like the sound of the Rick, but playability is an issue, you might go through three or four before one feels right, then they are so easy to pull out of tune. But you've got a totally unique variety one of a kind variety there.
​​Our primary goal here at Top Custom Guitars is to create unique instruments that match our players' personalities. The bond we've formed over the past 15 years with each of our clients has not only fueled the growth and maturity of our instruments, it's fueled our creative growth as a company. YOUR passion drives OUR passion, and because of the individual relationships we build with our clients. Enjoy our galleries and forums, and if you have any questions, ideas, or dreams to share, we’d love to hear them.
Nowadays it is customary to play this repertoire on reproductions of instruments authentically modelled on concepts of musicological research with appropriate adjustments to techniques and overall interpretation. Thus over recent decades we have become accustomed to specialist artists with expertise in the art of vihuela (a 16th-century type of guitar popular in Spain), lute, Baroque guitar, 19th-century guitar, etc.[4]
Even by the mid 1970s costs to manufacture instruments in Japan were rapidly rising. Labor was still cheaper than in the USA (it isn't anymore), but real estate, raw material, fuel, transportation costs and virtually all other manufacturing costs were fully as much if not more in Japan as in the USA. The Japanese were able to compete in the international market due not only to low labor costs at that time but also due to highly efficient manufacturing techniques and the fact that their low-cost workers were skilled and highly motivated.

My services include re-frets, fret dressing, fret end dressing, action adjustment, truss rod adjustment, intonation setting, nut replacement, bridge saddle replacement, acoustic pickup installation, electric pickup fitting/replacement, output jack replacement, pot replacement, re-wiring, sound post setting, tuner installation, brace re-gluing, broken headstock repairs, strap pin installation, re-strings, bridge setting, tremolo setting, Floyd Rose setting, custom scratch plate cutting, tuning problems, restoration, polishing, cleaning, wiring modifications...Get in touch I'm sure I can help!

In the mid-1950s, guitar distortion sounds started to evolve based on sounds created earlier in the decade by accidental damage to amps, such as in the popular early recording of the 1951 Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm song "Rocket 88", where guitarist Willie Kizart used a vacuum tube amplifier that had a speaker cone,[12][13] slightly damaged in transport.[14] Rock guitarists began intentionally "doctoring" amplifiers and speakers in order to emulate this form of distortion.[15] In 1956, guitarist Paul Burlison of the Johnny Burnette Trio deliberately dislodged a vacuum tube in his amplifier to record "The Train Kept A-Rollin" after a reviewer raved about the sound Burlison's damaged amplifier produced during a live performance. According to other sources Burlison's amp had a partially broken loudspeaker cone. Pop-oriented producers were horrified by that eerie "two-tone" sound, quite clean on trebles but strongly distorted on basses, but Burnette insisted to publish the sessions, arguing that "that guitar sounds like a nice horn section".[16]


DRILLING THE NECK HOLES ON THE BODY Before you do this you can carve down the back of the neck area if that is something you were going to do. If you are just going to leave it flat then that's ok too. The first step if you are using furreles is to map out where you want to place them and then mark the center of the hole where the screw will go. Then take your forstner bit drill enough to fit the furrele inside. Usually you can tell how deep to go if you drill a little at a time, and place the furrele in it to see if it is just low enough in the hole not to see the top of it if you look at the body horizontally or it is flush with the wood. After doing this you can drill the holes for the screws. Use a bit that has the same circumference as the screw including the threading so when you put the scre into the hole it just passes through with out you having to screw it in. Drill in the indention that was left by the tip of the Forstner bit, keeping the drill as straight as possible.
Welcome to Silesia Guitars, the guitar repair shop in Shoreline that is dedicated to taking good care of your dear friend, the guitar. We are located in Shoreline, just 15 min north of downtown Seattle. Our work consists of repairs of anything from broken headstocks and  cracked guitar tops, through replacing/installing electronics and custom inlays. Just need a set up or a string change? No problem! We try to accommodate any needs, big or small. Usually, the cheaper the guitar, the more it would benefit from being professionally set up. Evaluations are free, so stop by with your guitar today and let's talk about how we can help you get the most out of it!
Scott Knickelbine began writing professionally in 1977. He is the author of 34 books and his work has appeared in hundreds of publications, including "The New York Times," "The Milwaukee Sentinel," "Architecture" and "Video Times." He has written in the fields of education, health, electronics, architecture and construction. Knickelbine received a Bachelor of Arts cum laude in journalism from the University of Minnesota.
A bass amplifier or "bass amp" is a musical instrument electronic device that uses electrical power to make lower-pitched instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass loud enough to be heard by the performers and audience. Bass amps typically consist of a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and one or more loudspeakers ("drivers") in a cabinet. While bass amps share many features with the guitar amplifiers used for electric guitar, such as providing an amplifier with tone and volume controls and a carrying handle, they are distinct from other types of amplification systems, due to the particular challenges associated with low-frequency sound reproduction. This distinction affects the design of the loudspeakers, the size and design of the speaker cabinet and the design of the preamplifier and amplifier. Speaker cabinets for bass amps usually incorporate larger loudspeakers (e.g., 15" speakers are more common for bass than for electric guitar amps) or more speakers and larger cabinet sizes than those used for the amplification of other instruments. The loudspeakers themselves must also be sturdier to handle the higher power levels and they must be capable of reproducing very low pitches at high sound pressure levels.
6.  I’ve said this before but think it needs to be said again… Customer using truss rod to “fix” action.  Result:  Broken truss rod.  Fix:  Well, the fix costs more than the instrument and the guitar was scrapped.  This one depends on where the break occurred and what kind of rod was used.  If it’s a conventional rod and the break is close to the adjusting nut, Stew-Mac has a tool to re-thread the rod and save it.  If the break is farther down the rod or double action you may have to remove the fret board and that my friend is major surgery.
A final tip: not a lot of people know this, but Antares Auto-Tune works rather well with electric guitar. Of course Auto-Tune is monophonic, so it will dutifully ignore chords and double notes, but it will come into play when it detects a single note. You might reasonably ask whether a guitar tuner might not be a wise investment, but the reason I suggest Auto-Tune is not to compensate for a badly tuned guitar, but rather to pull imprecisely bent guitar stings into pitch.

Blending vintage-spec Alnico V single-coil sparkle, chime and quack with contemporary playability and versatile electronics, the Fullerton Standard Legacy from G&L offers superb Made-in-USA craftsmanship at an amazing price. With a stunning metallic lacquer finish over a resonant solid alder body, this instrument looks as good as it sounds, and the Leo Fender-designed PTB (passive treble and bass) system puts an incredibly wide variety of tones right at your fingertips. The Legacy also features Leo's acclaimed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato bridge for incredible tuning stability and quaver to dive-bomb range that's smooth as silk.
And that’s exactly what reverb effects are trying to emulate: the way a single instrument sounds different in different spaces and reflecting off of different materials. Many common environments that reverb units try to emulate are halls, churches, and chambers. There are some pretty unique reverbs like a particle reverb that adds special effects to make things sound more spacey, and there’s even one that attempts to emulate what we imagine a black hole to sound like.
The design of this guitar probably makes it stand out from the “crowd.” This is another awesome six string acoustic guitar from the brand Juarez available in sunburst and black . It is designed for the right handed and mostly comes in Sunburst color without a bag. The body is made from blackwood with the top laminated with Linden Wood. The entire structure has a natural gloss finish, with the fret board having up to 18 frets. The hardware structure has a chrome finish. Prices are quite fair, ranging from INR 2,790. Find more details below.
They are the most common effect group and are used by almost every guitar player from Stevie Ray Vaughan to Yngwie Malmsteen. Most amplifiers have channels for overdrive or distortion, but having these effects as pedals allows you greater variation in tone and allows you to “push” the cleaner channels of your amp harder, giving a different sound to the overdrive channel.
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The 52-week part is an excellent way to motivate you to practice. The selection of licks is great too with several genres covered well. It provides info for setting your metronome to get the beat right too. They are challenging, especially when you play them at the recommended speed. The wide selection will give you plenty of choices even if you skip a genre.
Many guitars (even new guitars) need the frets leveled in order to play buzz-free with low action. Most electric guitars with bolt-on necks come from the factory with high tongue frets. Doing great fret work is a learned art, and I guarantee that you will be happy with mine. All my fret work jobs are performed with the guitar mounted in a neck jig that simulates string tension. This allows very accurate work. Re-fret jobs include leveling the fretboard if needed.
While most collectors aren’t necessarily going to boast that they own a number of Harmony guitars, we shouldn’t forget the important “first axe” role Harmony played for many guitarists. This company took mass production of guitars to the next level. And though you may have to sort through a few to find one that is completely intact and doesn’t allow a car to drive under the strings, they were quality-made instruments for the most part. For those of you who first learned on a Harmony Archtone, this is certainly a childhood treasure!
Anyways, it sucks to not have a camera to show stuff or even a way to measure stuff I'm describing. I'll have to obtain a few small things to set it up. like a saddle and an allen wrench that doesn't suck. Probably whatever caliper or shim they use to do real setups as well. Maybe latter frames just have tilted bridges after a while. I don't really know. The bridge is rather thick. If you lower the bridge, do you just sand it?
The $300-$500 price range of acoustic guitars is perfect for all levels of players. Whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced player, this price point gets you a good guitar that will sound great while not breaking the bank. While you won’t find any American made acoustics under $500, you will find some by popular American brands offering cheaper versions of their high end guitars that are made in Mexico or China.
I am a beginner and based on your recommendation, I bought the Dummies book, and signed up for Guitartricks.com as well. This combo is turning out to be really effective for me, I haven’t been playing long but I can feel the progress with each passing day. The videos at Guitartricks are my main guide through this maze of learning, and the Guitar for Dummies is my go-to resource for reading about anything I want to find out. I’m sure doing a search on the internet would get me the same result, but the Dummies book is easier to hit up I think, and at least I’m sure it’s accurate.
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Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.", "value":"447.99", "priceMin":"447.99", "priceMax":"699.99", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"0", "brand":"Ibanez", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"5.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"10", "reviewHowManyReviews":"3", "usedOrNew":"new", "discontinued":"1", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"0", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "", "checksum":"", "priceVisibility": "1"}

I like most of the the 814's I've played though they seem just a bit brighter than some other guitars along that range. I prefer Collins guitars they're kind of in between the Martin sound, and the Taylor's brighter sound. After recording with several different ones. My favorites productions are Collin's OM1A , and more affordable Blueridge, and Recording king. I prefer Rosewood back and sides, Adirondack top, mahogany neck, with ebony fingerboard. Although mahogany back and sides with Sitka/ Engelmann tops sound nice too. When recording I think (might just be me) that I get better note separation from the Collins

As his Tuareg brethren continue their separatist insurgency in northern Mali, the leader of Tinariwen again can lay claim to being one of the world’s few literal rebel rockers. Ibrahim gets credit for inventing the modern Tuareg electric guitar style adopted by Etran Finatawa, Bombino, and other Saharan musicians. He generates this gritty, grungy, churning sound by hammering open strings on his Fender axe in a laid-back desert boogie reminiscent of his late northern Mali peer Ali Farka Touré.


Gibson produced only hollow body electrics until 1952, when the first Les Paul solid bodies hit the market. But that still left a gap. Certain players wanted a guitar with the versatility of a Les Paul, but the warmer, mellow tone of a hollow body — albeit one that could be played at high volume. A solid wood block runs through the center of the guitar’s body, allowing greater sustain and less feedback at high volumes than hollow bodies, while the winged side of these guitars’ bodies still provide for a mellow tone thanks to their acoustic resonance.
Leo Fender didn’t know how to play guitar. The inventor of the famous guitar brand, which includes the Telecaster and Stratocaster models (favored by Kurt Cobain and Jimi Hendrix), never learned how to play his own instrument. Fender began as an accountant with a knack for repairing radios, later turning that hobby into a full-time electronics operation. The highly versatile Telecaster, which he developed in 1950, became the first mass-produced solid-body electric guitar.
You can divide these further into cabinets and combos. A cabinet is simply an amplifier without a head. The head is all the knobs and so on that can be tweaked to produce variations in tone and volume. Combos include the head, so they're often preferred as they're easier to port around. However, if you want a multi-speaker setup, you'll want to opt for cabinets with separate heads.
I think Matts’ advice is good, (old guitar strings can be helpfull for “fishing”) but if you change your p’ups and switching often an accessible control cavity is a great thing, just be sure to drop all pots and such into the body and drill through the potentiometer holes so you know where to place template and assure router bit won’t hit anything dangling in the body.
Stewart MacDonnald has a great finishing schedule that I would recomend reading before you start the painting process. You shouldn't need to fill any pores on the neck because necks are usualy made from maple which is a tight grain wood. All that's need for it is a sanding with 220 grit paper unless you want to leave the neck natural and unfinished. I recomend using at least a few coats of sanding sealer of clear gloss laquer to protect the wood fromdirt and grime that comes from playing.
To me, the best practice amp hands down is the Yamaha THR10, and I have had them all. It just blows everything else away. But, it is $300 for an amp smaller than a toaster. Don't let the size fool you though, it is a killer amp. After the Yamaha, the Blackstar ID: Core series is my favorite. The ID: Core 20 or 40 is a great amp. The Yamaha and Blackstar ID: Core are both stereo for your aux input. To me this is a big deal. Many beginners are going to be playing along with backing tracks and songs, these stereo amps are awesome music playback tone. After those two amps, the Fender Mustang, Peavey Vypyr and Line 6 Spider are all about the same to me.
Finally introduced in 1936 was National Dobro’s first wooden Hawaiian Electric Guitar. These Hawaiian laps were built by National Dobro in Chicago. This had a squarish pear shape, rather wide and frumpy, with two sharp points for shoulders and fairly wide cutaways. This was “…solid wood finish, in hi-lited mahogany,” which is basically a shaded mahogany sunburst. The top was bound. A square neck rose up to a squared-off flat three-and-three head, now with plate tuners with plastic buttons. The 26-fret fingerboard (23″ scale) had dot inlays plus little numbers written along the treble edge for each fret position! This first wood-body looks to have some sort of elevated pickguard, also made of wood. The old, improved Stimson pickup was housed under a large, two-part rectangular cast bridge assembly with a slotted cover revealing the pickup poles, and a slightly elevated back section with rear slots for attaching the strings. Two little wings were appended to either side of this rectangular housing, the treble side with a volume knob, the bass side with a screw-on microphone-type plug attachment (this would be favored over 1/4″ plugs on Supro laps for years to come). A square metal Supro logo plate was mounted between the end of the fingerboard and the pickup cover. Again, cost was $75, including the amp.
Beavis Audio Research – started in 2005 as a hobbyist site to share information on DIY guitar electronics. From the initial few pages of questionable designs, it has grown to a popular place for DIY freaks to visit and learn. Along the way, beavis has evolved into a small company. They strive to advance the DIY ethic and provide resources, tools, kits and products to the worldwide community of gearhounds.

The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics considers the electric guitar and related accessories from a scientific point of view. The majority of books about electric guitars try to avoid using mathematics when describing the scientific phenomena related to the electric guitar. However, mathematics is an invaluable tool in the design processes of all areas of technology, even when designing musical instruments and audio electronics. This book presents simple mathematical methods for modelling the electric guitar as a signal source for electric circuits such as effect pedals and amplifiers. In addition to modelling the electronics inside the electric guitar, the principles of operation of some vintage guitar effects and amplifier circuits are explained and analysed using systematic methods of circuit analysis. The book is intended for everyone who is interested in the design and analysis of basic analogue electronics used in the electric guitar and guitar-related accessories. The presented topics cover the whole signal chain from the guitar strings to the loudspeaker. Therefore, a solid foundation is established for creating own designs in guitar electronics using basic components of analogue electronics.

Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.
Taylor Guitars was founded in 1974 by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug, and has grown into the leading global builder of premium acoustic guitars. Renowned for blending modern, innovative manufacturing techniques with a master craftsman's attention to detail, Taylor acoustic guitars are widely considered among the best-sounding and easiest to play in the world. The company is a pioneer in the use of computer mills, lasers and other high-tech tools and proprietary machinery, and today, Bob Taylor is widely recognized throughout the musical instrument industry as the visionary acoustic guitar manufacturer.
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A fantastic sounding unit and U2’s The Edge original delay sounds were a Deluxe Memory Man used on “I Will Follow” and “Sunday Bloody Sunday”. Some cool added features to the Memory Man is the added chorus effect you can put on the delays. This is one of the coolest delay pedals ever. Many pedals now digitally model the sound of an analog delay pedal and come very close with the added flexibility a digital delay pedal provides like extended delay times and tap tempo.

I bought mine used in 1989 in a mom and pop music store in the North GA mountains in Cumming GA and have loved it everysence I Know very little about it except that I would not trade it for a new one. The sustain in the body of the overtone note is fantastic and rare to find.I use d'Addario phosphorus bronze strings 11 - 52 and would not change anything about this guitar,fantastic!!! Thanks Victor

We don’t know about other early guitars, but Univox probably augmented its offerings with other offerings from the Arai catalog, similar to what Epiphone would do with its first imports slightly later, in around 1970. Evidence this might have been so is seen in the book Guitars, Guitars, Guitars (American Music Publishers, out of print) which shows a Univox 12-string solidbody with a suitably whacky late-’60s Japanese shape, with two equal cutaway stubby/pointy horns. The head was a strange, long thing with a concave scoop on top, and the plastic logo. This is the only example of this shape I’ve encountered, but it had two of the black-and-white plastic-covered pickups used on Aria guitars of the period, and the majority of later Univox guitars were indeed manufactured by Arai and Company, makers of Aria, Aria Diamond, Diamond and Arai guitars. These pickups have white outsides with a black trapezoidal insert and are sometimes called “Art Deco” pickups. Perhaps the coolest feature of this strange guitar is a 12-string version of the square vibrato system employed on Aria guitars of this era. You can pretty much assume that if there was a strange-shaped solidbody 12-string Univox, it was not the only model! These would not have lasted long, probably for only until 1970 at the latest, and are not seen in the ’71 catalog.
Jump up ^ DeCurtis, Anthony (1992). Present Tense: Rock & Roll and Culture (4. print. ed.). Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. ISBN 0-8223-1265-4. His first venture, the Phillips label, issued only one known release, and it was one of the loudest, most overdriven, and distorted guitar stomps ever recorded, "Boogie in the Park" by Memphis one-man-band Joe Hill Louis, who cranked his guitar while sitting and banging at a rudimentary drum kit.
I'm a beginning player and have felt intimidated in guitar shops. That changed after walking into Grumpy's on Saturday. I didn't feel uncomfortable at all, quite the opposite. Kevin did a complete se...tup on my electric guitar while explaining the process to me. Looked at my other two guitars and (surprisingly) let me know that they didn't need anything. Such honesty is rare these days and I greatly appreciate it. I'll be back for all my guitar needs in the future. PS My son is a professional musician and has nothing but good to say about Grumpy's as well. He's a drummer but he loves the shop as well. See More
OK, when the list started it was hard to tell if the author was knowledgeable on the subject because of the automatic “Go To” names. Unfortunately, by the time I got to the end I realized this was the author’s favorites list versus the Top 10 Greatest Guitar Players. Kirk Hammett, Slash, Jack White, Chuck Berry??? You can’t put them on any list and not mention the guy who influenced so many, and who Eric Clapton called the best guitarist in the world, SRV. Richards biggest claim to fame it the amount of drugs he’s done that haven’t killed him,… Read more »
Ibanez RG20061, also known as the RGT220A CAH, is an RG series Prestige limited edition guitar model specially created for the 2006 Winter NAMM Show. It based on the RGT220A, but stained brown, although claimed to be barbecued to a chocolaty brown color. Features include a neck through body construction, ash body wings, Dimarzio IBZ pickups and the Edge Pro tremolo. Only 153 Made 8/10 Condition
In the Beatles' early days, George Harrison briefly billed himself as Carl Harrison in honor of his quick-picking hero. Perkins' bright, trebly style – which the rockabilly king picked up from blues players in Tennessee – defined the singles he put out on Sun Records ("Blue Suede Shoes," "Glad All Over") and influenced scores of players from Eric Clapton to John Fogerty. "He took country picking into the rock world," Tom Petty has said. "If you want to play Fifties rock & roll, you can either play like Chuck Berry, or you can play like Carl Perkins."
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By 1970, however, market conditions were changing rapidly. Japanese manufacturers had greatly improved their quality as well as their range of product offerings. Japanese labor at the time was much cheaper than American, and the imported guitars offered more "bang for the buck" than American ones. In a relatively short time, brands such as Yamaha and Ibanez were outselling Harmonies and Kays. The Japanese guitars had more comfortable neck contours and had truss rods that actually worked. The Japanese rapidly improved the quality of their instruments as well as the variety of their offerings such that by the mid 1970s, Harmony, Kay and Danelectro had all ceased operations, and Martin, Fender and Gibson had eliminated most of the low-end student models from their lines to concentrate on a price range well above any of the Japanese imports. I went to Japan in 1974 and attended a music trade show there as well as visited numerous factories and music stores. I was absolutely astonished at the variety of offerings available. Whereas in 1970 most Japanese guitars were low-end student models which often copied currently available new American products, by 1974 the more progressive Japanese manufacturers were well aware that many vintage American instruments were far superior to the new ones of that time. As a result some of these Japanese manufacturers stared to concentrate on studying vintage American originals. Fuji Gen Gakki and Tokai started producing extremely detailed copies of old Les Pauls, Stratocasters, Mastertone banjos and other vintage American acoustic and electric guitars and mandolins.
In 1960, Gibson experienced a decline in electric guitar sales due to their high prices and strong competition from Fender’s comparable but much lighter double-cutaway design, the Stratocaster. In response, Gibson modified the Les Paul line. This 1961 issue Les Paul guitar was thinner and much lighter than the earlier models, with two sharply pointed cutaways and a vibrato system. However, the redesign was done without Les Paul’s knowledge. Although pleased with the sound, he asked Gibson to remove his name from the instrument until they fixed a design issue with the neck.[18] This separation occurred in 1960, but Gibson had a surplus stock of “Les Paul” logos and truss rod covers, and so continued to use the Les Paul name until 1963. At that point, the SG guitar’s name was finally changed to “SG“, which stood simply for Solid Guitar. In addition to the SG line, Gibson continued to issue the less expensive Jrs and Specials (and the Melody Makers) with the newer body style. These, together with the Firebird, were the standard Gibson solid-body models until the reintroduction of the Les Paul Standard Goldtop and the Les Paul Custom guitars to the market in 1968.
The Univox/Aria Les Paul openly copied its American original, but would never be mistaken for it because it continued many characteristics typical of Japanese production at the time; a bolt-on neck with the usual narrow fingerboard, sitting relatively high on the body, zero frets, block inlays (with rounded corners) and rounded ends. The headstock was a copy of the Gibson open book. And, obviously, it didn’t have Gibson humbuckers, favoring instead a design with 12 adjustable poles in a metal cover with a narrow black insert slit in the middle, sitting on black surrounds. Controls were standard three-way with two volumes and tones. The knobs were those tall, skinny gold kind seen on many early Japanese copies. Hardware was gold-plated. These first Univox Les Paul copies survived into the early ’70s, but were probably gone by around ’74. By ’71, the model was called either the Mother or the R&B Guitar Outfit and was available in either black (U1982) or gold (U1983) finishes. Also by ’71, the Univox logo had changed from the early plastic version to the more common outlined block letter decal.

: : : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! VoteinNovember
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