While it’s not as popular as the two previous brands we have mentioned, PRS is on a level of their own. American owned and made, these guitars are an epitome of quality and great sound. They have a completely unique appearance and offer a tone which has a distinctive color. Best thing about this brand is the balance price and performance. You get a lot more than you pay for with PRS.
There aren’t really any structured lessons—like, where you’re starting at the beginning and working your way sequentially through—you have to browse through the playlists and find what’s best, but the quality of the lessons and wide variety of topics will have everything covered. JamPlay is a sampler for the website, where you’re offered a subscription service to complete courses, which explains the kind of shotgun approach to the videos made available on YouTube. But the size and breadth of the topics you can access for free still makes it a great channel.
If you are inexperienced, it is only recommended that you attempt to setup a guitar that is of little value to you, both financially and sentimentally. If you don’t have one that fits these requirements, then it is best to pay the cost of a guitar setup as performed by a professional. The primary risk while setting up the instrument is over adjustment. Working any part of the bridge too much will cause wear and tear, and irreparable damage to the neck is often the result of improperly adjusting the truss rod. It is always hard to justify ruining a perfectly good instrument in order to avoid guitar setup cost.
To load a SoundFont in sforzando you can just drag and drop to the desktop or click Instrument, import and navigate to your SoundFont. Another good free program for PC is MuseScore and loading a new SoundFont is done by putting the file in the default Musescore SoundFont folder then selecting View, Sythesizer, Add and Set as Default. Musescore has basic editing capabilities as well as an excellent sheet music/score viewer and editor.
Bring up the topic of electrics, and Martin is hardly the first name of recall. The term “electrics” is not meant to include the company’s many fine acoustic-electric guitars, many sporting top-notch electronics (which ultimately remain acoustic beasts), but rather electric guitars meant for country chicken pickin’ or raunchy rock and roll. However, beginning in the early ’60s, Martin has launched periodic forays into the electric guitar marketplace with some very interesting, if commercially unsuccessful, results (which explains why the Martin name doesn’t come immediately to mind). Most coverage of the Martin brand is focused, quite rightly, on their substantial acoustic achievements. For this essay, however, let’s take an alternative view and look at the company’s various electric guitars, its thinline hollowbodies and later solidbodies.
If you mean the Guitar Hero III guitar then there are two switches on the back. The one just below the neck of the guitar (It looks like a quarter of a circle.) detaches the neck so you can store the guitar AND the neck in a smaller space, and the switch towards the side of the guitar detaches the faceplate so you can put a different faceplate on, or play without a faceplate.
Enter exhibit A: A late 60’s KENT short scale variation on the very popular (then and now) “Beatle” violin shaped bass. As you can see from the photos, this isn’t your average violin bass. While many, from the classic Hofner that Paul McCartney turned a few kids on to, to the Teisco and Black Jack Japanese models, didn’t stray far from the violin shape, this Kent takes a few attractive and stylish liberties with the standard template.
Many musical instruments are works of art, so it’s little doubt that design is very important to a lot of people. Make sure that you really like the way a guitar looks before purchase, because you might be playing it for years. This is one of the reasons the more natural wood colored guitars are always popular - they don’t go out of style or look out of place.
After you have the hang of mono and stereo miking, room miking, and air guitar, you may be ready for the final frontier of El Gtr exploration. The time-consuming technique that I call "multisourcing" combines all the aforementioned methods, multiplied by the infinite possibilities created by splitting the guitar output and sending it simultaneously to different amps (using, for example, a Whirlwind Selector splitter box).

The most common way that bass players connect their instrument to their bass amp is by using a 1/4" patch cord, a standard signal cable used in music and audio applications. Some bassists plug their bass into a small wireless transmitter about the size of a pack of cards, which can be clipped to the strap or to their belt. The transmitter transmits the bass signal to a receiver that is plugged into the amp. Bassists playing in large venues with complex stage set-ups, or a stage design where there is a large distance between performers, or players who like to dance or go out into the audience during the performance, may use wireless transmitters to avoid the risk of having their cable become disconnected while they move about on stage and give themselves more freedom. Another reason that some bassists use wireless transmitters is if their stage setup requires a long cable run between their bass and their amp. Long cable runs can weaken the strength of the signal and can adversely affect tone and sound quality.
The problem that had led to Martin and the idea of making guitars in the first place also led Kaman to the idea of using synthetic materials in guitars. He realized he could use a composite fiberglass to “improve” two aspects of guitar construction. He could solve the problem of cracking due to wood shrinkage caused by changes in heat and humidity, and he could improve vibration transmission from the back because fiberglass actually resonates at frequencies similar to many woods, but is more efficient (wood actually absorbs some of the instrument’s vibrations).
Hoshino Gakki also had semi acoustic, nylon and steel stringed acoustic guitars manufactured under the Ibanez name. Most Ibanez guitars were made for Hoshino Gakki by the FujiGen guitar factory in Japan up until the mid to late 1980s and from then on Ibanez guitars have also been made in other Asian countries such as Korea, China and Indonesia. During the early 1980s the FujiGen guitar factory also produced most of the Roland guitar synthesizers, including the Stratocaster-style Roland G-505, the twin-humbucker Roland G-202 and the Ibanez X-ING IMG-2010.
2) Use a line-out box (I use the Suhr Iso Line Out box) between your amp and dry speaker cab to take a tap off the dry signal. Run the line-out signal into a small mixer, and run the outputs of the mixer into a stereo power amp and two guitar cabinets. As with the previous rig, use the mixer sends and returns to patch in effects—which you will set at 100 percent wet (no dry signal) and blend to taste. In this setup, you can blend the dry signal into your “wet” cabinets. For live applications, mic all three cabinets, and pan the wet cabinets hard left and right in the PA. This is the setup I use, and I was inspired to go this route by guitarists such as Steve Stevens and Eddie Van Halen. I like to blend a significant amount of dry signal into the wet cabs. In the PA, the sound is absolutely massive! I also use an expression pedal to control the amount of effects in my wet cabs, so I can tailor my delays and reverbs on the fly.
Most, if not all of us have at least given some thought to learning to play the guitar. It is, after all, an instrument which takes the leading role in virtually every genre of popular music. No matter what type of music you aspire to play, there is almost certainly an important part there for you as a would-be guitar player. Of course, learning to play begins with actually owning a guitar. 
An utterly odd topic would be a discussion of woods for a certain tone. Wood does no magic to the tone. It has properties which might change the resonant behavior of a guitar body. But, that it does by some very course parameters, say stiffness and specific weight. Of very same importance is the shape of the plank which is referred to as “the body”. Stiffness, weight and shape work all together.
In the years since, Novak has built the instruments of choice for the likes of musicians like Charlie Hunter, Phillip De Gruy, Joe Louis Walker, and Henry Kaiser, to name a few. As time passed, he experimented with a variety of design ideas involving the use of non-traditional woods. At times, he was viewed as downright crazy from many a purist's standpoint. But he turned the other cheek, seeking the solutions that would satisfy his own personal playing requirements.
If you plug your electric guitar into the auxiliary input of your home stereo, you can get away with not buying an amp at all. All you need is a special, inexpensive adapter that you can purchase at any electronic or music store for less than $3. The adapter is just a metal or plastic-coated plug that has a female quarter-inch jack on one end and a male RCA (sometimes called phono) plug on the other. (Just tell the salesperson what you want to do, and he can supply the correct unit.) The following figure shows how the adapter and the guitar cord work together.
The United States Department of Justice found emails from 2008 and 2009 in which Gibson employees discussed the "gray market" nature of the ebony wood available from a German wood dealer—who obtained it from a supplier in Madagascar—as well as plans to obtain the wood. It filed a civil proceeding in June 2011,[40][43][44] the first such case under the amended Lacey Act, which requires importing companies to purchase legally harvested wood and follow the environmental laws of the producing countries regardless of corruption or lack of enforcement.[44] Gibson argued in a statement the following day that authorities were "bullying Gibson without filing charges" and denied any wrongdoing.[39][45] Arguing against the federal regulations and claiming that the move threatened jobs, Republicans and Tea Party members spoke out against the raids and supported Juszkiewicz.[46]
And it's not just about looking different because it does follow conventional acoustic guitar builds with its solid spruce top, scalloped X-bracing and laminated mahogany back and sides. For plugging in, it comes with the Fishman Sonicore under-saddle pickup and Isys+ preamp system, which comes standard with many acoustic-electric guitars in the market.
Optocoupling Compressor using a LED and a LDR. Similar to Colorsound Supa Sustain or DOD 280. As others have mentioned, instructions are a single photocopied sheet showing component layout. There's no mention that you'll need a piece of heat shrink to fab up your optocoupler. If you have some experience you can figure it out. Wire was not supplied.
I have been playing guitar, banjo, bass and harmonica for 46 years - and I don't find a $4,300 Martin D 41 to be affordable (Guitar Center price). I play a Taylor 402ce and a dozen other instruments. I believe Taylor is the best instrument for the price..Alvarez Yairi guitars are very good too. Martin and Gibson make fine guitars but they are overpriced. I have a Chinese Maple Guild that sounds fine but the fretwork is amateurish. A Chinese Takamine New Yorker is very well constructed and sounds great.
Fingerboards vary as much as necks. The fingerboard surface usually has a cross-sectional radius that is optimized to accommodate finger movement for different playing techniques. Fingerboard radius typically ranges from nearly flat (a very large radius) to radically arched (a small radius). The vintage Fender Telecaster, for example, has a typical small radius of approximately 7.25 inches (18.4 cm). Some manufacturers have experimented with fret profile and material, fret layout, number of frets, and modifications of the fingerboard surface for various reasons. Some innovations were intended to improve playability by ergonomic means, such as Warmoth Guitars' compound radius fingerboard. Scalloped fingerboards added enhanced microtonality during fast legato runs. Fanned frets intend to provide each string with an optimal playing tension and enhanced musicality. Some guitars have no frets—and others, like the Gittler guitar, have no neck in the traditional sense.
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For the most part, you might want to get a preamp that has at least some type of EQ on it. Tone shaping on an acoustic electric guitar can really give you an edge or at least a semblance of control before the sound guy butchers it during your gig, although you can do this with an effects pedal. Even though this is something that takes the time to learn, it's better to have the option readily available when you decide to step up to that level.
I have been playing guitar for over 40 years and purchased Taylor's, Gibsons and Fenders as well as many others. This Godin company understands value and passes that along to its customers. Fine tone when played acoustic or threw an amp. The wood tone and workmanship are awesome for this or any price point. You will not be disappointed with this guitar, it is a great value.
TC Electronic's Hall of Fame reverb pedal is stacked with features and is easily our top recommendation from this list. The first perk is a mode selector that gives you a total of ten different reverb types, in addition to the TonePrint option. TonePrint is TC Electronic's signature feature that allows you to program tones into your pedal designed by artists and popular musicians.

Providing all of the necessary features expected in a quality electric guitar at a budget-friendly price, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is perfect for those just beginning their musical journey or the seasoned guitarist looking for an everyday guitar for practice. The 650R humbucker pickups combined with the open coil design deliver strong and sustained tones. As seen on all Epiphone guitars, the Special II has over 500K potentiometer for both tone and volume, and a toggle selector with a 3-way pickup to focus in on the clarity of the sound and decreased excess humming. The body and neck are made with mahogany, while the fretboard has dot inlays within the rosewood design. String changing is also made easier due to the stopbar tailpiece, which helps to add more sustain in sound when combined with the LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge. With all of these features at such a reasonable price point, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a strong contender included on this list.


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First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.
The Fuzz-Tone connection hints that we need to look further back, and across the pond, for earlier examples of recorded guitar distortion. Gibson, and hence Maestro, was given the circuit that became the Fuzz-Tone by studio engineer Glen Snotty. Snotty, in turn, had devised the transistorized fuzz-generating design to replicate the sound that occurred when a tube preamp in the channel of a mixer he was using to record Grady Martin’s short-scale bass solo for the 1961 Mary Robbins hit record ‘Don’t Worry’ started to fail and yield a distorted tone. Whoever decided to stick with the track rather than re-record it through a properly functional channel was on to something; the result was Nashville’s first recorded fuzz guitar (a Danelectro bass, in fact). Courtesy of Maestro, Snotty’s fuzz circuit soon made the trendy new sound available to the world.
Support your local music shops! The Guitar Store is a great spot in a convenient location. Helpful and friendly staff all around. A good assortment of electric and acoustic guitars, amps, and more pedals than you could possibly imagine. No cases full of BOSS Metal Zones either - we're talking real pedals for the pedal enthusiast. They also are great for lessons/workshops and instrument repair. We had been bugging the guitarist in my band for having a noisy output jack for weeks. He took his guitar in, came in during a slow time, and they replaced the jack for him on the spot! Amazing! So while Guitar Center might be your only option to buy that fancy pack of tapered-B 5-String bass strings, The Guitar Store should be your first choice for literally anything else. Check it out! SUPPORT LOCAL MUSIC SHOPS! But they make you leave your backpack at the counter?!? ZERO STARS!!!!! ;-)
If you prefer the Linux platform, then Guitarix is your best free guitar effects solution. It is a free, full featured guitar amp and effects software. Aside from its impressive amp modeling capabilities, Guitarix has 25 equally impressive effects modules. Effects include a noise gate, modulation effects like flanger and phaser and it even has weird stuff like auto-wah. Guitarix's low latency audio engine ensures respectable audio, which is said to give you not more than 10 milli seconds of delay. This is a simple yet effective guitar effects software, unfortunately it is only available for Linux users.
Hey! I just opened up my 1984 g&l for the first time today and I found a design very similar to this. I had always loved the tone control on it but was too nervous to open it up for whatever goofy reason. I may try to draw it out and share it but maybe include a picture at some point as well. I’m glad someone else has looked at this because it definitely threw me for a loop when I first saw the two caps both headed to ground.

Resonator guitars are distinctive for not having a regular sound hole instead they have a large circular perforated cover plate which conceals a resonator cone. The cone is made from spun aluminum and resembles a loudspeaker. The bridge is connected to either the center or edge of the cone by an aluminum spring called the spider. The vibrations from the spider are projected by the cone through the perforated cover plate. The most common resonator guitars have a single cone although the original model patented in 1927 by John Dopyera had three and was called a tricone resophonic guitar. Resonator guitars are loud and bright. They are popular with blues and country guitarists and can be played with a slide or conventionally.


On some amps, setting the "gain" or "drive" control above a certain setting causes an overdrive effect, either due to the natural effect of overloading the preamplifier (or the preamp tube on a tube amplifier) and/or due to a distortion effect being turned on. Tube amplifiers typically also have a "standby" switch in addition to an "on/off" switch. Controls are typically mounted on the front of the amplifier near the top of the cabinet; often the knobs are recessed so that they do not project beyond the wooden cabinet, to protect the knobs during transportation. On amplifier "heads", protective metal U-shaped protrusions may be used to protect the knobs during transportation. On some amps, notably Roland models, the knobs and switches may be on top of the amplifier, at the rear of the top surface. Again, the knobs are usually recessed below the top of the wooden cabinet to protect them.
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The Effect:Chorus is one of the most recognized pedal effects, dating back from the beginning of the 70’s, and later on popularized in the 80’s, it was the most used effect on guitar pedals back then, and no guitarists dared to step foot on stage without the classic Boss CH-1 Stereo Super Chorus Pedal or MXR Micro-Chorus, to name a few. Originally, Chorus pedals came in Analog form, however today the market is mixed with both Analog and Digital pedals, with the difference between the two being that Analog modifies the signal directly, while Digital takes the original analog sound coming from your guitar, converts and modifies it into digital form, before finally converting it back to analog form prior to its release.

TC Electronic's Hall of Fame reverb pedal is stacked with features and is easily our top recommendation from this list. The first perk is a mode selector that gives you a total of ten different reverb types, in addition to the TonePrint option. TonePrint is TC Electronic's signature feature that allows you to program tones into your pedal designed by artists and popular musicians.
BOO TO AMAZON FOR CARRYING A MISREPRESENTED PRODUCT. Due to the description I thought we could use this for lessons. It is NOT an instrument it is a toy. It doesn't stay tuned for even a 1/2 hour lesson and the teacher won't allow him to use it for fear that it will hurt his ability to hear when a real guitar is out of tune in the future. I tried to return but they didn't respond for weeks and told me it was too late after they finally responded. The guitar has barely been used at all and won't be used since it is clearly doing more harm than good for a young musician! AMAZON you should drop this product, it is NOT what is presents itself to be!!!
When playing seventh chords, guitarists often play only subset of notes from the chord. The fifth is often omitted. When a guitar is accompanied by a bass, the guitarist may omit the bass note from a chord. As discussed earlier, the third of a triad is doubled to emphasize its major or minor quality; similarly, the third of a seventh is doubled to emphasize its major or minor quality. The most frequent seventh is the dominant seventh; the minor, half-diminished, and major sevenths are also popular.[79]

Seriously, Yamaha above ESP?! Japanese made ESP guitars are among the best in the world, no wonder so many people play them. They have great designs and an ESP standard is not to high in price compared to a USA Jackson or custom shop guitar. Ibanez prestige are very nice to (I hate the necks personally) but the build is really good. ESP blows Gibson out of the water by a VERY large margin. Gibson has lawsuits against them for selling "USA" made guitars that were discovered to be imports from cheap labor offshore factories. All ESP and Ibanez prestige guitars are made in Japan and are immaculate in terms of quality and consistency. ESP is more a metal guitar but they have much better tone than any of the others listed, the only one here that might have a sweeter tone is prs but for $8,000 and only a fractionally better tone that is subjective they can keep it. I personally like ESP and Schecter best but Jackson is really good too. Not to knock Ibanez, but their necks are way to thin ...more
The modern "tone block" is a design-based marketing approach from EBMM starting in their guitars a few years back. It originally involved routing out an alder body, fitting a block of mahogany from just behind the bridge to the neck join and applying a top to the guitar. It is an alteration of the design and some purists believe they hear a difference in the tone of the guitar versus plain alder bodied or mahogany instruments.
hi-can you put two caps on your two tone pots or will just the one do as is mormal-aslo on a push pull pot do you need two tone caps one for the bottom half as regular-if putting on the square part  of the push pull pot -can you put on any of the six lugs ie the ones not used -i have instaleed a push pull swich but when down the tone on the neck pickup does not seem to have any effect -when i pull it when usingn the pull pull it does have a effect is this normal-i have now neck-bridge-and all three in a row-when not pulled which would be normal five wat switch sound i seem to get a telecasster sound ,i thought this was the case when i pull it up=i have now a nice selection of sounds—thankls sean
Excellent information. There is so much more to discuss on this topic. I built an Explorer shaped guitar with Strat hardware and humbucking pickups. I love the dive bombing note bends and the fat sound of humbucking pickups. I used Koa for the body and the neck came from a '70's Hagstrom electric. REALLY, thin neck. Read about guitars. See what artists like to play and why. Then fit it to your needs / wants. Brian May's Red Special uses wiring techniques I never heard or thought of. And he and his Dad made that guitar. Les Paul invented the guitar with the same name. Read about him and what he wanted. The ideas are out there to expand on. My Les Paul has 2 volume controls and a common Bass and Treble control. Different way of thinking. And it works for me.
The #1 cause of fret wear is the fretting hand pressure exerted by the player.  I have some clients that grip very tightly and wear frets quickly (Rob Fahey), and some that grip very lightly and take forever to exhibit significant wear (Jasan Stepp, Dog Fashion Disco/PolkaDot Cadaver).  Fret material hardness, string hardness and frequency of use all contribute to wear as well, but hand pressure is still the leading cause since frets do not wear themselves out.  Technique is different for every player, unique and personal and habits can be hard to change.  Just like brakes in a car, how hard and how much something is driven directly impacts wear and longevity.  Please see the refrets page for further thoughts on this topic.
The Blackheart Killer Ant is another slightly unconventional choice. Features wise, the Killer Ant does not have even the basics found on most beginner amps, yet it costs more money. The only controls on the Killer Ant are a power switch and a volume control. However, what sets the Blackheart Killer Ant apart is the fact it is a tube amp, rather than the cheaper solid state amps used for most beginner amps.
Their selection these days is insane, especially since they target a lot of awesome smaller brands that NOBODY else in the area carries. I'm pretty sure this is the only place in town you can go to play the Reverend line, not to mention damn near every PRS model currently in production. The locally-made boutique stuff they stock is awesome too, and I would have never even known about it had it not been for the shop.
Unfortunately there are a few who are not too happy with with some of the default patches, they caution that the PODHD500X is not a plug-and-play unit. While you can get good tones with a bit of tweaking, you can get even better tones with more experience, so the learning curve can be a bit steep for some. For best results, you ought to research the actual gear that your favorite musicians use, along with their settings and use them as your starting points to creating your own tones. Thankfully, there are user made presets that you can also use as base for your own virtual signal chain.
Sounds great. Compact and good looking. Easy to use. Extremely versatile! Make sure you read the instructions because there are so many things you can do with this. Only drawback is that if you plan to use it live, try not to have too many effects applied because it slows down the transition timing. However, best for recording if youre trying to produce specific sounds from your instrument.

Run a length of wire (approx two feet is usually plenty) through the jack mounting hole and down into the cavity. When you see the wire in the cavity pull it up through the F hole. Make sure the wire is long enough for one end to stick out the jack hole, and the other to stick out the F hole. Tape the jack hole end of the wire to the guitar with masking tape, or tie it to the strap button. This will ensure it doesn’t fall through the jack hole while you’re working on the other end.
When it comes to the specific tone of a guitar as opposed to a harp or piano common wisdom suggests the transient, say “the pick” to be the discriminator at least for untrained listeners. Then the series of harmonics might be of interest. But this is fixed by the scale and fretting. Only the relative amplitude of harmonics may vary, which by common wisdom does not do to much in reasonable bounds.
To do hammers-ons and pull-offs, you simply click the switch for it on, and every time you play two notes within a small enough interval it plays them as a hammer-on or pull-off. This seems great until you realize it still does this even if you hold those two notes down together like you were playing a chord. To not have the first note immediately cut out, you have to switch this feature off.
It was late 1969 early 1970. I was 13 years old and had been learning guitar for about a year when I was given what I considered to be the key to a world of freedom. Mum & Dad said it was ok for me to setup my room in a shed inside Dad’s garage. The shed was the size of a small bedroom, about eight by ten in the old measurements. It was originally built from scraps of recycled building material from a 100 year old house and was initially used as a tool shed.

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If you are new to electronics, the essential tool you most likely need to buy is a decent temperature controlled soldering station. A basic one such as a Weller WLC100 can be had for less than $40 and will do the job just fine. Really nice ones with digital temperature readouts from Weller or Hakko are $100-$150 and as much as you will ever need for a home pedal shop. The soldering pencils have interchangeable tips, so you can keep a selection of different sizes. The one that normally comes with a new station will be suitable for most through-hole pedal kits.
Description: Body: Koa - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: White Sparkle - Frets: 22, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Thumbnail - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.6" (62.5cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Rocking Bar - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Grover Romantics Tuners, 3x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: FilterTron - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Flamed Koa
You can knock the price down of the S670 down with the S520, which is from the same series as the S670, but without the middle Quantum Alnico pickup (Alnico simply refers to the type of magnet material used - it’s fancy way to say “stock” pickups). Otherwise this guitar is tough to distinguish from most of the S670. You get the same Edge Zero tremolo system and locking tuners, along with a similarly thin body and neck design.
The Articulations page exposes all of the Shreddage II articulations to the user in a fully-customizable mapping scheme. The user can activate articulations via keyswitches or velocity ranges. The Engine page reveals the back end of Shreddage II for users seeking to tweak Shreddage II into the ultimate performance tool, with controls for velocity response, transposition, pitch bend range, resonance controls, pedal behavior, and control over noises like release and pick.
Without going into technical details, the amp's power rating is directly correlated to its loudness. This means that the higher the power rating is, the louder the amp can go. But loud is not always better, especially when considering space and noise level restrictions, this is why even those with big wall of amps have a humble practice amp to play quietly with. Low power amps also let you crank the gain at lower volumes, so you can get to your amp's sweet spot without being a noise nuisance. Thankfully, some big amps now come with built-in power attenuators, which give you the option to lower the power rating when needed. Also note that many tube amps are louder than similarly rated solid-state amplifiers.
Once again we traverse the extremities of guitar body sizes; from the sleek parlour shapes to the rather obviously named jumbo sized acoustics. If dreadnoughts are the poster-boys, and parlours the waif-like supermodels, then jumbo acoustics are the plus-size, brash, loud ones who just want to have fun. You’ll probably have seen jumbo-sized acoustics in the hands of Noel Gallagher or Bob Dylan, and the benefits here are measured in sheer volume. With all that extra wood, there’s more room for the sound to reverberate around the body, resulting in a big, bold sound which simply can’t be recreated from a smaller bodied guitar.
You know Eddie Van Halen, that legendary guitar player who pretty much knocked the music world on its ear with his innovative sounds and playing style back in the late ‘70s. For years he partnered with brands such as Kramer, Ernie Ball and Peavey to create signature models of his guitars, as well as the real guitars he used onstage. Now he has his own company: EVH.
Instrument amplifiers are available in a wide range of price, quality, and performance levels. Some are designed for beginners, such as small, low-wattage practice amps, which typically have a single 8" speaker and about 10 watts, or smaller "combo" amps with relatively low wattage (15 to 20 watts) and a single 10" speaker. Mid- to large-size "combo" amps with 30 to 50 watts and one 12" speaker or four 10" speakers are best for high-volume situations, such as band rehearsals and onstage performances. For large venues, such as outdoor music festivals, guitarists may use one or more 100 watt (or several hundred watt) heads with one or more 8x10” cabinets. Some guitar amps are strongly associated with specific instruments or genres, such as the Marshall amps, which are widely used in heavy metal music.
Chrome trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
Item Weight 9.6 ounces Product Dimensions 2.5 x 2.8 x 4.2 inches True Bypass Footswitch Zinc Alloy Outer Cover Transparent top knob and 2 cool small black knobs Psychedelic music uses the imagination to filter how we understand this strange ad beautiful world we live in: through melody and noise, with echoes and ambience, with peace and love. The TAPE EKO is a smart echo pedal that embodies the soul of the classic tape echo sound. It provides three delay modes: Mode I, Mode II, and reverse mode. Mode I gives you all the advantages of a digital delay. Compared with other tape echo effects, this mode produces a brighter, cleaner tone with less noise, all without sacrificing warmth or dynamics. Mode II differs from Mode I in terms of dynamics.
This acoustic-electric parlor style guitar features a solid cedar top and solid sapele back and sides, premium appointments that other builders will require you to pay top dollars for. And it features old school parlor style body shape, which gives the instrument a vintage appeal, and blues box style tone with emphasis on the middle frequencies. This makes it ideal for blues, folk and old school comping, a good contrast to regular sized acoustics in a mix.
The Ampeg Bassamp Company, founded in 1949 by Everett Hull, responded to the growing demand for electric bass equipment by producing a line of bass amplifiers. Ampeg bass amps were widely used by electric bass guitarists in the 1950s and 1960s. The first bass amplifier offered by Ampeg was an 18-watt model with a single 12" speaker and a rear ventilation port called the Super 800. In 1951, they introduced a 20-watt version with a 15-inch speaker. In 1960, they introduced the B-15 Portaflex, a flip-top 25-watt tube bass amplifier with a single 15" speaker. While the Ampeg Portaflex had a pleasing bass tone, and was used by studio bassists such as James Jamerson and Carol Kaye, it was not powerful enough to be used in a stadium or arena concert.[3]
Growing popularity of the guitar in the early 1900s, fueled by the growing popularity of folk music and country and western music, led to a demand for louder and more percussive guitars. In response, many companies began to use metal strings instead of catgut. These became known as steel-string guitars. By 1921, Martin had focused production towards this type of guitar.
Here's some net info you may find interesting. Some of the first Kents to have been imported into the U.S. were made in Sweden by Hagstrom. (They may have actually been Czech-made and sold by Hagstrom.) The Hagstrom HI, HII, and HIII (those are the letter H with roman numerals representing the number of pickups the guitar had) were branded Kent for sale in the U.S. and as Futurama for the U.K. They had the Kent name on the headstock and sometimes the upper bout. They were similar to Fender Stratocasters. They also made some Strat-shaped basses. According to an article in Vintage Guitar Magazine, importation of Hagstrom-made Kents began in 1962. Another story is that Hagstrom sold Kent-branded guitars through distributors other than Buegeleisen & Jacobson in the U.S. without permission from J&B and were forced to withdraw them after a short time. By then Hagstrom had become better-known and could sell them under their own name, anyway. At first, the idea was to keep ’em cheap and sell to the beginners and students. Later, as Japanese manufacturers proliferated and competition became hot and heavy, some of them began to copy the Fenders and Gibsons of the time. As quality began to improve, some manufacturers again began issuing thier own designs. One of the “beginners” who got a start with a Kent Polaris I was Bruce Springsteen. Alex Lifeson of Rush got started with a Kent acoustic. One of Gene Simmons first guitars was also a Kent. The BBC series “The Seven Ages of Rock”, episode 2, showed Lou Reed (R.I.P) with the Velvet Underground playing a Kent 532 Copa at Andy Warhol’s hangout. Kent created a vib then and they're still doin it today.

I remember choosing a floating tremolo equipped electric guitar as my first ever purchase, and I ended up being so frustrated at how hard it is to keep the guitar in tune and how complex string replacements were. To make the long story short, I felt relief when I traded it up for a simpler Fender Strat. These days, floating tremolos have gotten better and easier to setup, but I'd still recommend a guitar with basic stop tail piece or tremolo bridge for beginners - just so you can focus on learning the instrument and worrying about string setup when you have more experience.
If you are inexperienced, it is only recommended that you attempt to setup a guitar that is of little value to you, both financially and sentimentally. If you don’t have one that fits these requirements, then it is best to pay the cost of a guitar setup as performed by a professional. The primary risk while setting up the instrument is over adjustment. Working any part of the bridge too much will cause wear and tear, and irreparable damage to the neck is often the result of improperly adjusting the truss rod. It is always hard to justify ruining a perfectly good instrument in order to avoid guitar setup cost.
Washburn - With a long history that dates back to 1883, Washburn makes various types of guitar related products including electric, acoustic, bass, amps, banjos, mandolins and amplifiers. Their old acoustic guitars were involved with Delta blues back in the 1920s, while now, they are recognized mostly for their metal/rock friendly electric guitars.
In the 1950's company called Don Noble and Co, was founded in the 1950’s by Don Noble, a well-known accordion player and entrepreneur.  He began by importing Italian made musical instruments, mainly accordions, in an era when the "stomach Steinway" was very popular and accordions were being sold door-to-door, and accordion academies were common in most larger cities. But he also imported guitars under the Noble brand name.
Rosewood » The diminishing supply of Brazilian Rosewood has led to Indian Rosewood replacing it in most markets. While the two look different, the tonal quality is virtually the same. One of the most popular and traditional woods used on acoustic guitars, rosewood has been prized for its rich, complex overtones that remain distinct even during bass-heavy passages. It's cutting attack and ringing tones make for highly articulate sound and plenty of projection. Rosewood is also a popular choice for fingerboards and bridges.
The Quebec-based Robert Godin decided to create his own music instrument company in 1972. Today, the manufacturer sells its products under different brand names: Norman (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), Art & Lutherie (entry-level guitars), Simon and Patrick (mid-range and high-end guitars), La Patrie (classical guitars), Seagull (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), and Godin for electric guitars. Some models are equipped with a piezo and/or "synth" pickups. The body shape is pretty classic, somewhere between a Les Paul and a Telecaster. Among the most famous Godin players we have John McLaughlin and Leonard Cohen. The brand catalog is sorted in different series: Performance Series, Signature Series, Multiac (acoustic/electric hybrid), Passion Series (high-end instruments), 5th Avenue Series, plus some very original single models like the Glissentar, an acoustic/electric 11-string nylon-string fretless guitar!
It can get a bit difficult trying to properly depict certain aspects of effects pedals to our newer musicians out there since much of music tends to be described in an intangible sort of manner which relies heavily the assumption of prior knowledge and personal tastes which is why we try our best to not get the pros out there the meat of the information they are looking for, but describe it in a way that players of even entry levels can comprehend. So with that in mind, one of the more complex aspects of effects pedals for newer musicians is their implementation of a signal chain.
B.C. Rich specializes in guitars for the heavy metal and hard rock crowd. They’ve produced some of the most legendary designs in the history of metal, including the Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. Their instruments helped to mold the hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s and B.C. Rich is still a great choice for any guitarist looking for an instrument that looks and sounds as edgy as possible.
The design, while nothing particularly special, is clean and beautiful, which will help it appeal to most guitarists - the dreadnought acoustic body being one of the favorite parts. Ultimately, just about anyone could pick up this guitar and get what they need out of it, which is why it makes our top pick. We could recommend it to anyone, and when you talk about the price, it becomes even more attractive, because this is a high-end guitar for mid-range money.
Compared to building something from scratch, the kits listed here are relatively easy to work with. Still, there are some that require more patience and experience, like those with set-necks and hollow bodies. On the flipside, there are kits that make life easier for you with their no-soldering required electronics and bolt-on necks. It is recommended that beginners go for easier builds, but with so much information available in the internet age, it should not hinder you from getting what you really want - just make sure to be patient and do your homework.

Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Fulcrum Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Duncan Designed - Pickup Configuration: S-S-S - String Instrument Finish: Transparent Colors
Bill Collings dropped out of medical school in the early 1970s[3] and instead worked in a machine shop for five years.[4] At the same time he built his first guitar. In 1975 he moved to Houston, Texas, where he worked as an engineer with a pipeline and oil field equipment company by day and a guitar builder by night. Three years later he met renowned musician Lyle Lovett and built him a guitar.
Having a tuner on your pedal board is useful but these days I more often use a clip-on tuner, specifically the TC Electronic Polytune Clip (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US). I don't like the main signal to run through the tuner all the time if I can help it (I use the GigRig G2 switching system) but if you don't have that luxury, then look for a tuner with True Bypass like the TC Electronic Polytune 2 (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US) or use a Volume pedal that has a Tuner Output (many do these days!).
Discrete models describing the low frequency behavior of stringed instruments have appeared in the technical literature for more than 25 years. These models are very useful in understanding the nature of acoustic-structural interaction, but only when they are correctly tuned to match the measured response of a particular instrument. The tuning process is easiest when FRF measurements are made... [Show full abstract]

Dean Guitars is an American manufacturer, founded in Chicago in 1977. They build their guitars for speed players, and are famed for their eye-catching models, including the iconic Razorback. Signature models are also a specialty and they produce guitars for the likes of Dave Mustaine and Michael Angelo Batio, as well as huge line of Dimebag Darrell signature models.
ATTACHING AND DRILLING THE NECK For this you will want to use a clamp to hold the neck firmly in place while you dril the holes. Attach the neck to the body and clamp it lightly so you can set it in the right possition before drilling. Make sure you have some protection between the clamp and the body so you don't leave any indentions in the wood. A soft piece of plastic or a soft rag will work nicely. Use a long ruler to allign the neck to the position of the bridge. Do this on both sides of the neck to see that you get it centered. Tighten down the clamp a bit more until the neck doesn't move. Drill the holes as straight as possible with a smaller bit that you used on the body. If you can't reach all of the spots that you need to drill at because the clamp is in the way, take a couple of the furreles and neck screws and screw them into the neck. Once you have done this you can finish drilling the other holes with out the clamp.
1. Intonation: I have a brand-new Epiphone LP that will not completely intonate on the G, A, and Low E. Fretted notes remain sharp. I have replaced the factory strings with new Ernie Balls and tried every trick in the book to move the saddles as far away from the neck as possible. Many LP owners have this problem. Other than returning the guitar to Guitar World, my only other option is swap out the factory bridge with a wider one. You mention the latter option in one of your early comments, and I've decided to try it. I just bought a Gotoh one online. Hopefully, that will solve the problem.
The first thing that strikes you about Nate Savage’s Guitar Lessons YouTube Channel is how well the structured, numbered lessons are organised on the YouTube Home page itself. Overlays on the opening titles screens and the names of the lessons make it very clear about the content and help you to choose exactly what you need, or let you skip over any unnecessary stuff. His complete beginner topics go right back to “How To Hold The Guitar” which might sound really basic, but Nate’s absolutely right to nip any bad habits in the bud at the very beginning and that particular video could the most important 3:26 of your career. And I have to make mention of the high production levels on Nate’s videos. The vision and audio is excellent, the lessons are well made, and Nate’s friendly, easy-going manner makes you feel like he’s your best friend and guitar tutor at the same time.
Gitar Tricks are listening (see quote in bold) and as a result I have upgraded my Review Rating of this awesome Online Guitar Training Program. My previous review highlighted problems with the Video Loop Feature and the lack of Speed Control I am so happy that Guitar Tricks have released an immensely improved Video Player with faster video loading time, more accurate and reliable A/B looping and added a Video Timeline Preview that displays thumbnail images of the video at various points as you hover over the timeline. Another feature of the new player is the ability to adjust the speed via the Slow Motion feature.
Tube amps are appreciated for their high fidelity, which allows for the player’s ability and the quality of the guitar to be put to full fruition, and for their equally natural overdrive, which is achieved easier than with most solid state amps. However, besides being more expensive as an initial purchase, tube amps will also prove harder to maintain since lamps have a tendency of blowing up and are themselves quite expensive.
[Attention Korg Pa3x /Pa4x owners and Korg Pa700/1000 owners- I have a special version of this 6-velocity layer piano in .set format that will load to your Korg in compressed format at 116mb (equivalent to 232mb) - This set sounds wonderful on the Korg and uses 22 oscillators for outstanding realism including resonance, key-off and pedal effects. Send me an email (see bottom right) and I can provide a download link or go to the demo on SoundCloud here Korg Pa Yamaha C5 and follow the download link]

Two other Spanish guitars were available in 1954 which were not shown in the Teisco history photo, the J-2 and the TN-54. These are pretty much a mystery. The J-2 was likely a two-pickup companion to the J-1, although by a few years later, both these models had become double-cutaways. Whether that was the case with the J-2 from the beginning is unknown, but unlikely. The description of the TN-54 is completely unknown.
The short-lived Elite Telecaster of 1983 incorporated two specially designed humbucking pickups powered by an active circuitry that featured a “TBX” guitar expander and an MDX midrange booster with 12 dB of gain. Other features included a “Freeflyte” hardtail bridge and die-cast tuning machines with pearloid buttons. This guitar was among the latest CBS-era Fenders to feature a BiFlex truss-rod system, low-friction EasyGlider string trees and active electronics. After CBS sold Fender to a group of employees led by Bill C. Schultz in 1985, production ceased on the Elite Telecaster and other Elite models. Fender Japan made its own version of the Elite Telecaster in late 1984, which featured a 22-fret neck with medium-jumbo fretwire and a modern 9.5 inch fingerboard radius. Notable Elite Telecaster players include Johnny Hallyday and Dave Davies of The Kinks. Michael Houser w/ Widespread Panic and Andy Summers of The Police.
For an experienced guitarist, the choice of amplifier is personal and a major part of the guitarist’s sound. But most of our panelists thought that, for a beginner, it’s most important for an amp to offer a variety of good sounds so that they can find what works for them and make adjustments as their style and taste evolve. As Ken Rosser put it, “If a kid’s starting out and they’re really into Pantera, they’ll love an amp that gives them that sound, but next year they might discover Eric Clapton and want a different sound.”
Gibson filed a lawsuit November 18, 2010 in Federal court, the Central District of California, against WowWee USA and their Paper Jamz battery operated guitar toys charging trademark infringement.[27][28] The lawsuit claimed the Paper Jamz toy guitars copied the looks of some of Gibson’s famous guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson Flying V, the Gibson Explorer, and the Gibson SG. On December 21, 2010 Gibson was granted a request for an injunction against WowWee and retailers in the United States which were selling Paper Jamz guitars: WalMart, Amazon (company), Big Lots stores, Kmart Corporation, Target Corporation, Toys “R” Us, Walgreens, Brookstone, Best Buy, eBay, Toywiz.com, and Home Shopping Network (HSN)[29][30][31] The case was dismissed with prejudice (dismissed permanently) January 11, 2011 by Federal Judge R. Gary Klausner.[32][33]
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!

The electric guitar setup routine is as important to your sound as any component on your instrument. In addition, if you learn how to setup your guitar correctly you can save some money by not running down to the local guitar shop, and paying them to do it. I want to preface that I am not an expert on the building of guitars. I did not go to the "Fender/Gibson school of Luthier excellence". I am however someone that's built a dozen electric guitars, and have setup everyone of them. Additionally I've setup probably fifty more guitars, including acoustics, for friends, and friends of friends, who found out I've got some practical experience in the matter.


Virtually all headphone amps offer a full menu of distortion, EQ, reverb, and a host of other digital effects, many of them simultaneously. So a headphone amp can usually double as a multi-effects processor, which is quite cool. Headphone amps also provide numerous presets — sounds preprogrammed by the manufacturer — plus full stereo sound (especially effective over headphones).
Personally, I don't like the fender and gibson knockoffs, and squire's aren't the best brand, but I have a squire telecaster, which is actually great quality, better than I expected, and it has a slightly more drier, shaky tone that an actual tele, which is a nice feature. My friend has a squire precision bass, and upon hearing it, I honestly thought it was an actual precision bass at first, so, if you must get squire, than consider either the tele or the precision.

My tak is an amazing sound an unforgiving strong clear medium to deep sound great feel it's a limited edition and kicks my buddies 3800 buck Taylor's ass my guitar was a bit pricey at 2800 but well worth it my 6000 price Martin is not as nice as my takemine maybe I got lucky and the guitar just turned out that way who knows it is the most amazing clean very vibrant and holds the notes so long I have played them all only one guitar has this sound and its this one only for deeper sounds I have my Martin and ovation has unique sounds and the Gibson is softer and Taylor sucks sounds like a osterizer blender if you tried my guitar you would be shocked by its sounds I have played the same model and the other ones sounded the same as each other I don't know why the one I own sounded so much different I guess I lucked out. I also have an old Hagstrom acoustic and it sounds phenomenal better than any Taylor I have ever played it sounds very much like a high end Gibson but not as soft. try a ...more
The S670 QM is a speedster's guitar, with locking tuners and a razor thin "Wizard III" Maple neck, developed by Ibanez to be specifically fast and easy to play. Players with smaller hands or those who like to use their thumb to grab notes on the sixth string will find the neck particularly accommodating. So this model (and many of the Ibanez designs) score high marks for playability.

Two solidstate Tempo beginner amps were offered in ’71. These had black tolex covers, front-mounted controls and a rectangular logo with block letters on the grille. The Tempo No. 158 ($65) had an 8″ speaker, 10 watts of power, tremolo with speed control, reverb with depth control, three inputs, volume, tone and a black grillcloth surrounded by white beading. The Tempo No. 136 ($31.50) offered a 6″ speaker, six watts, three inputs, volume and tone. The grillcloth was dark (probably black) with horizontal flecks.


The F-55 was identical to the F-50 except for the addition of a bridge DeArmond humbucker, plus the attendant three-way toggle on the cutaway horn and a second set of volume and tone knobs flanking the treble f-hole. The F-55, too, had a Martin “M” trapeze tail. This series began with guitar #279831. Some 1,700 F-55s were made from mid-’62 to the summer of 1965.
The STRATosphere is not affiliated with Fender Musical Instruments. Strat®, Stratocaster®, Esquire®, Telecaster®, Tele®, Jazzmaster®, Jaguar®, Mustang®, P Bass®, J Bass®, Fender® and the distinctive headstock design of Fender guitars are registered trademarks of Fender® Musical Instruments. All applicable Fender products are covered under warranty by The STRATosphere.
My band has two guitar players. One often plays acoustic while the other one plays an electric guitar. There has always been a problem balancing the volume and the frequences. While both guitars play on a clean sound it sounds fine but when electric guitar changes to distorted, overdriven or crunched sound then even at a low volume the acoustic guitar is almost unheard. Is it a common problem or particulary our local one. Any solution?
“Spectrum ‘5’ has an unusually thin neck. To achieve the proper rigidity in this fast action neck Teisco had to select the hardest (and the costliest) material available…Ebony. The adjustable neck is fashioned out of 5 plys [sic] of laminated Ebony to insure maximum strength. The fingerboard of the Spectrum ‘5’ is likewise fashioned out of Ebony. Note the unique position markers and the extra wide, easy to finger frets.
We round off this list with a relatively modern innovation in the world of acoustic guitars; the ‘baby’ acoustic. As usual, Martin and Taylor have led the way with these particular guitars, which are effectively shrunken down dreadnoughts which focus heavily on their portability and the wide range of musical scenarios in which they can be used. Martin had dabbled in this world before, with its rather odd looking Backpacker, but it was with the LX1 – and Taylor’s subsequent Baby Taylor – that the world began to take note.
Archtop-wise, the PEs apparently went into the ’62 and sometime in that year were renamed with the EP prefix, but otherwise remained the same. No detailed info on the full line is available, but the ’62 PE-8 had a bound fingerboard, small block or strip inlays, a single rounded cutaway, a rosewood pickguard, two � not one � metal-covered pickups (with one row of exposed poles along the edge), a chicken-beak selector on the upper shoulder, and four controls on the lower bout.
Which is what you’ll be doing with the Omen-6: laying down heavy riffs and unleashing screaming solos. Two overwound Diamond Plus humbuckers are responsible for the guitar’s hot and thick output, while a thin “C”-shaped neck, 14-inch fretboard radius and extra jumbo frets keep things fast and comfy. Although this doesn’t have a tremolo for those dive bombs, a Tune-o-matic bridge and string-through body ensure your sustain will sing for days.

The tonal variations produced by an electric guitar, an amplifier, and a chain of stomp-box or rackmount effects processors are endless, and with the advent of the DAW and its many software-amp, speaker-cabinet and effects-modeling accoutrements, so are the options available for recording it. Since most commercial studio engineering techniques and tricks for recording the electric guitar apply to the project and home studio recording environment, let's turn on the gear, fire up the amp and get going.
If your interests are on the jazz side of things, the Ibanez Artcore series is worth a close look. These economical hollow-body guitars are perfect for players at any level who want a well-crafted instrument that won't break the bank. They come with a well-deserved reputation for solid stone and sustain and they hold tuning reliably, making the Artcore guitars a good choice to get the most bang for your buck.

Overdrive and distortion are effects that introduce harmonics to your guitar tone by pushing more volume into a circuit until it can’t handle it anymore and starts to break up. The types of sounds you can get from an overdrive or distortion range from a light boost to a full on metal crunch. Overdrive and distortion effects are great when placed after a compressor but before any of your other effects.

The initial single-pickup production model appeared in 1950, and was called the Esquire. Fewer than fifty guitars were originally produced under that name, and most were replaced under warranty because of early manufacturing problems. In particular, the Esquire necks had notruss rod and many were replaced due to bent necks. Later in 1950, this single-pickup model was discontinued, and a two-pickup model was renamed the Broadcaster. From this point onwards all Fender necks incorporated truss rods. The Gretsch company, itself a manufacturer of hollowbody electric guitars (and now owned by Fender), claimed that “Broadcaster” violated the trademark for its Broadkaster line of drums, and as a newcomer to the industry, Fender decided to bend and changed the name to Telecaster, after the newly popular medium of television. (The guitars manufactured in the interim bore no name, and are now popularly called ‘Nocasters.’) The Esquire was reintroduced as a one-pickup Telecaster, at a lower price.
I finally had the chance to bring my les paul for Steve to look at an annoying fret buzz. First he said the guitar is too straight and adjusted it.  Then he quickly discovered the 4th string buzz was at the first fret but it had nothing to do with the buzz because the issue was at the nut, it was cut too low!  Steve redo the string while we were chatting about how the neighborhood has changed. Within 5 mins, Steve redo the with some filling and filing and voila!! The buzz was gone.  I was so happy and asked him how much, he said it was easy so he didn't want take any money.  But i have him some coffee money and he said it was too much, I said it was for a week and he laughed.  My last issue I brought to Steve as well and we had the same conversation. I highly recommend Steve as experienced luthier and for someone who loves guitars and someone who can solve guitar problems.  Steve is a hidden gem in the Boston guitar world.
Playing power chords right up at the ‘dusty' end (past the 8th fret) gets difficult, because the frets are so close together. In the next stage we'll learn how to play power chords with a fifth-string root too, which solves that problem. However, it's important not to rush ahead, so make sure you put your effort just into the sixth-string root chords for now.
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To repair your guitar’s body, glue in any broken wings. Also, repair strap buttons that have come out and bridge holes that have been stripped by putting glue on a toothpick and applying it to the holes. When the glue is dry, you can re-insert the strap buttons or re-thread the bridge holes. You can use the same technique to repair bolt-on holes if the screw holes are stripped or are larger than the threads. If the holes are too large, just leave enough toothpicks glued into the hole to take up the extra space before you re-thread the screw.
SJ Series: The SJ is Collings’ version of what is commonly called a small Jumbo. Although the 16 inch lower bout is slightly wider than a dreadnought, and the sides almost as deep, the tight curve at the waist creates in a very different sound chamber. SJs, especially examples in maple, typically have a more pronounced midrange response when compared to a dreadnought.
@BLAKTORX - Charvel is a great brand for metal and shred that is really starting to regain some prominence in the music world. I really like the Pro Mod Series. Music Man, too, makes some good gear, but I tried to keep my list to 10. The Ibanez GIO series guitars are good for beginners. Seems like you're into metal. In that price range you might also check out the Jackson JS Series.

When buying your first guitar, the cost is always a matter of consideration. Be careful not to let this become the focus of the search otherwise you run the risk of compromising on quality. Think about it, you don't want to learn on the shoddy piece of equipment. You can usually get a good value with proper research. If you have a friend who plays the guitar; find out if they are willing to give you the benefit of their experience.


Strumming Patterns: Not surprisingly, light distortion works great for strumming patterns, since it’s an effect without any timing or repeating issues.Chords: Depending on where the chords are being played, light distortion can work for swells and ringing chords.Short Arpeggios: This isn’t a place where you will hear a lot of distortion utilized. In some cases it can work, but it’s not a hallmark tactic.Quick Solos: If you’re dealing with a louder bridge solo, light distortion will often be coupled with another effect (delay, tremolo, chorus, etc.) to give it that extra boost.

@Carl – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble. I am not clear on why this would be happening from the info you have provided. Can you please shoot us an email with details on the input and output connections and how each pedal is being powered when you experience this problem? Also, please also include a video that clearly shows this behavior, your connections, and how each pedal is being powered so that we have a better understanding of what you are experiencing. support@strymon.net
According to Wikipedia, a grimoire is a magical text that instructs the user “…how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to invoke supernatural entities…” In order to summon your own supernatural creations, this guitar-focused text compiles a vast selection of exercises that will help you connect patterns across the entire guitar neck.

Packed with over 200 amps, cabs and effects, the Line 6 Spider V 120 is a perfect amp for those who want a wide variety of sounds to choose from. Especially handy for those in cover bands as you can actually dial in famous amp and pedal combinations. It’s also wireless ready via the Line 6 Relay G10 wireless guitar system. No more guitar leads tripping you over while you're rocking out on (or off) stage!


Its the type of clipping you would expect to hear from a tube amp that been naturally gained up by cranking the volume levels really high.  Some players refer to this sound as Crunch.  These Overdrive pedals, such as the famous Ibanez Tube Screamer, can also be doubled up to give two gain stages:  Slight Crunch and Creamy Velvet Lead.  They sound as good as they might taste, if they were flavors of cereal or ice cream.  Many players found their tone by using two overdrive pedals back to back.
Tube amps use the height of the 1940s electronic technology to give out what is widely considered the best sound quality to date. Since some people tend to be confused by this, it’s important to note that only their sound rendering circuitry is based on vacuum tubes (or lamps) while the equalizers and assorted bits employ transistors like any other piece of modern electronics, with no bearing whatsoever on how the sound will come out.
The so-called modeling amps can be said to differ from both tubes and solid state ones as they employ modern processing technology to apply preloaded characteristics to the sound. This can alter the output in a variety of ways, from imitating certain classic styles to rendering something entirely new. Needless to say, they are favored by cover bands and electronic music fans, but many guitarists don’t appreciate their “artificial” sound, although they can serve as good practice amps.   
A Volume pedal is a volume potentiometer that is tilted forward or back by foot. A volume pedal enables a musician to adjust the volume of their instrument while they are performing. Volume pedals can also be used to make the guitar's notes or chords fade in and out. This allows the percussive plucking of the strings to be softened or eliminated entirely, imparting a human-vocal sound. Volume pedals are also widely used with pedal steel guitars in country music. It has also been used to great effect in rock music; the Pat McGee Band's live version of "Can't Miss What You Never Had" on General Admission illustrates what the pedal is capable of. Some volume pedals are:
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The best advice any guitar player can give when it comes to figuring out which guitar to get is to buy the best model your money can afford. In most cases, this advice is rock solid. Even if you are a beginner who isn't sure whether or not you want to commit to playing guitar long term, you can always sell the guitar with a minimal loss, like a decent car versus a junker.  Think of it as an investment as long as you maintain and take care of it.
As the market for iOS devices and apps has grown, so has the availability of affordable stompboxes and processors that can store downloaded effects. Being able to sample, purchase, and download effects through an iOS app or digital download gives you access to a whole new palette of sounds. Though relatively new, in years to come this may well become the way in which most players will assemble their effects libraries.
Solid body and Hollow are just two of the electric guitar types.  In many ways, the Semi-Hollow Body guitar is synonymous with Gibson’s ES series from 1936.  There have been many variants produced by Gibson itself, as well as copies built by other companies, but they all hark back to this original design.  Even though Rickenbacker first released the Semi-Hollow guitar, the ES-335 is now the mainstay in the world of guitar.
The strings fitted to the guitar also have an influence on tone. Rock musicians often[when?] prefer the lightest gauge of roundwound string, which is easier to bend, while jazz musicians go for heavier, flatwound strings, which have a rich, dark sound. Steel, nickel, and cobalt are common string materials, and each gives a slightly different tone color.
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