This is basically the same as having an entire studio’s worth of gear under your feet. You have 72 amp models to play with, painstakingly recreated from reference amps such as Vox Ac30 amps, Hiwatt Custom 100, Fender amps and more. There’s 194 effects to choose from ranging from distortion to modulation to delay, compression, wah – basically any effect you can think of! There’s also 37 cabinets that you can choose from which gives each amp model and effect a unique sound as well as 16 microphones which provide unique tonal qualities to your overall sound– we challenge you to get bored of this!

The original flanger effect was produced back in the 1960’s by recording to two tape deck simultaneously and mixing the result. As they were recording, an audio engineer would lightly touching the flange of one the reels of tape. When it played back, it created a swooshing effect similar to what you hear when a jet airplane takes off. Stomp boxes use a delay effect to create a similar sound.
That’s not an overstatement, as traces of T-Bone’s influence can be heard in the early recordings of Albert, B.B. and Freddie King, Muddy Waters, and especially Chuck Berry, who adopted many of Walker’s signature licks as his own. A sharp-dressed, flamboyant performer who played the guitar behind his head and did the splits without missing a note, Walker helped reposition the guitar player from the sidelines to center stage, inspiring Buddy Guy, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan to copy his impossible-to-ignore moves.
Think of some of your favorite songs. Maybe they get your toes tapping, or get you pumped up and ready to take on the world. Regardless of your musical preferences, the odds are that one thing all of our favorite songs have in common is an absolutely killer bass line. The bass has played a key role in holding down the rhythm throughout the history of popular music, and continues to make an impact to this day. Another One Bites the Dust by Queen, Been Caught Stealing by Jane's Addiction, Money by Pink Floyd, Sweet Emotion by Aerosmith, and Longview by Green Day are just a few examples of songs that are taken to the next level thanks to their incredible bass lines. Now it's your time to make your mark on this instrument with some serious grooves of your own. You'll find bass guitars for every skill level and playing style in this section.
If you’re used to using a pick to play your guitar, it might be time to get a handle on fingerpicking. This style of playing is incredibly diverse, and consists of various techniques that you can employ to gently pluck the strings of your instrument. It also has the potential to eliminate the plasticky strumming sound that can drive your unintended audience batty. It isn’t a good fit for every genre, but it’s important for all you metalheads to remember that two-hand tapping is technically a form of fingerpicking.
Epiphone began in Manhattan in 1903 when Anastasios Stathopoulo set up shop (not as Epiphone). When Anastasios died of cancer in 1915 his son Epaminondas (Epi) took over the business. Epiphone and Gibson had an on-going rivalry first in banjos and then in archtop guitars. Gibson finally acquired Epiphone in 1957. Although Epiphone guitars continued to be made in America for a time after the acquisition (often in the same factory, side-by-side with similar Gibson models), Epiphone is now a Gibson brand for overseas, imported lower cost guitars, though many are based on Gibson designs.
Jimi Hendrix: Right-Handed vintage white body flipped upsidedown for left-handed use with an oval profile maple-cap neck. The controls and electrics are vintage-modern to ensure stability. The guitar is strung upside down with the strap button on the lower horn, the backwards 68 thick black CBS headstock decal is so that—in front of a mirror—the player sees the guitar as it would appear if Jimi Hendrix played it. As well as this upside-down lefty Strat for right-handed players, Fender also made four exact copies of the Vintage white Stratocaster Hendrix used in many performances, the most famous being Woodstock (1969).

Boasting the title of the “world’s largest guitar manufacturer,” Fender is responsible for the creation and production of a number of the most iconic guitars ever conceived. The one Jimi Hendrix set on fire on stage? That was a Fender Stratocaster – similar in shape to the one pictured above. The one Bruce Springsteen plays at every concert? That’s a Fender Telecaster. Look at nearly any band on stage around the world and the likelihood is you’ll see a Fender guitar up there. And that’s no accident. Founded by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California in 1946, this brand hasn’t just pioneered iconic looks – they pioneered iconic sound. And that’s what keeps musicians like Eric Clapton, David Gilmour of Pink Floyd, and Jeff Beck so viciously loyal to the brand: unrepentant quality.
Many musical instruments are works of art, so it’s little doubt that design is very important to a lot of people. Make sure that you really like the way a guitar looks before purchase, because you might be playing it for years. This is one of the reasons the more natural wood colored guitars are always popular - they don’t go out of style or look out of place.
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Back again! I sold the Eagle Jazz bass copy, but have acquired a hollow body 3/4 bass that we believe said Lyle or Aria on the peg head (badge gone). Interestingly it seems like possibly a copy of a Kay design, florentine cutaway with a sunburst. Three of the tuners are missing the bushings, and I'd love to know how to get replacements! I may have to manufacture something, but don't own a metal lathe. Also found a Strat copy that says Mark II on the peg head, nice mahogany neck, in a dumpster along with a Jackson Dinky. Stole parts off the Dinky to make the Strat copy whole, and I like it better than the Mexi-Strat and Squier Affinity start I had, so I sold those, and the Jackson after replacing the bridge parts I'd stolen off it. Besides, I still haven't got all the magic marker off the pick guard on the Mark II (recently heard they were made by Cort, or whoever makes Cort). I bought a Telestar (believe it was made by Teisco) in a thrift store for maybe $12.99 or something like that. I love the pickup sound, but the neck doesn't get any wider as it approaches the body and the frets get closer together. I also have a San Antonio made Alamo like that, and sold off a Silvertone (made in Japan) tiny hollow body with that issue. The necks are hard to play! But I like that pickup on the Telestar so much I can't part with it.
The ’55 hollowbody line consisted of no less than eleven guitars. Models included the EP-4, EP-5, EP-6, EP-7, EP-11, EP-12, EP-13, EP-14, EP-15, EP-16, and EP-23. Clearly, in these instances, the numerical designation indicates appointments, not the number of pickups. Some of these are likely to be thin-bodied archtops with no cutaways, some thinlines with a single cut, and some full-bodied archtops with a single cutaway, with either one or two pickups, and probably no vibratos.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
However, 50 x does not mean that the two pickups wired in parallel are only half as loud as a single pickup, nor does 200 x mean that the two pickups wired in series are twice as loud as one pickup. Our human hearing does not work this way. Why that’s the case is beyond the scope of this column, but for our guitar-wiring purposes, it’s enough to know that the human ear doesn’t operate in a linear way.

Back in the mid-60s, a desire for independence in business led to John Skewes forming a small musical instrument agency and wholesale business based at his home near Leeds, England. Over time, his new business steadily began to take off, and soon included throughput of some self-branded lines of musical merchandise. That effective early decision to carry self-branded merchandise continues to this day, with their signature Vintage® acoustic and electric guitars and basses which were first produced and sold in 1985. Today, Skewes is the largest family-owned independent musical merchandise distributor in the U.K. and the Vintage ‘family’ includes Fret King® electric guitars, Pilgrim® Banjo’s and Mandolins, Laka® Ukuleles, Encore® electric and acoustic guitars, and Kinsman® cases.


Another great option if your budget for an acoustic is $500 or less is the BG 40 from Blueridge. It has a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and side. It features scalloped bracing for a clean and crisp tone. Owners describe it’s tone as loud and bassy, and compared the neck width to that of an electric. This could be a plus for those with smaller hands. This guitar also features a bone and nut saddle and East Indian rosewood fingerboard for smooth playability. Based on customer feedback, this is a great budget choice that won’t let you down.
Many recordings feature multiple guitar tracks playing simultaneously, but sometimes this can clutter up the mix. Another approach is to make each part sound distinctive by using different combinations of guitars, amps and effects. Panning the guitars to various areas of the stereo spectrum will create space for each part, while subtle use of ambient effects can create a sense of depth. EQ can be used to help guitars blend together. Try cutting certain frequencies from one guitar track and boosting those same frequencies in another.
This company specializes in guitars meant for heavy metal and hard rock lovers. It is the proud manufacturer of some of the most outstanding designs in the history of metal such as Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. It molded and influenced hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s. It is a great choice if you are looking for some edgy designs for your guitar. The guitars are available in 6, 7, or 8-string models that are suitable for players of all genres. Their recent introduction was the Villain series that has incredible designs and has a body of basswood or mahogany.
4. Vox VT40X 40-watt 1x10 Combo Amp ($249.99): The Vox is another modeling combo that utilizes a Valvetronix tube preamp to give you the sound qualities of a tube amp. With 13 onboard effects, you can channel quality effects without having a pedalboard at your disposal. Vox’s Virtual Elements Technology has allowed them to carefully recreate up to 20 realistic models of very sought-after amp tones, all within an attractive looking package.
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These Gibson Les Paul Reissue guitars simply perform better than those made the year after or the year before. Gibson is aware of this and has been for quite some time. That's why they've decided to push out a series of Les Pauls which aimed to match the ones from 1959. Are they equally as good? Probably not since the old ones are legendary, but they're as close as you'll get for a brand new guitar.
There’s plenty of substance under all that style, too. Two DiMarzio-designed Fusion Edge humbuckers power the S series axe—they aren’t exactly after-market pickups, but are designed in collaboration between Ibanez and the pickup brand. These ceramic humbuckers are aggressive, articulate and loud, ideal for modern metal. And for a touch more versatility, both pickups have also been coil-split.
The Omen line is made for everyone, but perhaps leans just slightly toward the shredding crowd. This guitar features a maple bolt-on neck which features a rosewood fretboard with pearloid inlays. The inlays are a nice touch at this price, if you’re into that sort of thing. The pickups are Schecter Diamond Plus humbuckers and offer a well-balanced tone that can also be aggressive when needed. Twenty-four jumbo frets means this is good for speed.
Hi! In this instructable I will be showing you how to fix and/or upgrade guitar electronics. This is applicable to most electric guitars, but I will be using a Fender Stratocaster. It is easier than most people think, especially if you know how to solder. Before you start, find a wiring diagram for your guitar and purchase the parts that are needed.
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The first impressive thing about the Zoom G3X is its build quality. This unit is solid, which puts our fears to rest that Zoom may have sacrificed build quality since the G3X is more on the budget side of the price spectrum. In the reviews and recommendations we read, several owners make it a point to comment that it feels like a serious piece of equipment that could withstand some abuse because of its sturdy metal construction. The G3X can be powered with a 9V adapter (which is conveniently included), or four AA batteries. Zoom claims about 6 hours of battery life, but in our experience manufacturers tend to exaggerate battery life a bit. Still, battery power is very convenient if you’re traveling with the G3X and want to do some on-the-go playing, or just taking it from room to room in your house (to save some money in the long run we recommend rechargeable batteries).

Overdrive, and its noisier cousin distortion, are effects used to ‘push’ your guitar’s signal before it reachers your amplifier. Most amplifiers have some degree of drive capability built into them so you’re most likely familiar with what they sound like. Overdrive is what pushes a clean sound to break up slightly, giving it a warmer, thicker sound. This is perfect for blues and rock playing. It also serves to add more sustain to your playing, meaning notes ring out for longer. In addition to giving a noticeable boost to your volume. Distortion is effectively a more extreme version of overdrive, in that it takes the signal you’re feeding it and makes it all degrees of nasty. You’ll typically hear distortion used in heavier guitar styles like metal and punk. Here, a liberal dollop of dirt is required to give the sound its thicker characteristic.

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Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
Next up we have the specialty electric guitars. This category consists of several different types of electric guitars, but we’ll start out with 12-string electric guitars. The fact that the low E, A, D, and G strings all feature higher octave strings while the B and high e strings both have additional strings that are tuned the same, electric guitar 12-string models have a distinctive shimmer and richness to them that guitar players love. Guitar players who favor heavier genres like death metal or hard rock may want to add a 7-string, an 8-string, or even a 9-string electric guitar to their rig for when they need some extra low-end growl and power. Other specialty guitars include baritone guitars, double neck electric guitars, and pedal steel guitars & lap steel guitars.
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