Though this decision can be based on preference, we think the best guitar for a beginner is the acoustic guitar. Classical guitars have a wider neck, which can be hard for younger students or physically smaller individuals to handle when learning guitar chords. Meanwhile, the electric guitar is designed to be played with an amplifier, which comes at an additional cost. Acoustic guitars are simple and require little to no additional equipment, making them ideal for beginner guitarists.
But for all its light weight, this classical guitar shows off a stunning cedar top and rosewood fretboard. The inlay is just as elegant, and to keep the guitar’s profile looking good, the neck has a 3-ply construction style to prevent warping. The guitar has a matte finish, which gives it an “old-school” appearance, and the matte finish is great for photo sessions: no glare.
The Effect: Even though acoustic electric guitars are generally not associated with various guitar effects, using some can be very beneficial to your tone. Naturally, the types of effects you are going to use will differ from those used with electric guitars quite a bit. The most common accessory in an average acoustic electric signal chain is a preamp pedal. Something like LR Baggs Venue DI is a perfect example. This preamp allows you to boost the signal being fed into the amp or PA, but more importantly, shape it in a way that enhances your tone. Aside from preamps, many guitar players like to use various modulation effects, delays, reverbs and similar. General consensus is that overdrives and distortions are not something you would want to hook up to your signal chain. If you are frequently performing on stage, having even a simple effects chain can be a real game changer.
A marvelous acoustic guitar with 6 strings and natural color. it has its body made from mahogany and a spruce top. The fret board is also made from mahogany. It one of the most beautiful guitar producing incredible sound. It is designed to suit the needs of the beginner in guitar playing. The price ranges from around INR 14,760 depending on available offers. To find more product information relating to Epiphone DR-212, click on the link below:
I first met Ralph Novak in 1980, when he was working at Subway Guitars in Berkeley, California. I'd assembled a kit Strat and it needed a refret. My monstrosity was painted Shell Pink in tribute to Strats from Fender's surf era. Little did I know what was to come of Ralph's distant future. He was the fret guru in Berkeley, and his work was astounding - the best I'd ever seen! Ironically, Vintage Guitar columnist Stephen White was also working at Subway at the time. So began our journey into luthiery madness! Fast forward to 1989.
Here we have for your consideration the Booming classic vintage Yamaha FG 160 Acoustic Guitar Made in Japan in the early 70's from Nippon Gakki factory. This example is an eary 70's a more RARE version Yamaha FG 160 again this example is the Made In Japan Nippon Gakki and not to be mistaken for the similar Korean version of the FG-160 which is also nice but not the same as these apples/oranges this is a great guitar. This example was built over 35 years ago and was built to very high detailed standards workmanship are wonderful quality as well as some of the best woods available in that time period to compete with the great Martin and now this Yamaha is quite well aged and is a true SINGING vintage guitar in its own right. This one has the Amber/Tan label and not the Red Label. The frets have good height and appear newish and though to probably to have had a fret job done sometime in it's past. The guitar has it's natural age and patina with a few expected minor nicks,dings and scratches from a well loved and played instrument. This fine example is on the way... We upon receiving we will remove strings clean and detail the guitar oil rosewood and polish finish, set intonation and set up this guitar to play very well and may include new bone nut/saddle/strings we have several of these old Yamahas and they are amazing instruments very well compared to Martin, Taylor, Gibson for there fine construction and playability with amazing tone for this kind of money... Here s a link to Harmony Central if you care to rehttp://reviews.harmony-central.com/reviews/Guitar/product/Yamaha/FG-160+/10/1 All New pics and additional info soon to come... Interested ? ask Thanks .
Here’s an interesting (they’re all interesting to me!!!) guitar that shows the evolution of Matsumoku made guitars.  Even the earliest solid body electrics that came out of the Matsumoku plant were made of solid wood and displayed really good wood craftsmanship!  Lots of start up companies went to Matsumoku in the early days because the plant had proper wood drying facilities (if the wood wasn’t dried properly, the guitars often became seriously messed up during the import trip across the ocean).
Re-amplified Distortion: This re-amplified distortion is audible by comparison, when switching between a solid-state and valve amplifier in real time. By paying close attention, it is heard as a fine spurious inter-cluttering within the music. This is clearly noticeable with efficient speakers but not with inefficient speakers. Valve amplifiers are inherently linear. Their natural gain is small and therefore require minimal or no negative feedback.
A good custom shop will have insight based on their experience that will help make the project better. That’s part of being custom — making concepts a reality. But there is more to running a custom shop than simply having the ability and experience to create someone’s dream. Figuring out what that is requires a little digging. The concept is buried in first understanding the other meanings of the word custom. Although “made-to-order” is a correct characterization where you can personalized the headtsock with your name or initials and you can CUSTOMIZE YOUR GUITAR: Mahogany, Alder, Maple, Bass Wood, Right/Left handed guitar, Body colour, Neck profile, No dots on fretboard and Fret size.Our Custom Shop Guitars referred to in this site as drawing "inspiration" from the major guitar brands and any reference to custom shop brand names or "Inspired by" are made strictly for comparison purposes only.
These two are definitely the most similar sounding of the bunch and this poses a slight problem. While Steel String has more resonance in the low-end and covers fingerpicking, Songwriter is a little warmer/duller sounding but has twice the samples and round robins.  For me, this makes it hard to pick between the two, and while the tones are different, perhaps not quite enough.
A DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) on/on switch has two channels (poles), each having three lugs. This is like having two SPDT switches in one. It’s the standard configuration for most push/ pull or push/push pots, and you can use it for almost all mods, including the seven-sound mod (if you leave one pole unconnected), coil-splitting a humbucker, out-of-phase mods (by adding some jumper wires from pole 1 to pole 2), a direct-through mod, and countless others. Let’s see what’s going on here.
Now check both the open and the 12th fret notes again. You’ll have to tune the open string again because by moving the saddle, the tension of the string will have changed and so will need to be retuned. Once you have correctly moved the saddle so that both the open string and the 12th fret are in tune, you can move on to the A string. Repeat until all of the strings have been done. Note that on this particular guitar, the (thick) E, A and D saddles could not be moved far enough forward to intonate correctly, so I had to swap their orientation to give a bit more distance.
Anyone who has a Tempest XII probably needs a pick guard. I have a 1966 which was in the case for much of the past forty years. The plastic apparently dried out and "shrunk," causing the two corners to pop off at the screws near the neck. Some guitar repair technicians are good at fabricating pick guards, but most are either woodcrafters or electronics geeks. Please advise how your search has gone. Maybe I'll replace mine, too. RED
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* The guitar comes with very light bendy strings. This is probably due to market data that tells Epiphone that the bulk of buyers for this guitar are teen Guitar Heros who think that string bending every note is an essential aspect of shredding and wailing. If you plan to put heavier strings on the guitar (like 12-51s for example) for jazz or other styles of music then you will probably need a truss rod adjustment to compensate for the added tension. If you don't know how to do this, ask someone who does. You can ruin a guitar, permanently, by being too aggressive with a truss rod adjustment.
The Fender CC-60SCE acoustic-electric guitar combines the powerful onboard electronics with classic Fender tone and the comfort of their longstanding craftsmanship. The smaller concert body features a solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, and "Easy-To-Play" neck, making it a perfect choice for beginning to intermediate level players looking to take the next step in their music. 
The first thing is to adjust height. If you have the first type, you will need a flathead screwdriver. The two posts holding the bridge have flat slotted heads showing at either end. You can turn these clockwise to lower the strings or counter-clockwise to raise them. Find the string height that suits you. For an electric guitar, it will be about 1/4" off of the neck or lower. Get the strings as low as you can for comfort, but be careful that your frets don't start buzzing or that the strings are not coming into contact with pickups or any other parts. If this happens, your strings are too low. If the bridge is the second type, you will need a very narrow Allen wrench to adjust the saddles; you will find the Allen heads on either side of the saddle top.
Enough with the American brands, haven’t the rest of the world got something to offer? Well, Japan has come up with a few! Ibanez for example offer amazing guitars, and when they first started out the original idea was actually to offer good copies of American electric guitars! Today they have moved on to doing their own thing, and produce excellent guitars.

:I need to know how to get parts for my old kent guitar.I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.

I kind of think what I do is like producing with my feet because I do a lot of that in my own shows. Particularly when I'm playing guitar with other bands, I'm always changing reverb [settings] and modulation types and the very sorts of things that [maybe no one else realizes what's going on], but it keeps me interested. I think because I come from a time before that was possible, it's a magical thing for me.


Bridge craft USA musical instruments presents the exceptionally designed Glen Burton GA204BCO Acoustic Electric Cutaway Guitar in Black by Glen Burton. Perfect for the beginner or the expert, the full package comes with Strings, Picks, Gig Bag, Strap, Digital Clip-On Tuner, Truss Rod and a 10 Watt Amplifier . This excellent Acoustic Guitar also includes: Flame top; Basswood back and sides Catalpa Neck and Bridge; Rosewood Fingerboard Steel String; Sealed Gear Tuners EQ: Active 4 Band 7545 .
Yes, a Martin guitar under $500. The Martin LX1E features a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It carries the Martin name, which  means high quality is expected. Being that it is closer to out $500 limit, you can expect this guitar to deliver on tone. This one is a direct competitor to the Baby Taylor. People that own both have said that they like the sound of the Martin better, describing it as bright and crisp. The tradeoff is the playability is not rated as high as the Taylor. See more pictures and reviews of the guitar here.
Twelve-string electric guitars feature six pairs of strings, usually with each pair tuned to the same note. The extra E, A, D, and G strings add a note one octave above, and the extra B and E strings are in unison. The pairs of strings are played together as one, so the technique and tuning are the same as a conventional guitar, but they create a much fuller tone, with the additional strings adding a natural chorus effect. They are used almost solely to play harmony and rhythm parts, rather than for guitar solos. They are relatively common in folk rock music. Lead Belly is the folk artist most identified with the twelve-string guitar, usually acoustic with a pickup.

It's pretty common that your fingers hurting at first. We all went through it. It does not matter what kind of strings you use. You will pay the price…. Think of it as a Right-Of Passage, or an initiation of sorts. If you think about it, everything in life that is pleasurable comes with a certain amount of pain that must be endured, whether it is financial, such as buying something you really want, emotional, as in love, or physical, such as building your muscles and playing sports.

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Vengeance and Gates’ ascent to the top of the metal guitar heap did not always seem inevitable. Avenged Sevenfold began life as a somewhat traditional Orange County–style metalcore act, as evidenced on their 2001 debut, Sounding the Seventh Trumpet, for which Vengeance served as the primary guitarist. But the band has been reinventing and refining its sound ever since. By A7X’s third effort, 2005’s City of Evil, they had morphed into a swaggering, thrashy unit with an adventurous edge that showed itself in everything from the grand, instrumentally dense songs to the band’s theatrical image.
The type of potentiometer you should use will depend on the type of circuit you are designing for. Typically, for audio circuits the audio taper potentiometer is used. This is because the audio taper potentiometer functions on a logarithmic scale, which is the scale in which the human ear percieves sound. Even though the taper chart appears to have a sudden increase in volume as the rotation increases, in fact the perception of the sound increase will occur on a gradual scale. The linear scale will actually (counterintuitively) have a more significant sudden volume swell effect because of how the human ear perceives the scale. However, linear potentiometers are often used for other functions in audio circuits which do not directly affect audio output. In the end, both types of potentiometers will give you the same range of output (from 0 to full), but the rate at which that range changes varies between the two.
Resonator guitars are distinctive for not having a regular sound hole instead they have a large circular perforated cover plate which conceals a resonator cone. The cone is made from spun aluminum and resembles a loudspeaker. The bridge is connected to either the center or edge of the cone by an aluminum spring called the spider. The vibrations from the spider are projected by the cone through the perforated cover plate. The most common resonator guitars have a single cone although the original model patented in 1927 by John Dopyera had three and was called a tricone resophonic guitar. Resonator guitars are loud and bright. They are popular with blues and country guitarists and can be played with a slide or conventionally.
While recording AC/DC's Back In Black, Tony Platt used a pair of condenser mics to pick up different speaker cones and give a wider sound to each guitar: "I developed a technique for recording guitars with two microphones roughly pointing at different speakers, which can be spread out in the stereo mix so it's not just a series of mono point sources. It makes for a more open-sounding guitar. That sound suited their particular technique, which involved Angus and Malcolm playing the same chords but with different inversions to get a very big unison guitar sound."
This mod revolves around the concept that adding mass to the headstock lowers its resonant frequency, while reducing mass will raise that frequency. The theory at work here is that vibration is absorbed or reflected back into the strings and body based upon this frequency. Depending upon the harmonic makeup of your particular instrument, changing this can enhance or degrade sustain and accentuate or attenuate certain harmonics. All of this is dependent not only on your guitar’s construction, but also on how large your headstock is to begin with. If all of this seems a bit hazy, that’s because it is. I don’t have a handy-dandy answer like “more mass equals more sustain” because it isn’t always true. Suffice it to say that you can make a difference in a guitar’s character by following this path. I usually go through this exercise with my builds because I have the luxury of time and the resources at hand. It’s like fine tuning a race car’s suspension settings to your liking.
One thing that is worth trying is combining different delays with different reverb effects. You can get some seriously beautiful sounds with a reverb and delay effect that sound good together. Some manufacturers have even gone so far as to create reverb and delay combo pedals. It is truly a perfect combination of effects, kind of like peanut butter and jelly.
Since King Crimson‘s first rehearsal in 1969, Robert Fripp has been its distinguishing instrumental voice, a singular blend of distorted complexity and magisterial sustain. That duality is best heard on the most progressive prog-rock album ever made, Crimson’s 1973 thorny-metal classic, Larks’ Tongues in Aspic. Fripp’s most famous guitar line is the fuzz-siren hook in the title track to David Bowie‘s Heroes. Fripp would “start up without even knowing the chord sequence,” said producer Brian Eno, adding that Fripp’s work

Additionally, the instrument gets a good once-over for all other miscellaneous needs. Every Calibration & Reset is tailored to the individual player and there are never any charges for adjustment once the service is initially completed. Every Calibration & Reset is guaranteed for 60 days from completion (though typically adjustments are made well past the 60 day mark for free). No Calibration & Reset is done until you're completely happy with the way your guitar plays. The only limitations are the laws of physics, which despite our many attempts, we have yet to find ways to break.
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Today I was working on my fave guitar, a James Trussart Steelcaster. Instead of reconnecting my tone pot and capacitor as usual, I ran two wires from the tone pot’s wiper and ground terminals, the spots where the cap normally connects, and soldered them to a little piece of stripboard with sockets for connecting the caps. Then I recorded quick demos for six possible cap values. I started with the two most common values, and then added two lower values and two higher ones.
Bass effects are electronic effects units that are designed for use with the low pitches created by an electric bass or for an upright bass used with a bass amp or PA system. Two examples of bass effects are fuzz bass and bass chorus. Some bass amplifiers have built-in effects, such as overdrive or chorus. Upright bassists in jazz, folk, blues and similar genres may use a bass preamplifier, a small electronic device that matches the impedance between the piezoelectric pickup and the amp or PA system. Bass preamps also allow for the gain of the signal to be boosted or cut. Some models also offer equalization controls, a compressor, and a DI box connection.
But there are two things in which latency matter. Latency is time. Every digital thing ever adds latency. If you’re a well trained musician or studio rat, you can hear about a millisecond of latency if you’re listening closely. You won’t likely be bothered by 1ms latency, but 10ms might be a bit of an issue, and 100ms makes some things completely unworkable.
EQ pedals do exactly what you would think.  They allow you to set the tone of your sound through equalization.  Just like on your radio, they can adjust the bass, mid, and treble frequencies of your tone.  Depending on the type of EQ stompbox you have, you may have different ways of tailoring your tone.  There are two main types: graphic and parametric.
Some effects, and the boxes that produced them, altered musical periods beyond recognition. The valve-driven Watkins Copicat, for example, will forever be associated with the sound of the late 1950s British music “beat” scene. Developed by Charlie Watkins in 1958, this odd machine supported a tape-recording mechanism that would record and play back any sound with varying lengths of delay in-between the replay heads. The device was critical to the rockabilly sound of the late 1950s, the “beat-group” sound of The Shadows, and the Liverpool Merseybeat scene of early 1960s (as well as the Birminghambeat, or Brumbeat scene). The sensation of hearing a guitar warble and wail to its own output encouraged guitarists to experiment with different styles of attack and vigor. For example, the noise that begins and ends the original 1962 recording of “Telstar” by the Tornados was made using the Copicat by creating a loop of echo and reverb effects. This produced what can best be described as some sort of space-echo/attack-helicopter noise.

• How fanned frets work: You’ve likely seen players like the jazz virtuoso Charlie Hunter picking instruments that have frets fanned out at an angle along the fingerboard. The aim of fanned fret placement is to give the lower strings more length and the higher strings less length, thereby providing more accurate tuning and deep bass sounds. Fanned frets may seem like an innovation, but they first appeared in the 16th century.
While a straight DI approach can work for clean sounds, simply plugging a guitar into an overdrive pedal and then routing the output of the pedal into your recording system will sound unnaturally thin and raspy because there are no speakers to take away the unwanted high end, but that hasn't stopped some people using it as a 'trademark' sound! For a more conventional sound, a speaker simulator is needed to filter out the unwanted higher harmonics. A passive speaker simulator, such as the original Palmer Junction box can be placed directly after an overdrive pedal or a regular guitar amp preamp output, but it will need to be recorded using a mic input rather than a line input (passive filtering always results in a reduction in level). Active equivalents (usually battery or phantom powered) are also available, which may offer a greater range of tonalities.

My live rig for years has been a multi FX floor pedal (currently, and for the past seven years, using a BOSS GT-8) running the left and right outputs into the effects RETURN of a small amp on stage and through a speaker cab simulator (lately, a “CABTONE” by Digital music Corp, at other times a Hughes & Kettner “RED BOX”) We often play as a ten piece band, with trumpet, trombone, three saxes… and here am I with a 30 watt Behringer amp with an 8 inch speaker, my BOSS GT-8 and a CABTONE direct box/speaker simulator going to the PA. Sounds great. (I’ve substituted bigger amps at times… a Tech21 Power Station… but to my ears, the Behringer sounds better.) You’re probably thinking… a 30 watt Behringer? That’s a “toy,” right? It’s enough. Well, that and the fact that the other “direct” channel is in our monitors, making for a rich 3D stereo sound on stage between the amp and the monitors. I am looking to upgrade to a multi effect processor that allows different cab simulations per patch – maybe the Eleven Rack… (I would have a hard time justifying the expense of the Fractal system) but honestly, I’ve been very happy with the setup I just described. Been happy with it the past seven years, and before that, it was different amps (actually bypassing everything but the power amp and speaker) and different floor processors (Digitech, Rocktron, BOSS…) but the same idea… one output to the board, the other to a small amp.
But here’s the thing: every single useful DAW is available for a 30-day demo or so. So you can at the very least try before you buy. The only downside is that some of these are only available in their full “pro” versions, so if you’re on a budget, you can get the 30 day (or more : REAPER has a 60 day demo and only costs $60 if you keep it, but I don’t know if you’d do live stuff with it… some of the fun will be figuring out all the tech).
Much of the difference between one make of guitar and another is in the player’s head. I doubt whether many people listening would really notice the difference and they certainly wouldn’t care. That said, there are differences in feel and in the player’s perception of the sound. I currently have four Gibsons and two Fenders, so you can see where my sympathies lie, but currently I’m more taken with either of my two Gretschs. One point of correction about scale length though. Over the years 25.5″ became standardised, probably by Martin. Fender copied this when it produced the Broadcaster/ Nocaster/ Telecaster since 25.5″ was the scale length for a guitar and Fender had no previous experience hence the poor neck radius and bad controls. Gibson, being actually considerably more innovative (I.e. the truss rod, the archtop, the raised finger rest/ scratch plate, controls for each pickup etc etc in fact most of the fundamentals we now take for granted) had worked out that scale length should be a function of body size. All of Gibson’s full size (17″ and up) guitars have 25.5″ scale lengths. Smaller bodies get shorter necks. So 24.75″ is only one of Gibson’s scale lengths sunce it has used shorter and longer as appropriate.
Believe it or not, some thought should be given as to where the compressor goes in your signal chain. A good rule of thumb is to place any gain-type effects before modulation effects: i.e., compressors and overdrives before delays or flangers. Another one that's practically set in concrete is to put the compressor before any overdrive, distortion, or fuzz pedal. This is why most guitarists place the compressor first, in order to send a stronger, better signal to the other effects.
thanks for your note. We are not drawing any conclusions whether one is better than the other, just that they are different, which I think is apparent from the samples. Also, we did use only one pickup that we moved between the samples, and mounted it in the exact same location in relationship to the bridge. I would claim that the only variable that could have been controlled to a greater extent is the picking attack.
EQ placement is similar. Some players prefer to mold and shape their guitar’s primary tonal character before it is processed by other effects, but others prefer to adjust the EQ of the finished sound (again, placement in front of delay and reverb is preferable). Or maybe your distortion pedal’s EQ controls just don’t have enough bass or treble and you need to tweak its tone a touch more. If you own an EQ pedal, have fun and try placing it in different locations to see what works best for you.
I would have never finished my project without this, 20 feet sounds like alot, but it can go very fast. I used this to rewire up an Epiphone hollow body,and I needed the length to reach from toggle to jack. The gauge is a perfect feel and doesnt have me worried about accidentally breaking it from movement. Also the cloth is great as it takes much more heat than the standard rubber coverings.
As a guitarist with a complete understanding of the vintage instruments he worked on, Novak wasn't completely comfortable with what any one instrument was capable of delivering. He wanted to combine all the features of his old favorites while adding design twists that would give him everything he was looking for in an electric guitar. This led to the invention of his patented fanned-fret fingerboard, which gives an instrument combined scale lengths.
That's right. It's neck first, then bridge height, then intonation (at least the way I do it). Nut height can be taken out of the equation by putting a capo on the first fret, so it can be sorted out later if there are any problems with it. Of course if you were to put a capo on the first fret, you'd need to compare that with the 13th fret when setting up the intonation.
Find a local music store to outfit you with a guitar suited to you needs and skill. Chords take a lot of practice and a skilled music teacher will save you a lot of time. I have played publicly with live bands and though each player’s skill levels were different we still made a good sound. Find a simple song with just a few simple chords and practice until you learn the chords and strumming pattern. Then move on to a new song. My catalogue of songs has over 1000 songs at different skill levels. Don’t give up or you will never be happy! The price for a quality instrument will be worth it in the long run!
The person who made up the Top Ten list of best guitars has it all wrong! Of all the guitar companies he lists, Carvin is the only company that still uses ebony as standard material for the fretboard. This is because most other companies refuse to take the time and expense of this type of production. The others all use rosewood because it is cheap, relatively soft and can be "slammed" together quickly by machine; an indication of how they make their guitars in general! No other company who makes guitars even comes close to using the hand selected grade of wood (start to finish) that Carvin does. Take a hint from someone who knows how great guitars made step by step; if you want a guitar made from the best materials you can get, with critical operations still done by hand, order one one from Carvin, try it for ten days, if you really don't like it just return it... No questions and no hassles... Really. If you are not the type of person who cares, or are not willing to do ...more
When it comes to amplifiers that won’t break the bank, but sound loud enough to break your windows, Orange Amplification know exactly what they’re doing and they do it well! The Orange Crush 12 Solid State 12W 1X6 Combo is one of the best cheap amps in the music scene and one that can easily be used on stage and in the studio due to its legendary tone and reliability. This Orange Crush 12 Solid State 12 watt amplifier features a 6” Voice Of The World speaker custom designed by the team at Orange amplification to deliver punchy and articulate sound.
The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.

In the 1980s, when shred metal was at its peak, Ibanez took a big share of the market with models that were geared towards the fastest, loudest players – thin necks, floating double-locking tremolos and high-output pickups. These guitars were endorsed by modern day virtuosos such as Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, with many artists designing their own custom Ibanez models.
If you just want one or two instruments from a large SoundFont then follow this procedure.  Open the large multi-instrument SoundFont in Polyphone, then select File, New, Name the new SoundFont.  Go to the Presets of the original SoundFont, Left-Click the Preset you want and then holding down the Left mouse button then drag it to the Presets of the new SoundFont and let go of the button (the preset is now inside your new SoundFont).  Right-Click on the main heading of the original SoundFont and choose Close File.  Now simply choose File, Save (or Save As), Close.
Alembic | Baldwin | BC Rich | Burns | Crucianelli | Danelectro | Egmond | Eko | Epiphone | Fender | Framus | Futurama | Gibson | Goya | Gretsch | Guild | Guyatone | Hagstrom | Harmony | Hofner | Ibanez | Kalamazoo | Kay | Kent | Kramer | Levin | Martin | Magnatone | Microfrets | Mosrite | National | Ovation | PRS | Rickenbacker | Silvertone | Supro | Teisco | Yamaha | Valco | Vox | Wal | Zemaitis
Launch price: $1,949 / £1,639 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 21 | Pickups: 3x Pure Vintage '65 Gray-Bottom Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, neck tone, bridge/middle tone | Hardware: Pure Vintage 6-saddle Synchronized vibrato, Pure Vintage Single Line 'Fender Deluxe' tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Olympic White, 3-Color Sunburst, Candy Apple Red
I think jackson (particularly the USA models) are truly the most versatile of all the high end electric guitars. The build quality is second to none as they are made at the custom shop by very experienced luthiers, the woods used are exotic and tonally superb. The hardware is the best around Floyd rose/ Seymour Duncan's and the action/playability is fantastic. All in all you feel although expensive, you feel like you're getting your monies worth. But the great thing is that they produce an incredible array of sounds which covers all aspects of musical style from the beefed up classic grind of a Gibson, to the stringy percussive violin sounds of a start and everything in between. The USA ones are expensive but I have 2 (an sl 1 and sl 2) and given the enjoyment and reliability they have given me, they owe me nothing.
Everybody doubles their rhythm parts, but I always thought, 'Why don't they double their lead solos, too?'. It's really hard to do, especially with any bends and faster sections, and it does take a very long time, but I've been doing it a different way to make things a little easier. For instance, as soon as I've just finished a song, I'll double the lead part right away, while it's still completely fresh in my mind.
The VOX Pathfinder 10 is one of the best cheap amps on the market today, but don’t be fooled by its budget friendly price tag – this is a powerhouse of tone. Its pricing and ease of use makes it ideal for beginner guitarists but its signature, high quality VOX sound is why it’s also relied upon by professional guitarists and studio engineers everywhere.

Numerous sources, such as Physics by John D. Cutnell and Kenneth W. Johnson, state that the human ear can hear sounds ranging from 20 hertz to 20,000 hertz. A guitar is going to fall in this range because it wouldn’t make good business sense to produce an instrument that can only be heard by dogs. From a scientific perspective, just about everything within the normal human range would be considered effective, since the instrument accomplishes its goal. Beyond that, a researcher wouldn’t be able to designate what’s good.
The main benefit with tube amps is the tone. They offer what is often described as a pure, natural, creamy or fluid guitar tone, which is incredibly responsive to the player’s dynamics. When pushed hard enough, they overload and produce natural overdrive (which is how overdrive first came to be). While their tone is hard to beat for all styles of music, tube amps tend to be expensive, harder to maintain and heavier than other amps. For more on tube amps, check out our dedicated tube amp page.

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The most common route for absolute beginners will likely be a good, old fashioned guitar instruction book. We’ve all seen at least one of these kicking around. They tend to have a guitar and some interesting 80s-inspired graphics emblazoned on the front. The typical format is either an encyclopedia of scales and chords (indeed, some on this list follow that formula), or a series of songs broken down into digestible theory tidbits often accompanied by an ancient information vessel known as a Compact Disc.
The headstock is located on the end of the neck opposite the guitar body. It is fitted with tuning keys, also known as tuners, tuning pegs, or machine heads. These adjust the tension of each string, changing their pitches. The nut is a small strip located where the headstock meets the neck, that is grooved to guide the strings onto the fretboard. On an acoustic guitar, the nut is commonly made of plastic, but it can also be bone, graphite, or any number of other materials.
What every great guitarist does, with respect to sound, is achieve a very high level of nuanced control over the sound, not by having a computer play his guitar for him. As a keyboard player, I would recommend you first concentrate on playing your synth with lots of use of pedals, velocity-sensitive changes in timbre, and left hand controllers. Then you can experiment with all sorts of synth sounds. This way, you can play as expressively as a gutarist, but without sounding like a bad copy. Instead, you can sound like something different, new, and this is really where synth lead work can shine (and actually add to our musical lexicon).
To show you how to read the chords diagrams above, let's use the A chord as an example. For the purposes of chord diagrams, here is how your left-hand fingers are numbered. As you will notice, the index finger is denoted with number 1 the middle with 2 the ring finger with 3 and the pinky with 4. These numbers are used on the diagrams to show you what fingers use for pressing the frets composing the chords.
Re-amplified Distortion: This re-amplified distortion is audible by comparison, when switching between a solid-state and valve amplifier in real time. By paying close attention, it is heard as a fine spurious inter-cluttering within the music. This is clearly noticeable with efficient speakers but not with inefficient speakers. Valve amplifiers are inherently linear. Their natural gain is small and therefore require minimal or no negative feedback.
The body of the guitar is usually made of wood; different types of woods are used by different manufacturers, and there is ongoing debate concerning which is best. Typical woods include maple, mahogany, swamp ash and alder for quality guitars, and plywood or pine for cheaper, less durable guitars. While the type of wood used in the solid body of an electric guitar will noticeably affect the sound it produces, the quality of the sound is most affected by the pickups which convert the vibration of the strings into an electrical signal, as well as the amplifier that's used to shape and model such signal. We could go on and on dissecting the technical aspects of electric guitars, and yet never get close to that which makes that music unique: it's soul. That's something that can be clearly felt and experienced by players and listeners alike, but which all the while can hardly be put into words. Enjoy the electric guitar music loops!
Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]
“Take a humbucker wound with 42-gauge wire as a benchmark. With an Alnico II magnet, it would have a warm, soft bass response, a very sweet high end and a slightly pronounced mid- range. Alnico III, funnily enough, is not quite as strong as Alnico II. So, the highs tend to be more muted and rounded. Probably the best way to imagine the sound of Alnico III is to think of the early 1950s when this form of magnet was very common. Think of the sounds of the jazz and clean guitar tones from that time – that plummy roundness.
There are of course, other buttons and positions featured on guitars. BB king’s Lucille had a switch to toggle different values for R11 (thus going from moody chords to punchy ‘Lead’ with a finger and no need for extra gear). Advanced guitars may have phase and antiphase switches for humbuckers or dual pickups. The jackson 5 Telecaster I think is an example as it has both a phase and anti-phase wiring on their pickup selector.
The Lotus Vantage copy (Washburn Eagle, Aria Pro II Cardinal series, or Ibanez Artist) double cutaway (batwing) guitar with a solid body, 3 per side tuners on headstock, rosewood fingerboard with brass inlays, brass nut and neck-through construction (though there may have been a bolt-on model). This was usually finished in emerald green, polished mahogany or stained blue/white breadboard style and occasionally gloss white with 2 exposed humbucker pickups.

Awesome for the money! I have had my guitar for about a month now. The guitar itself is worth the money. I play on a 100w amp at church and it sounds good. Definitely not the highest quality but still a good full body sound. (After restringing it. The strings it comes with are garbage) The amp that this comes with is nice ... I actually was using it as a practice amp with my bass and it did fine. Nothing that I could play with any other instruments but definitely can hear what I'm doing. My son also uses it as a practice amp on an electric guitar and it does fine, it doesn't have any functions just meant to be an accustic amp. Definitely worth the money.
Our fretwork is one of the things we are most proud of. We go to the extreme to make sure that your guitar is going to play the best it can. The fingerboard is planed under tension. The fretting process is done with epoxy fretting. We use a special blend of epoxy that makes re-fretting very easy without messing up your fingerboard. This process is used for multiple reasons. One of the advantages to this type of fretting is that you lose the hollow gaps under the fret that you find with the traditional way of fretting. In traditional fretting, with each fret you put on, it is like driving a wedge into the fingerboard, which causes back tension on the neck. With epoxy fretting, all of these issues are eliminated. The epoxy under the frets helps to transfer string vibration throughout the neck to the body, and relieves all stress and tension on the neck that occurs with traditional fretting. This results in a stress-free neck, which allows the truss rod to work properly and to adjust the neck accurately.
Not only is Mick funny, but the book is extremely useful for learning theory, efficiency, technique, playing over chords and more. Similar to Creative Guitar (recommended below), Mick is all about having you put in the work to learn what he's laying out. While you'll spend more time learning this way, it'll pay off and at the same time, teach you a great way of learning.
The extra-versatile twin-channel layout with independent controls delivers a wide variety of tones from clean to overdrive. The Sonzera 20—which we recently reviewed—packs a hell of a punch for players who need a versatile workhorse amp that pairs well with pedals and sounds incredible on its own for any style of music. While the Sonzera 50 Combo is well suited to the stage, the 20 is easy to haul to gigs, has a lower output that’s better suited for the studio—and its “American style” voicing thanks to its 6L6 power tubes (the Sonzera 50 features EL34 tubes).
COST – I have touched upon this topic several times maybe but I feel like I need to reiterate. Amps are usually not a cheap thing to come by, especially if you want a tube amp. BUT practice amps are good because they help beginners develop their skills without having to spend several hundred. Needless to mention, even practice amps come at various prices. For instance, Donner Electric Guitar Amplifier 10 Watt Classical Guitar AMP DEA‌-1 we talked about is twice as cheap as Roland CUBE‌-10GX 10W 1×8 Guitar Combo Amp. While price often is a good guideline to which model is better you should always keep in mind that more famous brands will have more expensive models even in the cheap sections. Apart from that, keep in mind that an amp having a lot of great features and effects does not mean it’s good.  
The Danelectro 12/6 Doubleneck Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar for sale with Gig Bag deserves the limelight. With its what I refer to as creamburst finish and dual necks, it's bound to draw positive attention. The 12/6 doubleneck features maple necks with rosewood fretboards. Danelectro lipstick pickups are true to the originals with that unique tone everyone loves. There's a 3-way pickup selector and another selector for switching between 6- and 12-string modes. Controls also include dual concentric volume and tone controls allowing for different settings between the two necks. Includes gig bag.MORE HERE...
As you will note in the earliest catalogs, Ibanez guitars were first "copies" or "reproductions" of guitar models originated by several American guitar manufacturers and manufacturers from other countries. They were not forgeries, as they were never sold with misleading logos or with the intent to deceive. Ibanez models replicated such styles as the Gibson Les Paul, Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster, Rickkenbacker styles, and others. Due to their high quality, Ibanez guitars and those made under other brands, such as Greco and Aria, quickly earned a reputation around the world as quality instruments at a great value. There is a form of urban legend that circulates in the guitar community that has many variations, but usually involves either Gibson or Fender suing Ibanez, Aria, or some other Japanese manufacturer, with the intent to stop that company from manufacturing superior copies. The truth is less glamourous. Only one company ever sued another, and it was Norlin (the owner of the Gibson brand at the time) suing Hoshino (owner of the Ibanez brand) and the suit was focused only on the "open book" headstock shape common to Gibson guitars and replicated on the Ibanez guitars. The suit was brought in 1977, but by then Ibanez had already changed the headstock shape on its copy models, so the suit was settled out of court. No other company was ever sued by any other company. However, this episode has given rise to the term "lawsuit" guitar, which is used to describe any Japanese copy guitar made in the shape of an American manufacturer's model.
The Firebird did have some other unique features such as its banjo style tuners and mini humbuckers that produced a different sound than the full humbucker pickups Gibson typically offered.  Many notable players preferred the Firebird: Mick Taylor from the Rolling Stones used it on the album Exile on Main St.  Allen Collins would also use this axe on stage with Skynyrd alongside his Explorers.  The great Texan blues guitarist Johnny Winter was known for playing slide on his 1963 Firebird to great effect.  Dave Grohl, of Nirvana and Foo Fighters fame, used his white Firebird to create a modern rock sound.

Let’s learn the basic layout of Tabs. When you take a look at a Tab that you want to learn you will most likely see some standard notation on top and the Tab on the bottom. The six strings of the guitar are represented by the six horizontal lines of the Tab. The top line represents the high E string of the guitar and the bottom line represents the low E string of the guitar. This can seem a bit counterintuitive to some people so just remember that the top line is the thinnest string and you will be good to go.
Before we go into the parts of an electric guitar, it’s worth noting that there are three different body types: solid body, hollow body, and semi-hollow body. The main difference between them is the way the bodies are constructed, and the amount of resonance they produce. If you’re into punk, rock, metal, or any style of fast or heavy music, then it should be solid body all the way. It allows for louder sounds and more sustain, while avoiding the feedback issues that affect some hollow bodied instruments at higher volumes. The hollow and semi-hollow bodied guitars on the market will appeal to players who prefer softer styles, such as jazz, country and blues, as well as soft rock and pop, as they offer a full, rich and more resonant sound with lots of bass. Beginners will be best off sticking to a solid bodied guitar, as they are easier to handle in most scenarios. For the rest of this anatomical breakdown we’ll focus on solid body guitars.
My 5056 has pretty high action on it, and these guitars are very bad candidates for neck resets, as the necks were glued with epoxy, not hide glue (which can be softened with heat). Anyone who looks at buying a vintage Alvarez should bear this in mind if the action is high. There may be no practical remedy (Search web for comments on it.). And those who own them should probably stay away from heavy string gauges, i.e., not bigger than .12's on high "E". I now de-tune my Alvarez guitars when I put them away for longer period storage even though I use 11's on them. If you do use heavier gauge strings, you might want to de-tune when putting away the guitar. Just a suggestion. Cheers.

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Rock music evolved from Blues, the music of the streets. Most musos’ of the 50s and 60s were poor and guitar amps made to a budget. Some but not all technical principles of amp designs were well thought out. Fender and Marshall were the dominant and most copied brands. The powerful amps had 4 output valves in parallel push-pull and gave approx 60 - 100Watts.
The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.
Wife wants to play guitar again after a long hiatus. My full sized Takamine with fat strings is too big and heavy for her. Got her this 3/4 Yamaha and I fell in love with it. I may have to get another one for her because I've been hogging it. It has a great voice for a 3/4. The action is nice, the built in tuner is a real treat. Never had one before but it is unbelievably convenient. I don't plug it in often but I had to check out that sound too. The electronics sound decent. Can't crank it up too loud or it starts to feedback, but I'm actually sitting right on top of my small but punchy VOX amp so I can't really say how it would work for playing out. The reviews convinced me to buy this one. The best review only had one major complaint; the tuning pegs. I agree they could be better, but I don't think they are awful. I have to tweak the tuning just a little once or twice a day before I play, but it isn't like it goes out of tune when I'm playing, even when I'm beating on it hard. I think it is well worth the price and was surprised by the volume it produces. Much better than expected. If you don't find the tuning pegs worthy, I think the instrument is good enough to spend money on for an upgrade, but I don't plan to. It is solid, light weight, comfortable, nice sounding, well designed, feature rich and handy. I'm keeping it in the corner by the bed and I pick it up every chance I get. I haven't played guitar much the past few years so having a guitar at my fingertips all the time is helping me get my callouses back quickly. No matter what you play, if you lose your callouses, rebuilding them is always painful for a few weeks, but this instrument is pretty easy to play. I've gone through the process several times over the years with my Takamine. This is far less painful. Perhaps that means it will take longer, but at least I can still use my fingers to type long reviews in the meantime. No avoiding the pain regardless of what you play, but there is pain, and there is agony. This guitar hits a sweet spot somewhere in between. It's just right for young or old, big or small. (FWIW, I heard an interview with Clapton where he confessed he doesn't play much when he's not working and when he has to prepare for a tour, even he has to go through the callous building process). Well, I'm way off topic now. Again, great little guitar. Go for it.
Unlike Christian, however, Montgomery used his thumb instead of a pick to create the percussive-yet-warm tone associated with his style. (According to interviews, Wes learned to play with his thumb because it created a softer sound, appeasing his neighbors.) With his phenomenal ear, Wes quickly grew beyond his influences and developed a style all his own. His knack for melody, groundbreaking use of octaves in a soloing context and intricate chord solos—as demonstrated in his devastating interpretations of standards like “Round Midnight” and “Days of Wine and Roses”—broadened the range of guitar, pushing the instrument into unchartered territory.

The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.
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When talking about 1920s Martin guitars, you hear people say this a lot (especially if they are trying to sell you a guitar!) Unfortunately there is no definative way to tell if a 1920s Martin is capable of handling steel strings. The term, "braced for steel strings", though is inaccurate. A better way to put it would be, "built for steel strings". For a 1920s Martin to be built for steel strings there were several small changes - the top, braces and bridge plate are all slightly thicker. Can you see this inside the guitar? For the most part, no, unless you really know what you are looking for (frankly I can't tell). So how do you know if a 1920s Martin is built for steel?

“The bottom line is you get a better dynamic response from the coil. Most people who play a hand-wound pickup say it sounds more ‘open’. It’s easy to make a pickup sound brighter but to have a truly open voice it’s got to be dynamically responsive – and that’s what scatter-winding [intentionally irregular hand-winding of a pickup coil] does. Also, compared to a machine-wound coil, the frequency response is slightly extended. So the sound is bigger and you hear more not just in the high frequencies but also in the depths of the frequency response.”


Regardless of their investment potential or merit compared to Martins, Fenders and Gibsons, the fact remains that clean original Harmony and Kay guitars as well as some of the other interesting student-grade instruments of the 1960s and earlier are quite rare today. Since they were prone to structural problems, many were simply thrown away rather than being repaired. Due to the lack of good repairmen prior to the mid 1970s, attempts to repair such instruments were often as bad or worse than the original problems, further adding to the destruction. Since most of these instruments cost much less than a Martin, Gibson or Fender when new, owners often felt much less of an incentive to take good care of them. Back in the mid 1960s when I was starting out, I saw far more people playing Harmonys, Kays and Danelectos than Martins, Fenders and Gibsons, but for a variety of reasons most of these student instruments have not survived, so that today it is actually a rare occurrence for me to find an original Harmony Sovereign or a good Kay archtop in playable or good cosmetic and structural condition.
By far the best bang for the buck. These guitars are beautifully made with good attention to details such as fret ends, bridge fit and neck joints. They also have wonderful finishing and are made from quality materials. The 'snob' factor is the only thing against them, they are not Gibsons. Martin's or Fender's, BUT they do play just as well and quite frankly, only those with a good ear and perfect pitch could tell the difference in a rock environment. I have Fender, Gibson, Taylor, Columbus, Washburn, Squire and Maccaferri Guitars, as well as Richwood. Sadly like the great majority of guitarists, the guitars themselves are more capable than I am, and I am happy to admit it. Having an exceptional guitar will not make you an exceptional guitarist, just as a more professional camera won't make you a professional photographer. The Richwood Artist / Master series of guitars are good, believe me! For the average guitarist, pro or am, you can buy more expensise guitars but not better as far ...more
I had this guitar handed down to me. It is in pretty rough shape. I think it is in good enough shape to restore to good condition/used shape. Before I attempt such a thing I would like to know more about the guitar itself. I know the history of Lyle and "Lawsuit" guitars so that part is done. The body has a cherry red finish with 2 "f" openings. The neck has had some stress on it, enough to have the wood lift a little on its grain pattern about 2 inches long from the nut to the fret board. I am not sure if injecting glue into this will keep the neck from breaking in the future. The fret board is loose at the nut but I believe I can glue it again. This is not the first restoration I have done. I have restored a flute and a grenadilla wood clarinet. Any comments regarding how to or if I am wasting my time will be welcome.
The Effect: Flangers belong to the modulation class of effects and are among the most unusual tools you can have as a guitar player. Being similar to phasers, flangers are often the subject of numerous controversies. At the end of the day, this effect is a different kind of beast. One of the best examples of a good flanger is the Electro-Harmonix Stereo Electric Mistress. This pedal was based on an older design that’s credited with pushing flangers to the mainstream. Another thing to know about flangers is that they can make or break your tone. Due to their aggressive nature, one has to be careful how much of this effects they use. It’s easy to get overwhelmed and lost in it.
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Gold trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.

Input kewords into the searchbox at the top of each page, then click the WHAT'S IT WORTH button. The search engine will find matching pages based on keywords you type into the Search Box. The engine searches all categories of objects, not just this particular category, so you may get some irrelevant items in your search results. Too many results? Be more specific. Not enough results? Be less specific.

Re-amping a DI'd keyboard or bass can really liven up a sound, but if you don't have access to a nice amp or amp modeller, you can simulate the effect by sending the audio to a bus with a delay plug-in set to a short delay time and with the wet signal set to 100 percent and dry to 0 percent. Then send the bus's output to another bus with a distortion (or better still, a guitar amplifier emulator) plug-in inserted. This simulates the delay you get from miking up a speaker, and if you blend this in with the DI'd sound, it can give the recording a live feel — especially if you use a convolution reverb to add some 'room' ambience. You may also want to roll off the very low and high frequencies to help get rid of that DI'd vibe. Nicholas Rowland
The Martin D-28 is a modern recreation of the dreadnoughts that came from Martin's "golden era", which falls between 1930 to 1940. Since vintage D-28 specimens that were built in the '30s were being sold for more than 30 grand, the company decided to give today's guitarists a chance to own one at a more reasonable price point. Carrying with it the same premium all-solid build that include a solid Sitka spruce top, solid east Indian rosewood back and sides, solid mahogany neck and solid ebony fretboard - you can expect this acoustic guitar to sound as Martin-y as possible.
The Fender Tele Jr. is a variant of the Fender Telecaster electric guitar that the Fender Custom Shop produced in a limited run of 100 units in the early 1990s. It uses a Telecaster body shape, scale length, and electronics controls (albeit, with a reversed control plate). However, many of its construction and electronic features—for example its set-in neck and P-90-style pickups—are similar to those of a Gibson Les Paul Junior (hence the name) and Gibson Les Paul Special electric guitars.
Morning everyone, well it is here in UK anyway. Who can help with my find. It's a Dia Hummingbird labelled F 315 but no serial number. So from what I can find Dia was a brand used by Matsumoku but I can only see electrics under Dia brand when I search. However it looks identical to a Aria F315 Hummingbird on eBay USA at present, and identical to an Aria Pro II from the 1976 catalogue but labelled W 30 model I believe. I won't put a link on here in case I'm breaking rules. It has that weird aluminium compensated bridge and seriously, this one looks brand new with two tiny dings that would make it a second or an ex-demo if it was on sale. Action at low E 12th is about 2.7mm and about 1.8 at high e. It's in such good condition I began to question if in fact it is a 'knock off of a knock off' though why anyone would think that would work I can't guess. It is very very playable, and at first I wasn't keen on the tone though sustain is great (despite bridge) but I changed to heavier strings (13) with much improvement. I'm seeing a luthier friend next week who is finishing off work on a brilliant Terada FW 613 (D18 clone if you like), but I'm wondering whether to get him to replace the whole alloy bridge. I can do a couple of pics if anyone is interested. Any help in identification of maybe year (guessing 1976) and origin greatly appreciated. I think it's a keeper, but should I change that bridge ? Has anyone done similar on one of these compensated aluminium designs and what were results. Many thanks.
Been in my attic for 20 years...kinda dirty...Rare Vintage Electric Guitar that i have never found an exact pic of on the web...seems like a Teisco Del Rey,but looks earlier than the 60's models ive seen...obviously needs cleaning an repair...but man this thing is cool...a great restoration project...the only marking is the patent number 31-4127 on the truss rod cover...or a Norma or Guyatone version...or just hang it on your wall as a great conversation piece
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There are also companies like Eastwood Guitars that are releasing their own versions of the Hi-Flier. Available for a pretty low sum, you can get Eastwood’s recreation of a Phase 4 Hi-Flier in both right-handed and lefty configurations. If you don’t find the world of vintage guitars too appealing, but you dig the look and feel of the Hi-Flier, this might be a prime option for you.


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Three recording sessions between 1936 and 1937 produced 29 songs, including the verifiable classics “(I Believe I’ll) Dust My Broom,” “Sweet Home Chicago,’” “Walkin’ Blues,” “Love in Vain” and “Crossroad Blues.” His popularization of cut boogie patterns presaged electric Chicago blues and rock and roll, while his fretted and slide guitar licks are so timeless that they still show up in contemporary music.
George Beauchamp was a vaudeville performer, violinist, and steel guitarist who, like most of his fellow acoustic guitarists in the pre-electric-guitar days of the 1920s, was searching for a way to make his instrument cut through an orchestra. He first conceived of a guitar fitted with a phonograph-like amplifying horn, and approached inventor and violin-maker John Dopyera to create a prototype which proved to be, by all accounts, a failure. Their next collaboration involved experiments with mounting three conical-shaped aluminum resonators into the body of the guitar beneath the bridge. These efforts produced an instrument which so pleased Beauchamp that he told Dopyera that they should go into business to manufacture them. After further refinements, Dopyera applied for a patent on the so-called tri-cone guitar on April 9, 1927. Thereafter, Dopyera and his brothers began to make the tri-cone guitars in their Los Angeles shop, calling the new guitars “Nationals”. On January 26, 1928, the National String Instrument Corporation was certified and, with its new factory located near a metal-stamping shop owned by Adolph Rickenbacher and staffed by some of the most experienced and competent craftsmen available, began to produce Spanish and Hawaiian style tri-cone guitars as well as four-string tenor guitars,mandolins and ukuleles.[3]
1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-220 "Strat-Style" Electric Guitar. Both original, single coil, "Spectrum" Pickups. Great, original Candy Apple, Metallic color. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. Laminated maple neck. Separate ON / Off switch for each pickup. Overall Rhythm / Solo tone switch. Volume and Tone control and adjustable truss rod. With the exception of some "Battle Scars" on lower bout of body (see photos) the finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 strings. No case included.
Distortion and overdrive circuits each 'clip' the signal before it reaches the main amplifier (clean boost circuits do not necessarily create 'clipping') as well as boost signals to levels that cause distortion to occur at the main amplifier's front end stage (by exceeding the ordinary input signal amplitude, thus overdriving the amplifier) Note : product names may not accurately reflect type of circuit involved - see above.[38]
The Teisco TG-54 was a two-pickup Les Paul, named for the year it was designed, 1954, not long after the original! It had a large white plastic covered pickup at the neck, set into the pickguard, and a slanted metal-covered pickup set into a metal tailpiece assembly, sort of like a Telecaster. Again, strings passed through the tail assembly and the body. Similar to the J-1, the volume and tone controls (same knobs) sat on a small rectangular plate, this time metal like a Tele, with an added chicken-beak three-way rotary selector switch.

Many pedalboards on the market are powered. They feed DC power directly from the board to your pedals, eliminating the need for battery changes or external power adapters. This simplifies your setup and minimizes your need for power outlets. Some pedalboards even have a small built-in combo amplifier, making them a great practice and jamming solution.
The Red Hot Chili Peppers always knew how to rock a party; it took John Frusciante to turn them into an arena-packing band with a sound they could call their own. Frusciante is a remarkably elastic stylist and a gifted sculptural arranger who pushed the Chilis to explore new worlds without getting in the way of their funk-pumped energy; he beefed up their sound with both well-placed fire (the volcanic, Hendrix-style solo on “Dani California”) and remarkable elegance (the indelible opening chords of “Under the Bridge”).

A lot of folks really like Squier guitars. In most cases, I'm not one of them. Fender’s economy guitars (Squiers) are cheap, coming in under $400 (often $200 or less), which can be an attractive option for a first-time buyer. However the price difference between a Squier Strat and a real deal Fender Strat isn’t big enough to make up for the quality hit you take when you buy a Squier.
This is the name given to the amplifier, separate from the speakers. It’s the pre-amp and amp in one box, which is usually placed on top of a cabinet or a stack of speakers. This is a common configuration for large venues, and it might be useful to have a separate amp head if you play a lot of festivals or “battle of the bands” events, where the speakers are generally provided by the organizer.
The same kind of automatic difficulty adjustment works in Rocksmith's Lessons feature, which is just what it sounds like: a set of tutorials to teach players everything from how to hold the guitar and basic picking techniques, to how to bend, slide, and hammer on notes. Get them right and you'll advance to ever more challenging material. Struggle, and the oh-so-polite instructor tells you he's just going to slow that riff down a little and give you another crack at it. Herein lies Rocksmith's greatest strength as a teaching tool—it gives you the ability to learn at your own pace without fear of judgment.
Clearly, when playing live rather than recording, the room you are in will create its own reverb. Live performance spaces are often prepared with a combination of acoustically absorbent and reflective materials to achieve the desired balance. Sometimes this means hi-tech purpose made fittings made of special materials. Often it's just judicious arrangement of curtains and rugs, combined with bare walls.

The numbers below the chord tell you which fingers you should be using to form the chord. Finger one is the finger closest to your thumb and then it goes across until finger four is your pinky. The image below shows this labelled for you. If you're playing a left handed guitar you'll have to use the mirror image of these pictures. The thumb doesn't get a number because it is very, very rarely used when forming chords.
The explanation for this "asymmetrical" tuning (in the sense that the maj 3rd is not between the two middle strings as say in the tuning of the viola da gamba) is probably that the guitar originated as a 4-string instrument (actually an instrument with 4 double courses of strings, see above) with a maj 3rd between the 2nd and 3rd strings and that it only became a 6-string instrument by gradual addition of a 5th string and then a 6th string tuned a 4th apart:
Rolling Stones best electric guitarist list should've been nicknamed the best average guitarist list. I didn't give this guy the time of day because I thought the bucket thing was to cover up how badly he sucks. Turns out it's the opposite. He's just weird. It's too bad the average person doesn't have the capacity to enjoy this type of advanced music.
The Takamine GD71CE is a feature packed acoustic-electric guitar, with its solid top construction, visual embellishments and improved electronics. Takamine equipped this guitar with a solid spruce top and rosewood for the back and sides - a nice tonewood combination known for its articulate sound. It also comes with matching aesthetic appointments that include maple binding for the body, neck and headstock, abalone rosette, rosewood headcap, maple dot inlays, gold die-cast tuners with amber buttons, and the body is wrapped in a nice looking gloss finish. In addition to all this, the Takamine GD71CE is equipped with their TK-40D preamp system which gives you more control over your amplified sound with its mid contour switch, 3-band EQ with bypass and notch filter.
Because most electric guitars offer far more adjustability than acoustic guitars, the setup and adjustment of the guitar is more important than it is with acoustics, which don’t have much to adjust. We decided John and I would test the electrics first right out of the box, with their stock strings and factory setup, then get a professional to set them up with Ernie Ball Regular Slinky strings in gauges from .010 to .046—for decades, this has been one of the most popular string sets for electric guitars. Our setup technician was Avishay Shabat, who heads the Guitar Groomer repair shop in Woodland Hills, California, and who also manufactures his own line under the Shabat Guitars brand.
BassLab: This company can be best described as someone who goes completely against believers of tone-wood theory. They basically employ monocoque carbon fiber construction for their guitars, yeah you heard that right, the entire guitar technically becomes a continuous piece of carbon fiber with not even a trace of wood in it. The construction process for these guitars is pretty much same as F1 racing cars and is quite pricey. Since the guitar uses a monocoque carbon-fiber construction they offer the option for extremely thin profile necks, because making the neck thin doesn’t impact the structural strength of a monocoque guitar. This enables them to make their guitar necks even faster to play than those Wizard necks found on Ibanez guitars. As for bridge, well almost all BassLab guitars are headless, the ones with trem use high quality headless trems made by J-Custom, the design of these trems are based on the much acclaimed (but now discontinued due to high production cost) Steinberger S-trem which are a piece of cake to tune and hold their tuning as good as hardtail bridges. Just like Strandberg they also offer the option for Cycfi XR pickups, but unlike Strandberg since the BassLab guitars are made of pure carbon-fiber there’s barely anything on it to color the sound of those pickups, this gives them an extremely precise and transparent clean tone unheard on any other guitar. They also make acoustic guitars, for acoustic guitars they have option for carbon-fiber and wood composite to replicate tone of woods, or you can go for usual monocoque pure carbon-fiber construction for completely unadulterated tone from the strings. They are one of the few guitar makers who have dared to rise above the confines of traditional guitar making and have created what can be best described as guitars of the future.

Splitting the humbucker #1: by grounding the coil-tap and connecting the hot lead to output we’re rendering the coil closer to ground useless because both of it’s leads are grounded. What we’re left with is the coil closer to the hot lead. Since we only have one coil, it will not be hum-cancelling on it’s own. It’s common to split a humbucker, so it can be wired with another coil in parallel, making the noiseless combination, especially on H-S-H guitars.


John Fahey, who died in 2001 at age 61, was American folk guitar's master eccentric, a dazzling fingerpicker who transformed traditional blues forms with the advanced harmonies of modern classical music, then mined that beauty with a prankster's wit. "His music speaks of a boundless freedom," says ex-Captain Beefheart guitarist Gary Lucas. In the Nineties, Fahey switched to a spiky minimalism on electric guitar that made him a post-punk icon. "To be validated by John Fahey," says Thurston Moore, "was really special for our scene."
In the Popular Mechanics lab, we played the Xbox 360 version of Rocksmith 2014 with a pair of Epiphone guitars: The Les Paul Junior that comes with the game bundle, and a $1000 Les Paul Custom that the company sent us for testing, and which, sadly, we have to send back. The thing that sets Rocksmith apart from other rhythm games is the "Hercules" adapter. It's a cable that plugs into the output jack of any guitar or bass and connects it to your console via the USB port. You use the ordinary console controller to navigate menus.

The Martin DSR2 also comes equipped with built-in Fishman Sonitone electronics, which features discrete soundhole mounted controls, allowing for stage-ready performance without having to drill excessive holes on the side of the body. With its continuesly high rating and incredible value for money, the Martin DSR2 should be at the top of your list when you're looking for an acoustic-electric guitar in this price range.
From its humble beginnings as an experiment in resonance to the flagship image of rock and roll, the electric guitar has taken many forms over the years. All of them have their advantages — and their disadvantages. Every manufacturer has tried their own take on some of the different body styles, which include hollow body, semi-hollow body, fully solid body electric, and even acoustic-electrics. Here, we will take a look at what exactly those terms mean, and what to look for in each.
The Orange Crush is all about style and portability. It’s distictive look is due to the Orange basket weave Tolex, woven speaker grille, beading and legendary hieroglyphs (PiX) and of course the Orange signature ‘picture frame’ edging. It’s not as feature rich as other models, but that’s the point. It’s simple, portable and just a good basic combo amp. It’s also available in black (why?) and retails for around $99.
National did not seem interested in the project, and, as we’ve seen, Beauchamp and Barth left National that year to begin Ro-Pat-In with Rickenbacker, where they used their ideas on the development of the new Electro electric Hawaiian aluminum “frying pans” and Spanish guitars. Again, some disagreement exists regarding the relative roles of Beauchamp and Rickenbacker in the development of these guitars, but, again that’s a different story. Beauchamp applied for a patent on his “frying pan” on June 8, 1933, and again on June 2, 1934, eventually receiving the patent on August 10, 1937.
• Them Changes: Since the strings on acoustic guitars play a much more important role in projecting volume and clarity than strings on an amplified electric guitar, considering changing acoustic guitar strings often to keep an instrument sounding its best. Remember to wipe down the strings after playing and check for string damaging fret wear. Both can prematurely end a guitar string’s life.
Portable- you can carry them in one hand to jam with friends, take to your guitar lesson, or even play at a small party. The Fender “Frontman” 10 watt weighs only 8.5 pounds and brand new costs only $59. Another fun amp is the Danelectro “Honeytone” that only costs $19.99 and is equipped with a belt clip so you can walk or roller skate around while playing your guitar.
The final stages of on-board sound-shaping circuitry are the volume control (potentiometer) and tone control (a low-pass filter which "rolls off" the treble frequencies). Where there are individual volume controls for different pickups, and where pickup signals can be combined, they would affect the timbre of the final sound by adjusting the balance between pickups from a straight 50:50.
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