Multi-effects devices have garnered a large share of the effects device market, because they offer the user such a large variety of effects in a single package. A low-priced multi-effects pedal may provide 20 or more effects for the price of a regular single-effect pedal. More expensive multi-effect pedals may include 40 or more effects, amplifier modelling, and the ability to combine effects or modelled amp sounds in different combinations, as if the user was using multiple guitar amps. More expensive multi-effects pedals may also include more input and output jacks (e.g., an auxiliary input or a "dry" output), MIDI inputs and outputs, and an expression pedal, which can control volume or modify effect parameters (e.g., the rate of the simulated rotary speaker effect).
Capacitors used in guitar circuits aren’t polarised, so it doesn’t matter which way round you fit the legs - we normally go with the printed side facing out from the pot. They’re measured in microfarads (uF) and will be marked with a number. You can experiment with different values and materials for different results, but if in doubt, just swap it for what you already have.
“It was just a different world,” Ford says. “There was ‘Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert,’ Ed Sullivan, Dick Clark, and they would have one band on and you would wait all week to see who that band was going to be. And you could talk about it all week long with your friends — ‘Saturday night, Deep Purple’s going to be on, what are they going to play?’ — and then everybody’s around the TV like you’re watching a football game.”
Official Vintage Guitar Price Guide: This print guide, published by Vintage Guitar and Bass, is an annual guide that is re-published with updated information each year. The webpage above is handy because it shows links for all guides that have been published in one place and will continue adding links for future years. The link shown for each guide will take you to a store online where you can purchase the guide. It is known for being extremely thorough, and its latest edition, the 2017 guide, has appraisals for 2,000 brands of guitars, basses, amps, effects, mandolins, steels, lap steels, ukuleles and banjos.

A volume pedal is ideal for those guitarists out there who like to use volume swells or fade-ins, and those who don’t want to have to use the volume pot on their guitar to do so! All you do is apply pressure on the front or back of the pedal to get the desired effect and you’re good to go! They’re super simple to use and only change the signal rather than the tone of your guitar or bass.
A far cry from just another mass produced vintage looking guitar, the Kay Vintage Reissue Series successfully duplicates the original 50's models, within feel, playability and the legendary Kay sound. Complete with the company's gold chevron, flagship headstock design, displaying 3-D raised "Kel-von-a-tor" style emblem, to this day, the Kay Thin Twin Electric Guitar is probably one of the coolest looking guitars ever made.
For its tops (soundboards), Ovation used sitka spruce, a wood which Kaman engineers had been using in helicopter blades. In the 1970s, Ovation developed thinner sound-boards with carbon-based composites laminating a thin layer of birch, in its Adamas model, which has been viewed as one of the most radical designs in the history of acoustic guitars. The Adamas model dissipated the sound-hole of the traditional soundboard among 22 small sound-holes in the upper chamber of the guitar, yielding greater volume and further reducing feedback during amplification.[1] The Adamas design strengthened the sound-board, reducing the traditional design’s bracing and hence its weight. In the 1980s, another innovation was the introduction of shallow-bowl guitars, which appealed to electric guitarists.
Just ask any savvy stompbox builder or low-tuned 7-string player: Sometimes the best way to add power to your low tones is to remove a bit of bass. That’s because the lowest frequencies in your signal disproportionately overdrive your amp and effects. Siphoning off just a bit of bass can add clarity and focus. At extreme settings, the filtering can produce sharp, squawking tones akin to those of a ’60s treble booster pedal (not a bad thing). If you’ve ever grappled with high-gain tones that make your amp fart out, here’s your flatulence remedy.

While most effects pedals can drastically alter your sound, there are some that add more subtle elements to your signal to create a more pleasing sound. They may not be as exciting or fun to play with, but they can be the difference between pretty good and truly great sounds. As your collection of effects grows and opportunities to play with bands increase, some of these will become important additions to your rig.
Indeed, the Adamas was not the only technological exploration conducted by Ovation. In 1973, as the threat of copying loomed, Ovation decided to manufacture its own inexpensive “copies.” Launching a full-out research effort Ovation came up with new bowl materials, a new way to make tops, and a new neck construction based on more technology used on the helicopter side.
The 2555X Silver Jubilee reissue has the same silver vinyl covering used on the originals, and looks just as handsome. The controls are pleasingly familiar, with a simple front panel layout featuring controls for bass, mid, treble, presence, together with a preamp gain and two master volume controls - one for lead and one for rhythm. A push/pull switch on the output master volume changes channels, while another on the gain knob flips the 2555X into rhythm clip mode, changing the clean channel into something a lot more aggressive. The third rocker switch changes the output stage mode from pentode to triode, dropping the power from 100 down to around 50 watts, and softening the attack a little. The sparse rear panel also features a series effects loop, a fixed-level frequency-compensated DI output, and a jack socket for a single-button footswitch, used to change channels. Overall, the 2555X is built to last and look good for a long time, with Marshall's typically high build quality and attention to detail. Apart from its association with Slash, Joe Bonamassa, and various other high-profile users, the main reason why 2555s are so sought after is their sound. We're pleased to report that the reissue amp is tonally as accurate as it possibly could be, with perhaps a touch more gain and low-end punch than the original. The 2555X accurately reproduces the original tone - and with a few minor exceptions, the look - of the original, at a price that's very reasonable compared with the competition, especially for a UK-made product.
Richard Thompson has been one of rock's most dazzling stylists since his days with Fairport Convention, a British folk-rock band that veered into English traditional music. Shooting out life-affirming riffs amid lyrics that made you want to jump off a bridge, he combined a rock flatpick attack with speedy fingerpicking. His electric-guitar solos, rooted less in blues than in Celtic music, can be breathtaking, but his acoustic picking is just as killer; no one knows how many tears have been shed by players trying to nail "1952 Vincent Black Lightning."

“I was getting really bored with this guitar sound—or lack of an interesting sound,” Davies remembers. “There was this little radio spares shop up the road, and they had a little green amplifier in there next to the radios. An Elpico. I twiddled around with it and didn’t know what to do. I tried taking the wires going to the speaker and putting a jack plug on there and plugging it straight into my AC30. It kind of made a weird noise, but it wasn’t what I was looking for.
the most with a headphone jack. Any suggestions? I am just a bedroom player who sucks and price is well I say depends what it (the amp) is worthy b/c I am on disability and my neurologist said just quit but at 48 years old it (music) is the only area of life besides my dog and mom that keeps me even and she is in worse shape than me (sorry for the soap box). Is the EVH 5150 III though its' combo is 50 watts but it has the headphone jack. Please anyone help???
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During the late Middle Ages, gitterns called "guitars" were in use, but their construction and tuning was different from modern guitars. The Guitarra Latina in Spain, had curved sides and a single hole. The Guitarra Morisca, which appears to have had Moorish influences, had an oval soundbox and many sound holes on its soundboard. By the 15th century, a four course double-string instrument called the vihuela de mano, that had tuning like the later modern guitar except on one string and similar construction, first appeared in Spain and spread to France and Italy. In the 16th century, a fifth double-string was added. During this time, composers wrote mostly in tablature notation. In the middle of the 16th century, influences from the vihuela and the renaissance guitar were combined and the baroque five string guitar appeared in Spain.[33] The baroque guitar quickly superseded the vihuela in popularity in Spain, France and Italy and Italian players and composers became prominent. In the late 18th century the six string guitar quickly became popular at the expense of the five string guitars. During the 19th century the Spanish luthier and player Antonio de Torres gave the modern classical guitar its definitive form, with a broadened body, increased waist curve, thinned belly, improved internal bracing.[34] The modern classical guitar replaced an older form for the accompaniment of song and dance called flamenco, and a modified version, known as the flamenco guitar, was created.
Anyone who commented that this was a good list needs to reconsider what makes up a great guitar player. It’s about being multi-faceted musician. Creativity, technicality and musicality all come in to play when your talking about the highest quality players. When I listen to a “shredder” like Steve Vai, I think..yes he is fast but his music makes me feel absolutley nothing emotionally. Truth be told…SRV and David Gilmour are probably the only players on this list that deserve to be there.
Welcome to OvationGallery.com.  This is my personal website for displaying photos of my various Ovation guitars.  I have been a player and collector of these fine instruments for over 30 years.  Although I don't profess to be an expert on all things Ovation, I do have a passion for their artistic and sonic beauty which I hope you will share.  My collection is always evolving, at one point  numbering over 50 guitars.  At one time or another I've been lucky enough to own almost every type of Ovation and Adamas guitar as well as some one-of-a-kind and truly collectable specimens.  All of these guitars are wonderful and it is my pleasure to share them with you on this website.     Dave   

Blueridge Historic Series BR-160 Looks good, sounds even better. Blueridge’s BR-160 celebrates the company’s rich history, which is reflected in the guitar’s vintage dreadnought design. The warm, mellow sound it produces also takes you back to the good ol’ days way before the internet came along. Having this guitar is just like having a piece of history in your hands.
There are nine types of guitar here: four folk, two classical, one flamenco, one jumbo and one gypsy, as well as a choice of nylon or steel strings. It works like Kontakt in that you have MIDI keys for playing notes and then control keys for the playing articulations, such as legato, palm mute, harmonics, sustain or chord detection. There are different chord types and a strumming engine to recreate the action of playing.
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A 5 way selector is commonly found on guitars with 3 pickups , a humbucker in the bridge , single coil in the middle and a humbucker in the neck. So the 5 way selectors job is to select only one or more pickups at a time to offer different sounds on the guitar. The way the selector is pointed will tell you which pickup is selected and this is common on guitars from all brands. The bottom position is your bridge pickup which is closest to where the strings begin , the middle position is all 3 pickups and the top position closest to the neck is your ....you guessed it neck pickup. The bridge pickup will offer heavier sounds if you play the right notes and the neck for soloing as the output (intensity) of the neck pickup isn't as powerful as the neck for a reason. The more you play the more you'll see uses for switching pickups on the selector. The tone knob on the other hand it depends on how you use it I know a lot of guys who are endorsed and so forth who never touch the tone knob or have guitars built without it , but used properly it can do a lot of stuff from Eric Clapton to Carlos Santana type stuff. you will also see a 5 way selector on guitars with two humbuckers this feature is called a mega or super switch depending on brand. It makes the pickups do different stuff but this feature is usually found on expensive guitars and keep in mind a 3 way blade switch looks like one but only goes in three positions. Bridge , middle and neck.
: Values? Well, with the prices of 1960s American and British guitars through the roof, collectors and musicians turn to the next-best-thing, and that would be European and Japanese guitars. In general, any made-in-Japan solid-body electric guitar in good cosmetic shape, that's complete and playable, is worth at least $100, and any acoustic-electric, at least twice that. The more pickups it has, the more elaborate the controls, and the more flashy the pickguard, the more it's worth. Same goes for the body and headstock shape. The standard shapes that copy Fender and other manufacturers aren't as desirable as some of the weirder shapes. A Decca solidbody with an unusual body shape, with 3 pickups and an unusual original finish would probably be in the $250-350 range to the right person. An acoustic-electric with the same specs would probably be worth $100 more than that. I've seen some of the exceptional Teisco solidbodies go for $500-600, but that's uncommon. In about 2006, I saw a Teisco (one of their Mosrite copies) from about 1967 that was in flawless condition for sale in an instrument shop in Tokyo for 200,000 Yen (about $1,900). I wouldn't be surprised if it sold for that.
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If you like to run all your effects into an amp set clean and get your gain sounds from pedals, you probably don’t ever need to consider using amplifier effects loops or a wet/dry/wet rig. If your amp(s) are set relatively clean, you will be able to use any of the effects listed above straight into the front of the amp—and they should sound really good.
Aside from the stereo effect of doubling up the same part and panning it to opposite ends of the stereo spectrum, some guitarists use stereo rigs in conjunction with stereo effects. Traditionally, this involves using two amp cabinets, although single cabs that operate in stereo are available. To achieve a good, even stereo image, it’s best to mic each cab identically, ideally with the same type of mic. Invert the polarity of one of the channels to avoid any out-of-phase issues, and pan them hard left and right. Stereo effects such as reverb, delay and room ambience, can be added to mono guitar signals at the mixing stage.
Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]
The biggest determining factor on how easy a guitar is to play is the 'action' - distance from the strings to the neck. When it is very low it is easy to press the strings down to touch the fret; when it is too low the strings will buzz when you play. If a guitar's action is too high it will be very hard to play, and for a beginner, this can be pretty disheartening.

"Bring up one mic at a time and get it to optimum level on your board. To check that they're all in phase, make sure the signal is adding and not subtracting as you add in the other mics. If not... reverse the phase. Then start to put up each mic, one at a time... as you move the faders back and forth, you'll hear the greatest EQ, because of the phase relationship... Then if you flip the phase on one of the mics, you can really have some fun — it'll act like a filter."
Yes, try learning licks before school in a crowded home. Or late at night. Do you want to play or not? Is the simple question. I think I learnt guitar because I could do that all day without bothering anyone. I don't like headphones. Very small amps are OK. But no amp? Yeah. I still do practice scales and stuff unplugged. As a kid I figured out I could brace my guitar against the wardrobe door and it would resonate, great!
Some studios are too small for regular amp miking, and even if they're not there are sometimes occasions on which you need better separation from the other instruments playing at the same time. A neat way around this is to use a soundproof box containing a guitar speaker and a microphone. Various commercial models are available where your guitar amp output feeds the speaker inside the box and the microphone feed comes out to the mixer in the normal way. The designer's challenge is to make this work without the resulting cabinet being too large or too boxy sounding. The DIY alternative to this is to place the combo or speaker cabinet in an adjoining room, or maybe even a cupboard or wardrobe (along with the mic, of course!).
Another clarification about brand names is in order. Teisco guitars can be found mainly bearing at least eight brand names: Teisco, Teisco Del Rey, Kingston, World Teisco, Silvertone, Kent, Kimberly and Heit Deluxe. Teisco was the name used mainly in Japan but also on a few occasions here in the United States. Most Teisco guitars were imported into the United States by Chicago’s W.M.I. Corporation � originally owned by guitar importing pioneer Jack Westheimer � bearing both the Teisco Del Rey and Kingston brand names. By the mid-’60s W.M.I. was providing Teiscos to Sears and Roebuck carrying the Silvertone moniker. I’m not sure the World Teisco brand ever got to the U.S.; my guess is that it was an export designation that went to other markets. Some of the early Kent guitars imported by New York’s Bugeleisen and Jacobson were purchased from Teisco. The distributors responsible for either the Kimberly or Heit Deluxe brand names remain a mystery at this time. It is possible that you may encounter other brand names on Teisco-made guitars sold through other distributors, but these will be in a minority. If you know of any other names, please let us know.
Coming to its making, it has full-size dreadnaught body for big sound. The top is made up of laminate spruce whereas sides and back are nicely finished with basswood. This Fender Guitar is the reason it lacks a little bit of sounding because solid wood guitars can provide high-end sounding. As far as handling is concerned, kids might find it difficult due to its full size. Teenagers with right heights will find it quite comfortable. Just make sure that your fingers go down to fretboard pretty easily.
Now, there are some basic terms in the electric guitar lingo that you need to be aware of. Below are some of the terms that you need to know before you go out and research about different electric guitars. But if you are musically inept, there are some ways you can compete with the guitar guy. If you learn some points about the electric guitar, such as terms and mechanics of the instrument, you can impress your friends and possibly even will be the guy holding the guitar at your next dinner party.
WARTUNG Herzlichen Glückwunsch und vielen Dank dafür, dass Sie sich für ein Produkt von Ibanez entschieden haben. Ibanez legt bei seinen Produkten die höchsten Standards an. Alle Ibanez- Instrumente werden vor der Auslieferung unserer strengen Qualitätskontrolle unterzogen. In dieser Anleitung wollen wir beschreiben, wie Sie das Äußere Ihres Instruments pflegen und Ihre Gitarre in dem Zustand halten, wie sie bei Auslieferung ab Werk war.
The Ovation Guitar Company founded by Charles Kaman based in the USA. The company primarily manufactures nylon-string acoustic guitars & steel-string acoustic guitars.These are the kind of electric guitars that are ideal for a recording in a studio and also great for stage performance. Their design incorporates, a wood top with a rounded, synthetic bowl shape instead of the traditional back and sides. CE44-RR is one of the most popular series of acoustic guitars produced by this brand. This is an expensive brand of guitars whose starting price is 31,555 INR approximately.
BAJAAO bring to you the best and extensive range Electro Acoustic Guitars also known as the Acoustic Electric Guitar or Semi Electric guitar in layman terms from all over the world. Versatile in design, the electro acoustic guitar is known for its smooth sound and powerful projection. At its core, an acoustic-electric guitar is acoustic in style fitted with a pickup device allowing it to be plugged into an amplifier, a number of effect pedals or played on its own for a more intimate sound. Heard in basically every genre of music, these guitars are indispensable in almost any modern band setting. In acoustic-electric nylon string guitars, piezoelectric pickups and microphones are used because magnetic pickups are not capable of picking up vibrations of non-magnetic materials. The design is distinct from a semi-acoustic guitar, which is an electric guitar but with the addition of sound chambers within the guitar body. Buy the best Electro Acoustic Guitars online with BAJAAO.com with the best and affordable price in India. Make your shopping experience a wonderful one with us.
By the time After The Rain came out, the blues critics created enough of a backlash that it started affecting sales. Muddy must have realized that the records were upsetting his blues fanbase which had been loyal to him for over twenty years. Perhaps he feared he'd lose them forever if he stayed in this direction and that the young fanbase he had now might not stick with him as long. It wasn't until 1970 and after a more normal electric blues record (Fathers and Sons) that Muddy started talking badly about Electric Mud and then only mildly at first. Muddy released some great records in the rest of his lifetime, but he never experimented much with his music again.
You will be able to chord the guitar with comfort and has bend strings. You will be able to play with ease as it has c shaped neck with satin finished. Its three single-coil pickups can allow you to play the rock and jazz sounds, two-tone sound controls, 5-way switches to pick up. ITS Synchronized Tremolo chrome allows you to create a flat pitch and sharp sound. This is just the right guitar in your certain budget to get the best quality assurance and peace of mind. 
Most metal guitarists would kill to have half of the power and precision of James Hetfield’s right hand, not to mention his ability to write the most devastating riffs known to mankind, from “Seek and Destroy” and “Creeping Death” to “Enter Sandman.” Of course, most musicians with skills comparable to Hetfield’s have such big egos that they become the targets of our murderous intentions. That’s not the case with Hetfield.
Choose a pedal kit or two from one of the kit suppliers. If you are new to this, start with one of the simpler kits such as a boost pedal. You can move on to more complex circuits such as delays and reverbs later. You can order multiple kits at once if you want, but learn your skills on the easy ones first. Good kits come with comprehensive documentation. They normally list the tools that you will need, so read the docs online first and make sure you have the tools available. If not, order them at the same time as your kits so you’ll have everything ready. It’s very irritating when you are keen to get started on a pedal project and are missing that one small tool or part.
Washburn is an EXCELLENT brand. I have owned an N4, 2 N2's, and their latest, cheapest Nuno model for my daughter. My daughter's guitar is amazing for the price I wish I had such quality for my starter guitar. I would put my N4 up against ANY guitar- period. Plus, whenever I have contacted the company, they have top notch customer service. I know this isn't about amps, but I wrote them about an issue I had with my Randall amp ( a division of Washburn). Without me asking, they mailed me an amp part with an apology. Top notch.
Gotta say a tele has to be the hardest but most rewarding to play. If you make a mistake, you will definitely hear it, but it just helps you're playing get more clean. Les pauls are a lot easier with the shorter scale length and forgiving pickups. Haven't played any metal guitars but I figure it has a lot to do with their setup that makes it sound so easy. You can do just about anything with the tremolo arm into a van halen kind of setup and it'll sound cool. Or you can whack one off with your guitar like steve vai

Sometimes people forget that the greatest musician is not the one who can plays faster. I play guitar and I admire who plays fast, but i admire more the ones who can make beatiful music, even if it's simple. Frusciante is one of the few guys who can do so (beside Hendrix). And Frusciante could play all of Jimi's songs when he was 12 years old, and I guess he still can. So for those who compare them to Steve Vai, you should listen to music and not watch to the speed of their fingers.
The Telecaster has also been a long-time favorite guitar for hot-rod customizing. Several variants of the guitar appeared throughout the years with a wide assortment of pickup configurations, such as a humbucker in the neck position, three single-coil pickups and even dual humbuckers with special wiring schemes. Fender offered hot-rodded Teles with such pickup configurations, the US Fat and Nashville B-Bender Telecasters around 1998. The Deluxe Blackout Tele was also equipped with 3 single-coil pickups, a “Strat-o-Tele” selector switch and a smaller headstock than a standard Telecaster. The most common variants of the standard two-pickup solid body Telecaster are the semi-hollow Thinline, the twin-humbuckerDeluxe—and the Custom, which replaced the neck single coil-pickup with a humbucking pickup. The Custom and Deluxe were introduced during the CBS period and reissues of both designs are currently offered.

Gibson lost the trademark for Les Paul in Finland. According to the court, “Les Paul” has become a common noun for guitars of a certain type. The lawsuit began when Gibson suedMusamaailma, which produces Tokai guitars, for trademark violation. However, several witnesses testified that the term “Les Paul” denotes character in a guitar rather than a particular guitar model. The court also found it aggravating that Gibson had used Les Paul in the plural form and that the importer of Gibson guitars had used Les Paul as a common noun. The court decision will become effective, as Gibson is not going to appeal.[48]


Gut strings were the original strings for the classical stylist.  They were literally made from the guts of farm animals, mostly sheep.  The intestines and the process used to make these strings became more expensive than nylon and thus have fallen out of favor.  Even though you may hear the term “cat gut” strings, this style of string was never made from the innards of our cute, cuddly, feline friends… just the beasts we like tend to use as a food source.
“A magnet doesn’t have a tone, per se – you can’t put it to your ear and hear anything. It’s really the engine that drives the coils in a pickup. In a humbucker you’ve got a bar magnet located under the coils; if it’s a Stratocaster or a Telecaster you’ve got magnetic rods that are in the centre. But essentially they’re all doing the same thing: throwing up a magnetic field that the guitar strings vibrate in when they’re plucked.

The Blackheart Killer Ant is another slightly unconventional choice. Features wise, the Killer Ant does not have even the basics found on most beginner amps, yet it costs more money. The only controls on the Killer Ant are a power switch and a volume control. However, what sets the Blackheart Killer Ant apart is the fact it is a tube amp, rather than the cheaper solid state amps used for most beginner amps.


It’s apparent right away that Acousticsamples knows how to sample a guitar, regardless if it’s acoustic or electric. All frets on all the string have, of course, been meticulously sampled and taken through a round of guitar techniques: slides, mutes, hammer-ons, pull-offs, staccatos, fret noises, and a plethora of other articulations — 53 different samples per fret/string.
A musician is only as good as the songs he or she plays - except when you're improvising, of course! And even for those of us who write mostly our own music, there's always room for a repertoire of the classics. Building up your musical library starts with the tablature available in this section, and where it ends is up to you. If you're like most musicians, you'll probably spend your whole life collecting and trying your hand at new music. And with material here for guitar, bass, ukulele, banjo, mandolin and even violin, there's something for virtually everyone. Cover the songs in your own personal style or try your hand at recreating them as they were first recorded; it's up to you.
The Canadian firm Godwin is another popular name for producing best quality electric and acoustic guitars. (Have you heard of Seagull acoustic guitars? It’s the same brand.) Godwin outshines among the world of guitars due to producing high-end instruments with surprising variations. They even manage to touch bass too. Not only the Godwin guitars depict quality, but also reflect classiness.

Jump up ^ DeCurtis, Anthony (1992). Present Tense: Rock & Roll and Culture (4. print. ed.). Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. ISBN 0822312654. His first venture, the Phillips label, issued only one known release, and it was one of the loudest, most overdriven, and distorted guitar stomps ever recorded, "Boogie in the Park" by Memphis one-man-band Joe Hill Louis, who cranked his guitar while sitting and banging at a rudimentary drum kit.
National Reso-Phonic Guitars - World renowned for their resonator instruments. Unlike acoustic guitars, where the vibration of the wooden body creates the sound, in a resonator instrument the body acts as a speaker cabinet. When the strings are plucked, the vibration is transmitted through the saddle to the resonator. The resonator, or speaker cone, then amplifies that vibration.
Tube amps use the height of the 1940s electronic technology to give out what is widely considered the best sound quality to date. Since some people tend to be confused by this, it’s important to note that only their sound rendering circuitry is based on vacuum tubes (or lamps) while the equalizers and assorted bits employ transistors like any other piece of modern electronics, with no bearing whatsoever on how the sound will come out.

Modelling/digital amps: This type of guitar amp uses digital technology to stimulate old-fashioned technology. They are able to emulate old amplifiers using software, and this feature enables them to combine several amps into one. Their programmable nature enables the user to switch digital effects such as the chorus, delay, and other features. Some models of these amps have a digital or analog output that goes directly to a recording or PA system through speaker simulation.

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Any vibration we can hear as "sound" is composed of some distribution of overtones above the fundamental frequency. Overtones exist in a set fashion based on the physics of vibrating waves and the ratios between them. The only difference in tone between any instrument is caused by a different prominence and distribution of these overtones. When a string is plucked on an electric guitar the vibrations move into the body of the guitar as well. The resonant properties of the wood will cause some of these overtones to be "summed" and exaggerated while others will "cancel" to some degree. The vibrating string will be influenced, however slightly, by the vibration of the guitar, in turn changing the distribution of overtones on the vibrating string - essentially creating a feedback loop.
There are only two Amazon reviews for this instrument, as it is at a higher price point than other guitars, but the reviews are very positive. The rich tone of the cedar as well as the ability to take this classical guitar into the world of electrical pickups makes this a fabulous option for the musician looking to upgrade to a more professional-sounding instrument.
The biggest determining factor on how easy a guitar is to play is the 'action' - distance from the strings to the neck. When it is very low it is easy to press the strings down to touch the fret; when it is too low the strings will buzz when you play. If a guitar's action is too high it will be very hard to play, and for a beginner, this can be pretty disheartening.

Telecaster is considered to be the oldest solid body electric guitar in the world. Capturing that type of pedigree is not easy, but Squier managed to pull it off. Handling the Squier by Fender Vintage Modified Telecaster brought back some of the best memories of my youth, when Telecaster was the go to axe. This is definitely one guitar worth trying out.
The first recording of an electric guitar west of the Mississippi was in Dallas, in September 1935, during a session with Roy Newman and His Boys, an early Western swing dance band. Their guitarist, Jim Boyd, used his electrically-amplified guitar during the recording of three songs, Hot Dog Stomp, Shine On, Harvest Moon, and Corrine, Corrina.. An even earlier Chicago recording of an electrically amplified lap steel guitar was during a series of sessions by Milton Brown and His Brownies (another early Western swing band) that took place January 27-28, 1935, when Bob Dunn played his amplified Hawaiian guitar.
Most of the time, a chord diagram will not show you the finger numbers. They will leave that up to you, because different people sometimes play chords differently. Some people cannot play an A chord like this, because their fingers are too big, and this fingering is very cramped for them. Instead, they play an A with a mini-barre, using the same finger for more frets. For example, I could bar my 1st finger across the 4th, and 3rd strings at the second fret, then place my 2nd finger on the 2nd string, second fret (see image on the left). This gives me more room between the frets, and also frees up my 3rd and fourth fingers to pick out melody and bass notes. It’s just a preference, you can play the chord how you prefer.

Maton established itself early on the Australian rock scene in the late Fifties, assisted by Australia’s tariff regime, which made imported guitars far more expensive than the local equivalents. Maton guitars were used by many well-known Australian pop and rock groups including Col Joye & The Joy Boys. The company also made one of the first sponsorship deals in Australian rock, supplying Melbourne band The Strangers with a full set of the distinctive ‘El Toro’ model guitars and basses (notable for their outlandish ‘horned’ body shape) while the group was working as the house band on the TV pop show The Go!! Show in the mid-Sixties.
I understand and concur with you totally, as a sound man, I love it when everyone is direct, it makes life so much easier. every mike you eliminate adds roughly 3 db headroom overall to the max level without feedback. But as a bassist, and a Chapman Stick player, ampless just feels too flat and lifeless for me. I recently worked a John McLaughlin and Fourth Dimension gig in Bali, Both John, and Gary Husband went direct, it was wonderful. The bassist was amped though, for the same reasons I prefer to be amped If I am playing bass. Nathan East is another who doesn’t like bass in the monitors, preferring the sound and dynamic control of having his own amp. By and large, I find that generally (with some VERY notable exceptions) people who grew up playing concerts “back in the day” prefer amps, subsequent generations of people who grew up playing with small “portable” amps (think SWR, etc.) generally don’t mind going ampless, they have pedal racks, and have the sound they want from that. They don’t miss the air moving on their strings, because they never had it.. Perhaps because I am a dinosaur, I need the feel of 6, or 8 10s behind me, (or at least 2 15s), the resonance effect it has on the strings, makes my instrument come alive and it breathes with a feeling no pedal rack can duplicate. You should see Bootsy Collins’ rig, he had 2 1x18s, 2 2x15s, and 2 4×10 boxes, and that is what he calls his “small gig rig”! I guess I grew up regarding the amp as an integral part of my instrument, without it, playing feels, well, like you don’t have an amp! Even in the studio, I run a DI into the board, but I play through an amp for my own feel. Peas.

The new generation of ‘boomers’ as they were known, thrived with the growing push on consumerism.  This of course included buying records and with the pin ups of Rock and Roll like Elvis and Chuck Berry – they felt part of a new movement which understood them and related to their struggles, such as growing pains, responsibilities and fitting in with society.
You’ll notice that once it reaches zero sound gets very muddy very fast. That’s because we have zero resistance between the signal and the cap. To prevent this, some people put a small resistor (10K or so) between the pot and the cap. That way we won’t affect pot operation at higher settings (510K is very close to 500K) but at lower settings it will prevent it from reaching zero as we’re always adding 10K in series.
I'd never heard of this brand but was recently in a store in North Carolina looking for a nylon string guitar. The salesman asked me if I was "open minded" and if I'd be receptive to trying a brand that I probably had never heard of. He handed me a really pretty instrument with a very different looking headstock. I immediately figured he was showing me a very expensive instrument. I asked how much it cost, but he didn't answer. He simply replied "Try it, then let me know what you think." I had no idea how much this guitar would cost, and honestly I hate guessing games, but the guitar was really beautiful. I played several classical guitars there that day. A Yamaha, a Cordoba and an Alvarez, but the Merida was unquestionably the best sounding (and looking).
Hi there, Nicolas here. I'm all about continuous life-improvement and discovering your true-self so that we can find and attract beauty into our lives, be the best we can be, and enjoy life as much as possible. I have a passion for writing and publishing and that's why you can find me here. I write about the topics where I can share the most value, and that interest me the most. Those include: personal development, fitness, swimming, calisthenics, healthy lifestyle, green lifestyle, playing guitar, meditation and so on. I really wish to provide my readers with great value and for my books to be a source of inspiration to you. I'm sure that you will enjoy them and find some benefits! Stay tuned for some awesome books Wish you all the best, Nicolas Carter
There sure are a lot of electric guitar options to choose from in this day and age. Thankfully, your choice doesn't have to be a difficult one to make thanks to world-leading guitar companies like Epiphone. In fact, Epiphone specializes in a wide range of electric guitar value packages, assembled specifically to help budding enthusiasts begin their musical journey on the right foot. If learning how to play the guitar is something you've always wanted to try but were never sure where to start, consider this section your launching pad.
The blues was my inspiration-specifically, the late-'40s solo recordings of John Lee Hooker. "Hobo Blues" is an excellent example of early Hooker on which his violent string slapping-clearly audible in a blend of amp sound, haunting vocals, and trademark foot stomping-creates an indelible realism and engaging intimacy. My recording of Paris Slim's "The Day I Met The Boogie Man" (see the sidebar "Selected Discography") was one of my early experiments with this technique. Since that time, I have used a discrete "air-guitar" mic whenever I have had an available track for it. Guitarists may initially be skeptical of such unusual miking, but it's always a treat to watch their faces light up as they listen to the monitors deliver the bright, transient sounds that they have been accustomed to hearing during their years of practicing their instruments.

The easiest way to record bass is to just plug it straight into the console/interface—of course, using the correct instrument-level input or dedicated DI box, and not a standard line input. This will provide a nice, clean, deep tone, but it will likely lack the growl and grit that’s often desired—for that, you’ll want the sound of an amp. While you can always use a bass amp sim plug-in later, in the mix (see below), there’s nothing like the pants-flapping wall of low-end sound coming out of a real bass amp, if one is available. But most engineers will record both—a DI’d signal, and a miked-up amp. They can be combined later on, for the best of both worlds—the clean, round, depth from the DI, with the edge and midrange punch of the amp (but see below, for a caveat).
Launch price: $999 / £899 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Amp models: 33 | Effects: 42 | Connections: Standard guitar input, minijack stereo aux input, standard main outputs (L/Mono, R), XLR main outputs (L/Mono, R), standard stereo phones output, standard Send (L/Mono, R), standard Return (L/Mono, R), MIDI in, MIDI out/thru, USB, expression pedal | Power requirements: Mains power (IEC lead)

In 1974 Martin Sigma electrics included two SGs, a Tele and a Fender bass. The SBG2-6 was pretty much a straightforward SG copy with a bolt-on neck, center-peaked three-and-three head, block inlays, large pickguard, twin humbuckers, finetune bridge, and stop tailpiece, in cherry. The SBG2-9 was pretty cool, with a natural-finished plywood body, white pickguard, rosewood fingerboard with white block inlays, gold hardware and Bigsby. The SBF2-6 was a Tele with rosewood fingerboard, three-and-three head, block inlays, neck humbucker and bridge single-coil. The SBB2-8 was the bass, with natural finished body, three-and-three head, rosewood ‘board, block inlays, white ‘guard, and two humbucking pickups.
Yes, a Martin guitar under $500. The Martin LX1E features a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It carries the Martin name, which  means high quality is expected. Being that it is closer to out $500 limit, you can expect this guitar to deliver on tone. This one is a direct competitor to the Baby Taylor. People that own both have said that they like the sound of the Martin better, describing it as bright and crisp. The tradeoff is the playability is not rated as high as the Taylor. See more pictures and reviews of the guitar here.
Nashville studio engineer Glen Snoddy discovered the Fuzz-Tone sound when recording Marty Robbin’s 1960 hit “Don’t Worry About Me.” Allegedly an overloaded transformer blew in a Langevin tube module, transforming Grady Martin’s bass guitar into a distorted, heavy fuzz. Some put the event down to another case of amplifier malfunction. Either way, Martin continued to use the tone throughout 1961 while Snoddy transistorized the malfunctioning circuit through trial and error, and sold it onto Gibson in 1962.
Wah pedals can sound eerily similar to a human voice, and they were actually a favorite of Jimi Hendrix, who many have said possessed the most expressive guitar playing amongst all the great guitarists. Wah pedals are great to activate right when you’re about to take a solo and when you really want to make it sound like you’re speaking with the guitar.
Portland, OR was probably the place of import, but all the Lyles were 'licensed' copies of Gibson, they weren't seconds. The acoustic guitars were built in Japan, with laminated tops and sides. Over all construction on the guitars was very good for the materials used. I gave my Humminbird copy to my son after playing it for 25 years, and he still plays it today. Unfortunated during that 25 years, I had to have the bridge reset 3 times due to the weakness of the laminated top. My luthier asked me why I didn't just buy a Gibson or a Martin for as much money as I put into repairing that Lyle...I told him the tone was worth the extra expense.
A well-rounded complement of inexpensive microphones for recording an electric guitar would consist of a Shure 57 (a must have), an inexpensive condensor mic or two (I like some of the AKG models like the C-1000 and the C-3000), and an inexpensive compressor/limiter (dbx makes a few models that are a great value). If you have, or can borrow these mics, it almost doesn't matter whether you're recording on a 4-track Porta-Studio or using a Mackie 8-Bus with 24 tracks of adat, your guitar will sound great.
First introduced as a 35th Anniversary Edition Guitar in 2009, it joined Taylor’s standard line up as a Specialty Model in 2010. The Baritone model features a Grand Symphony body and a longer 27-inch scale length which enables it to be tuned from B to B while maintaining normal string tension. It comes in either 6-string or 8-string option. The 8-string models incorporates a pair of octave strings that double the 3rd and 4th (D and A) strings. Solid wood back and sides available for the Baritone model are Tropical mahogany or Indian Rosewood with rosewood binding and an abalone rosette.
Your own write-up suggests that the RP500 is "best of the best" for nailing classic amps/effects, and for being affordable; additionally your own write-up suggests Zoom should not be "best of the best" since it's tonally inferior to both the Digitech and the HD500X. Finally, the M5 isn't even a multi-effects pedal. It can model any single effect, that is all: it shouldn't even be mentioned here. Otherwise I like the actual write-ups: they're informative.
In 1954 Pat Hare produced heavily distorted power chords for several recordings (including James Cotton's Cotton Crop Blues"), creating "a grittier, nastier, more ferocious electric guitar sound,"[36] accomplished by turning the volume knob on his amplifier "all the way to the right until the speaker was screaming."[37] Link Wray's 1958 recording "Rumble" inspired young musicians such as Pete Townshend of The Who, Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin, Jeff Beck, Dave Davies of The Kinks, and Neil Young to explore distortion by various means.[38] In 1966, the British company Marshall Amplification began producing the Marshall 1963, a guitar amplifier capable of producing the distorted "crunch" that rock musicians were starting to seek.[39][40]

Vintage Gibson Les Paul Special model, introduced in 1955 This 1957 model is killer.Utilizing the Junior’s solid Mahogany body with single cutaway shape but  finished in what Gibson called Limed Mahogany which appeared white on black and white television sets which gives it the nickname of "TV Special"A neck pickup with accompanying volume and tone circuitry was also added making the Special an affordable but still professionally playable instrument. The Special was sold in this configuration until 1958 . Gibson’s surviving shipping records indicate approx. 1,452 Les Paul Specials were shipped in 1957. MORE HERE.
Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.
Get ready to rock! This kid's electric guitar set has everything little rockstars need to jam out in style and foster a growing passion for music. Whether a child is just learning the basics or has mastered every chord, this guitar is the perfect practice tool to lift them to the next level. Hook it up to the included 5-watt amplifier and let your kid experience music like never before!
Gibson makes authorized copies of its most successful guitar designs. They are less expensive than those bearing the Gibson name. A former competitor, Epiphone was purchased by Gibson and now makes competitively priced Gibson models, such as the Les Paul and SG, sold under the Epiphone brand,[69] while continuing to make Epiphone-specific models like the Sheraton, Sorrento, and Casino. In Japan, Orville by Gibson once made Gibson designs sold in that country.[70] Gibson has sought legal action against those that make and sell guitars Gibson believes are too similar to their own.

While a straight DI approach can work for clean sounds, simply plugging a guitar into an overdrive pedal and then routing the output of the pedal into your recording system will sound unnaturally thin and raspy because there are no speakers to take away the unwanted high end, but that hasn't stopped some people using it as a 'trademark' sound! For a more conventional sound, a speaker simulator is needed to filter out the unwanted higher harmonics. A passive speaker simulator, such as the original Palmer Junction box can be placed directly after an overdrive pedal or a regular guitar amp preamp output, but it will need to be recorded using a mic input rather than a line input (passive filtering always results in a reduction in level). Active equivalents (usually battery or phantom powered) are also available, which may offer a greater range of tonalities.


The materials and the methods of classical guitar construction may vary, but the typical shape is either modern classical guitar or that historic classical guitar similar to the early romantic guitars of France and Italy. Classical guitar strings once made of gut are now made of such polymers as nylon, with fine wire wound about the acoustically lower (bass side) strings.
The rotary speaker effect is based on an actual rotating speaker system invented by Donald Leslie called the Leslie speaker. It was often paired with a Hammond organ, but in the 60’s guitar players also began using it for the unique tone and effect it gave the guitar. The original Leslie speaker cabinet used a two speaker system with a rotating horn and bass woofer drum. This created a cool, swirling effect where the music seemed to move around the room. Obviously, guitar pedals can only simulate this rotatary effect, which can be enhanced with a stereo amp setup. Of course you could use an actual Leslie speaker (or one of the newer competitors), but costs are high and it requires lugging around an extra speaker cabinet.
Modulation stompboxes like our BF-3 Flanger should be after the tone-producing effects like distortion, wah, etc. so they can process and modify the tone built by the pedals before it. If you put it before the distortion, then you are distorting the sound of the flanger. Maybe that’s what you’re after, but in general, put the BF-3 and other modulation effects after the tone-shaping (and noise–producing) pedals. And then there are the ambience effects: delay and reverb. As we discussed earlier, reverb—and sometimes delay, depending on the space—is the last thing that happens before the sound reaches your ears in a physical space, so these go last. Delaying reverb can sound muddy, so it’s usually better to have the reverb after the delay.
Here we have a very nice example of the Yamaha Red Label fg230-12... This example is in very good - excellent original condition. The woods used on this guitar are of a very high grade ... spruce top, Honduran Mahogany back, sides and neck please see pics for the details but very nicely grained woods!... workmanship is impeccable... the guitar plays like a real with very good action and the intonation is set dead on... The neck is solid Mahogany and is slightly beefy..I love the feel of this guitar and when you hear is you will be in 12 string heaven... no cracks or repairs ... the condition is vintage used its about 40+ years old you know ...with several minimal scratches but still overall a very beautiful vintage guitar. The wood has aged and mellowed with time to yield a wonderful rich tone only a 30+ year old quality instrument can offer. This one has that quaity rich sound along with the playability with the right aging now and with its beauty ...its a no brainier... Also available is a cool $100 vintage hard shell case see pics Thanks for your interest!.

You should try the compressor after the overdrive stage. Providing an already compressed signal to a drive/distortion pedal doesn’t allow the full dynamic range of the pedal to be applied to the raw guitar signal, losing something of the capability or unique nature of these pedals. You can also lose the touch sensitivity of the drive pedal when the input signal has its louds softened and it’s quites upped. Placing the compressor after drive pedals allows the full driven tone to then be leveled dynamically with the compressor. Note that may drive and distortion pedals will include their own natural compression so addition of compressor after the drive pedals allows for fine tuning of the overall compression. It’s worth experimenting with.


In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.
A good custom shop will have insight based on their experience that will help make the project better. That’s part of being custom — making concepts a reality. But there is more to running a custom shop than simply having the ability and experience to create someone’s dream. Figuring out what that is requires a little digging. The concept is buried in first understanding the other meanings of the word custom. Although “made-to-order” is a correct characterization where you can personalized the headtsock with your name or initials and you can CUSTOMIZE YOUR GUITAR: Mahogany, Alder, Maple, Bass Wood, Right/Left handed guitar, Body colour, Neck profile, No dots on fretboard and Fret size.Our Custom Shop Guitars referred to in this site as drawing "inspiration" from the major guitar brands and any reference to custom shop brand names or "Inspired by" are made strictly for comparison purposes only.
Im sure are techs at these stores that aren't bad AT ALL, but when you don't know who they are, I wouldn't trust them with a truss rod while you're not there standing over trheir shoulder watching them. I may just be paranoid, but hey, better safe than sorry is the way I look at it. I've done my own setups. And I plan to keep doing it until the day comes when I order myself a custom bass that I worked my ass off for, then I'll be willing to spend $50 on a 'properly' done setup. I dunno
Yea, really depends on your area. At the local Guitar Center, the guy seems to know what hes doing. Overworked and underpaid if what iveheard about GC and Sam Ash techs is true though. Theres a local tech who got his site to be one of the top results and hes busy as well. Perfect work. And even though hes busy, hes fast too. Thats why his site is one of the top results though.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Edge III - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Devil's Shadow
Yes, a Martin guitar under $500. The Martin LX1E features a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It carries the Martin name, which  means high quality is expected. Being that it is closer to out $500 limit, you can expect this guitar to deliver on tone. This one is a direct competitor to the Baby Taylor. People that own both have said that they like the sound of the Martin better, describing it as bright and crisp. The tradeoff is the playability is not rated as high as the Taylor. See more pictures and reviews of the guitar here.

Polytone Mega Brute, Jazz guitar amplifier fully functional. Has loads of clean head room but also has 3 settings: Warm, Edge and drive.  I think they’re rated and 65watts, into 8ohm 8” speaker. Super light and portable, approx. 22lbs. Probably from the mid ‘80s production. Hi and low gain inputs, bright switch, effects loop. Spring reverb. Mint condition and everything works like brand new. Shipped to the lower 48 for $50.00. Local pick up would be great. Return if unhappy but ship in same packing and also pay return shipping. Thanks  
Why We Liked It - If you’re looking for an electric acoustic guitar that’s just great all round, and doesn’t have a large price tag, then this Yamaha has to come into consideration. It has all of the construction features you’d expect from a solid mid-range choice, with the addition of quality hardware, and nice touches like the scalloped x-braces. For those interested in Yamahas FG series, can always look at the alternative products, the yamaha FGX700SC.
Popularity also was a critical factor in our choices, although we generally passed over a few best-selling reissues or boutique clones in favor of the real deal. So even though the Bubba Bob Buttcrack Tube Overdrive may sound more soulful than an original Tube Screamer, if it’s little more than a copy with slightly upgraded components, it didn’t make the cut.
While Gibson are the creators of the original J2000 jumbo-sized acoustics, the company’s reasonably priced sister company Epiphone do a range of acoustics which are perfect for players looking to dip their toes in the water. The Epiphone EJ2000 is identical in dimensions and appearance to its more costly sibling, yet offers the perfect entry guitar for budding rhythm players.
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Some distortion effects provide an "overdrive" effect. Either by using a vacuum tube, or by using simulated tube modeling techniques, the top of the wave form is compressed, thus giving a smoother distorted signal than regular distortion effects. When an overdrive effect is used at a high setting, the sound's waveform can become clipped, which imparts a gritty or "dirty" tone, which sounds like a tube amplifier "driven" to its limit. Used in conjunction with an amplifier, especially a tube amplifier, driven to the point of mild tonal breakup, short of what would be generally considered distortion or overdrive, these pedals can produce extremely thick distortion sounds much like those used by Carlos Santana or Eddie Van Halen. Today there is a huge variety of overdrive pedals, and some of them are:

When Jimi Hendrix came on the scene in the late 1960s, he was like nothing anyone had ever seen before. His ability to use volume, feedback, wah pedals, and other sonic devices to their maximum effect was awe-inspiring. Eric ‘God’ Clapton saw Hendrix for the first time and thought he would be the end to his career. There may be more technically impressive guitar players, but it’s hard to find anyone who played with more adventure or spirit than James Marshall Hendrix.

The guitar player who makes his guitar sound anything but a guitar. Helicopter rudders, disc scratching, and his use of the kill switch for staccato like guitar riffs has made him probably the most innovative guitar player of our time. He is a guitarist who can take feedback, and ground hum from his own body into coherent music. Be it Rage Against The Machine, or Audioslave you can always see Morello’s signature licks shining through.
This is a guitar that we’ve featured before as our top pick for those who are looking for an electric acoustic for less than $500, so there’s no surprise that it’s back as one of the very best prospects at any price at all. Epiphone might be Gibson’s more affordable brand, but that certainly doesn’t mean you aren’t getting very high quality when you choose the Dove Pro.

The first electric instrument amplifiers were not designed for use with electric guitars. The earliest examples were portable PA systems, which appeared in the early 1930s when the introduction of electrolytic capacitors and rectifier tubes allowed the production of economical built-in power supplies that could be plugged into wall sockets, instead of heavy multiple battery packs, since rechargeable batteries would not become lightweight until many decades later. While guitar amplifiers from the beginning were used to amplify acoustic guitar, electronic amplification of guitar was first widely popularized by the 1930s and 1940s craze for Hawaiian music, which extensively employed the amplified lap steel Hawaiian guitar.[2]


Some of the most impressive pieces of equipment come in small packages and in the shape of an item you would not expect to be as good as it is. The proof of this is the deceptively simple looking Mugig Portable Amplifier for Electric guitar, with 10W of power. This piece of equipment is on the big side of small, but is perfect in every single aspect of it, other than the size. The design is simple and understanded, the ease of transport is guaranteed, while the sound takes over the mind and heart of the musician and the crowd instantly. It is possibly the best electric guitar amp that I have gotten to mention on this list.

AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!
Jazz guitarists integrate the basic building blocks of scales and arpeggio patterns into balanced rhythmic and melodic phrases that make up a cohesive solo. Jazz guitarists often try to imbue their melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by horn players such as saxophone players. As well, a jazz guitarists' solo improvisations have to have a rhythmic drive and "timefeel" that creates a sense of "swing" and "groove." The most experienced jazz guitarists learn to play with different "timefeels" such as playing "ahead of the beat" or "behind the beat," to create or release tension.
Overdrive originally resulted from the natural breakup that occurred when a tube amp received an overly hot signal from a guitar. This pushed the tubes to deliver a subtle, warm breakup. Generally overdrive is a more subdued, natural form of distortion. While you don’t have to use an overdrive effect with a tube amp to get a great sound, the combination of the two can produce a rich, pleasing tone that many guitarists prefer. The first overdrive effects were designed to push more signal into a tube amp, giving it the very throaty, mid-range tone associated with Stevie Ray Vaughan. With that in mind, many of today's pedal makers have created circuitry to add that desired tone when used with a solid state amps as well. Since overdrive is a signal boost, adjustments from your volume knob will create a variety of different sounds.
i play a squire jazz bass, it has always sounded good and played very good. wanted to " jazz it up" a bit so i was searching for new pickups and control pots and stumbled on your site.. first thing i thought was oh wow, how freaking cool is that.. after ALOT of searching, i purchased the obsidian wire control pots for a jazz bass as well as the control plate since mine looked pretty worn.. i also got the v-mod pickups from fender. install was just as smooth as advertised, especially since i had never even cracked open a bass before, ever.. done in less than 30 minutes ( as far as the wiring ) the pickguard had to be removed and cut to fit, and the old knobs didn't fit ( totally expected ) it is now done and i cannot believe the difference in tone and clarity.... all i can say is your products are innovative and really much more than i expected... thank you..." - Bob Vintage Jazz Bass® Wiring
One of the greatest things about being a touring musician is having the opportunity to see, hear and play with some of the greatest guitarists on the planet. Over the course of my career, I’ve performed with legendary guitarists like Ted Nugent, Steve Cropper, and Glen Campbell, to drop just a few names. Playing lead for a headline act like Toby Keith also allows me to watch fantastic guitarists like Keith Urban and Brad Paisley take the stage before me.
The guitar is also available in various packages with an amp and other accessories, such as this one that includes a Fender Frontman 10G amp, a cable, a strap, picks, and a tuner. Note, though, that Fender offers a truly awesome little amp with built-in effects, the Champion 20, for just a bit more. We strongly recommend spending a little extra and getting a Champion 20, which will give almost any guitarist practically any sound they can imagine with no need for effects pedals. Read more about the Champion 20 in our review of the best electric guitar amp for beginners.

Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.


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For beginners looking to practice their first notes, chords and songs, nothing more than a couple of watts is needed – in fact, most dedicated practice amps won’t offer much more than 10 watts. If you are planning on jamming with a full band or starting to gig in small venues (think bars, clubs and small halls), then anything from 15 to 50 watts will suffice. Bigger gigs, including auditoriums and outdoor festivals, will demand upwards of 100 watts.

John Mayer: features a select alder body, a thick C-shape maple neck with African rosewood fingerboard and 21 Jim Dunlop 6105 narrow-jumbo frets, American Vintage hardware and a trio of “Big Dipper” single-coils with a special “Scooped” midrange voicing and 5-way pickup switching. Available in a variety of finishes, including black with 3-ply mint green pickguard and gold hardware, 3-tone sunburst and olympic white with brown shell pickguard and as a limited-edition version with a cypress mica finish, white vintage amp knobs and a 3-ply parchment pickguard. In 2010, Fender also released a limited 500 run of John’s personal BLACK1 strat.
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
It was a great guitar to learn on, but you are ready for a serious gigging guitar.  Okay, if she was your FIRST love then don't dell her, keep her around for inspiration (plus she ain't worth any money anyway).  Do NOT upgrade her.  Once you start, there will be no end.  Sure great pickups will make her sound great, but you'll also want to replace ALL the electronics, and the tuners, and the bridge, and... well, you get the idea.

Australian singer Frank Ifield also owned and used a Maton guitar, which he later had fitted with a custom-made scratch plate, made in the shape of a map of Australia. Frank gave this instrument to his guitarist Ray Brett when he returned to Australia, and it has been featured on an episode of the BBC programmeAntiques Roadshow. Although these guitars are now normally worth around UK£2,000, expert Bunny Campione valued Ifield’s guitar at between UK£10,000 and UK£15,000, because Ifield had used it in songs featured in a compilation album alongside The Beatles‘ first two singles.[2]
Sure, your pickups pick up the sound, and your amp amplifies it, but even before they get to handle it, your precious tone has already been formed by the interaction of string and wood. Pluck a string, and you set into motion a transference of vibrational energy from the strings into the wood of the body and neck (via different coupling elements such as bridge saddles, nut, and frets). The spectrum of sounds kicked out by this acoustic interaction is the biggest determining factor at the heart of the sound that eventually reaches the listener’s ear, however you delay, spin, or distort it along the way. Let’s look at the characteristic voices of a few tone woods, and see how they contribute to our guitar’s sound.
There have always been slight variations in the color of the cream plastic parts used on Gibson and other guitars. It's not uncommon to see brand new and vintage guitars with bindings, pickup rings, toggle switch rings and pickguards that don't perfectly match in color. We do our best to match all our cream products, but there's no absolute control from batch to batch, or from supplier to supplier.
An effects unit is also called an "effect box", "effects device", "effects processor" or simply "effects". In audio engineer parlance, a signal without effects is "dry" and an effect-processed signal is "wet". The abbreviation "F/X" or "FX" is sometimes used. A pedal-style unit may be called a "stomp box", "stompbox", "effects pedal" or "pedal". A musician bringing many pedals to a live show or recording session often mounts the pedals on a guitar pedalboard, to reduce set-up and tear-down time and, for pedalboards with lids, protect the pedals during transportation. When a musician has multiple effects in a rack mounted road case, this case may be called an "effects rack" or "rig". When rackmounted effects are mounted in a roadcase, this also speeds up a musician's set-up and tear-down time, because all of the effects can be connected together inside the rack case and all of the units can be plugged into a powerbar.

Not many classical guitar concertos were written through the guitar history. Nevertheless, some guitar concertos are nowadays wide known and popular, especially Joaquín Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez (with the famous theme from 2nd movement) and Fantasía para un gentilhombre. Composers, who also wrote famous guitar concertos are: Antonio Vivaldi (originally for mandolin or lute), Mauro Giuliani, Heitor Villa-Lobos, Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Manuel Ponce, Leo Brouwer, Lennox Berkeley... Nowadays, more and more contemporary composers decide to write a guitar concerto.
Like effects pedals, multi-effects processors are used to modify and alter the clean signal of your guitar to produce a large variety of effects (reverb, wah-wah, overdrive, distortion, chorus, etc). Unlike a simple pedal that gives you one or two options for modifying tone, a multi-effects processor has a full load of effects and sounds that allow you to play music with a rainbow-colored tonal palette. There are processors for modifying guitar, bass, and even units for vocalists with pitch-correction tools and harmonizer effects.
In ’71, Univox introduced what are arguably their coolest-looking amplifiers, the B Group, covered in nifty two-tone blue vinyl. Remember, this was the tail end of the heyday of Kustom, with its colored tuck-and-roll amps, and the two-tone blue with a red-and-white oval logo was boss. The lettering was the same uppercase blocks as on the outline logo. These new Univox amps were hybrids, with solidstate power supplies and lots of tubes – lots! The Univox B Group had two combo and two piggyback guitar amps, two piggyback bass amps and a piggyback PA. It is not known how these were constructed, but because previous amps had Japanese chassis put into Westbury-made cabinets, these were probably built that way also.
I bought my first guitar several years ago and I’ve been happy with the purchase. But recently I’ve thought about buying a used guitar if I happen to find a good guitar at a bargain at a music store or pawn shop. I like the advice you gave for buying a used guitar: that I should stick with well-known brands and inspect the fret boards, neck, and other parts for needed repair. I’ll keep these tips in mind the next time I visit a guitar shop.
I'm going to assume that if you're reading this, you've probably been to two dozen guitar sites, all with varying, if not conflicting information on the correct way to do a setup. I've been there too, I've watched guys on youtube filing down frets with a dremel tool. Now it didn't look right to me, but maybe it works for him. The reality is there is more than one way to do something, and that's OK. If the end result is a great sounding instrument, it doesn't matter how you got there. So I'm going to show you my way of how to get to a great sounding electric guitar. And if you should choose to do something differently, and it works, great!!. Part of having some fun in life is experimenting, I encourage it.

Taylor is other remarkable guitar brand which manufactures good looking guitar with easy instruction to play. And people can easily but it medium price budget. Just try out this brand and test once and you will get to know its specifications well. This has been placed on the eight positions due to its some unique characteristics including clear sound.
The reverb driver amp consists of a phase inverting push-pull circuit made from dual sections of a 5532 high quality audio op-amp. This provides a voltage swing of approximate twice the supply voltage to the reverb impedance matching transformer, allowing higher power transfer. The 100 ohm resistor is critical for insuring a clean drive signal, without it, the op-amps can saturate when driving the transformer, producing unwanted distortion.
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I built me my own custom guitar in high school shop class and it was simple i made an Ibanez RG styled body and a Randy Rhodes/Alexi Laiho styled body just so i can swap the 2 when ever i want and i can say the cons are waaaaaaay over exaggerated cause it was VERY cheap to do it i spent a total of $350 to do it and thats even with the the EMG 81's i have in them. I mean yes its only a 1 pickup guitar on each but its how i want the wood was only $60 for an Ash body (thats for both of them not each) and i have a hook up to get free mahogany that i used on the neck for it and mine noooo one could tell the difference between an actual Ibanez RG or ESP Alexi Laiho's signature guitars the only thing that they were able to know it was custom was the head stock being my signature and the parts that were on it and color option i used is NOT used by ether of them but the time is spot on it took 3 months for me to do them but this was of course all during the course of 45 mins for 3 months so it would of been much faster without it being in school but then again i also sort of cheated with mine cause i have been doing carpentry work since i was 8 so i already knew how to do everything professionally
Finally moving over to the flipside, there is a certain issue with the amplifier which I’m not quite able to understand. Don’t get me wrong, it is a very good 10 Amp Amplifier from Hollinger, but somehow you get this buzzing noise when you set it in full volume. At a lower volume however, it sounds just fine. Even the distortion button works well, and helps you work up some pretty cool effects. All other accessories work fine, and aid your growth as a fresh learner.
Last week we talked about choosing the right “Guitar Effects to Expand Your Sound” with sub-topics of “Guitar Effects Used By Your Favorite Pro Guitarists” and “Guitar Effects To Use For Each Music Genre”. Now that you’ve hopefully acquired some pedals of your own, there is another important topic that greatly influences the outcome of your tone – your pedalboard order.

This aim of this site is to provide high quality SoundFonts (virtual musical instruments in sf2 format) that can be played using a midi keyboard connected to a computer, tablet or smart phone. Emphasis has been placed on real or acoustic instruments particularly piano and other favourites for keyboard players (pads, strings, electric pianos, organs and orchestral) but some SoundFonts here also include high quality guitars, some synths and ethnic instruments. There is also a nice GM set for playing general midi files. The SoundFont format sf2 is widely supported by lots of programs/apps and devices.

Some people like to play the two notes on 5th and 4th strings with a small barre with the 3rd finger. It's O.K. to do that, but I think using two fingers gives you a better finger position on the notes; you'll get a better sound that way, it makes it easier to change chords most of the time and easier to get all the thin strings muted. I strongly advise to learn it this way, and then if you still prefer to use the little barre you have the option of choosing whichever one works best in any situation!
I can't believe this! Blackstar are designed and built by retired Marshall professionals and they have every last bit of knowledge on tube amps, heads, and combos. I own a Blackstar HT-1R, it is 1w but it feels like 100w just the way the Blackstar team have combined their ideas and structures and balanced it out with tubes. And line 6 is further up the list? You are mistaken bro. Another thing. These are bloody expensive and aren't very well known but Two Rock make probably the GREATEST amps ever made and I would kill to fire one up!
Optocoupling Compressor using a LED and a LDR. Similar to Colorsound Supa Sustain or DOD 280. As others have mentioned, instructions are a single photocopied sheet showing component layout. There's no mention that you'll need a piece of heat shrink to fab up your optocoupler. If you have some experience you can figure it out. Wire was not supplied.
This is a wide range of electric guitar series that have a stylish body and deliver high-quality sound. Cort guitars are fabricated by South Korean manufactures and have been on the market since 1973. Those who are keen on the appearance of the guitar can opt for this brand of electric guitar. This is an electric guitar that is available at an affordable price range between 10,000 to 40,000 INR.

A phaser pedal is similar to a chorus as it thickens up your sound but also adds a sweeping effect – almost as if the speaker within the amplifier is spinning around or moving up and down. If you pretend the speaker is moving away from you and moving closer and back again – you’ll get an idea as to how it sounds. You can change the length of the effect and how quickly the movements are via the pedal.

Semi-hollow body electric guitars are basically a middle ground between a solid body electric and a fully hollow body electric guitar. Jazz, country, and rock guitarists alike may gravitate towards semi-hollow body electric guitars for several reasons. One of the main reasons is that semi-hollow body guitars still produce that rich, resonant sound of a hollow instrument, but they typically have a solid or sometimes chambered center block in between the top and back. This design helps fight off that unwanted body-resonant feedback we spoke about before while even adding some extra sustain. Gibson offers a wide selection of semi-hollow body electric guitars, which include the iconic Gibson ES-335. Guitar brands such as Gretsch and Ibanez are also widely recognized for their semi-hollow body electric guitars.

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