Another +1 for shreddage. I have the PRS version and was trying it out through BIAS and TH3 the other day. Had an absolute ball, and was able to achieve somewhat realistic results with very little effort. I also love pretty much everything I have from Amplesound, though results through effects engines can be hit and miss. Their Taylor acoustic is lovely if that's what you're looking for. I've not found a really fantastic strum engine/option yet but then I will fully admit I haven't put the time into mastering what I already have in that department. I have heard demos using the guitar VIs that I have that do sound convincing so it is possible though maybe not easy.
The Hal Leonard Bagpipe Method is designed for anyone just learning to play the Great Highland bagpipes. This comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide serves as an introduction to the bagpipe chanter. The accompanying DVD includes video lessons with demonstrations of all the examples in the book! Lessons include: the practice chanter, the Great Highland Bagpipe scale, bagpipe notation, proper technique, grace-noting, embellishments, playing and practice tips, traditional tunes, buying a bagpipe, and much more!.

There are different types of delay – digital, analogue and tape. Analogue and tape delays behave similarly. As each echo repeats, the sounds slightly distort which can be pleasing particularly for electric guitar. If you want cleaner repeats, go digital. Tip; if you are using it for acoustic, try the pedal set on a high number of repeats before you buy and check the sound quality. Some cheaper digital units can sound ‘grainy’ after a few repeats with an acoustic.
American guitar manufacture was at its peak in the 1960s, with numerous highly-respected guitar companies making instruments at all levels; from the likes of Kay, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Fender and Gibson. But Harmony was one of the very biggest producers, at one point the biggest, selling guitars branded both as Harmony, and rebadged for numerous other distributors. In fact, in the mid/late 1960s, Harmony was said to produce more guitars than all other American guitar manufacturers combined. Most were entry or intermediate level instruments though, and although examples of most models are easy to find, examples in really good condition are rare.
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I have owned a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier for 5 years now and couldn't be happier! Granted, the amp took a long time to dial in my perfect tone, but it was a good way to familiarize yourself with the amp. If you want cleans, crunch, distortion, and a wall of gain that is big enough to destory small islands than this is the perfect amp. Not to mention, the customer service is out of this world! About a month after purchasing the amp Mesa Boogie called to make sure everything was okay and I was enjoying the amp. They also ask you to take a questionnaire on how the sales person performed. Great company, Best amps.
Bottom Line: The Zoom G3X is everything a guitar multi-effects pedal should be, and then some. As strange as it sounds, as we researched what owners of this pedal are saying about it, it was difficult to find any outright negative comments (any negative feedback tends to be centered around the notion that digital multi-fx don’t sound as good as individual pedals, which is a hotly debated topic). You have to consider how amazingly low the G3X price tag is versus how many features it packs in. It’s not the best in the world at any one thing - the looper isn’t as good as a TC Electronic Ditto, and the delays might not match up to a Strymon - but it does a lot of things quite well, and the user interface is such a pleasure to use. The Zoom G3X will be your best friend if:
Overdrive, and its noisier cousin distortion, are effects used to ‘push’ your guitar’s signal before it reachers your amplifier. Most amplifiers have some degree of drive capability built into them so you’re most likely familiar with what they sound like. Overdrive is what pushes a clean sound to break up slightly, giving it a warmer, thicker sound. This is perfect for blues and rock playing. It also serves to add more sustain to your playing, meaning notes ring out for longer. In addition to giving a noticeable boost to your volume. Distortion is effectively a more extreme version of overdrive, in that it takes the signal you’re feeding it and makes it all degrees of nasty. You’ll typically hear distortion used in heavier guitar styles like metal and punk. Here, a liberal dollop of dirt is required to give the sound its thicker characteristic.
Whether you are a guitarist looking for new tones, or a sound designer looking for new ways to mangle your audio, virtual guitar amps and effects are a great way to achieve new sounds and enhance your productions. There are many great guitar amp and pedal effects plug-ins available on the market today to purchase, but there are also numerous effects that are available for free. In this article I'll offer up some professional guitar effect plug-ins from around the internet that you can use on your next project, completely for free.
Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.
I am a beginner player and I am a bit disappointed in both Fender and Gibson. Both entry level guitars suck, for beginners like me. Why not they make the fret board neck nut a little more wider so that its easier for learning. In the last 5 years playing both Fender Starcasters and Gibson Maestro, I cann’t play chords properly. I am still looking for entry level guitar for my chord practice without breaking my budget ($700).
Are you running it through a cab simulator? That or proper eqing. Turn up the mids and drop a high pass filter on that sucker. If you're finding it still lacking check out the KeFir cab simulator and then just use the preamp you have now. I've had wonderful results with that. If you're not liking your preamp try out The Anvil by Ignite amps. Best clean tone I've had out of freeware.
Second, just like removing the pickup selector, you will need to access the back electronics cavity or remove the pickguard. Refer to the pickup selector section for more details. Take note of what wires are soldered to what lugs before you remove the pot. If you are not familiar with electric guitar wiring, I suggest that you draw a picture of the selector and label the soldered wires. Once you know where everything has be wired, you can cut the wires close to the lugs and remove the old pot. Then you can bolt the new pot in place, solder the wires on the lugs, replace the cavity covers or pickguard, and replace the knob. For more information about how to solder wiring, see the soldering page.

EMG DG20 David Gilmour Wired Pickguard   New from$329.00In Stockor 8 payments of $41.13 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Seymour Duncan SH4 JB Humbucker Pickup   New from$79.00In Stockor 4 payments of $19.75 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson '57 Classic Humbucker Pickup   New from$164.99In Stockor 4 payments of $41.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING EMG JH Set Custom James Hetfield Signature Pickup Set   New from$249.00In Stockor 6 payments of $41.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Pickups
Maybe you'd rather check out the legendary "Marshall Sound" in all its glory? If so, flip the switch on the Marshall DSL40C 40W All-Tube 1x12 Guitar Combo Amp. This all-tube powerhouse is great for gigging guitarists, thanks in part to its fantastic projection and its Pentode/Triode switch that allows the performer to drop the power down from 40W to 20W on the fly for even more versatility. When only the best will do, nobody delivers like Marshall.
I've had a Sunburst pattern Ventura when I was a teenager.. it was a nice guitar and played well. recently i saw a really well made Oscar Schmidt gs-1 . not expensive at all. My main guitar for many years was a Gibson howard roberts "artist" dove style. wine red and mother of pearl inlay and gold plated. I eventually sold it to a lady in alaska that plays a lot of blue grass and pop. I got full money out of it. I had it 25 years, so it was vintage by now.
If you are an insurance agent, pawn store, a manufacturer or appraiser searching for used guitar prices and other musical equipment values, Used Price is for you. Our extensive database contains the value of thousands of pieces of used musical equipment. Whether you are looking for a Fender guitar value, a Gibson guitar value or a certain bass value or drum value, we have them for you all in one convenient location.
SOLD OUT! Takamine EF406 RARE Here we have a RARE and GORGEOUS 1999 limited Edition Takamine acoustic-electric guitar, model EF-406. This instrument is a PREMIUM example of a New York or also called a Parlor guitar and is a Hand Crafted in Japan model an amazing example of Japans high Quality workmanship & fit & finish and is truly just as good as it gets. As you can see from the pictures, it is simply gorgeous to look at. It has a classic slotted headstock with Top Quality gold open gears and gold tuners with Pearl buttons. The Top- Back & sides are all a High grade choice AAAA FLAMED KOA with natural Koa color (there is no stain)and none was needed to bring out the AWESOME grain patterns of this Rare Native Hawaiian Wood. The top sound hole apears to be bound or painted and inside looks same as out /all Takamine internet information leeds to say the tops on this model is solid however we can not guarantee this as fact. The electronics are a GRAPH-EX pre-amp system: peizo transducer, with "exciter," volume, bass, treble, and mid controls. It comes with a deluxe, plush hardh shell case, note: In he picture close up of the ack of the headstock you may notice a dull spot running threw the center over the made in Japan tag area this is just a spot of waxed area that was inadvertently missed and not rubbed out... it is fine this guitar is in Excellent used condition. .
Older 1800s Martins are a challange to date (since they don't have a serial number like 1898 and later Martins). A "New York" stamp does not immediately suggest that the Martin guitar is from the 1830s for example. To accurately date pre-1898 Martins you must be familiar design and ornamentation appointments and the changes that took place in each model throughout the 1800s. Most useful though is the stamp, but you can only use the stamp on the INSIDE of the body on it's center backstrip (visible through the soundhole) to date a guitar. And even then you can only date to a period (and not to an exact date). For example if it says on the center back strip, "C.F. Martin, New York", then the guitar is pre-1867. If it says, "C.F. Martin & Co., New York", it is between 1867 and 1897. Note 1860-1890s Martins have a date (year of manufacture) penciled on the underside of the top. Check with a mirror, looking just below the soundhole and between the braces.
In mid-’29, John Dopyera left the National company to start the Dobro Manufacturing Company along with his brothers Rudy and Ed, and Vic Smith. National String Instrument Corp. continued operating under Beauchamp, Barth et al. In 1930, the Dobro company name was changed to the Dobro Corporation, Ltd., with additional capital provided by Louis and Robert Dopyera. Dobro was, during this period, a competitor of National’s, although in this somewhat incestuous world, both got their resonator cones, plate covers and other parts, like tailpieces, from Adolph Rickenbacker.
Today we are going to show you some of the best effects pedals from this category, which you can get right now. We have chosen a variety of flavors as well as price ranges, thus making sure that anyone can have access to a good reverb no matter what. More importantly, we want to use this opportunity to familiarize you with reverb as a guitar effect.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22, Medium - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tone Pros - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Duncan Designed - String Instrument Finish: Vintage White, Vintage Gold Top, Black
Gibson dates back to the late 1800s, when Orville Gibson patented a mandolin design that was much more durable than other instruments at that time. He sold these instruments out of a one-room workshop in Kalamazoo, MI, until his death in 1918. The designs lived on, however, as the company hired designer Lloyd Lear to continue creating new instruments.
Best brand in price/quality relation. I have 4 guitars, an epiphone explorer goth made on korea, and Jackson KV2 made on usa and 2 ibanez. RG320PG P2 and a RGT6EX, both made on indonesia. The first one is the cheaper, but the sustaine, action a comfort is very nice for a bugget guitar. I've played bugget guitars of other brands, and ibanez is far superior. In fact, my RG320 P2 is nice as some others guitars that cost twice of it price. Mi RGT6EX is excellent, to me must worth $1000 USD but the real price is close $800 USD or less.
The Fender T Bucket is a great choice for beginner guitarists looking for a great sounding entry level acoustic. It is frequently the top choice for new guitarists looking for a an affordable acoustic guitar. Many owners site it’s ease of playability as one of its greatest attributes. It is available in 3 different color combinations: 3-Color Sunburst, Moonlight Burst, and Trans Cherry Burst. It is made of maple wood. It has a preamp installed, making it an acoustic electric. It is our top pick for the best acoustic electric under $500. It is a great choice for beginners.
The standard tuning, without the top E string attached. Alternative variants are easy from this tuning, but because several chords inherently omit the lowest string, it may leave some chords relatively thin or incomplete with the top string missing (the D chord, for instance, must be fretted 5-4-3-2-3 to include F#, the tone a major third above D).
The tone selector on an electric guitar controls the capacitor, which basically filters out high frequencies. The same way a high-cut filter (or low-pass-filter if you prefer) works on a standard equalizer. By dialing down the tone, you remove brightness and treble. The pickup selector does just what it's called.. Selecting which pickups being used to capture the vibration of the strings, and translates the energy into electric current, though the configuration and number of "presets" can vary from guitar to guitar, depending on how many pickups it has etc. If you're a handyman you can even configure this yourself.
Schecter's Diamond Plus passive humbuckers are pretty hot for what is essentially an affordable set. Their range is wide and they handle distortion rather well. This is largely what makes this such a versatile option. Schecter went with a standard Tune-o-Matic bridge for this build, making it a simple but reliable configuration, especially for those more interested in playing than tinkering.
I took the Gearank scores we have calculated for individual guitars for each brand and combined them using a weighted average to produce a rating for each brand. I can best explain this by saying if a hypothetical brand had 2 models and one of them had 99 rating sources and the other one only had a single rating source then the first model's ratings would contribute 99% of the final rating for the brand. An interesting statistic; we processed more than 17,000 sources for these calculations.
Almost all bass amplifiers are designed for use with an electric bass, which has magnetic pickups. When a double bass player is plugging their instrument into a typical bass amp, the signal usually comes from a piezoelectric pickup mounted on the bridge or beneath the feet of the bridge. The direct signal from a piezoelectric pickup does not usually sound good when it is plugged into a standard electric bass amp. Many upright bass players who use piezoelectric pickups use a preamplifier or preamp-equipped DI box before the signal is sent to the bass amp. The preamplifier helps to ensure that the impedance of the pickup signal matches the impedance of the amplifier, which improves the tone. Some preamplifiers also have equalizers which can be used to modify the tone.
If you are a beginner, you may have heard of electro-acoustic models. In the future you may want to consider one of these, as they will allow you to plug into an amplifier and project your sound across a room, concert hall or stadium (well, you have to dream big!). However, for now it’s wise to stick with a solely acoustic model, which will be cheaper and less complicated to use.
Now, to answer your question I would have to point out a series of popular brands and what they are popular for. After that, you make a decision on which one is best for you. You might see where I’m going with this. There is no single best guitar brand the same way there is no single best car brand. But we do have the Ferraris and Lamborghinis, as well as the Toyotas and Nissans of the guitar world!
Ritchie Blackmore: a variety of versions, each with a 22-fret neck, CBS large headstock with 1970s-style decals and two Gold Fender Lace Sensors; some variants have the neck set into the body rather than bolted on and a Roland GK2A synth pickup. Reintroduced in 2009 with a 21-fret maple neck, graduated scalloped rosewood fingerboard, Bullet truss rod nut with 3-bolt neck plate and Micro-Tilt neck adjustment, flush-mounted Jim Dunlop locking strap buttons and two Seymour Duncan Quarter Pound Flat single-coil pickups (the middle pickup is omitted, but the pickup hole for the middle pickup is still present).[15]
Also shown in ’60s Bizarre Guitars, but not in the Teisco book photo, is a ca. 1954 Hawaiian Teisco EG-R which was sort of shaped like a Gibson and which had the same pickup as the J-1, with more elaborate symmetrical metal rocket shapes on the sides, housing the volume and tone controls. A chrome dome sat in front of the pickup between it and the dot-inlaid fingerboard. The head was stubby and rectangular. This was very “Moderne” looking, very Buck Rodgers.
A tremolo effect simply alters the volume of a signal at a preset interval, within a preset range. Some amps have this effect built in, and in some cases it’s called vibrato (a misnomer that caught on long ago and has stuck around to this day). Tremolo sounds much like hitting a note and then turning your volume knob up and down rapidly. Most tremolo effects have two controls: speed and depth. Adjusting speed changes how rapidly your volume fluctuates. Adjusting the depth controls the range of volume from loud to soft as the tremolo fluctuates.
The obvious first step is too loosen the truss rod, however, after inspection I learn the truss rod is already completely loose. In order to straighten the neck we opt for a heavier gauge string which places more tension on the neck, pulling it straight. The heavier gauge is necessary to render the neck flat, without it string buzz is overwhelming.
Little data is to be had on Teiscos from the late ’50s, but it’s probably safe to assume the line continued on roughly as before. In 1958 the EP-61 joined the line. This was obviously not numbered for the year of introduction! It’s not known what this guitar was, but shortly thereafter the high-number EPs were fancy full-bodied archtops, so that may have been it.
So, I've done what any self-respecting woman with a rather obsessive personality could do and trawled YouTube for all the best videos of Swift performing stripped down versions of her songs where it's just her singing against a minimal melody. I'm sure you'll agree that as much fun as queen of the squad, awkward dancing hero era Swift is, that these videos are all the proof you need that she doesn't need dance moves or supermodel friends on stage in order to rule.
And just a quick note: I do not buy or sell guitars. I have no idea what any given guitar from this period would sell for. I don't know if some of the listed guitars are indeed valuable. My sole purpose is to help people looking specifically for information on the maker of their MIJ guitar. So please...don't ask me what your guitar is worth. To me, they're all priceless.
Brand new in ’64 was Teisco’s first double-cutaway, the Model EP-9, a small-bodied thinline hollowbody archtop. The EP-9 had a pair of pickups, mainly the oval kind with center poles. This had the old center-humped three-and-three head (no open-book dip), and the rectangular edge inlays. Controls were placed on the lower treble bout on a triangular plastic plate, with one volume and one tone, and two on/off rocker switches.
Popularity also was a critical factor in our choices, although we generally passed over a few best-selling reissues or boutique clones in favor of the real deal. So even though the Bubba Bob Buttcrack Tube Overdrive may sound more soulful than an original Tube Screamer, if it’s little more than a copy with slightly upgraded components, it didn’t make the cut.
If you’re new to the world of guitar pedals, it can be a little daunting if you’re thinking to yourself “which guitar effects pedals do I need?”. Maybe you’ve bought your son or daughter a new guitar for Christmas or their birthday, or you’ve decided to really get serious when it comes to changing your sound up and you want to know where to start, what guitar effects pedals do and what sounds different guitar pedals make. Either way, we’re here to help with our handy guide to guitar effects pedals, complete with sound examples.
Although most acoustic guitars have steel strings, classical and flamenco guitars use nylon strings. Nylon strings produce a mellower, softer sound. It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. Nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
Just for fun, try taking this inverted approach to setting string height: instead of getting them as low as you can without inducing serious buzzing, set your strings as high as you can have them and still be able to play with some reasonable facility. Doing this correctly might also require adjusting string intonation at the bridge saddles, because their angle and distance across their speaking length is now changing slightly, too, but for now just try it as is, in case you choose to return your action to point one. (Note that raising string height at the bridge might need to be coordinated with a tweak of neck relief at the truss rod, although I will leave that to your own best judgment as there is plenty of debated between the flat-neck/slight-relief crowds, and this determination will depend upon your own preferences.)
The Teisco TG-54 was a two-pickup Les Paul, named for the year it was designed, 1954, not long after the original! It had a large white plastic covered pickup at the neck, set into the pickguard, and a slanted metal-covered pickup set into a metal tailpiece assembly, sort of like a Telecaster. Again, strings passed through the tail assembly and the body. Similar to the J-1, the volume and tone controls (same knobs) sat on a small rectangular plate, this time metal like a Tele, with an added chicken-beak three-way rotary selector switch.
I've got a vox white shadow too though its a crimson/red colour with 2 chrome plated humbuckers, it has one volume pot, two tone pots, 1 toggle switch aswell as 2 further switches to change between pick-ups. It has stamped on the back neck plate "made in japan" I can't seem to locate the serial number though. Would love to know more about this guitar.
In ’41, the old Avalon Hawaiian was renamed in the No. 88 Supro Clipper Hawaiian Electric Guitar. This instrument would become a mainstay of the Supro line for many to come, and marked the debut of pearloid plastic coverings for Supro guitars. This was very similar in shape to the Baton. The body was still roughly rectangular, but now with a curved lower edge. The shoulders now had two symmetrical scalloped “cutaways.” The head had a curve with a slight peak; despite the Regal look, these were made by National Dobro. The fingerboard was genuine rosewood with dot inlays. This was covered in “sparkling brown plastic,” i.e. pearloid. The pickup was the new exposed-pole unit with the handrest, contained in a large square metal plate complete with tail slots for fixing the strings, otherwise similar to the plate on the Baton. One volume and one tone control knob sat on either side of the strings. The back was done up in non-slip grey suede. It could be had with a curly, plush-lined, grey shark Servitex case. In April of ’42, the Clipper cost $54.50.

With over 8 decades of development, the electric guitar and music from guitars is getting progressively more sophisticated. Nowadays there are thousands of models available, from a number of manufacturers; electric guitars come in all kinds of shapes and sizes – some reminiscent of the regular acoustic guitar, and some drastically different from the traditional instrument. Regardless, there's a number of features which are invariably present in practically every electric guitars: the headstock, neck, body and strings. The headstock includes the machine heads, truss rod (may not be used in all models), string guide and nut; this section is used for tuning and holding/adjusting the strings. The neck serves the function of supporting the strings, and it's comprised of a fretboard, the inlay fret markers, the actual frets and a neck joint. The body of the guitar is comprised of several mechanisms including the pickups (neck and bridge), saddles, tuners, pickup switch, control knobs (tone and volume), output connector and strap buttons – sometimes others, in more sophisticated models. Finally, the strings are usual divided in brass and treble variants.
Rickenbacker manufactures three distinct pickups for their current standard models: Hi-gain, Vintage Single Coil Toaster Top, and Humbucking. All three pickup designs share the same footprint, allowing them to retrofit into most current or vintage models. The tone varies from one style to the next, partially because of the types of magnets used[13] but also due to the amount of wire wound around the pickup’s bobbin.
Some guitarists consider the notion of modifying an electric guitar from its stock configuration distasteful, while others consider it mandatory. As a custom builder with a decidedly vintage background, I fall somewhere in between. Generally, I’m most in favor of maximizing an instrument’s usability without jeopardizing the ability to return it to original condition.
the product took a while to arrive which i was ok with they let u know ahead of time….however the only instructions is a poorly photocopied over view of the board and a few details of other items…nowhere is the wiring schematic… they give you a foot long one color wire not the 3 color connected wire they show here on amazon… kinda bummed on unfinished instructions…. disappointed with the single color wire i mean the foot switch has 9 openings where are the instructions for that? actually while writing this review i down graded it to a 1 star… i was getting more upset with the lack of instructions….
If you want to invest in a guitar that replicates the famous ’70 guitars, look no further than the model offered by Fender Vintage. This product was designed to feature a basswood body that is a replica of the famous workhorse Fender guitars. Moreover, the device has a “C” shape neck that was constructed from maple, and that is said to be quite resistant.
By ’71, the Univox had expanded considerably with new copy guitars. Still around from earlier were the Hi Flyer Mosrite copy, the ‘Lectra violin bass, and the Mother or Rhythm and Blues Les Paul copy. Joining them were the Badazz guitar and bass, the Effie thinline, another Coily thinline guitar and bass, and the Naked and Precisely basses. Univox acoustics are also first sighted (as far as we know) in ’71.
With so many features, it can be tempting to just dismiss it as a low quality jack-of-all-trades unit, but even experts are convinced of its versatility and sound quality. Guitar World concludes: "Costing less than most single-effect stomp boxes, the G1Xon is an incredible bargain that provides versatile multi-effect processing power and impressive performance and practice capabilities."
Let’s kick things off with one of Schecter’s top tier models. Blackjack Slim Line C-1 FR is by far one of their more refined guitars. It’s slim, lightweight, and brings the kind of thunder that will give you goosebumps. With a set of premium Seymour Duncans, we expected nothing less. My brief encounter with this axe was one of the most enjoyable playing sessions I’ve ever had, and I’ve played many, many guitars.
A comparable alternative at a fraction of the price to the Axe-Fx (which also made the list), the Line 6 Pod HD Pro offers a ton of amp models and effects within it’s 2U rack interface. With over 100+ premium effects, 16 different cabinet models, and even eight microphone models, the Pod HD Pro gives you complete control over every aspect of your tone. All of this is complimented by an intricate display that lets you know exactly what your virtual signal path is. Add the ability to use a mic, bass, or your Line 6 Variax guitar for recording or live scenarios, and you’ve got the best of every realm of music-making at your fingertips. Oh, and to answer the most important question: Does it djent? Yes.
The enormous world of electric guitars can seem daunting to navigate. While there is no best or worst guitar, there are guitars that have been ingrained into our collective headspace. There are also guitars that have pushed boundaries and become staples of the modern musical landscape. Putting aside the latest in guitar tech or rare vintage gems, let’s take a look at models that have time and time again satisfied and inspired players of all tastes and from all walks of life. Here are five of the most popular electric guitars in the world.
The Pacifica family of guitars was launched years ago to address this market in particular. They’re excellent guitars for the working man and student alike. After a break-in period, these machines should provide stable, frustration-free operation for many years, with enough tone and versatility to play any style. The video below even demonstrates how, with a solid amp, you might not even know it was inexpensive.
For the most part, you might want to get a preamp that has at least some type of EQ on it. Tone shaping on an acoustic electric guitar can really give you an edge or at least a semblance of control before the sound guy butchers it during your gig, although you can do this with an effects pedal. Even though this is something that takes the time to learn, it's better to have the option readily available when you decide to step up to that level.
Sorry Joe but I don’t really any value of this arrangement. It could work only in super bright guitars that would always need some treble bleed. It’s much better to change pot values for guitars like that, go from 500K to 250K etc. When changing pots doesn’t cut it it’s better to get rid of the pickups/guitar than to have a bleed circuit on all the time, some of the magic is always lost.

Collectors grade 1964 Harmony H-59 Rocket near mint condition. These guitars are so hard to find in this excellent condition. This one is a 9 out of 10. Great action, straight neck, Gold Foil Pickups, and that rocket look too. She has a few very small edge nicks on rear of headstock, a few slight tiny cracks on center of back in grain, and one small edge ding. Also some very slight age checking but this guitar looks great! All are nothing to be alarmed about and not obvious when looking at guitar. This is the finest example of an H-59 we ever came across. Guitar is completely original with great color and grain. Comes with chipboard period case. Just reduced to $1,299.99 complete.
The gray area between different types of phasers and chorus pedals—and phaser-style chorus pedals versus delay-based chorus pedals—arises probably because designers and manufacturers really have followed two distinct paths in this field. Some phasers have sought to approximate the Uni-Vibe’s approximation of a Leslie cab, and some so-called choruses have done much the same. Other phasers have been designed from the ground up more purely from the perspective of the principles of phase shifting in itself, rather than in an effort to sound like a whirling speaker or any other electromechanical device that has come before. The result means the field is broad and varied, and different phasers (or their related effects) can often have different voices with characteristics more distinct than, say, two delays from different makers.
The truth is that I've never known what it's like to not want to play music of my own because I come from an Irish family that all played instruments. Luckily for me, my parents were very young when I was born -- they were like sixteen, seventeen -- and they were from a tradition of people playing instruments, accordions, pennywhistles, guitars, harmonicas and things like that -- cheap little instruments. But because they were young and moved over to Manchester, they liked rock and roll and pop music of the day.
The Viper came in two versions made of ash, maple, alder or mahogany, the 1271, with two single-coil pickups, and the 1273 Viper III with three single-coils. Vipers had two-octave unbound fingerboards of either rosewood with pearl dot inlays or maple with black dots. A laminated pickguard (with model name engraved) held the pickups and extended down the body for the controls, including master volume and tone knobs. The plastic-and-metal bridge/tailpiece assemblies were the same as on the early Preacher. The single-coil pickups were about the size of mini-humbuckers with metal sides, black inserts, and flat polepieces. Windings were different depending on the position. The bridge pickup had poles slanted diagonally that emulated the slant of a Strat. Early Vipers have a three-way toggle. As with the Preacher, later Vipers have no name engraving, the all-metal bridge assembly, and an extra toggle which is probably a series/parallel switch.
Several years after his last adventure, retired fortune hunter, Nathan Drake, is forced back into the world of thieves. With the stakes much more personal, Drake embarks on a globe-trotting journey in pursuit of a historical conspiracy behind a fabled pirate treasure. His greatest adventure will test his physical limits, his resolve, and ultimately what he's willing to sacrifice to save the ones he loves.
Gibson makes authorized copies of its most successful guitar designs. They are less expensive than those bearing the Gibson name. A former competitor, Epiphone was purchased by Gibson and now makes competitively priced Gibson models, such as the Les Paul and SG, sold under the Epiphone brand,[69] while continuing to make Epiphone-specific models like the Sheraton, Sorrento, and Casino. In Japan, Orville by Gibson once made Gibson designs sold in that country.[70] Gibson has sought legal action against those that make and sell guitars Gibson believes are too similar to their own.
Second in your chain are usually wah or EQ pedals. These tend to do well when directly affecting a distorted signal, and without much else in the mix. If you plan on using a compressor you have a choice: for a more natural rock tone, the compressor works best right after the distortion or wah/EQ effects. If you’re going for that thick classic country sound however, try putting your compressor right at the end of the chain so that it squashes everything.
These probably were not made very long, due to the intensity of the war effort. In 1942, production of resonator guitars ceased for good (except for their brief revival on the fiberglass models of the mid ’60s). The acoustic Hawaiian craze had peaked and was already being replaced by electric Hawaiian music, as reflected in the growing line of lap steels. By the end of World War II, resonators were obsolete, and music would be dominated by big-bodied dreadnought and jumbo acoustics, or electricity.
You have to have wood to get wood, and it’s unfortunate that a noticeable depletion on this natural resource is affecting the guitar industry even though guitar-making isn’t the primary reason for this depletion. When you talk about tonewoods, you have to mention sustainability in order to protect the natural resource and ensure a future of musical instruments.
Although most of this article deals with miking regular guitar amps or using various DI options, there are also some great sounds to be had using very low-power guitar amps — even battery-powered ones. You can see these in music shops, often designed to look like miniature versions of Marshall, Fender or other top-name amplifiers. While some sound pretty grim, others sound surprisingly musical and raunchy. Obviously they don't have a lot of low end, but if you mic them closely to exploit whatever proximity effect your cardioid mic has to offer, and use EQ cut to tame the inevitable mid-range resonance, you can get some really great sounds. Best of all is that these things are cheap, so you can afford to experiment, and they also come in useful for their intended purpose, which is practising, something we all tend to do too little of when we get caught up in recording technology.

According to Mr. Noguchi, Teisco instruments debuted in 1946 and were made by a company founded principally by the late Mr. Atswo Kaneko, a renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist, and Mr. Doryu Matsuda, an electrical engineer. Mr. Doryu Matsuda was born in 1921 and was still alive at the time of this writing. As mentioned, Mr. Kaneko gave the guitars the Teisco brand name, however, the original name of the company was Aoi Onpa Kenkyujo (roughly translated: Hollyhock Soundwave or Electricity Laboratories). This was a small workshop formed in war-ravaged Tokyo.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturing company, which is famous for being the first to mass-produce the seven-string and eight-string variants of guitars. The perfect size, great projection and beautiful tone offered by AEL, PF and EWP series of Acoustic guitars are remarkable. RGX and the GRX series of electric guitars come with the Ibanez brand at an affordable price. The mid-range GRG series include offers greater precision, high performance and playability.
In other words, it will slather the tone with raw dirt without affecting the core of the signal. A lot of people mistake fuzz pedals for distortions due to their more aggressive nature, but these beasts of old are definitely unique. One of the best examples of what a fuzz box sounds like is the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi – a fuzz pedal whose circuitry gave birth to countless other models.
You have a huge range of effects at your disposal, which can be applied to both vocals (thanks to the XLR inputs) and line level instruments such as your acoustic guitar. You have 2 compressors, a boost, 3 Chorus types, as well as 3 types of delay and reverb effects to suit a wide range of sonic palettes, all of which have been optimised specifically for acoustic guitar. However, it’s the Acoustic Resonance selectors, 80 second phrase looper and anti-feedback feature that the acoustic guitarists will really take advantage of.
This is not a cheap Chinese manufactured kit of questionable quality where the parts simply don’t work together (like most of the other kits that you will find on Ebay, Etsy and Amazon). We proudly manufacture these kits in our shop in Portland, Oregon. We are a family-owned company building products and traditions that we expect to last for a long, long time. We produce instrument kits with exacting specifications, high quality production, and domestic, sustainably-cultivated sources of materials whenever possible.
Subtlety: You don't always have to make longer echo or delay effects obvious in the mix for them to be effective. Once you've set up the delay times and panned them to suit your song, try dropping the delay levels until you scarcely notice them during most of the mix (listening on headphones often helps set the most suitable level). This generally results in intriguing little ripples of repeats that you notice at the end of verses or during pauses, that add interest and low-level detail to the mix. Martin Walker
Distortion, overdrive, and fuzz can be produced by effects pedals, rackmounts, pre-amplifiers, power amplifiers (a potentially speaker-blowing approach), speakers and (since the 2000s) by digital amplifier modeling devices and audio software.[1][2] These effects are used with electric guitars, electric basses (fuzz bass), electronic keyboards, and more rarely as a special effect with vocals. While distortion is often created intentionally as a musical effect, musicians and sound engineers sometimes take steps to avoid distortion, particularly when using PA systems to amplify vocals or when playing back prerecorded music.


A perfect jammer or learner guitar, the Yamaha Pacifica is a super inexpensive electric guitar option. While you really shouldn’t use this electric to tour or play live, you can still hook it up to an amp and shred to your heart’s content. With a maple neck and rosewood fingerboard, this guitar actually has a great look to it while also providing for a comfortable neck and fast action. Expect to pay under $200 for this super-affordable, super-shreddable guitar.

Hidesato Shiino (1947–). Music-Trade.co.jp. Dai-Show Corporation. — The person who involved with a lot of remarkable Japanese guitars including: Yamaha FG, Fernandes & Greco models, Morris & H.S. Anderson (named after his son; well known as Prince's Hohner Telecaster), early ESP, Vesta Graham & Vestax (now known as DJ brand), Akai Guitar 1997 series, D'Angelico, etc.

The SG retains a similar dual-humbucker configuration as the Les Paul Standard but it truly has a life and style all its own. Due in part to its aggressive style, impressive mid-range bite and thunderous output, the SG has become synonymous with rock ’n’ roll. The Gibson SG is one of only a handful of models that has never been out of production since its introduction in the early ’60s.
• I like to insert a compressor after this, to add some sustain and even out the guitar's dynamics, for a more consistent distortion sound. So for the second insert slot, choose Dynamics/Vintage Compressor, then click on the insert's Edit button to see the compressor's interface, and set up the parameter values as desired. A good starting point would be Input at 17 and Attack at 8.9, with Punch and Auto set to On. You'll probably need to adjust the Input (effectively the Threshold in this case) according to the level of signal coming into the plug‑in. Set the Output to a level that's as high as possible, but doesn't approach clipping.
I am struggling with the same issues trying to wrap my head around the benifits of constructing my neck through in this fashion . It would appear most of the big dog builders subscribe to this theory though I don't really know why. I read in a post in this forum that it started with a mistake by luthier Carl Thompson when he cut the channel too deep for the neck and was later copied by Ken Smith ,and then Fodera.
3. Peavey Vypyr VIP 2 40-watt 1x12 ($199): This amp is an all-in-one powerhouse, equally capable of handling electric guitar, bass and acoustic all in one amp. Not only is it capable of effects modeling, it can also handle instrument modeling, giving the player access to acoustic, violin, bass and many other stringed instruments. As far as effects go, it boasts more than 25 effects with controllable parameters and with over 40 watts of power, it’s even ideal for rehearsal.
While close-miking can indeed be punchy and muscular, you’ll often find it doesn’t capture the full breadth of your electric guitar tone – that is, it simply doesn’t sound the way your amp sounds in the room. That’s because when you stand somewhere near the middle of any room and play an amp that’s placed a few feet away, several other elements affect the sonic picture. The distance between your ears and the speaker (the “air”), the shape and size of the room, materials used to make the walls, ceiling and floor and/or their coverings, the ways in which sound reflects from them, along with other factors all contribute to how your amp really sounds in the acoustic environment. Most engineers find, therefore, that they need to use some form of distant miking when the aim is capturing a realistic amp tone.
Delay pedals take your original signal, a guitar chord or note for example, delays it and plays it back exactly how the pedal hears it the first time. It can either play the note back once or multiple times depending on your settings or “feedback time”. Often, you’ll see Digital Delay pedals as well as Analogue Delay pedals. The major difference is that digital delay pedals will offer longer delays and a ‘cleaner’ exact sound, however guitarists often prefer the analogue sound for all the subtle nuances and slight unpredictability in sound. This comes down to personal preference but both options sound great.

One of the most important attributes of boost pedals is their transparency. In other words, they need to able to boost the signal without changing the signal itself. As easy as it sounds, achieving good transparency is pretty hard and not many pedals are capable of doing so. With that said, a good booster pedal is a pretty powerful tool in the right hands.


The Seismic Audio SADIYG-15 JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit gives you the ultimate shredder guitar. Originally designed by Steve Vai, this style is built for speed. Innovative features like a Monkey Grip Handle and Floyd Rose Tremolo complete the unique design. All the parts needed for a finished guitar are included. This guitar kit is suitable for the aspiring or established luthier and all guitar players. A truss rod adjustment hex wrench, two Floyd Rose tremolo adjustment hex wrenches and solder are included. You will need a phillips head screwdriver and a soldering iron to fully assemble the guitar. A pack of six nickel alloy strings and a right-angle guitar cable are also included.With your purchase, you will receive one DIY JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit pictured and described above.
Not all guitars sound the same. The type of pickups, strings, wood, and body style all dictate the sound a guitar makes. One of the most important decisions a guitarist can make is whether to get a solid body, semi-hollow, or hollow body guitar. A solid body has a cutting tone with plenty of sustain, whereas a hollow body has a warmer, more rounded sound.
What's so special about the Epiphone Les Paul Special II Electric Guitar? The super-low price for starters and that's not all. It gives you all the essential elements of a Les Paul. Made with a mahogany body, bolt-on mahogany neck, smooth 22-fret rosewood fingerboard, this baby is every bit as handsome as its uptown cousins. Features 700T/650R open-coil humbucking pickups that deliver long, singing sustain and true Les Paul tones. The LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge and stopbar tailpiece add more sustain and make string changing easier. Limited lifetime warranty. Strings: D'Addario; 10, 13, 17, 26, 36, 46
Melodious tuning powerful pickups and with supreme body ESP is also famous for its affordable prices. This brand is famous for its quality and best for the lovers of Electronic Guitar lovers. The Japanese company was founded in Tokyo Japan in 1975.it manufactures some best  brands like  “ESP Standard”, “ESP Custom Shop”, “LTD Guitars and Basses”, “Navigator”, “Edwards Guitar and Basses” and “Grassroots”.
Chorus pedals actually make your guitar sound like there are a variety of different guitarists playing the same thing that you are playing, but with a different guitar and slightly out of time with you. This effect makes everything you play sound a little bit ‘warbly’ and thickens up your guitar or bass lines. We recommend experimenting with these as you can use them subtly to add weight to your sound or as a full-blown effect that completely takes over your signal.
Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.
That is, if the tone caps in parallel filtered from within th 1k-2k and 3k-5k frequency band with the pot determining how much of those ranges are filtered off, then moving the 2nd cap parallel to the pot should shift the 2k window of the bigger cap so it would be filtering less of the 3-5k at one end of it’s sweep, and more of the 1k-3k filtered at the other end of it’s sweep. (my frequency selection and math here are conceptual only, and not to be taken as accurate measurements).
When playing the electric guitar, you’ll have to simultaneously use both hands. One hand will be responsible for fretting and the other hand will be responsible for strumming or plucking. Depending on which is your more comfortable side and whether the electric guitar is designed more for one side than the other, it will impact your play style and music quality.

In January 2017, Vox introduced the MV50 amp head and amp sets. Described by Vox as a hybrid amp, the amp heads are called the MV50 AC, the MV50 Clean, and the MV50 Rock. When paired with the BC108 cabinet, each is then described as the MV50 AC set, the MV50 Clean set, and the MV50 Rock set respectively. Vox states the MV50 AC is designed to provide the sound of a VOX AC30, and that the MV50 Clean is designed to provide clean tones with a lot of headroom as inspired by the sound of American amplifiers. Vox states the MV50 Rock is designed to provide the more aggressive high gain sound of vintage British amps. In January 2018, Vox announced two new MV50 amp heads: the MV50 Boutique and the MV50 High Gain.
Wet Set: If you have a sound that you want to push a long way back in the mix, it can often be better to make your reverb effect pre-fader, and temporarily remove all the dry sound. Then alter the sound's EQ and reverb settings while listening only to the wet reverb sound. Once you've got that sounding good, gradually fade the dry sound back in until you're happy with the wet/dry balance. This approach can often be more effective than simply whacking up the reverb level while you listen to the whole song. Martin Walker
Bass cabinets are more likely to have thicker wood panels than regular electric guitar amps, and to have stronger internal bracing. These design features help to lessen the likelihood of unwanted cabinet buzzes or rattles, which are more likely with bass cabinets than electric guitar cabs because of the low-frequency sounds that bass cabs have to reproduce.

In 1992, two more models were added, the single-cutaway BC-40 and the 5-string B-540. Although widely admired[who?] for their high quality and lovely appointments, they proved to have limited appeal due to their $2000-plus list prices. By 1997, all four of these initial basses were dropped in favor of the B-1, a lower-priced ABG with laminated mahogany sides as part of Martin’s 1 series of guitars. The BM, an even less expensive model in Martin’s now discontinued Road series soon followed; it had laminated mahogany sides with a solid mahogany back. Also around this time electronics became standard on Martin basses. The most recent additions are the BC-15, a single-cutaway version with a mahogany top, the BC-16GTE, also a single-cutaway with solid Genuine mahogany back and sides with a gloss top, and the 00C-16GTAE, which is a slimmer thin-line version of the previously mentioned model. As a special edition, Martin offered the Alternative X Bass with jet black High Pressure Laminate back and sides and a Graffiti-patterned Aluminum finish top. This bass was very similar in build to the other guitars in Martin’s X series. There have been two Limited Edition Martin acoustic bass models. The first, the SWB Sting Signature Model, was released in 1999 and was made with woods certified by the Rainforest Alliance’s SmartWood program[citation needed]. The SWB’s top is made with book matched solid Sitka spruce reclaimed from pulp logs, the back, sides and neck are solid certified cherry, and the fingerboard is certified katalox. Sting’s signature is inlaid between the 18th and 19th frets, and a label inside the body states that a portion of the sale price is donated to the Rainforest Foundation International[citation needed]. The second and more recent Limited Edition is the B-28KV Klaus Voormann Signature model released in 2008 for the German market. It has a Sitka spruce top with Solid East Indian Rosewood back and sides and a black Ebony fingerboard. The headstock features a unique art design by Klaus as a circular inlay making each bass a one-of-a-kind. In addition to these U.S.-made instruments, Martin also markets Sigma ABGs made in Korea.
Next up we have the specialty electric guitars. This category consists of several different types of electric guitars, but we’ll start out with 12-string electric guitars. The fact that the low E, A, D, and G strings all feature higher octave strings while the B and high e strings both have additional strings that are tuned the same, electric guitar 12-string models have a distinctive shimmer and richness to them that guitar players love. Guitar players who favor heavier genres like death metal or hard rock may want to add a 7-string, an 8-string, or even a 9-string electric guitar to their rig for when they need some extra low-end growl and power. Other specialty guitars include baritone guitars, double neck electric guitars, and pedal steel guitars & lap steel guitars.
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