In the Spring of 1960 the Kent Musical Instrument Company (20 East 15th Street, New York City) was founded as a subsidiary of prominent New York distributors Buegeleisen and Jacobson. It’s first products were microphones, cables and aftermarket guitar accessories like pickguard/pickup assemblies for archtop guitars and soundhole pickups for flattop acoustics. In 1960 the Marco Polo Company (1055 E. First Street, Santa Ana, CA) began importing Japanese guitars (many by Suzuki), including electrics, which it began to advertise in 1961. Kent began promoting Japanese solidbody electric guitars (mainly Guyatones) in April of 1962, although by the Fall of ’62 the Kent Standard series consisted of Teisco models.
Prior to dennis, i had never taken guitar lessons. Always tried to teach myself. I struggled since i had no structure, i would consistantly get lost, which would make me put the guitar down due to frustration. Deciding to hire dennis was a break thru for me, and honestly wish i would have looked into it much sooner. Not only has my skills progressed, which they due weekly at a much faster rate then when i was trying to learn on my own, but my confidence and motivatation has increased greatly. I look forward to meeting with dennis each week and building off of what he taught me the previous week. The amount of patience dennis has is great, and the way he explains different things so that i understand is awsome. Would definetly recommend dennis to anyone, whether they have just purchased their first guitar, or they have tried numerous times to teach themselves, or even if you have alot of the basics down, but looking to take your knowledge and playing to the next level.

There exist libraries that can do astoundingly realistic guitars, but they're expensive. There are a few guitarists hanging around the AF, I suggest you hook up with one of them. Even if you do buy a library, if you don't play the guitar there's a decent chance you won't be able to write for them well. No one wants clunky, awkward guitars! Team up with a fellow musician and have some fun.


Electric guitars are powered by electromagnetism—and electromagnetic induction to be precise. That might not sound familiar, but you've probably used it if you've ever ridden a bicycle at night with a dynamo-powered light. A dynamo is a simple electricity generator with two basic parts: a rotating coil of wire that spins around inside a hollow, curved magnet. As the coil spins, it cuts through the magnet's field. This makes electricity flow through the coil. Two electrical connections from the coil are wired up to a lamp and the electricity generated makes the lamp light up.

There are lot of great amp out there, but there are overpriced. Peavey prove they can do almost as great as other for a really more decent price. Moreover, they have great features and technical improvement that the "classic" manufactureres avoid to be focus on vintage sound and their reputation... The bandit 112 is a bargain. The valveking series was great budget valve amp for metal. Classic 30 and 6505 are interesting too. Vypr series was also great but it seems their recent series have issues... Anyway they build great amp and doesn't scam people as others do... check it out!

• Library content : Choose from 154 patterns covering a wide range of realistic riffs, arpeggios, alternating intervals and chords. The patterns are conveniently grouped into 31 well-coordinated set of presets, suitable for everything from modern pop music to electronics. Autochord mode and convenient presets allow you to execute or program convincing batches of electric guitar, regardless of background music.
The type of potentiometer you should use will depend on the type of circuit you are designing for. Typically, for audio circuits the audio taper potentiometer is used. This is because the audio taper potentiometer functions on a logarithmic scale, which is the scale in which the human ear percieves sound. Even though the taper chart appears to have a sudden increase in volume as the rotation increases, in fact the perception of the sound increase will occur on a gradual scale. The linear scale will actually (counterintuitively) have a more significant sudden volume swell effect because of how the human ear perceives the scale. However, linear potentiometers are often used for other functions in audio circuits which do not directly affect audio output. In the end, both types of potentiometers will give you the same range of output (from 0 to full), but the rate at which that range changes varies between the two.
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I just noticed that no-one has mentioned Robben Ford – another master of both technique and taste and a certain contender for my top ten list, fighting for a place in the same space as Larry Carlton and John Scofield. (John Mayer can certainly play, but for me, any of those three offers at least as much technique, and a wider range of accomplishments, than JM – check out their various versions of “I don’t need no doctor”).
Leo Fender didn’t know how to play guitar. The inventor of the famous guitar brand, which includes the Telecaster and Stratocaster models (favored by Kurt Cobain and Jimi Hendrix), never learned how to play his own instrument. Fender began as an accountant with a knack for repairing radios, later turning that hobby into a full-time electronics operation. The highly versatile Telecaster, which he developed in 1950, became the first mass-produced solid-body electric guitar.
Most reverb pedals fall into the ambient effect category, similar to delay and echo in the way it manipulates your signal. It's likened to the delay effect because it's technically a timing effect which, in the world of signal processing, can be described as "sound after sound." In other words, the original sound is produced and another sound follows.
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!
I finally had the chance to bring my les paul for Steve to look at an annoying fret buzz. First he said the guitar is too straight and adjusted it. Then he quickly discovered the 4th string buzz was at the first fret but it had nothing to do with the buzz because the issue was at the nut, it was cut too low! Steve redo the string while we were chatting about how the neighborhood has changed. Within 5 mins, Steve redo the with some filling and filing and voila!! The buzz was gone. I was so happy and asked him how much, he said it was easy so he didn't want take any money. But i have him some coffee money and he said it was too much, I said it was for a week and he laughed. My last issue I brought to Steve as well and we had the same conversation. I highly recommend Steve as experienced luthier and for someone who loves guitars and someone who can solve guitar problems. Steve is a hidden gem in the Boston guitar world.
Zen guitar is not about scales and memorizing chords. Instead, it is a masterpiece of why to play guitar, helping you get through the times where learning guitar gets frustrating, and believe me, it will at some point get frustrating. But if you can get through that and push on, you’ll be rewarded with mastery of an instrument that will give you personal fulfillment and a lifetime hobby that brings achievement and satisfaction.

OM-28: Similar to the 000-28 model in body size and ornamentation, but uses a 25.4″ scale, 1-2/4″ nut spacing, and 2-3/8″ string spacing at the bridge. Also known as the “orchestra” model, so named because of its association with banjo players transitioning to guitar in the late 1920s and early 1930s. The 14-fret neck-to-body design was designed to allow greater upper fret access, and thus feel more comfortable to banjo players accustomed to full acces the length of a 24-fret + neck.


This package features an iconic electric guitar—The Les Paul— paired with a great little practice amplifier, the Electar-10, and quality accessories. The Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a versatile guitar that feels comfortable covering most any major style, including rock, blues, punk, classic rock and more. The guitar features a dual humbucker pickup configuration. The package also includes a tuner (very important), guitar picks and free online lessons to get you playing right away. A cable, strap and gig bag complete the package.
For solidbodies there is usually a one- or two-letter prefix indicating the body style or general model. This is followed by a dash and a number which usually indicates the number of pickups (e.g., J-1), although on occasion the number indicates the year of introduction (e.g., TG-54). Guitars bearing a vibrato usually appended an “L” after the pickup number (e.g., MJ-2L).
Body tops are optional. If you're just starting out, you should either skip this option, or choose the veneer top that appeals to you most. We offer veneer tops (paper-thin layer of wood) and cap tops (thick layer of wood). Most people will add a top to their instrument because of the top’s naturally beautiful appearance. Some people will add a top to their guitar because it can affect the overall sound of the instrument, too (only applies to cap tops, not veneers).
In around 1988 Martin introduced a line of Stinger amps and effects pedals. Amps included the FX-1 (10 watts, 8″ speaker, “Tube Synth” distortion circuit, $152), the FX-1R (15 watts, 8″ speaker, Tube Synth, spring reverb, $220), FX-3B (15 watts, 10″ speaker, compression, separate pre-amp and master volume controls, 3-band EQ, $189), FX-3C (30 watts, 12″ speaker, Tube Synth, chorus, $299), and the FX-3RC (65 watts, 12″ speaker, Tube Synth, chorus, reverb, effects loop, $379).
This guitar is one of the more affordable left-handed variants that you will find on the market. With a 41-inch body and a full-scale, you won’t find any limitations to the music you wish to play. The body is 3 inches thick which not only makes it comfortable to hold but also play. The cutaway gives you good access to higher frets while also increasing the appeal of the guitar.
Another factor that may need to be considered is the length of the speaker cable. Very long speaker cable runs may affect the performance of the system, either by causing line loss of power or by affecting the impedance. For best performance and highest wattage output with bass stacks or combos with extension speakers, bassists typically use the shortest possible speaker cable.
Electric guitars vary greatly in sound, look and playability. Different designs, quality of craftsmanship, electronics and choice of woods make them sound, look and feel different from one another. It's the luthiers' goal to combine the best of these elements to create the next masterpiece. Our task is seeking and offering the finest tonewoods available to make that goal a reality.
But the guitar store? They always remember me and treat me like a guest even if I'm not there to buy shit. Everyone there is a genuinely good dude. They're all honest too, which can be hard to find in this industry. I took my guitar in for a check up and they told me doing anything to it would be unnecessary. They could have easily charged me $80 for a set up and taken my guitar.
Ampeg was swallowed up by Japanese electrical giant Magnavox in 1971, when they wanted to get in on the electric guitar copy craze of the 1970s. Magnavox produced electric and bass guitars under the Stud badge as well as the successful Ampeg brand. It's been suggested that Magnavox was also responsible for producing Selmer acoustic guitar badges during this time, but that has not been verified. Selmer was sold to Magnavox around the same time they bought Ampeg, so it certainly seems plausible they could have made Selmer acoustic badged guitars as an offering for that market. Stud badged guitars were made until '75, with Ampeg guitar production continuing until 1980. Opus was another badge made by the company. Magnavox lost their interest in Ampeg shortly thereafter and the brand languished until it was resurrected over a decade later by another American company.
Makers of the Elk badged guitar from the early to mid 1960s to 1975, although other sources indicate that the Elk brand did not stop production until the early 1980s. Elk badged guitars came in clear acrylics in addition to colors in the early 1970s, which was an attempt to copy clear acrylics designed by the legendary Dan Armstrong in the late 1960s.
How are acoustic guitars and electric guitars different? Several ways. Most notably, acoustics don’t need to be plugged in to be heard. Acoustic guitars are generally larger and have a hollow sound chamber. This sound chamber "magnifies" the resonance of the guitar’s wooden top and body as you pluck or strum the strings. The bridge helps transmit the strings’ vibrations to the body.
The Fender Stratocaster features cutaway horns that give musicians access to higher frets. The back of the body is designed for comfort for longer performances. These guitars have three single coil pickups which transfer the string vibrations to the amplifier. They can all be turned on at once to produce a wide range of sounds. It also features a tremolo bar which allows you to lower or raise the pitch, much like tremolo pedals themselves, by pulling up or down on the bar to produce different effects. Stratocasters are the best option if you like to dabble in different playing styles and music genres.
To fulfill the diverse requirement of our esteemed clients, we are engaged in offering them a wide range of Electric Spanish Guitar. This offered range of Electric Spanish Guitar is available with us in various shapes and size and can also be modified as per our clients requirement. Our clients highly appreciate our offered Electric Spanish Guitar for its
The MS-50G lets you use up to six of effects simultaneously, from its large pool of digitally modeled effects (47) and amps (8). And all of the settings and parameters are adjusted via its intuitive interface, albeit with just a single footswitch. You can save each preset you create or edit, just store them into the pedal's 50 memory banks. This flexibility gives you an unprecedented tone options. Other noteworthy features include its built-in chromatic tuner and its versatile power options, which include 2 x AA batteries or via a USB power source.
The Neal Schon Signature Les Paul model has a carved mahogany top, mahogany back, multi-ply black/white binding on top, chrome-plated hardware and a Floyd Rose tremolo. The one-piece mahogany neck has a scarfed heel joint a “Schon custom” slim-taper neck profile. The 22-fret ebony fingerboard features pearl split-diamond inlays and single-ply white binding. The pickups are a DiMarzio Fast Track/Fernandes Sustainer in the neck position and a Gibson BurstBucker Pro in the bridge position. In addition to the standard Les Paul electronics (individual pickup volume and tone controls, plus three-way selector switch), the Schon Signature features two mini-toggles – an on/off for the Sustainer and an octave effect – along with a push/pull pot for midrange cut. Only 60 of the guitars were made, and sold it out in days upon release.
Nice and great are just two of the many positive adjectives that people use to describe the Ibanez AEG12II-NT. And most of these satisfied users are pleased with its playability, describing it as a truly inspiring and fun instrument. Its visual appeal and sound quality are also commended often, some even coming from experienced players who compare it to more expensive acoustic-electric guitars.
Potentiometers (Pots) for audio are used to adjust tone and volume. Pots are resistors with three terminals and a sliding contact (the wiper) that creates an adjustable voltage divider. If only two terminals are used (one side and the wiper), it acts as a variable resistor or rheostat. Potentiometers are most commonly used as control devices, such as volume control on audio equipment. A potentiometer for Audio applications would feature very low to no introduced noise.

He's not talking about that kind of 'setup', it's not a type of guitar, it's an essential basic maintenance you perform on any guitar. The setup that he's talking about involves properly adjusting the neck relief (the bow of the neck), the string/saddle action (height above the fretboard), and the intonation (altering the length of the string by moving the saddles on the bridge closer or further from the nut so that the strings are in the most consistent tune up and down the neck).
Overdrive originally resulted from the natural breakup that occurred when a tube amp received an overly hot signal from a guitar. This pushed the tubes to deliver a subtle, warm breakup. Generally overdrive is a more subdued, natural form of distortion. While you don’t have to use an overdrive effect with a tube amp to get a great sound, the combination of the two can produce a rich, pleasing tone that many guitarists prefer. The first overdrive effects were designed to push more signal into a tube amp, giving it the very throaty, mid-range tone associated with Stevie Ray Vaughan. With that in mind, many of today's pedal makers have created circuitry to add that desired tone when used with a solid state amps as well. Since overdrive is a signal boost, adjustments from your volume knob will create a variety of different sounds.

In 2003,[73] Gibson debuted its Ethernet-based[74] audio protocol, MaGIC, which it developed in partnership with 3COM, Advanced Micro Devices, and Xilinx.[73] Replacing traditional analog hook-ups with a digital connection that would, "...satisfy the unique requirements of live audio performances," may have been the goal of this project.[74] This system may require a special pickup,[73] but cabling is provided by a standard Cat-5 ethernet cable.[73][74]

All mass-market brands offer at least one distortion pedal—and often many. Boss, for one, tries to cater to all possible tastes. Its DS-1 (not to be confused with the SD-1 overdrive mentioned above) is one of the workhorses of the breed, with some big-name players happy to stomp on its rectangular switch, including both Steve Vai and Joe Satriani. The DS-2 takes things a step further, while the MT-2 Metal Zone and MD-2 Mega Distortion get successively more evil. And Boss isn’t the only one, with DOD, Ibanez, Marshall and many, many others playing the game too, along with a few of the boutique makers. The proliferation is most distinctive in many “metal” pedals that go beyond even the standard distortion sounds. These generally offer the archetypal scooped-mid sound with thudding lows and crispy highs. Many are adjustable for anything from classic rock to metal sounds, with a tone control that acts more to reduce or accentuate mids rather than the usual high boost/cut, and often a “resonance” control or similar to adjust the fullness of the bass.

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Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.
By the 1960s and 1970s, semiconductor transistor-based amplifiers (also called "solid state") began to become popular. This was in large part because for a given wattage level and feature level, solid state amplifiers are less expensive, lighter weight, and require less maintenance than tube amplifiers. As well, transistor amplifiers are more reliable and less fragile than tube amps. In some cases, tube and solid state technologies are used together, usually with a tube preamplifier driving a solid state power amplifier. There are also an increasing range of products that use digital signal processing (DSP) and digital modeling technology to simulate many different combinations of amp and cabinets.
By 1966 Daniel sold Danelectro to MCA, but remained with the company. In 1967 the Coral line of guitars is introduced. At the time, Danelectro sold about 85% of it's products to Sears. So MCA started the Coral line to sell to other distributors. The difference was the Coral hollow bodies (only) were manufactured in Japan. All other Coral parts were made in the New Jersey Danelectro plant. Also all Silvertones and Danelectro instruments were made entirely in the U.S.

I own some 13 or so, high end American, Canadian and/or Japanese 6 strings 7 basses and a full studip of gear and if my opinion means FA then I can't help but not mention my Washburn Custom Shop WV548! It has Parker guitars (famous for the FLY) patented composite glass carbon fiber fretboard, EMG active PU's (81, 85) and a real Floyd with the Buzz Feiten system and it is bar none, the fastest, smoothest, and by far the nicest playing (and sounding for that matter) guitar I own or have played in my some 30 odd years plus, playing electrics.
Probably one of the greatest is Glenn Schwartz, formerly of the James Gang and Pacific Gas & Electric. Considered to be a "white" Jimi Hendrix, he was asked by Jimi to play at what was to be his last birthday party. Glenn played behind his back and with his teeth (now with his gums) before Jimi ever did. Now out of the limelight (and out of his mind) Glenn plays (and preaches) on Thursdays at a blue collar bar in Cleveland. ONE F*CKING INCREDIBLE PLAYER. Should be on any list.
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