This is where the roads came back together. Kaman continued to play guitar during his building of the helicopter business. He kept his guitars hanging on the wall, instead of in the case, so he could grab one if he felt like playing. As a result he ended up with lots of cracked backs, including one on a favorite Martin. Charles traveled down to Nazareth to get the guitar repaired and Fred Martin gave him a factory tour.

For someone who’s been playing for a while, your options are a little different. Perhaps they’ve got a certain guitar in mind. If so, get them what they want! Chances are they’ve already done their homework and have their eye on their next guitar. If they’re not sure, you can still make an educated purchase. There are many popular options that should satisfy most experienced players. And there are many lesser-known models that can be the right fit for someone with more specific tastes.

In terms of how the effects and amp models sound, we give the Zoom G3X a 7 out of 10. Most effects sound great and very convincing. All but the most discerning tone snobs would be able to distinguish them from the “real thing.” As is typical for digital multi-effects units, the quality of the overdrive and distortion effects is sub-par. Conversely, delays, reverbs, and choruses sound pretty great. In fact, one recommendation many users make is to start out with the Zoom G3X, and eventually buy a separate dedicated overdrive or distortion pedal, like a Fulltone OCD or Pro Co RAT2. This comment from an owner sums it up well:
We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!
If you want to combine the dynamics of a well-recorded drum kit with the pumping excitement you get from heavy compression, send either the overheads only or the entire kit to a buss and insert a nice-sounding compressor there. Set the compressor to a high ratio and low threshold and mix in some of this with the song. You may need to adjust the attack and release controls to get the effect you're after, but you don't need to blend in much of the compressed sound to really add punch and weight to a drum track. Nicholas Rowland
A multi-FX unit is a single effects device that can perform several guitar effects simultaneously. Such devices generally use digital processing to simulate many of the above-mentioned effects without the need to carry several single-purpose units. In addition to the classic effects, most have amplifier/speaker simulations not found in analog units. This allows a guitarist to play directly into a recording device while simulating an amplifier and speaker of his choice.
For better or worse, by 1982 the taste for natural-finished, neck-through guitars with lots of switches and active electronics had begun to move on. On the horizon were the brief affair with weird-shaped “heavy metal” guitars and the impending first Strat-mania and the rise of Superstrats which would pretty much define the remainder of the decade. 1982, and the 18 and 28 Series, marked the end of Martin’s direct manufacture of electric solidbody guitars.
The McCarty Model - named after Theodore 'Ted' McCarty, Gibson's president during its 1950s to 1960s heyday and, much later, 'mentor' to Paul Reed Smith - originally appeared in the early 1990s and was the company's first attempt at a more vintage-informed guitar. It takes its name, primarily, from its scale length of 24.594 inches. However, the focus of the 594 is not just that scale length but a desire to recreate, as closely as possible, the 'holy grail' of vintage Gibson tone - a 1959 Sunburst, but in a modern double-cut guitar. A change comes with the pickups, which are PRS's latest date-series 58/15 humbuckers but with an 'LT' (Low Turns) suffix, which on a meter shows the bridge unit to have a lower DC resistance than the standard McCarty's 58/15, although the neck pickup seems virtually identical. The four-control layout (the first PRS double-cut guitar to use it) possesses the classic LP setup and feels immediately comfortable to any player used to the much-copied Gibson layout.  Full humbucking, or with the partial coil splits engaged, full volume, half volume, tones rolled off - not to mention the shades with both pickups on - there's not a duff sound that we can find. Dynamic, expressive - it purrs, it roars, it's one of the best electric guitars.
Eddie Kramer has a slightly different approach, working from a familiar setup of favourite close and ambient mics (including the Beyerdynamic M160 ribbon mic) and then mixing them together to taste. "I use a three-mic technique: an SM57, an MD421 and an M160, all in a very tight pattern. Then I can pick and choose the tone quality, because each mic is totally different. I combine these together, and then I put a U67 away from the amp to get the ambience."

While it is possible to practice on a huge stack, it’s more convenient (and probably more sensible) to practice on a compact, low-powered, versatile practice amp. These little combo amps are one of the most important tools in a guitarist’s tool box, especially for beginners who should avoid ‘dry practice’ (i.e. without an amp) as it encourages bad habits. Many amps can be considered a practice amp, but one of our favorites is the Fender Frontman 10G – a very affordable practice amp that offers 10 watts of power, solid Fender tone and a headphone jack for quiet practice sessions.
There are some guitarists who place the compressor last, though, to boost their signal just before it hits the preamp of their amplifier. The drawback to this approach is that any hum or hiss introduced by other effects will be increased by the compressor's output gain. Sometimes you can remedy this by placing a noise gate before the compressor, however, the noise reduction can have an effect on the tone quality. A best-of-both-worlds approach might be to put your compressor first and use a signal booster just before your amplifier. Some guitarists also like the sound of putting their wah or envelope filter before the compressor to give it a wider frequency range to affect. Experimentation is always encouraged, but putting the compressor first is recommended.
One of the most impressive guitars on this list when it comes to style is this C-1 SGR from Schecter – a respected brand in the world of rock and metal. With a design that’s heavily influenced by their premium C1 models, this affordable alternative features a solid basswood body that’s arched and contoured for great comfort, allowing unhindered access to the 24-fret maple neck.
Besides its classic vibe, the best part about this guitar may be its Broad’Tron pickups. These were designed specifically for the Streamliner, and are known for their throaty midrange, booming lows and sparkly highs. They’re also louder than Gretsch’s other popular pups, the Filter’Tron, so push them hard and they’ll snarl and scream. Dial back the volume knob, however, and you’ll encounter the warmth and rounded tone for which Gretsch hollow-bodies are known.
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!
Try to keep the amp relative to the quality of your pickups. For example, if you’re spending under $50 on a transducer pickup for an acoustic guitar, a basic acoustic amp will do you fine. But if you’re dropping around $300 on a hybrid system, there’s little point unless your amp can deliver the power and natural sound the pickup is capable of producing.
Hi - I am looking for a new amp for small to medium venues. I quite fancied the Marshall Mini Silver Jubilee combo, but then noticed several companies selling JVM 50 watt combos in the same price range. It seems that the JVM's are a Swiss Army knife whereas the MSJ seems to be capturing a small version of a classic amp and is more of a one trick pony . Any way you could help me make the right decision. On the other hand , how reliable are the JVM's considering their sophistication?

You probably won’t have to do this, but if you do, here’s how to go about it: First, slacken the affected strings and move them to the sides of the saddles. Then take some needle-nose pliers and remove one end of the retaining spring (different styles of bridge will use different types of retaining spring – sometimes there is an individual one for each saddle, in which case you might even need to remove the whole bridge to do this).
By far the most common way to sort out this tablature selection is by artist. Some best-selling highlights include the Hal Leonard Jimi Hendrix Complete Guitar Tab Library, Alfred Led Zeppelin Box Set I-V Guitar Tab Platinum Edition and Hal Leonard Eric Clapton Complete Clapton Guitar Tab Songbook. And those are just a few examples from a library packed with hundreds of books. No matter what sort of music you want to play, there's tablature ready to teach it to you.
Mr. Bojangles,Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Leaving on a Jet Plane, John Denver, City of New Orleans,Steve Goodman, Alice’s Restaurant & Motorcycle song, Arlo Guthrie, Bobby McGee, Janis Joplin, Taxi, Harry Chapin, Please Come To Boston, Dave Loggins, Lady, Little River Band, Sailing, Christopher Cross, Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Credence Clear Water Revival.
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Made of mahogany, just like the classics, the DT520 Destroyer's iconic body style has attracted many artists. Ibanez's biggest leap forward will continue to be appreciated by today's player: namely the mahogany slim neck grip and set-in neck that offer ultra-smooth playablity. No matter what the setting, the DiMarzio Air Norton pack this axe with a rich tonal palette. Gorgeous old school pearl/abalone block inlays make for a path back to one of rock's most dynamic chapters. The original Ibanez Tight-Tune bridge provides improved transfer of string vibration and better tuning stability.
The simplest guitar amplifiers, such as some vintage amps and modern practice amps, have only a single volume control. Most have two volume controls: a first volume control called "preamplifier" or "gain" and a master volume control. The preamp or gain control works differently on different guitar amp designs. On an amp designed for acoustic guitar, turning up the preamp knob pre-amplifies the signal—but even at its maximum setting, the preamp control is unlikely to produce much overdrive. However, with amps designed for electric guitarists playing blues, hard rock and heavy metal music, turning up the preamp or gain knob usually produces overdrive distortion. Some electric guitar amps have three controls in the volume section: pre-amplifier, distortion and master control. Turning up the preamp and distortion knobs in varying combinations can create a range of overdrive tones, from a gentle, warm growling overdrive suitable for a traditional blues show or a rockabilly band to the extreme distortion used in hardcore punk and death metal. On some electric guitar amps, the "gain" knob is equivalent to the distortion control on a distortion pedal, and similarly may have a side-effect of changing the proportion of bass and treble sent to the next stage.
Merson emerges again as an importer in the late ’50s and early ’60s (as the guitar boom was building), marketing Giannini acoustic guitars made in Brazil and Hagstrom electric guitars made in Sweden. Recall that in the ’50s, the accordion craze had given great impetus to the success of music merchandisers. But by the end of the decade, the collapse of the fad left them holding the squeeze-box, as it were. After some meandering, the Folk Revival picked up at the end of the decade, creating a growing market for acoustic guitars. Hence the Gianninis.

Buddy Holly turned a generation of future heroes – George Harrison, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck – onto the guitar, with an elemental style: an antsy mix of country and blues that merged rhythm and lead; check the push-and-tease phrasing on "It's So Easy," which echoes Holly's growl-and-hiccup vocals. Playing his Stratocaster and fronting a double-guitar-bass-and-drum quartet, Holly essentially invented the rock band. "Listen to the songs on the first three Beatles albums," says John Mellencamp. "Take their voices off and it's Buddy Holly."
The Les Paul Custom then became known as the “tuxedo” Les Paul with its Ebony and Alpine White color finishes, accentuated with shiny gold hardware. The Custom PRO features a classic gold LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge and a gold stopbar tailpiece. You’ll find more gold in the headstock with the gold Grover tuners. It also features a fully bound body, headstock and neck, as well as pearloid fretboard inlays.

Taylor Guitars is an American guitar brand based in California. The company was founded in the mid 1970’s, and it has since grown into one of the largest and most respected acoustic guitar companies. Taylor guitars are recognized for their incredible quality, craftsmanship, and innovation, while still being an accessible guitar at a reasonable price.
The FR6UC's matt black flat finish and lack of bling lends the instrument a mean, no-nonsense aesthetic that would be a perfect fit for the modern metalcore player. There's an ebony fingerboard and its neck is a five-piece affair, with two thin strips of 0.5mm walnut between three sections of maple. The FR6UC's suitably rock-looking distressed pickup covers house a pair of Bare Knuckle Aftermath humbuckers with "accelerated bass response for exceptionally fast tracking of high-speed staccato riffing with crushing midrange and precise high-end articulation". The 14.7k-ohm bridge unit comprises a trio of ceramic magnets, while the neck is Alnico V with a DC resistance of 11.5k ohms. This instrument is built cleanly with excellent fretwork, as you would expect from a Japanese guitar at this price point, although it has to be noted that - considering its relatively compact proportions - it's a little on the weighty side, weighing in at 3.8kg (8.4lbs). The FR6UC's Bare Knuckle Aftermaths in full humbucking mode are perfect for a gamut of king-size-yet- articulate heavy rock tones, from Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age right through to Deftones and Slipknot. That said, the Aftermaths are by no means all about metallic high gain; back off the volume and switch to position two or four to get one of the inner coils in isolation and you'll enjoy pleasantly springy Strat-style tones. It may be none-more-black in appearance, but there's a broad range of hues on the FR6UC's sonic palette.
Aside from the superstrat ESP M-10 shown earlier. The ESP LTD EC-10 is also an affordable guitar but with a different body design derived from the Les Paul. The features of this LP inspired guitar that makes it different is the bevels on the body and belly cut at the back for comfort. Its major resemblance to a Les Paul is the humbuckers pick-ups equip on the guitar. Together with the bridge design for having a stopbar and tom bridge without a whammy bar.

The 1934-’35 Dobro Hawaiian had the relief sections around a round central bridge/pickup “cover” with a Dobro “lyre” logo between the pickup and the neck. The more-or-less rounded lower bout (cutout at the butt) culminated in two little pointed shoulders, which then tape into the neck, giving it an almost “Spanish” look if you squint and ignore the cast designs. The tapered head had two cutouts in the middle and a triple-stepped top extended on the bass side. The principal difference between this earliest Dobro and the one shown in Gruhn/Carter is the tailpiece, which was a curved, cast-in affair, unlike the rectangular tail on the later version. Also, the side relief panels are painted black, with the whole thing clear-coated to seal it. On this first Dobro electric lap there is no volume control. The jack is on the but, in the bottom cutout, next to the strap button.
While the Boss ME-80 doesn’t have anything in terms of extras to really blow expectations out of the water, it includes some nice and handy features. The onboard looper works well and has 38 seconds of loop time, which is enough time to do some basic jamming over some chords. And speaking of jamming, the AUX input on the back of the ME-80 is nice, since it allows you to plug in an iPhone/metronome/mp3 player/any other music playing device and jam along with your music (this is fun and a feature we would actually use). The USB output lets you take patch editing over to your computer, in BOSS's Tone Studio software. Cool, but not necessary since editing patches is actually very easy and actually quite fun on the unit itself (no complicated menus to go through - just fun knobs!). One idiosyncrasy to be aware of is that if you plug anything into the headphones jack, the speaker simulator is automatically enabled. This is great for solo practice in your headphones, but note that that’s the only way to actually switch it on.
I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL.
What most of us know as the classic ’60s Teisco line began in 1964. The year marked both the debut of many new guitar models, noted by a transition to a new headstock designs (which can help you date a particular guitar). As already noted, Teisco headstocks through the ’50s were mainly variants of the Gibson three-and-three. Indeed, these remained into the ’60s on Teisco hollowbodies.
The jumbo frets give you extra room for shredding, which is great because this guitar plays fast and smooth, so you’ll definitely be shredding on it (once you work up the chops). It employs Ibanez’s classic bolt-on neck with the ultra-deep cutaway for high access to the fretboard and rounds it all out with a three-way selector and plenty of onboard tone controls.
The third technique I would like to talk about today consists in, once again, doubling a distorted, or not, guitar sound with a...folk guitar. This will give you much more definition and sustain on arpeggios, while on rhythm guitars it will allow you to highlight the sound's percussive aspect, and on power chords it will make your sound more powerful. This production technique has been around for ages (Led Zeppelin was pretty fond of it, for instance). But this doesn't mean that it's an outdated trick and it can't be used on modern productions: lots of contemporary metal bands still use it nowadays.
As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.
Over the past three years, Gibson’s annual revenue has fallen from $2.1 billion to $1.7 billion, according to data gathered by Music Trades magazine. The company’s 2014 purchase of Philips’s audio division for $135 million led to debt — how much, the company won’t say — and a Moody’s downgrading last year. Fender, which had to abandon a public offering in 2012, has fallen from $675 million in revenue to $545 million. It has cut its debt in recent years, but it remains at $100 million.
Bass amplifier equipment manufacturers include a variety of different types of companies, ranging from companies that only make individual components (e.g., Accugroove loudpeakers, a speaker manufacturer) to companies that only make bass amplifiers and loudspeakers (e.g., Gallien-Krueger). At the other end of the spectrum are companies that offer bass amplification equipment as part of a much broader offering of different types of instrument amplifiers and public address systems (e.g., Peavey, Carvin A&I or Yorkville Sound.)
Guitar-Sunbeam : Precisely transmits the eternal electric guitar, ideally suited for modern production. It combines an extensive library of strum patterns, brute force, arpeggios and real riffs with real-time performance monitoring. An innovative playback engine allows you to create an almost infinite number of variations of chords and you get convincing, musical results.

Bring up the topic of electrics, and Martin is hardly the first name of recall. The term “electrics” is not meant to include the company’s many fine acoustic-electric guitars, many sporting top-notch electronics (which ultimately remain acoustic beasts), but rather electric guitars meant for country chicken pickin’ or raunchy rock and roll. However, beginning in the early ’60s, Martin has launched periodic forays into the electric guitar marketplace with some very interesting, if commercially unsuccessful, results (which explains why the Martin name doesn’t come immediately to mind). Most coverage of the Martin brand is focused, quite rightly, on their substantial acoustic achievements. For this essay, however, let’s take an alternative view and look at the company’s various electric guitars, its thinline hollowbodies and later solidbodies.


Adding to their already good value, most multi-effects come with built-in features that are essential to gigging and practicing, first of which is a built-in tuner. Looping is also a good feature to look for, thankfully it now comes standard for most units. Having the ability to record straight to a computer is another handy features that should be considered, as well as the ability to edit the settings via your computer or mobile device. Built-in metronome/rhythm is also a nice plus, especially for those who want to take their skill to the next level.

In 2003,[73] Gibson debuted its Ethernet-based[74] audio protocol, MaGIC, which it developed in partnership with 3COM, Advanced Micro Devices, and Xilinx.[73] Replacing traditional analog hook-ups with a digital connection that would, "...satisfy the unique requirements of live audio performances," may have been the goal of this project.[74] This system may require a special pickup,[73] but cabling is provided by a standard Cat-5 ethernet cable.[73][74]

Zactly!!!!!!!! Terry Kath, hands down the greatest ever! Hendrix is on everybodies list as the best, well Jimi said Terry was the best and if Jimi said it it's good enough for the rest of us. I just can't believe it took until Sept. 24th 2009 for someone to put his name down! To bad he valued the band concept more than his ego or he would be more well respected.
I haven't listened to all the amps on the list but found the Rivera Knucklehead blew away every Fender, Marshalla and Mesa in the shop when I was testing things out for the clean blues with a PRS. My daughter playfully plugged in a Gretsch baritone, cranked up the gain and Three Days Grace came screaming out with the finest quality. She agreed the Knucklehead was a win.
By the early 1980s, the radical experiments of early 1970s-era fusion gave way to a more radio-friendly sounds of smooth jazz. Guitarist Pat Metheny mixed the sounds of blues, country, and “world” music, along with rock and jazz, playing both a flat-top acoustic guitar and an electric guitar with a softer, more mellow tone which was sweetened with a shimmering effect known as “chorusing". During the 1980s, a neo-traditional school of jazz sought to reconnect with the past. In keeping with such an aesthetic, young guitarists of this era sought a clean and round tone, and they often played traditional hollow-body arch-top guitars without electronic effects, frequently through vacuum tube amplifiers.
Launch price: $999 / £899 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Amp models: 33 | Effects: 42 | Connections: Standard guitar input, minijack stereo aux input, standard main outputs (L/Mono, R), XLR main outputs (L/Mono, R), standard stereo phones output, standard Send (L/Mono, R), standard Return (L/Mono, R), MIDI in, MIDI out/thru, USB, expression pedal | Power requirements: Mains power (IEC lead)
Another Quality Ibanez Guitar ....This example is MODEL VINTAGE # V302 BS...And it IS A REAL GEM and it has a Premium German Sitka SOLID Spruce Top, WoW! what a nice original finish this one has...AAA Mahogany Sides-Neck & Back "see quality og the grain in the pics" . Lots of Full-and Wonderful rich tone from this baby. Its real ez to play & stays in tune well. It is a crafted in Japan guitar and it compairs favorably to Gibson, Guild or Martin! Please Note: If you prefer the guitar in Natural and not sunburst see our other listing for another V302 non sunburst we have in stock & available.. thank you for your interest, Joe .
Furtadosonline proudly presents our wide range of bass guitars for every playing style and musical need. Whatever the type of music you play, you\'ll find the right bass guitar from all your favorite brands Gibson, ESP, Warwick, Squier,Yamaha, Epiphone, Musicman, Cort and many more. Feel free to Choose an electric bass, an acoustic bass, an upright bass, a fretless bass, a left-handed bass, a 5-string bass, and even a 6 string bass, we have it all. Don\'t forget to browse through our portal for essential bass gear like bass amps, bass effects, bass heads and bass speaker cabinets. If you\'re shopping for bass guitar accessories look no further, bass strings, hardshell case or a gig bag for your bass. Feel free to take advantage of our wide range and great seasonal discounts. It is absolutley safe to purchase from us online and we can assure you total satisfaction backed by the Furtados Service Guarantee.
Phrase sampler: Like a loop pedal, a phrase sampler will store loops or phrases of even greater length. The more expensive and sophisticated phrase samplers will save multiple phrases or loops, drum and bass, rhythm guitar, or practice solos. Some have USB connectivity and can hook up to your computer for uploading, so you never lose a loop or phrase.
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The body of the guitar is usually made of wood; different types of woods are used by different manufacturers, and there is ongoing debate concerning which is best. Typical woods include maple, mahogany, swamp ash and alder for quality guitars, and plywood or pine for cheaper, less durable guitars. While the type of wood used in the solid body of an electric guitar will noticeably affect the sound it produces, the quality of the sound is most affected by the pickups which convert the vibration of the strings into an electrical signal, as well as the amplifier that's used to shape and model such signal. We could go on and on dissecting the technical aspects of electric guitars, and yet never get close to that which makes that music unique: it's soul. That's something that can be clearly felt and experienced by players and listeners alike, but which all the while can hardly be put into words. Enjoy the electric guitar music loops!
The guitar is very light in weight and pretty resonant. At this point they were hard-wiring the cord right into the guitar with a nifty spring strain relief on the plug. This guitar has a brighter sound than my Gretsch and I probably prefer it for ultra-clean work because it has that vintage "thang" going on that some call "mojo." I am, however, trying to get the driven sound sorted at this point because of all the overtones. Now I know what sort of sound the Telecaster bridge pickup was based upon!
Here we have another very Beautiful and rare "The Aria Model" Vintage Japanese F style Mandolin with such amazing tone!!! nearing 40 years old these are AMAZING! This is the rare " The Aria" Model M700 as seen on the Classic inlay in the headstocks Gorgeous Brazilian Rosewood veneer is a super beautiful Japanese example of the highly revered F style mandolin made famous by Gibson. These older models were put out during the 1970s this example was 1973. These premium examples have become so popular with Players & Collectors over the past several years now. The inlays on the neck and headstock and the classic violin sunburst on this model are simply gorgeous! The top is solid tight grained old growth Sitka spruce and the back & sides are premium AAA figured & flamed maple, the neck is Mahogany This particular M 700 is in very good condition with some minimal wear from playing please refer to the pics for those details. The original case and pick guard are also still present and do come with this fine instrument the guard is simply off for now. With the resurgence in popularity of Bluegrass and other music styles utilizing the wonderful Mandolin sound in recordings and live performances these rare Gibson Replicas vintage mandolins have been steadily increasing in popularity and in value because players are catching onto the great old high end vintage Japanese instruments now so the demand has risen accordingly. If you're looking for a great Vintage Mandolin that is extremely well made with top craftsmanship utilizing top the grade AAA woods that have now aged and have a wonderful vintage patina to them these are the affordable Japanese vintage F Mandolin alternative choice to a $5000.00 - $10,000 vintage Gibson F-5 ..thats why many Pros today are seeking the best vintage for a great deal. This Old Aria M700 is simply a great one!.
Yamaha-C5-Salamander-JNv5.1- Arguably the best free piano on the internet and better than many of the expensive ones as well. Modified for sf2 with five brightness levels with optional resonance and this set includes the new Dark, Mellow and Dynamic Grands.  All in a set at 592mb in size.  This version has the detailed 15 velocity layers for seamless expression.
This beautiful wood is not a very common tonewood for the construction of a guitar body, but you may see it more commonly in neck construction. However, it has been done to build a guitar body, and it was done well on the famous Gibson J-200 that the Epiphone EJ-200SCE also imitated. It’s a very solid, hard, and dense wood that has amazing sound punch and bright tones.

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The tone selector on an electric guitar controls the capacitor, which basically filters out high frequencies. The same way a high-cut filter (or low-pass-filter if you prefer) works on a standard equalizer. By dialing down the tone, you remove brightness and treble. The pickup selector does just what it's called.. Selecting which pickups being used to capture the vibration of the strings, and translates the energy into electric current, though the configuration and number of "presets" can vary from guitar to guitar, depending on how many pickups it has etc. If you're a handyman you can even configure this yourself.
Well, that’s not exactly what he said. Although, it would seem that way, if you take time to browse the company's Facebook photos. Every guitar the company makes is truly enticing and a work of art. Moreover, the quality of each instrument is astoundingly good. Take the Xuul Katan VI. While the guitar is certainly unique, it also boasts a strong specs list:
Hey! I just opened up my 1984 g&l for the first time today and I found a design very similar to this. I had always loved the tone control on it but was too nervous to open it up for whatever goofy reason. I may try to draw it out and share it but maybe include a picture at some point as well. I’m glad someone else has looked at this because it definitely threw me for a loop when I first saw the two caps both headed to ground.

The first design was an Early Telecaster model, called Squier, with a single mic. The main contribution Leo Fender did, was the bode and neck removal separetly. In previous models, when the guitar need repairs, the complete instrument needed to be sent, while, after Leo fender design, the plate could be unscrew and sent to the shop only the damaged part.
FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 and up. Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer. Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.Add $25.00 for finished maple fretboards.
i have an old Dorado solid-body electric serial # 0726454 on the neck plate it says STEEL ADJUSTABLE NECK, then the serial number, then made in japan. it has abalone fret markers, and dorado is in abalone in the headstock, blonde finish white-black-white-black pickguard, and a funky trem. i was told once that maybe guild had made this guitar... seems pretty unlikely... and that it retains it's original value, it all seems pretty unlikely... but i don't know... please help!!!

It will take time to write and update all of the content at once. Come back regularly and I promise that there will be always something new for you to read, the list with essential guitar effects will be constantly updated. If you are just starting out, we recommend going through some online guitar training before you dive in the guitar pedals world.


There’s a common belief that certain strings are better for beginners than others. While nylon strings can be easier on beginner’s fingers, the main thing that matters when it comes to guitar strings is the style of music you are planning to play, because the difference in feel and sound between the two materials is significant – even for a beginner.

I have an old Zoom 505 all in one pedal plugged into the clean channel of my Peavy Scorpion 2-12 amp. I’m using the distortion, chorus, reverb, delay, etc. programmed from my pedal. I want to add my Crybaby wah so it’s just a matter of easily just switching the order of both pedals and see what works best. Until I upgrade, it should be simple. Here we go. Thanks.


With the new Shreddage 2X update released in July 2014, S2 is better than ever. Enjoy a brand-new user interface and totally rewritten engine, with intelligent string / fret selection, new features and options, even more customizable mapping, and new samples like powerchord slides and staccatos. You can also use new built-in effects pedals and save/load your own custom presets to use across multiple projects.
This pickup is a solid choice for those who might want to keep their options open in terms of style or who have a responsibility to multiple genres and music types. Typically you’ll use the JB model for the bridge and the Jazz model for the neck, matching the configuration for notable users such as Seymour Duncan himself, Randy Rhodes and Jeff Beck.
Kill Switch A kill switch abruptly stops the sound while it is active and lets the sound play again whilst not active. On guitars with a pickup and pots configuration like that of a typical Les Paul this can be achieved by turning the volume for one pickup off and playing with the pickup selector in the middle position. Whilst holding a note, the player can rapidly switch between middle pickup and the silenced pickup giving a stuttering effect. Do this at your own risk because rapidly switching pickups will inevitably wear your pickup selector. This effect is sometimes implemented by a pedal which is only active while it is pressed down (unlike most pedals which are one click on/one click off). Some people will also modify their guitars to add a dedicated killswitch.
Oh man.......... back to that Firebird 12. It is luscious. I have several tracks from 1973 where I used metal finger picks when tracking that thing and playing high up on the neck with a bit of compression.... heaven!!! I then did some standard chaka chaka rhythm parts with the 12 through a Marshall 50 watt.... heaven x 100. The guitar is SO comfortable to play, sits in ANY mix perfectly and dominates the "oooohhhh" factor with its sound. Please please please sell it to me!!!!!!
Like in the overall best-selling list, there are a few amps on this list which have been discontinued but continue to sell very well on the used market. Part of the reason these amps rank so high on our lists is that Reverb is one of the only places these models are still being sold, meaning that our sales likely account for a sizable chunk of the entire used market for these particular amps.
Finally, the Univox 1085 PA Amplifier System ($1,035) was another piggyback with 10 tubes, 105 watts, four channels, eight inputs, external echo or equalizer connection, four volumes plus master volume, bass, middle, treble, presence, reverb with footswitch, and a cabinet with four 15″ Univox speakers with 20-ounce Alnico magnets and 2″ voice coils. It also had 12 high-frequency horns with crossover networks, usually used with two cabinets.
I could not afford an American or European guitar when I was 12, but Sam Ash sported a Japanese stratoslabber, with 1, 2, 3, or 4 pickups. Each extra pick up was another eight dollars! I bought the 2 pick up model for $24 and brought it home. What a square slab. The wood had the aspects of cardboard, it was probably what is called basswood. The pickups were single coil, chrome covered, and no better than a deArmond harp mike. My brother returned it, and bought a better looking tele style Japanese guitar I believe by Kent, with tin foil inserts in the pick ups. It went from Kandy apple red, to natural, to white, and finally to trunk-splatter grey with Seymour Duncan pickups and Grover tuners. I finally sold it in 2009.

I'm sorry to disagree Merlin, but the woods used really do make a big difference to the sound of a solid body guitar. Both the neck and body are resonators, the string energy drives the woods which damp some frequencies and use that energy to emphasise the resonant frequencies. That drives the string's vibration through the bridge/nut/fretboard. It's a feedback loop.


If the microphonic problem is not due to the cover, or is with a singlecoil pickup you have two options. First is to wax pot the pickup. The second is to pot the pickup in something else. Laquer was once commonly used, but it can cause a problem with some types of insulation (disolving it) and prevents future repair (other than full rewind). I have found a great alternative to both. It is vinyl sanding sealer. (I'm using Sherwin williams wood classics interior sanding sealer) This stuff penetrates deeply, dries solidly, and allows for repairs same as wax does. It requires no special equipment or care. Just submerge the pickup wait till bubbles stop appearing, pull it out and set it on a paper towel to dry. Once the excess has run off (a minute or so) wipe off the top and bottom of the pickup with a rag and allow it to finish drying. In it's intended use it dries fully in an hour. I leave them overnight.
San Francisco-based Senior Contributing Editor Joe Gore has recorded with Tom Waits, PJ Harvey, Tracy Chapman, Courtney Love, Marianne Faithfull, Les Claypool, Flea, DJ Shadow, John Cale, and many other artists. His music appears in many films and TV shows, plus an incriminating number of jingles. Joe has written several thousand articles about music and musicians and has contributed to many musical products, including Apple’s Logic and GarageBand programs. In his spare time Joe produces the Joe Gore line of guitar effects and edits a geeky guitar blog (tonefiend.com).
Mikko, spot on. Even light wood has density, and there comes a point in solid body electric guitars where how dense any piece of wood is only makes a difference acoustically. The point you made about how a guitar feels when you're playing it is sound, though. Its weight and acoustic resonance will affect how you respond to it and how you attack it (same for neck thickness and profile), and that will account for the preference we have for one guitar over another of the same model.
I, too, am searching for more info on my Kent. It's a Model 834, violin shaped with a cutaway. Mine is red with "racing stripe" binding on the edge. It's sounds INCREDIBLE (very vintage) and plays well, though I find the neck very narrow. There was an E-Bay auction for a couple of framed ads which featured this model, plus the 833, 835 and 836 from 1967 (one of the pictures, from what I could tell, looked exactly like mine). I also tracked down a picture of one that is a Yellow 67 with a Bigsby-Style vibrato (mine lacks this). If anyone finds a source for more Kent info, I'd love to hear from you...
While there's nothing necessarily wrong with plonking your mic right at the centre of the speaker cone if it gets what you're after, a lot of producers take the time to experiment with different positionings off axis, where the sound is typically warmer. Mike Hedges: "Depending on where you have [the mic] — outer speaker or inner speaker — you get the difference in tone from the edge of the speaker and the centre of the cone." In fact, Mike Clink also tries small changes in position even when working with basically on-axis sounds. "I'll point [the SM57] exactly dead on, though I might move it an inch or two to get the right sound."
Very difficult guitar to put down. I was browsing local guitar shops, looking for a deal on a used MIM Stratocaster, just to have, I'm an SG man. This guitar caught my eye and the store owner was kind enough to allow me a little play time with this visually stunning guitar. I think I was expecting another copy of Fender's Stratocaster, given the shape and three single coil pickups. From the first strum I knew this was something different, tonally like a cross between a Strat and a "Rick". That's a very big deal. Finish was excellent and setup close to ideal for me, so I wound up with a new guitar for roughly what I expected to pay for a used model. Getting home I immediately ran through my amps, trying to find something to complain about. I'm lucky to have a few tube amps known for excellent clean channels. This is my preference, and this guitar does not disappoint. Think 60s Ventures, dripping with reverb. Yeah! Overall this guitar gives a great range of tone, is comfortable though just this side of heavy and seems to be very well made. Moderate use of Leo Fender's brilliant trem doesn't seem to effect tune. The guitar came strung with 9s, though I've since moved to 10s, my personal preference. And it fits a Strat hardcase perfectly. To be crystal clear, this guitar doesn't replace any of the legends, such as my beloved SG's or Strats. Instead, it provides a beautiful and unique enhancement for guitarists that favor those instruments.
I recently purchased this guitar,and was wondering if you had any insight of it? i.e.-the pick up selector switch has a reverse,mono,& off setting.Question is:I would like to know if their are certain settings that only work,because I'm just not hearing that much of a difference in sound with this thing? I am running through two amps with the "VOX" original stereo chord,it has 12 volume & 12 tone knobs.
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Unfortunately there are a few who are not too happy with with some of the default patches, they caution that the PODHD500X is not a plug-and-play unit. While you can get good tones with a bit of tweaking, you can get even better tones with more experience, so the learning curve can be a bit steep for some. For best results, you ought to research the actual gear that your favorite musicians use, along with their settings and use them as your starting points to creating your own tones. Thankfully, there are user made presets that you can also use as base for your own virtual signal chain.
Due to the acoustic, aesthetic and processing properties (workability, finishing, joints) the wood and the ligno-cellulose composites are the most valued materials for the musical instruments' construction. The guitar is made up of a complex structure, formed by a vertical wall in a curve shape (technologically named "sides") and two faces made up of ligno-cellulose plates, so that it should... [Show full abstract]
The electric guitar was at the heart of popular music for the new generation. Fender released the Telecaster – the first mass produced solid body electric which made it possible for the average Joe to buy a guitar and start a band to express themselves.  With amplifiers and solid body electrics the volume could be cranked and every bit of emotion displayed through the music.
Except for the Epiphone Les Paul Express’s total domination of the mini guitar category, there was no clear leader among the guitars, and our picks are the guitars that got the best average ratings. Our testers found lots to like in many of the guitars we tried, and you may find an axe you like better in our competition section below, where we include comments on all the guitars we tested.
But where do you start? What do all these different pedals do? In this guide we will give you a brief overview of what each different type of effect does so you can make sure you are looking for the right gear. If you're new to the pedal world, you might wanna check out our selection of best guitar pedals for beginners while you're here. And if you already have some pedals but want advice on which pedalboard to get, click here!
Being a PODHD user for many years now, I am but one of the many who commend its balance of versatility and sound quality. Like many reviewers, it allows me to gig and record conveniently, often times plugging straight to PA with great results. I've also seen a number of professionals using PODHD500X's in their concerts, so it's not surprising that even experts at Music Radar were convinced, saying: "The modelling is excellent throughout, with authentic-sounding amps and quality effects".

Tube or solid-state? One has the nice warm vintage tone, but the other is just so much simpler and free of hassle. Vox make one of the best hybrid amps, which heats up your guitar signal with a proper 12AX7 tube in the preamp before it becomes amplified by conventional transistors to deliver up to 30 Watts. A warm tone with smooth overdrive, but without the aggravation.


Seagull S6 Original Acoustic guitar is one of the best gadgets for the beginners in the list. It comes with the beautiful texture of domestic wild cherry back and sides that give it a unique tone. In addition to that silver leaf maple neck with a rosewood fretboard lets the fingers to have a perfect grip and easy tuning. It’s a power pack guitar to get you the best playing experience and hands on many of the tricks you are looking for.
One important thing about caring for a guitar is keeping the wood supple and moist, and quite often, you have to purchase a separate humidifier block with any guitar. Not this guitar, though. The Cordoba C12 comes with its own humidifier block right in the case. You just have to make sure you keep it moist every week. It is now ranked first on the best classical guitar list.
When jazz guitar players improvise, they use the scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chords in a tune's chord progression. The approach to improvising has changed since the earliest eras of jazz guitar. During the Swing era, many soloists improvised "by ear" by embellishing the melody with ornaments and passing notes. However, during the bebop era, the rapid tempo and complicated chord progressions made it increasingly harder to play "by ear." Along with other improvisers, such as saxes and piano players, bebop-era jazz guitarists began to improvise over the chord changes using scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) and arpeggios.[2] Jazz guitar players tend to improvise around chord/scale relationships, rather than reworking the melody, possibly due to their familiarity with chords resulting from their comping role. A source of melodic ideas for improvisation is transcribing improvised solos from recordings. This provides jazz guitarists with a source of "licks", melodic phrases and ideas they incorporate either intact or in variations, and is an established way of learning from the previous generations of players.
Admit it. You’ve slow danced to Stairway To Heaven before. Page’s playing have influenced so many guitar players of today, and Led Zeppelin revolutionized Rock and Roll blending acoustic guitars, banjos, and mandolins while still staying with the same gritty rock image. His guitar riffs are forever etched into Rock and Roll’s hall of fame. How influential was he? Step into a guitar store, and you’ll see. Thousands of 12 year old kids across the globe are playing the intro to Stairway. Now that’s how you know you’ve made it.
You should have been making all the above adjustments with the preferred gauge of strings, but since you have probably loosened and tightened the strings a number of times over the course of this process, you should now put on a fresh set and do a final check of all the settings Neck adjustments in particular can tend to settle in over the a couple hours after they have been done, so I find it best to then let the guitar sit overnight and do a final check the next day. The bottom line in ending up with a quality set-up is making each of the important adjustments in the correct order: Neck- then Nut- then Bridge saddles.
While it is well loved for its HD amp models, it also packs quite a lot of effects (over 100!), applying the same HD modeling technology on actual stompboxes to get them to sound as close to the real thing as possible. The amp modeling and effects section together allow for a wide variety of tones, while the deep controls that you have over each amp and effect parameter allows for even more in-between tones, so you can craft your very own sound. The LED rings add to the unit's overall eye candy and improve the already intuitive interface of the unit. It also houses extensive input and output options, including having its very own mic preamp, so you can use it for a variety of instruments and even vocals. Other features include built-in 48-second looping, tuning and compatibility with Line 6' modeling instrument (Variax) and amps.

Me got a Dorado resonator guitar, very nice dark walnut finish with white binding on edges. I bought it in 1985 but assume the guitar is mid-70's. Incidentally the neck has a very "japanese" feel to it. I was told by a guitar dealer that these particular instruments may have been ( at least partially) manufactured in Japan, then possibly had their resonators fitted in USA. They were DISTRIBUTED by Gretsch, in Europe at any rate. Mine is a nice guitar but not nearly as loud as most resonators.
You have tonnes of distortion models based on the likes of the classic DS-1 (Dist-1) and Pro Co Rat (Squeak) pedals and more as well as boost, delay and modulation effects. An onboard tuner, stereo/mono looper with up to 80- seconds of phrase recording, tap tempo, stereo headphone output for silent practice and the ability to use up to 7 effects simultaneously.
The Supro line continued to grow in 1938, as can be seen in the CMI catalog. Still around was the Supro Spanish Guitar, now called the Supro Avalon Spanish Guitar, other than the name change (which is not featured on the guitar, as far I can ascertain), it is identical. Gone are the wood-bodied, frumpy-pear Supro Hawaiian Model and the Model D amplifier, although a Supro Special amplifier is mentioned (and not described) as being available for $40, the same price as the Model D. One and the same?
@Umberto – Thanks for supporting Strymon! 🙂 The best place for the Lex is where it sounds best to you. If you like how it sounds in front of your drive pedals, I recommend using it in that location. I also want to note that turning up the PREAMP DRIVE on the Lex can lead to lower effect output volume and recommend using the pedals on-board boost (up to +6dB of boost) to counter this loss of volume.
One look at its distinct bowl-back body, and you already know that the Ovation Applause Elite AE44II is not your average wooden guitar. This distinct back is crafted from Lyrachord, the same material which is said to be used in helicopter blades and more. This results in a lightweight instrument that's not as fragile as wood. Still it does come with a solid spruce top and other wooden components, so it doesn't sound or look too out of the ordinary. Finally, the guitar comes equipped with an undersaddle piezo and preamp system, which features a 3-band EQ and built-in tuner.

Starting from the body, we see the standard Les Paul shape. The tonewood of choice is mahogany, as expected, but this time it comes with a maple top. The top of the guitar arches slightly just like the original Les Paul does. In terms of details, we see a white binding around the top section that really stands out on the dark matte finish.  It's something to behold.

Vacuum tubes were the dominant active electronic components in bass amplifiers manufactured from the 1950s until the early 1970s, and tubes continue to be used in the 2010s for expensive bass combo amplifiers, amp heads, and preamplifiers (as well, tube amps continue to be used by audiophiles for some expensive home hifi stereo systems). Tube amplifiers for bass almost always use class AB1 topology for efficiency reasons.


Full hollow-body guitars have large, deep bodies made of glued-together sheets, or "plates", of wood. They can often be played at the same volume as an acoustic guitar and therefore can be used unplugged at intimate gigs. They qualify as electric guitars inasmuch as they have fitted pickups. Historically, archtop guitars with retrofitted pickups were among the very earliest electric guitars. The instrument originated during the Jazz Age, in the 1920s and 1930s, and are still considered the classic jazz guitar (nicknamed "jazzbox"). Like semi-acoustic guitars, they often have f-shaped sound holes.
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