Famous for having created reference electric guitars like the Telecaster and the Stratocaster in the 1950's, the US-based manufacturer has also been offering amps since 1948 to complement its guitar range. The first series was called "tweed" because of the typical cabinet covering. Among Fender's most well-known amps, we have the famous Bassman (1952), which was originally conceived for bass guitar, as its name implies, but turned out to be readily adopted by guitar players. The Twin (1952) and its different variations (especially the Twin Reverb) also influenced rock history with The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton. Fender's amplifier range is quite comprehensive (see the Hot Rod, Champ, Princeton, and Bandmaster series) and its common denominator is a clean sound that is still a reference in its category.

I've been to Steve about a dozen times with my guitars, families and friends instruments and have sent several people there and have nothing but great things to say. He is reasonably priced and likely one of the most talented and experienced Luthier's in Boston. It's rare to see any establishment get 5 stars from so many people and Steve deserves it! Only thing is, if you're in a rush to get your instrument back, go somewhere else where they do it quickly and without much thought/TLC. Steve takes his time to do it right and has a lot of customers because he's the guy to go to in the greater Boston area. Highly recommend!
The blues was my inspiration-specifically, the late-'40s solo recordings of John Lee Hooker. "Hobo Blues" is an excellent example of early Hooker on which his violent string slapping-clearly audible in a blend of amp sound, haunting vocals, and trademark foot stomping-creates an indelible realism and engaging intimacy. My recording of Paris Slim's "The Day I Met The Boogie Man" (see the sidebar "Selected Discography") was one of my early experiments with this technique. Since that time, I have used a discrete "air-guitar" mic whenever I have had an available track for it. Guitarists may initially be skeptical of such unusual miking, but it's always a treat to watch their faces light up as they listen to the monitors deliver the bright, transient sounds that they have been accustomed to hearing during their years of practicing their instruments.
CALIFORNIA CLASSIC models feature superb playability, distinctive looks and an unmistakable Fender vibe. The fully-painted solid Sitka spruce top and natural solid mahogany back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-line headstock and koa binding and rosette, give them an elegant two-toned aesthetic that was made for the stage. California Special and California Classic acoustic guitars are equipped with a Fender- and Fishman-designed PM preamp specifically tuned to complement the unique shape and voice of each instrument—complete with tuner, frequency and phase controls.

The greatest all time innovative guitarist to come out of the UK. Such a distinctive style and sound which is most important. Many guitarists have a similar sound and tone to others. This guy got me hooked on the sound of the guitar from a young age and I have tried to find others in a similar vein to no avail and I own over 2000 rock/metal CD's and have followed the scene since the mid 80's. A totally under estimated guitarist in my opinion. Long live The Cult.
The most defining feature has got to be the neck. It’s thicker than the standard Strat neck, which gives extra meat to work with when bending those strings. Even the fretboard was designed around this technique, with its narrow frets and flat fretboard. It’s not the cheapest one out there, but Fender Stevie Ray Vaughan Stratocaster is definitely one of the best Strats around.
Many bass players believe that tube amplifiers produce a "warmer" or more "natural" sound than solid state amplifiers when lightly or moderately driven, and more pleasing distortion characteristics when overdriven. Some performers also believe that tube amps have a greater level of perceived loudness for a given amount of amplifier power. Even though tube amplifiers produce more heat than solid state amplifiers, few manufacturers of tube amplifiers include cooling fans in the amplifiers' chassis. Usually adequate cooling is provided by passive convection. Adequate airflow is needed to prevent excessive heat from shortening the tubes' lifespan or producing tonal inconsistencies.[13] Tube amplifiers require more maintenance than solid state transistor amplifiers, such as replacing vacuum tubes or rectifying the tubes.

Resonator guitars are distinctive for not having a regular sound hole instead they have a large circular perforated cover plate which conceals a resonator cone. The cone is made from spun aluminum and resembles a loudspeaker. The bridge is connected to either the center or edge of the cone by an aluminum spring called the spider. The vibrations from the spider are projected by the cone through the perforated cover plate. The most common resonator guitars have a single cone although the original model patented in 1927 by John Dopyera had three and was called a tricone resophonic guitar. Resonator guitars are loud and bright. They are popular with blues and country guitarists and can be played with a slide or conventionally.
Guitar amplifiers vary widely in price and quality. Many music equipment companies import small, low-powered practice amplifiers for students and beginners that sell for less than $50 USD. Other companies produce expensive custom-made amplifiers for professional musicians, which can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars (USD). Most combo amplifiers have a carrying handle, and many combo amplifiers and cabinets have metal or plastic-reinforced corners to protect the amp during transportation.

I have to say I'm an Impact Soundworks fan. I haven't listened to the Archtop demos, but another one from them is Django Gypsy Jazz Guitar. The sound is stunning to me, both lead and rhythm. However, it depends on what style you're going for. It's not going to be as versatile as some other acoustic options, but what it does it does very well. I don't have it but it's on my buy list. I own Shreddage II SRP and it's my favorite electric because of the interface and playability.
SPRAYING TECHNIQUE Spray the body holding the can 6 to 8 inches away, moving either up and down or right and left depending on how you have set the nozzel. Start spraying from 2 inches outside the body and finish the stoke the same way. Don't stop or start the spry right on the body because you will end up with an uneven build up or paint drips. It is also good to spray a light "tack" coat first and let that dry for 45 min before laying on the thicker coats. This lets the paint adhere to the body better. You can also mount the guitar body to a square wooden stick that will fit inside the neck pocket so you can hold the guitar flat while you paint the top of it. This lets the coats build up thick and even, but watch for drips on the side.
On Thursday, mere days after launching a news site for women called the Lily, the Washington Post published a story by Geoff Edgers that mused on the supposed death of the electric guitar. Sales are down at places like Sam Ash and Guitar Center, big guitar makers like Fender and Gibson have seen their revenues decline, and in 2010, acoustic guitars began to outsell electric guitars. Why? According to the piece, it’s because male guitar heroes are dying off and aspiring musicians have no men to look up to. Sad!
Clearly, when playing live rather than recording, the room you are in will create its own reverb. Live performance spaces are often prepared with a combination of acoustically absorbent and reflective materials to achieve the desired balance. Sometimes this means hi-tech purpose made fittings made of special materials. Often it's just judicious arrangement of curtains and rugs, combined with bare walls.

Distortion, overdrive, and fuzz can be produced by effects pedals, rackmounts, pre-amplifiers, power amplifiers (a potentially speaker-blowing approach), speakers and (since the 2000s) by digital amplifier modeling devices and audio software.[1][2] These effects are used with electric guitars, electric basses (fuzz bass), electronic keyboards, and more rarely as a special effect with vocals. While distortion is often created intentionally as a musical effect, musicians and sound engineers sometimes take steps to avoid distortion, particularly when using PA systems to amplify vocals or when playing back prerecorded music.
Ovation, Roundback, Adamas, Legend, Custom Legend, Elite, Applause, Celebrity, Balladeer, Ultra, Thunderbolt and Lyrachord , The Roundback body shape, Roundback design and Roundback Technology, Guitar Bowl Shape, Fingerboard Inlay Design, Sound hole Rosette Design, Adamas Peghead Shape, Bridge Design, Epaulet Design, Soundboard and Sound hole designs, Guitar Tuning Head are protected by one or more US and Foreign Trademarks and Patents.
John Scofield (b 1951) is an American jazz guitarist and composer, who has played and collaborated with Miles Davis, Joe Henderson, Charles Mingus, Joey DeFrancesco, Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny, Bill Frisell, Pat Martino, Mavis Staples, Phil Lesh, Billy Cobham, Medeski Martin & Wood, George Duke, Jaco Pastorius, John Mayer, and many other artists. Scofield had played a 1981 Ibanez AS-200 as his main guitar for over 20 years.[26]

The Zoom G3X features a built-in wah-wah expression pedal that controls the sound parameters in real time. It has over 100 effects and 22-amp models that bring out the amazing sounds of your guitar. This distortion pedal also features a stompbox with over 100 stage-ready effects. For computer recording, this pedal has a USB audio interface for Mac and PC. In addition, it has a balanced line-level output, an onboard chromatic tuner, and an integrated drum machine. Its 40-second looper gives it overdubbing capabilities.
When buying your first guitar, it’s sensible to stop and think about what you are buying it for. Is it just something to learn on? Will you be upgrading in a year or two when you start thinking about forming a band, gigging, and recording? If so, you may be better off trying one of these affordable electric guitars, which all offer a solid platform on which to learn.
When the Fender company was bought from CBS by a group of investors and employees headed by Bill Schultz in 1985, manufacturing resumed its former high quality and Fender was able to regain market share and brand reputation. This sparked a rise in mainstream popularity for vintage (and vintage-style) instruments. Dan Smith, with the help of John Page, proceeded to work on a reissue of the most popular guitars of Leo Fender’s era. They decided to manufacture two Vintage reissue Stratocaster models, a maple-fretboard 1957 and a rosewood-fretboard 1962 along with the maple-fretboard 1952 Telecaster, the maple-fretboard 1957 and rosewood-fretboard 1962 Precision Basses, as well as the rosewood-fretboard “stacked knob” 1962 Jazz Bass. This project was very important and critical to the company’s survival. These first few years (1982–1984) of reissues, known as American Vintage Reissues, are now high-priced collector’s items and considered as some of the finest to ever leave Fender’s Fullerton plant, which closed its doors in late 1984.
Another swell new hollowbody for ’66 was the EP-200L (Teisco Del Rey EP-10T Deluxe). This had an offset double-cutaway body basically like a Strat, with offset waist and a groovy single f-hole shaped like a stylized T. It also had the hooked four-and-two head, dots, twin square-poled pickups, roller bridge and Bigsby, and an elevated pickguard and semicircular control plate on the lower bout. Controls included two on/off rockers and a third solo/rhythm rocker, with volume and tone.
Boss’ CE-1 Chorus Ensemble was the first of these types commercially available, and is the best remembered of the company’s now-archaic looking early range of die-cast metal pedals. The unit was an instant success when it hit the market in 1976, and was quickly snatched up by a range of major players. Andy Summers used the CE-1 with the Police in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and it’s probably most famously heard on the band’s big 1979 hit “Message In A Bottle,” though others made creative use of it too. Shortly after the Boss, Electro-Harmonix offered both its Memory Man Stereo Echo/Chorus—which featured a very good, spacious chorus setting that a lot of player’s loved—and smaller, stand-alone Small Clone chorus. Like the Small Stone phaser before it, the Small Clone had a softer, subtler sound than many of the chorus pedals that would soon flood the market, and it too was a huge hit. Kurt Cobain’s use of the pedal on “Smells Like Teen Spirit” and Chris Novoselic’s bass part on “Come As You Are” from Nirvana’s Nevermind album shows off how it can add a rich, moving, liquid texture to both clean and distorted parts. MXR, DOD and Ibanez all offered popular early IC-based analog chorus pedals, and today every major mass-manufacturer has a unit on the market. 

Music enthusiasts can find a wide range of new and used guitar amplifiers on eBay, often for deep discounts.  Buyers who want to explore a wide range of possibilities should simply enter the keywords "guitar amplifier" into the eBay search bar, while those with more particular needs can refine their search by adding keywords associated with the make and model of the amplifier, as well as its color or condition.  The "ask the seller a question" feature will enable the buyer to ask additional questions pertaining to style, sound, and condition (if the guitar amplifier is used).
GUITAR BLEND/BALANCE POT, 500KA.  Bourns dual MN taper blend-balance with center detent. Split shaft. 17 mm body diameter. 1/4" knurled shaft diameter. Solder lugs. 3/8" bushing.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special MN taper used for balance/blend pots.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.
The remaining ’62 Teisco laps had a sort of paddle shape to the body, with sides wider than the fingerboard all the way up to the asymmetrical head with the circle Swan logo. The EG-A and EG-S had short scales and black fingerboards with the diamond markers, while the EG-U and EG-L had longer scales with fingerboards angled toward the bass side at the pickup. The EG-U had a light fingerboard with split-parallelogram markers, whereas the EG-L had a dark ‘board with dots. All were six-strings with one black-covered pickup and a little plate with volume and tone controls. Tuners mounted from behind the head as on a Spanish guitar.
The Truetone Rock Star has a classic 1960s Fender Jaguar - inspired body with a cherry & black sunburst finish and swank natural wood grain finish neck. The headstock has an odd, but killer-looking shape, an elaborately cut pick guard and what might be the world's coolest pickup; a chrome-cased body with a shimmery red marblized pickup cover. The guitar is 100% original with no replacement parts. We  rescued this one a while back and it was rusty and did not work when first tested. We meticulously detailed and cleaned it and removed the rust. We also re-soldered a few wires inside, and this fab Japanese guitar was ready to rock again. It sold and was shipped France, and the Rock Star is pretty rare, but there are lots of cool retro Truetone / Silvertone Japanese Guitars for sale below! Scroll Down for more from our collection!
The ultimate rock/metal electric guitar instrument is here! Shreddage II covers the entire range of lead AND rhythm playing – every fret, every string, and tons of articulations. A powerful interface allows for easy playing and deep customization. With the included Kontakt Player and ReValver HPse, you’ll have everything you need to SHRED. Now includes Shreddage 2X update!

RARE Epiphone Vintage FT-150 Bard Lefty Conversion with bone saddle. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides. Medium to low action. Beautiful sounding and playing guitar. Superb projection. Rivals guitars costing thousands.In excellent cosmetic condition with normal fretwear for a guitar it's age, and tiny dings here and there but nothing that stands out and looks gorgeous. Includes original right-handed, adjustable bridge. Includes hard shell case and original right-hand adjustable bridge if you wanna convert it back to a righty!


By the 1950's, brands like Gibson and Fender were gaining notoriety thanks to the popularity of rock 'n' roll and its stars weilding electric guitars. Guitarists like Dick Dale, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry and Chet Atkins could all be found carving their own places in music history with the electric guitar, and by the early 60's the instrument saw an extraordinary upsurge in popularity. Today, there are an endless amount of rock sub-genres, making no shortage of superbly crafted electric guitars from the world biggest brands, including Ibanez, Epiphone, and Danelectro, as well as Godin, Gretsch, Peavey and more. Whether you're into black metal or folk rock, you can be sure that there's an electric guitar that perfectly matches your own style and tastes, and it can easily be found right here, regardless of your skill level or budget.
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The Badazz U1820 guitar and U1820B bass were essentially bolt-neck copies of the new Guild S-100 introduced in 1970, the so-called “Guild SG.” This was a solidbody with slightly offset double cutaways. It had a bolt-on neck with a Gibson-style open book head, outlined decal logo, block inlays, bound 22-fret rosewood fingerboard (rounded end), two of the 12-pole humbuckers with the narrow center black insert, finetune bridge, Hagstrom-style vibrato (as found on early Guilds), two volume and two tone controls, plus three-way. The bass was the same without the vibrato and with dots along the upper edge of the fingerboard. These were available in cherry red, orange sunburst or natural (“naked”). List price for the guitars in ’71 was $199.50 with case, while the basses cost $220. These pickups, by the way, while being somewhat microphonic (as with most early Japanese units), scream, if you like a really hot, high-output sound.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Nickel, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Various
In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers did not have any tone controls. Tone controls on early guitar amplifiers were very simple and provided a great deal of treble boost, but the limited controls, the loudspeakers used, and the low power of the amplifiers (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. This made these early amplifier/speaker systems a poor way for upright bass players to amplify the sound of their instruments.

Funny, the Dorado was manufactured in Japan during the 70's and the Japanese factory worker must have arbitrarily placed a model number when he or she felt like it. However, it seems that Serial Numbers (presumably in proper sequence) were always assigned and hand written with a black ink pen. My example, while space is present, is void of any model number.


I have my Dad's '68 Kent guitar and am looking to have it restored..any info on parts would be helpful...I think all it needs is the spring for the vibrato (whammy bar)...everything else is there...the rubber piece on the bridge looks quite worn or perhaps brittle (rightfully so). Does anyone know what this guitar is worth? It's in orange sunburst ...It's a left handed guitar

While fan-braced modern classical Torres and post-Torres style instruments coexisted with traditional ladder-braced guitars at the beginning of the 20th century, the traditional forms eventually fell away. Some attribute this to the popularity of Segovia, considering him "the catalyst for change toward the Spanish design and the so-called 'modern' school in the 1920s and beyond."[5] The styles of music performed on ladder-braced guitars were becoming more and more unfashionable; and, e.g. in Germany, musicians were in part turning towards folk music (Schrammel-music and the Contraguitar), but this only remained localized in Germany and Austria and became unfashionable again. On the other hand, Segovia was playing in concerts around the world, popularizing his modern classical guitar, as well as a new style of music in the 1920s: Spanish romantic-modern style with guitar works by Moreno Torroba, de Falla, etc. Some people consider it to have been this influence of Segovia which led to the domination of the Torres instrument. Factories all over the world began producing them in large numbers.
Second, the right side of the pedal is a feedback controller and a series of knobs that allow you to adjust the Sonic Maximizer feature. This hallmark of the Acoustimax basically streamlines your guitar's tone, matching up the lows and highs of your acoustic's resonance and projecting them at the same time. Without this feature, the tone of an amplified acoustic can be inconsistent, projecting higher frequencies earlier than the low end resonance.
Absolutely killer amp in my opinion the best of that era as the De-luxe is too thin sounding and the Twin too loud, perfect working order excellent for small gigs and recording! Now! The important bit I will not ship abroad anymore due to minor damage caused to previous shipping and mistreatment and me having to issue partial refunds, so strictly no postage through EBAY'S SHIPPING SCHEME you can of course organise your own couriers at your risk, back to the item, it works and functions as it should with the exception of a mild hum when reverb is engaged otherwise it's perfect
International shipping and import charges paid to Pitney Bowes Inc. Learn More- opens in a new window or tab Any international shipping and import charges are paid in part to Pitney Bowes Inc. Learn More- opens in a new window or tab International shipping paid to Pitney Bowes Inc. Learn More- opens in a new window or tab Any international shipping is paid in part to Pitney Bowes Inc. Learn More- opens in a new window or tab

Why We Liked It - If you’re looking for an electric acoustic guitar that’s just great all round, and doesn’t have a large price tag, then this Yamaha has to come into consideration. It has all of the construction features you’d expect from a solid mid-range choice, with the addition of quality hardware, and nice touches like the scalloped x-braces. For those interested in Yamahas FG series, can always look at the alternative products, the yamaha FGX700SC.
A. Musical instruments, especially acoustic and electric guitars, are routinely pawned for short-term loans. Buyers prepared to pay cash can sometimes find high-quality acoustic guitars at pawn shops, but there are no guarantees on condition. Furthermore, the seller may or may not be able to provide any technical information or additional accessories.
In 1956 Jennings was shown a prototype guitar amplifier made by Dick Denney, a big band guitarist and workmate from World War II. The company was renamed Jennings Musical Industries, or JMI, and in 1958 the 15-watt Vox AC15 amplifier was launched. It was popularised by The Shadows and other British rock 'n' roll musicians and became a commercial success.
How about comparing the guitars only by the sound alone. Especially when overdriven playing in the realms rock and plug on the same amplifier or using the same set-up. Arguably there are many guitarist would find less expensive guitars are not bad at all. That they are also very much capable of producing the needed dirty tones and also able to produce a decent smooth clean sound to let players go out there and play.
For instance, the guitars that have a solid body are the most numerous out there. These models are as sturdy as they come, but they do not offer one plenty of resonance and sustainability. If you are interested in a design that mimics the figure of acoustic units, then you should pay attention to those guitars that have a hollow body. These products are able to deliver plenty of resonance, but they might not be of great help when it comes to feedback.
Gretsch G5422G12 Electromatic Double Cutaway Electric Guitar, 12-String   New from$999.99In Stockor 12 payments of $83.34 Free Ground Shipping Reverend 2017 Airwave 12 Electric Guitar, 12-String   New from$1,199.00In Stockor 12 payments of $99.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING D'Angelico Premier DC Electric Guitar, 12-String (with Gig Bag)   New from$899.99Only 2 Left!or 12 payments of $75 Free Ground Shipping Ibanez Artcore AS7312 Electric Guitar, 12-String   New from$499.99In Stockor 8 payments of $62.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitars: 12-String
The Fender T-Bucket 300 is a cutaway dreadnought guitar that comes with a stylish design and an incorporated pickup system for easy amplification. This instrument comes with a laminated maple top that features a Trans Cherry Burst finish. With quarter-sawn scalloped X-bracing, this guitar offers superior resonance and playability even as time goes by.
Gretsch was founded in 1883 in Brooklyn, with their biggest boom coming in the fifties and sixties, at the birth of rock n’ roll. Famed for making hollow and semi-hollow models, their guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.
By contrast, tuning (or pitch) correction processors and plug-ins are normally considered processors rather than effects, but they do have creative uses. The idea behind these devices is to monitor the pitch of the incoming signal, then compare it to a user-defined scale, which can be a simple chromatic scale or any combination of notes. Pitch-shifting techniques are then used to nudge the audio to the nearest semitone in the user's scale but, because the amount of pitch-shift required is usually quite small, the result doesn't sound grainy or lumpy, as often happens when large amounts of pitch-shift are generated. Because pitch tracking is used to identify the original pitch, only monophonic signals can be treated.
Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.
Hook, who covered the economics of running a nightclub in his 2009 book, “The Hacienda: How Not To Run a Club”, predicted: “The guitar companies are going to restructure and get smaller. The true artist in the company — the guy who builds a guitar by carving it out of a piece of wood hopefully will be the one that will be celebrated, not the middle management.”

Whether you are a guitarist looking for new tones, or a sound designer looking for new ways to mangle your audio, virtual guitar amps and effects are a great way to achieve new sounds and enhance your productions. There are many great guitar amp and pedal effects plug-ins available on the market today to purchase, but there are also numerous effects that are available for free. In this article I'll offer up some professional guitar effect plug-ins from around the internet that you can use on your next project, completely for free.

Now that you have made it through, if you chose to build a guitar, you are probably going to want to make more. Hopefully some of the info as well as links I have provided has helped to get you started in the right direction. Guitar building is fun and chalenging at the same time, and if your like me you will always want to improve your skills and find something else to try out on your next project. I have added some pictures of some of the guitars that I have made down at the bottom so you can see my progression. So here's to having fun and building a piece of art that you don't just have to look at. Though they do look good hung on a wall!
The neck, which extends from the guitar body, includes the fretboard and headstock on which the tuners are mounted. It contains a metal truss rod that prevents neck bowing and twisting, and can be adjusted to help the guitar maintain consistent pitch. The fretboard is usually made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, although some models, usually with maple necks, have a fretboard made of the same wood as the neck. Most fretboards have position dots or other markers inlaid in the fretboard. Some models have markers on the upper edge of the fretboard offering the player easy visibility.

Now that we’re done with the construction, let me discuss the pivotal aspect of playability itself. Having conducted scores of guitar lessons both online and offline, I am for one well aware of the fact that it only takes a few tiresome sessions with a bulky, full size guitar to scare them away from their lessons forever! Therefore, your first ever guitar choice is extremely important. A beginner’s guitar needs to be user-friendly and high on playability. On both these accounts, the Davisson Full Size Black Electric Guitar scores high. Not only is it lightweight and comfortable to wrap your fingers around, but also has a very neat and simplistic design to enables beginners for learning faster. The presence of a single Humbucker Pickup and the invariable absence of a pickup toggle, is not a hindrance but in fact a positive aspect of getting your grasp over your first electric guitar.


Considering a brand is only really important to a certain extent. Generally, certain top brands will have a reputation for being better at things than others, but given that most guitar brands now have a very wide offering, it’s really best to consider individual models. It’s worth doing a little extra research in some areas though, because there are interesting brand relationships that mean some more budget guitar brands have actually been designed by premium ones. Epiphone and Squier for instance are more affordable sub-brands of Gibson and Fender respectively, which means that you can often get a very high quality product that’s been made in Taiwan rather than the USA for instance. The Dove Pro is a good example of this.
• Why fret ends get sharp: Sometimes the end of the fret wire can become sharp or, more accurately, protrusive at the sides of a guitar’s neck. Besides being rough on the hands, this is an indicator of a trickier problem: that the fingerboard has become dry and shrunk. This means that the guitar has been kept in an environment that lacks the proper humidity. More careful storage is the ultimate answer, but using lemon oil on the fretboard also helps prevent this from happening by moisturizing the wood.

Kramer Guitars is the manufacturer of electric guitars & basses originated from America. Inearly’s off origination in 1970’s, they produced aluminum necked electric guitar& basses & in later 1980’s they started producing wooden-necked guitars catering to hard rock and heavy metal musicians. This is the brand of guitar that challenges the quality of guitars made by Gibson. Made of maple wood and aluminum inlays, this makes one of the finest make of bass and electric guitars. These are highest priced electric guitar which starts from 90,000 to 1.5lacs. These are one of the most powerful ranges of electric guitars used by professional musicians.
Note: Youpi Choupi's answer calls my answer below into question by pointing out that classical and flamenco guitars are acoustic guitars. He is correct in this of course, they are all types of acoustic guitar. However, most of the time when someone says they play "acoustic guitar," they mean the commonly used steel-stringed acoustic that most rock, folk, country and other artists play, and I believe this was the intent of the OP when they asked the question. Hence, an answer simply pointing out that Spanish guitar and acoustic guitar are both acoustic guitars would not have been a helpful answer.
The relationship between perceived volume (loudness) and power output in watts of an amplifier is not immediately obvious. While beginners sometimes assume that there is a linear relationship between perceived volume and wattage (e.g., beginners may think that a 50-watt amp will be much louder, or about ten times louder than a 5-watt amp), in fact the human ear perceives a 50-watt amplifier as only twice as loud as a 5-watt amplifier (which is a tenfold increase in power in watts). Doubling the power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural audio compressor at high volumes.

While pretty much every noise musician uses the guitar as a weapon of mass destruction, Mark Morgan of scuzz-worshippers Sightings uses his guitar for sheer negation. Playing in 50 shades of gray on found and borrowed pedals, the leader of this longtime Brooklyn noise band is quicker to sound like a vacuum humming, toilet flushing, or scrambled cable porn feed than Eric Clapton or even Thurston Moore; a unique sound that has all the emotion of punk, with none of its recognizable sounds. As he told the blog Thee Outernet: “Probably the biggest influences on my playing style is sheer f—king laziness and to a slightly lesser degree, a certain level of retardation in grasping basic guitar technique.”


I see a bunch of people all over social network sites and youtube videos responding with things like "who needs it, just give me a guitar and a tube amp" whenever news about a pedal of some kind comes up. What's so wrong with pedals? For some reason there's a stigma against them that "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" when most people use them to get sounds out of their guitar that you normally can't without them. I don't understand why so many people opt for the "guitar right into an amp" sound when there's so much more available.
Yes...I've seen a VST guitar plugin (can't remember the name) where you play chords on the keyboard with the left hand and the software converts them into guitar chord voicings, then you "strum" with the right hand by hitting different keys....and each key does something different...up-strum, down-strum, rake, mute, etc. I actually thought it sounded pretty damn good considering. Definitely close enough for background rhythm guitar work.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  1 Meg Ohm, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
This is a rare bird. Its a early ibanez maxitone 994. It has a huge neck but plays pretty great! It has that classic MIJ tone. I can include a new Gator case for $50 extra! The neck and frets are good! The electronics are a little dirty. Ill clean them the best i can, but i thoughtit worth mentioning. It is functioning as it should be just a little dirty!
There were also a number of guitars that featured the same headstock style as the 700-800 models that featured symetrical hollow or semi-hollow bodies similar to some of the Gibsons. Gibson aficionados refer to the bodies as having "Mickey Mouse ears". One model had a deep jazz guitar-style body. They all had what appear to be humbucker pickups, some black and some plated. The Kent name only appeared on the headstocks.
Artists all over the world are enjoying the classic looks and premium features of Vintage Guitars. Professional players and producers working with world renown Artists like Gregg Allman, Amy Grant, Josh Turner, and many  more, rely on the great sound and playability of Vintage Guitars. See what they’re saying about the guitars they’re rocking out on every night!
The phaser is an interesting pedal that has a surprising mix of uses across genres. What a phaser does is add an out of phase version of your signal with your original signal. This gives your sound a swirling effect that has many sonic possibilities. Eddie Van Halen famously used a phaser set a a low rate to add some “movement” to his solos. In funk, phasers are fundamental in creating the bright and terse rhythm sounds.
Also called a “wah-wah pedal”, the wah was one of the earliest effects designed for guitar players and has remained popular ever since. Basically, a wah uses a pedal and filter to sweep the tonal range from bass to treble, creating a vocal like “wah” sound. Some players also use them as a tone control leaving the pedal set at different settings to get different tones.
STORCH is a virtual instrument, designed with the participation of ambitious music producers and beat-makers. This dynamic software is influenced by the legendary brand sounds of Scott Storch and includes 300 presets, divided into 18 categories of instruments. Categories include: Stringed, Drums, Dirty Pianos, Reversed EPs, 808, Arps and more. Moreover, users can create their own original sound...
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Before we get into the details, it should probably be noted that building a solidbody electric guitar is a much less challenging project than building a semi- or fully hollowbody guitar. Building the latter types from scratch involves sophisticated woodworking skills and tools that will be beyond the reach of all but the most ambitious beginners. And as we note below, designs with bolt-on necks versus set necks are more beginner-friendly.
Here, in this mini guide to acoustic guitar body types, we’ll aim to show you some of the key differences in size, shape, sound and suitability between the major variations of guitar. We’ll look at the history of some of the better known body types, and make recommendations according to the sound you’re going for and the style in which you play. So whether you’re a wispy finger-picker or a hearty strummer, we’ll explain some of the more intricate details of acoustic guitar body shapes.

The volume knob can act as a boost which can take your guitar from clean sounds for rhythm playing to dirty overdrive tones for soloing. When playing a song keep your volume knob at 6 or 7 when playing chords or verse parts and when it’s time to deliver a rockin’ solo roll up the volume to 10 and you will not only hear a boost of gain (overdrive) but also a volume lift over any other instruments in the song.
The Jasmine S35 acoustic guitar has its share of criticisms, most notably its heavier strings and bargain basement appearance, but what keeps it popular with customers is the starter kit. Other entry-level acoustic guitars rarely include the accessories that the Jasmine S35 offers. It is also valued as a good back-up guitar for advanced players who want a dependable spare on hand during performances.
SG Special is pretty much the same thing as the Les Paul 100. The most obvious difference is the body style. Other than that, you get very similar electronics and overall build quality. A lot of people learned their first chords on this guitar, still keeping it as one of their favorite axes. I’ve played this thing a few times and it definitely has some juice.
There's more to being a musician than what you do on the stage: while that's the perfect place to turn it up loud with a standard guitar amplifier, sometimes you don't want anybody but yourself to be listening in on the tunes. That's when headphone guitar amps come in handy. There's a solid variety of these little amps to choose from, so you can get yours with as few or as many features as you like. Then, all you need is your favorite set of 'phones and you're ready to rock.
Distortion pedals is responsible for many of the sounds that you think of when you think ‘electric guitar.’ It’s absolutely classic, and you’ll find that the majority of effects are some flavor of distortion pedal. The results you can get from these stompboxes vary from overdrive-like breakup to smooth melodic power, so it’s important before you take one home that you check for the type of sounds that specific distortion pedal is designed to create. Doing your homework really pays off when it comes to distortion pedals.

Most players don’t use more than one modulation effect at once, so it doesn’t matter all that much if you place the phaser before the chorus or the flanger in front of the phaser. However, the one exception is tremolo, which should be placed behind other modulation pedals, as this placement will produce the most dramatic and desirable rhythmic on/off effects. Placing a tremolo pedal in an effects loop is also closer to the signal path of an amp with built-in tremolo, but my personal preference is to plug a tremolo pedal into an amp’s front end and save the effects loop for other effects.
Power amp clipping is not the same thing as preamp/preamp tube clipping. Sending a power amp signal that is getting power amp clipping to a speaker can blow the speaker. Sending a preamp/preamp tube clipped signal through a speaker is not harmful. In practice, part of the "breaking up" amp sound, of a "cranked" amplifier, which is widely appreciated by hard rock, metal, punk and blues musicians, is a mix of preamp and power amp clipping. One of the benefits of using a separate components head system, in which a separate preamp and power amp are mounted in a rack, is that the bassist or bass tech can watch for the clipping warning LED on the power amp and lower the power amp volume, if necessary.

Players perceived a loss of the initial high quality of Fender guitars after the company was taken over by CBS in 1965. As a result, the late-1960s Stratocasters with the large “CBS” headstock and (from the mid 1970s) the 3-bolt necked models (instead of the conventional 4 bolts) with the “Bullet” truss-rod and the MicroTilt adjustment system fell out of fashion. However, many blues-influenced artists of the late 1960s soon adopted the Stratocaster as their main instrument, reviving the guitar’s popularity. Also, so-called ‘pre-CBS’ Stratocasters are, accordingly, quite sought-after and expensive due to the perceived difference in quality even compared with contemporary post-CBS models. In recent times, some Stratocasters manufactured from 1954 to 1958 have sold for more than US$175,000.
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While there’s still 9 more guitars to talk about on this list, you really can’t go wrong with stopping here, at the Les Paul Standard. This guitar is one of the most sought-after electrics in its price range. If you’ve ever played a Les Paul Epiphone before, you know what we’re talking about. Besides being a legendary guitar invented by the artist, inventor, and guitarist, Les Paul, this guitar also has what it takes to be legit, such as ProBucker-2™ and ProBucker-3™ pickups with coil-tapping. You can find this guitar for literally one dollar under $500 at most stores. 

I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar.  I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best.  You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment.  You get treated like a valued customer.  Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars.  They have a great variety of quality instruments.  Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars.  A place like this is so rare nowadays.
An avid skateboarder and hot-rod enthusiast, Ness epitomizes working-class Southern Californian culture. Springsteen comparisons are always dangerous, but the Boss did appear on Ness’ 1999 solo disc Cheating at Solitaire. Springsteen also named Social Distortion’s Heaven and Hell as his favorite record of 1992. Brian Setzer is another kindred spirit and musical collaborator. Ness is one skate punk kid who has stood the test of time.
Launch price: $999 / £899 | Body: Basswood | Neck: 5-piece maple/walnut | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple | Frets: 24 | Pickups: Ibanez V8 humbucker (bridge), S1 single coil (middle), V7 neck humbucker | Controls: Volume, tone, 5-way selector | Hardware: Edge locking vibrato | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Desert Sun Yellow, Road Flare Red, Purple Neon, White
: Values? Well, with the prices of 1960s American and British guitars through the roof, collectors and musicians turn to the next-best-thing, and that would be European and Japanese guitars. In general, any made-in-Japan solid-body electric guitar in good cosmetic shape, that's complete and playable, is worth at least $100, and any acoustic-electric, at least twice that. The more pickups it has, the more elaborate the controls, and the more flashy the pickguard, the more it's worth. Same goes for the body and headstock shape. The standard shapes that copy Fender and other manufacturers aren't as desirable as some of the weirder shapes. A Decca solidbody with an unusual body shape, with 3 pickups and an unusual original finish would probably be in the $250-350 range to the right person. An acoustic-electric with the same specs would probably be worth $100 more than that. I've seen some of the exceptional Teisco solidbodies go for $500-600, but that's uncommon. In about 2006, I saw a Teisco (one of their Mosrite copies) from about 1967 that was in flawless condition for sale in an instrument shop in Tokyo for 200,000 Yen (about $1,900). I wouldn't be surprised if it sold for that.
Get a custom drawn guitar or bass wiring diagram designed to your specifications for any type of pickups, switching and controls and options. Just complete the guitar wiring diagram order form with your custom specifications and our designers will do the rest. Our custom diagrams are easy to read, affordable and delivered by email for FREE! To order a custom diagram, select the number of pickups on your instrument below and complete the diagram order form.
Transistors are related to crystals. Their individual function is non linear and have to be arranged in compound groups to behave as a linear circuit. Solid-state amps operate at low voltages (10 - 100V). Valves amps operate at high voltages (200 - 600V). Speakers operate at approx (0 - 40V). The Output Transformer converts the high operating voltages of valves to the lower operating voltage of speakers. A transformer has 2 separate coils of wire (primary and secondary) wound around an iron core. Electricity flowing through wire causes a magnetic field around the wire and visa versa, a changing magnetic field causes electricity to flow through wire.

In some small to mid-size venues, such as bars and nightclubs, the PA system may not have the capacity to provide the bass sound for the venue, and the PA system may be used mainly for vocals. Bass players in bands that play at a variety of venues, including these types of small to mid-size venues, may need to be able to provide the bass sound for the venue, and so they will require a large combo amp or bass stack with this capability.
Thanks to these affordable guitar kits, you can now build your own guitar without having to craft body parts from wooden tables and planks. Unlike Brian May and his dad, who built the iconic "Red Special" guitar from wooden tables and planks - all you have to do is order a guitar kit online, and you are free to assemble and customize as you prefer. These guitar kits reduce the skill and cost requirements of guitar building considerably, making for great entry points into lutherie and guitar modification.
Harmony was the largest US guitar manufacturer between the 1930s and late 1960s. At the height of the guitar boom in the mid-1960s, Harmony was building more than 1000 instruments per day. Not only were they producing Harmony-branded guitars, there was a time when the Chicago-based factory was making guitars for 57 different brand names and trademarks. At one point, Harmony was selling 40 percent of their guitars through Sears & Roebuck under the Silvertone brand.
The L-00 carries over the airy nasal tone and midrange emphasis of the original, making it great for tasty slide and classic rock riffs. Your favorite blues licks will also have more oomph when played through this blues box. For something so small, this parlor guitar can compete with standard size acoustics in terms of volume. Its solid sitka spruce top and solid mahogany back and sides work together well to give this seemingly diminutive instrument great clarity and good low end.
I've spent a few weeks on this kit - I will update with progress. Cutting out the headstock and finishing the guitar was fun and not too difficult. I chose to use TruOil and a natural finish, which takes a few weeks to finish. The body I got was made from 4 pieces of joined wood, and I wasn't careful about checking for glue spots, so there are a couple in the finish, but it still looks great. The neck fits nicely and feels good. It is straight and correctly set up for string tension (a little bit of bow before the strings are on).
Echo and delay are created by copying the original signal in some way, then replaying it a short time later. There's no exact natural counterpart, though the strong reflections sometimes heard in valleys or tunnels appear as reasonably distinct echoes. Early echo units were based on tape loops, before analogue charge-coupled devices eliminated the need for moving parts. Today, most delay units are digital, but they often include controls to help them emulate the characteristics of the early tape units, including distortion and low-pass filtering in the delay path and pitch modulation to emulate the wow and flutter of a well-used tape transport.
ESP Guitars makes seven types, the Eclipse series, James Hetfield Truckster, and Kirk Hammett KH-3 from ESP, the LTD EC series and Truckster, the Edwards E-LP series, and the Navigator N-LP series, which are based on the Les Paul design. Certain EC models have 24-fret necks and active electronics using EMG pickups instead of the standard passive pickups and 22 frets found in the traditional Les Paul. The Edwards and Navigator lines are made in Japan, and available only on the Japanese market; they come standard with Gotoh hardware and Seymour Duncan pickups (EMG pickups in a few models), and unlike the EC and Eclipse series guitars, which are updated variants on the Les Paul, these are made to be as close to the Gibson 1959 Les Paul design as possible, in the vein of the late 1970s and 1980s “lawsuit” model guitars from Tokai, Burny, and Greco, complete with Gibson style headstocks.
It worked like all amps: the guitar in my hands translated the vibrations from its strings through magnetic pickups into a voltage that traveled through the guitar's wiring and out the main 1/4" cable, then the amp picked up the signal and sent it through a coil of wire around a much larger magnet than those in the pickups, and the vibrations of that magnet shook the cone of the speaker, producing sound. The specific vibrations corresponding to those voltages created specific frequencies of vibration through the air, and my 10-year-old ears were hooked.
The GRX70 showcases how good Ibanez is at producing great value guitars, they sure know how to keeps other guitar manufacturers on their toes. It has all the makings of a mid-tier instrument, complete with dive bomb capable bridge and great looking aesthetics, but packed inside a super affordable entry-level instrument. The basswood body with quilted art grain top is gorgeous, and a trio of pickups gives you tons of tones. A standard tremolo handles divebombing and other whammy acrobatics. This axe is perfect for burgeoning rockers who want a versatile guitar for all occasions. All in all, the Ibanez GRX70 gives you a whole lotta guitar for the money!.
After you have the hang of mono and stereo miking, room miking, and air guitar, you may be ready for the final frontier of El Gtr exploration. The time-consuming technique that I call "multisourcing" combines all the aforementioned methods, multiplied by the infinite possibilities created by splitting the guitar output and sending it simultaneously to different amps (using, for example, a Whirlwind Selector splitter box).

The guitar features what is called a Super Strat shape. In other words, it is an evolution of the Stratocaster body style. Ibanez used mahogany as the main tonewood and maple for the neck. This guitar comes with two finish options. You can have the blackberry sunburst or the light violin sunburst. In terms of pickups, we have a set of two Ibanez-made passive humbuckers which pack a decent amount of heat. They handle distortion great but also sound very decent on a clean channel too.
Naturally, you must also consider the Gibson Les Paul starter pack as well. Available from the consumer friendly Epiphone range, this player package is a great introduction to one of the most popular electric guitar models in the entire world. With 22 frets, dual humbuckers, and a gorgeous aesthetic with ebony finish and silver hardware, this is a knockout in every regard. The set is rounded out with the standard fare such as an amp, picks, a cable, a strap, and a tuner.
After covering Types of Guitar: Beginners Guide to Buying a Guitar, I feel it is appropriate this week to focus on learning guitar chords and the importance of practicing them. By that I mean anything from two-note power chords to spidery jazz chords spanning all six strings. Don’t make the mistake of attempting lead guitar without first getting a solid grasp on chordal, rhythmic playing.
The Les Paul Custom then became known as the “tuxedo” Les Paul with its Ebony and Alpine White color finishes, accentuated with shiny gold hardware. The Custom PRO features a classic gold LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge and a gold stopbar tailpiece. You’ll find more gold in the headstock with the gold Grover tuners. It also features a fully bound body, headstock and neck, as well as pearloid fretboard inlays.
It’s the knob that controls a potentiometer (informally a “pot”) which acts as an inhibitor of sorts (when used in conjunction with a capacitor), bleeding off the high end frequencies of a guitar’s pickup (or pickups) signal that has passed through the volume control and is on it’s way out of the guitar, giving it a “warmth” (think muffled-ish) sound.
There are many different kinds of pickup selectors. The most common forms of pickup selectors are 3-way and 5-way switches. Obviously, a 5-way switch gives you more pickup combinations than a 3-way switch. Below are some diagrams of what 3-way and 5-way pickup selectors can do. In choosing a pickup selector, I suggest that you try to replace your pickup selector with the same kind of selector. Refer to the manufacturers website and wiring diagram to get the right specifications. Notice I said to get the same “kind” — not the same one. It would make no sense to replace a cheap selector with another cheap selector. Find out the specs on the old selector and buy a nice one.

In 1978, Michel Chavarria, guitarist, singer and songwriter for French band Madrigal, decided to create a guitar shop with his friend Daniel Delfour. The shop was on a street called "rue de Laganne," which inspired the name Lâg. Like in many other cases, the small business started as a repair, setting and customization shop before creating its own models. Due to the quality of their instruments, they sell custom-made guitars to French and international musicians like Jean-Jacques Goldman, Phil Campbell (Motörhead) and Keziah Jones. Among the best-known models we have the Arkane (a Super-Strat available with different pickup combinations) and the Roxane (with Gibson-like humbuckers).

All I can say is quit wasting $ on new. A new guitar is like a new car it’s gonna lose 20% of its value once you take it out the first time. Unless you are buying a Gibson or fender custom shop etc Just go for what plays and sounds great. Perfect example is the Esp ltd ec401vf or 400. Used $300-400 has stock seymour duncan 59 neck jb bridge or the newer 401 has the dimarzio’s in it. Grovers tuners earvana nut mahogany body. Just an excellent setup for half the price of an epi les paul. Don’t get me wrong I have an Epi les paul traditional pro and it’s a nice guitar but for $750 nah. Since I picked up the 401 I hardly play my jag mustang or either of my epi l.p. or sg. Its just that nice of a guitar. If you are in the market for a les paul style or a new guitar in general take a look at the 400 series it’s a whole lot of guitar for the $


I JUST GOT A PALMER P44 EC ACUSTIC/ELECTRIC..BANGED UP BUT FAIR,,I TIGHTEND IT UP,, PUT NEW #12 STRINGS,, WORKS & SOUNDS GOOD,,, I JUST GOT TO LOWER THE STRINGS ,,MY FRIENDS & EVEN THE GUY @ THE REPAIR SHOP KNEW NOTHING ABOUT "PALMER" WHICH GOT ME TO THIS SITE ...AS A FEW OTHER PEOPLE COMMENTED,, I AGREE,, GOOD ENOUGH FOR CAMPFIRES ,,,ITS A FUN INSTRUMENT,,ITS WHAT WE CALL A "BEATER" TO KEEP IN TRUNK & TAKE CAMPING OR HAND TO THE DRUNK GUY W/THE BIG BELT BUCKLE @THE PARTY,,
Understanding how to read electronics schematics is the key to being a successful DIY pedal builder. A schematic will show you what components are needed for the build, as well as how these parts are hooked together to create (in this case) an effect pedal circuit. At first glance, a schematic may look like a bunch of hieroglyphics, compiled of various symbols, numbers, and letters (see below). Don’t fret! – After a bit of practice, you should develop a basic understanding of how a schematic works, and you will be putting together DIY effect pedals in no time!

One of the most versatile electric guitars we encountered when putting together our list is ESP’s LTD EC-1000 KOA. Koa is a Hawaiian wood that this guitars top is made from, and it has very special sound qualities. It makes the tone very bright, crisp and clear, but at the same time it’s full of life and depth. We immediately though that the sound reminded us of an ukulele or some other happy little stringed instrument, and the sound can easily bring us back to summer evenings around a camp fire.


We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .010 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!), cleaning and polishing. One of the best things about this guitar is the modification to a factory flaw that most TW's we've seen have. The finger board is too long from the nut to the first fret, thus most all of these we have seen will not intonate, thus not play in tune. We had a compensated nut, modified and installed on this one (see photo collage). I don't know where they acquired it, but it worked like a charm. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 "Round-wound" strings. Guitar looks near new and plays great. No case.

Lest anyone think left-handed guitarists are at a disadvantage compared to their right-handed contemporaries, consider this list of some of the best known lefties: Paul McCartney, Dick Dale, Jimi Hendrix, and Albert King are just a few of the world’s most esteemed left-handed guitar players. In the 1950s and ’60s, though, left-handed guitars were often difficult to come by, especially for guitarists on a budget. This makes left-handed...Continue Reading

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Spruce has historically been the wood of choice for acoustic flat-top guitar soundboards. However, Luthiers and other large guitar manufacturers very often choose more economical and readily available woods rather than top-quality spruce. Redwoods and cedar, for instance, are often used in soundboards by American guitar-makers to great effect. In some cases, two different woods are used together to give the guitar a distinctive appearance and tone.

Vintage Gibson Les Paul Special model, introduced in 1955 This 1957 model is killer.Utilizing the Junior’s solid Mahogany body with single cutaway shape but  finished in what Gibson called Limed Mahogany which appeared white on black and white television sets which gives it the nickname of "TV Special"A neck pickup with accompanying volume and tone circuitry was also added making the Special an affordable but still professionally playable instrument. The Special was sold in this configuration until 1958 . Gibson’s surviving shipping records indicate approx. 1,452 Les Paul Specials were shipped in 1957. MORE HERE.

No way can this list be accurate simply for the fact that there are so many styles out there with such important players, having a list of greatest guitar players with BB King and Tom Morello on it is ridiculous. Both are great in their own right but it’s like comparing apples and oranges. There should probably be separate lists for separate genres. Having said that, I think a good start for a top 10 ROCK list, in no particular order, would be: Joe Satriani, Yngwie Malmsteen, Kirk Hammett, Dimebag Darrell, Steve Vai, Eric Johnson, Slash, Jerry Cantrell, Joe Perry, and Angus Young.
A good guitar builder can pick materials that provide a predictable result. The process of making a guitar that costs $10,000 and one that costs $1,000 is identical, or at least very similar. The big difference is likely that in the more expensive one, personal attention has been put into selecting, drying, storing, and cutting the tonewood. The cheaper, which is mass produced by less skilled labor, consists of the same species of wood, but from a pile that came out of a container, in the order it was stacked. This means that two guitars from the same batch can sound quite different. They can sound exactly like the expensive guitar, but they can also sound different.
Who created the first distorted electric guitar sound in history? I’ll tell you: the first adventurous player to plug a hollowbody guitar into a tube amplifier way back in the 1930s, that’s who. We might have forgotten his name, or maybe there was no one there to witness the event, but you can bet he lifted up that guitar, checked out his new amp, saw that the loudness control went to 10, and cranked it up to hear just what it could do.
Seller: atcycle (2,136) 100%, Location: Sugar Land, Texas, Ships to: US, Item: 122791185383 This Used Guitar, cosmetically in general is in good used condition, it's played and everything works fine. Includes tremolo bar. The string trees have been removed for tuning stability but will be included should you wish to use them. Please use the enlarge feature and look over all pictures as this is the best way for me to show / describe the condition to you. I will have other Guitars listed. PLEASE NOTE ALL FAULTS SHOWN IN PICTURES ARE CONSIDERED PART OF THE DESCRIPTION.This Lotus "Strat" triple single coil is one of the finest examples of high quality imports which strongly competed with the big boys back in the day. Those of us who were around back then, learned that frequently these guitars had better sound and build quality than the Name Brand at that time. They were so good that the Big Name Company had them build many guitars for them! Condition: Used, Condition: There are a few signs of wear typical of an older used instrument. Missing switch button., Brand: Lotus, Body Type: Solid, MPN: Does Not Apply, Dexterity: Right-Handed, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Color: Black, Body Material: Solid Wood	 See More

Original plate reverbs were mechanical in nature. There was a literal plate inside the amplifier, which would transform input signal into vibration. Then you would have a pickup located somewhere near the plate, that recorded those vibrations. Today, such a contraption comes across as relatively crude, but many still love the unique mechanical sound it produces. Spring reverb uses a pretty much exact same principle, only this time you have a spring in there instead of a plate. The biggest improvement a spring reverb offers is reduction in both weight and size of the device.
In choosing an amp you have to first consider how much you have to spend, the style of music you like to play, and what kind of tone you like best. It is perhaps best to start with something small. You might feel that a Marshall stack is the way to go, especially if you have the money, but for home use, big amps are hard to work with because to drive them into distortion, you have to get really loud. They also take up a lot of space.
Patti Smith famously described Tom Verlaine's guitar sound as "a thousand bluebirds screaming." Television's leader soaked up the flavor of favorite records by John Coltrane, the Stones and the Dead – then synthesized them into something entirely new on the band's 1977 debut, Marquee Moon, spinning out endless fluid solos in concert with fellow guitar aesthete Richard Lloyd. Verlaine has kept a low profile in recent decades, but he remains a model for generations of guitarists with a taste for both punk violence and melodic flight.
The Marine Band 365 Steve Baker Special (365/28 SBS) possesses the same construction as the original 365, but with low pitched tuning to their natural major keys, available in C, D, G, A, and F. It is named for, and was developed in part by noted harmonicist Steve Baker, who resides in Germany and has contributed to the design of several other Hohner harmonica models, including the Marine Bands Deluxe and Crossover.[18]
Another aspect of the jazz guitar style is the use of stylistically appropriate ornaments, such as grace notes, slides, and muted notes. Each subgenre or era of jazz has different ornaments that are part of the style of that subgenre or era. Jazz guitarists usually learn the appropriate ornamenting styles by listening to prominent recordings from a given style or jazz era. Some jazz guitarists also borrow ornamentation techniques from other jazz instruments, such as Wes Montgomery's borrowing of playing melodies in parallel octaves, which is a jazz piano technique. Jazz guitarists also have to learn how to add in passing tones, use "guide tones" and chord tones from the chord progression to structure their improvisations.

While you can play one through an electric guitar amp, an acoustic guitar will sound its best if it is played through a dedicated acoustic amplifier. While similar in structure to electric guitar amps, acoustic amps are primarily designed to offer transparency. In other words, it strives to reproduce the tone of your acoustic guitar’s natural sound as closely as possible. Interestingly, they almost exclusively come in a combo format, while most acoustic amps will have two channels – one for the instrument and the other geared towards microphone use. The AER Compact 60 represents what a great acoustic guitar amp looks and sounds like, with enough power for stage use as well as a high-end organic tone.


With so many options available in the world today, buying a guitar that perfectly represents your own style, tastes, and attitude has never been easier. Whether you're a classical guitarist looking for that perfectly balanced nylon flamenco, or a hard rock enthusiast who needs Pete Townshend crunch combined with Jack White power, there is simply no shortage of axes to choose from.
Making their second appearance on our list, Mesa Boogie delivers with the Dual Rectifier Rackmount (appropriately nicknamed the “Racktifier”). This 3-U behemoth is simply a Dual Rectifier Head, and is one of the very few rackmounts to contain a pre-amp and power-amp all-in-one.  The Racktifier is made for those who simply want the dual rectifier sound, but have the “rack-gear bug”.
Whereas tube amps are the traditional, solid-state amplifiers represent the modern guitar amplifier (even though they have been around for decades). While some guitarists refuse to consider solid-state amps worthy of their time, models such as the Roland JC-120 Jazz Chorus are proof that solid-state amplification is not only capable, but preferable in some cases. This high-end amp offers 120 watts of power, professional-grade tone and awesome versatility. It’s a good reflection of this segment, which offers endless versatility with affordable prices, low maintenance and incredible reliability.
This cheap acoustic guitar is highly recommended for beginners on a budget. It continues to stand among the best selling acoustics, and many a young musician has had this as their first ever guitar. It features a familiar combination of spruce top, mahogany body and neck, and rosewood fretboard. The guitar's classic configuration and traditional dreadnought shape works well with almost any type of music, from folk to rock and everything else in between.
Get ready to rock with the First Act Electric Guitar with Amp. It's scaled down for smaller players, yet it's designed with the same materials, electronics and appointments as First Act's full-size guitars for full rock sound. One high-output humbucking pickup delivers big rock distortion and classic clean tones. The maple neck and rosewood fingerboard offer a solid feel and warm tone. Classic hard tail bridge pumps up the sustain. Independent volume control means the ultimate in sound tweaks.
Fender Montara acoustic electric with HSC. Part of the California series made in the early 90's. BEAUTIFUL guitar! See pics. I would describe it as being in excellent condition for its age. Of course there are some minor signs of use upon very close inspection but nothing that jumps out. (2 small dings are shown in pics) All electronics work, could probably use some new strings. If you have any questions please ask!
Martin opened its “Custom Shop” division in 1979.[7] Martin built its 500,000th guitar in 1990, and in 2004 they built their millionth guitar. This guitar is entirely hand-crafted and features more than 40 inlaid rubies and diamonds. It is worth an estimated $1,000,000.[8] As of 2007, Martin employs 600 people. Thirteen workers are devoted to quality assurance[citation needed]. In October, 2009, Martin purchased at auction a D-28 that was played by Elvis Presley in his last concert for $106,200.[9]

But if you never play with a tone as dark as the fully-rolled off sound, you might consider a lower-value cap. The next example is an .033μ (also know as 33n and 333), another popular choice, followed by the smaller .022μ (also know as 22n and 223), and the even smaller .01μ (also know as 10n and 103). As the cap gets smaller, the minimum tone knob settings gets less dark. As the overall range of the tone pot decreases, it may be easier to locate any desired “nooks and crannies” between the highest and lowest settings.
The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is another fairly standard style beginner amp. It has the same standard features as most beginner amps. The Crush PiX CR12L is a little more expensive than some similar featured amps, like the Velocity V10, but it makes up for the extra cost with a better build quality, better tone, and a well designed control layout. The Crush PiX CR12L gives a lot of control over the tone, but manages to do so in a clear, easily understood control panel.
While all of the brands featured in this guide produce wonderful instruments, the clear all around winner is Fender. Fender somehow manages to feature the best of both worlds in nearly every category. Guitar players have been turning to Fender for over seventy years, and for good reason. The company is renowned for its high quality craftsmanship and their beautifully constructed instruments have been inspiring guitarists for decades.

My live rig for years has been a multi FX floor pedal (currently, and for the past seven years, using a BOSS GT-8) running the left and right outputs into the effects RETURN of a small amp on stage and through a speaker cab simulator (lately, a “CABTONE” by Digital music Corp, at other times a Hughes & Kettner “RED BOX”) We often play as a ten piece band, with trumpet, trombone, three saxes… and here am I with a 30 watt Behringer amp with an 8 inch speaker, my BOSS GT-8 and a CABTONE direct box/speaker simulator going to the PA. Sounds great. (I’ve substituted bigger amps at times… a Tech21 Power Station… but to my ears, the Behringer sounds better.) You’re probably thinking… a 30 watt Behringer? That’s a “toy,” right? It’s enough. Well, that and the fact that the other “direct” channel is in our monitors, making for a rich 3D stereo sound on stage between the amp and the monitors. I am looking to upgrade to a multi effect processor that allows different cab simulations per patch – maybe the Eleven Rack… (I would have a hard time justifying the expense of the Fractal system) but honestly, I’ve been very happy with the setup I just described. Been happy with it the past seven years, and before that, it was different amps (actually bypassing everything but the power amp and speaker) and different floor processors (Digitech, Rocktron, BOSS…) but the same idea… one output to the board, the other to a small amp.

As with many of our services, we do more than just pull and replace your frets when doing a refret. Full refrets include a resurfacing of the fingerboard to proper level (even more precisely done than many factories), repair to any damaged fret slots, nut removal and reuse (when applicable), and full Calibration and Reset service (which includes a full traditional set up). Strat style tremolos add $10 to the price, Floyd Rose style bridges add $30.
Paint chips and cracked binding: Common on older instruments. Over time these openings will collect sweat, polish, and dirt, causing discoloration, lifting of the edges, and further deterioration. It is best to clean these spots w/ naptha (lighter fluid)or alchohol, remove any loose edges around the chips before cleaning (they will be holding polish and grime preventing the glue from working), then seal the chips and cracks with thin superglue. Super glue can be heated in the microwave for a few seconds (plastic bottles) to make it flow better. Drop Filling is a technique for filling chips with paint. This is covered at the ReRanch site.

The SparkFun Proto Pedal is an easy-to-assemble kit that makes building guitar effect pedals easier. Let’s face it, most guitar pedals start with all-too-similar circuitry – you need the input and output jacks, the bypass switch, and a barrel jack for power input. In some pedals, there may be as much wiring involved in the jacks and switch as there is in the effect itself. The SparkFun Proto Pedal takes care of the hard part and provides you with a simple infrastructure; all you need to do is decide what simple circuit to make to gain your desired effect, and you’ll be ready to rock!
Sound engineers prevent unwanted, unintended distortion and clipping using a number of methods. They may reduce the gain on microphone preamplifiers on the audio console; use attenuation "pads" (a button on audio console channel strips, DI unit and some bass amplifiers; and use electronic audio compressor effects and limiters to prevent sudden volume peaks from vocal mics from causing unwanted distortion.

Custom 24 series have been the bread and butter of PRS for a long time. This guitar has proven to be a really capable axe that can keep up with you no matter where you go in terms of music. A good friend of mine used to own one for a long time, which allowed me to play it numerous times. It’s one of the smoothest and best sounding guitars I’ve ever had a chance to play.
The first Hagstrom electrics actually came to the U.S. beginning about 1959, carrying the Goya name imported by New York’s Hershman (Goya acoustics were made by Levin, also in Sweden). These were the now-legendary sparkle-covered hollowbody “Les Pauls” with the modular pickup units. However, while the Goya acoustics continued on in the ’60s (eventually to be distributed by Avnet, the owners of Guild in the late ’60s), the Hagstrom electrics took on their own identity and switched to Merson. The first Hagstrom I guitars were the little vinyl-covered mini-Strats with the “swimming pool” pickup assemblies – basically two single-coil pickups mounted in a molded plastic assembly looking like its nickname, with sliding on-off switches and the Hagstrom fulcrum vibrato (which was also used on early Guild solidbodies). These were followed by similar wood-bodied Hagstrom IIs, then the quasi-SG Hagstrom IIIs in the ’60s. Hagstrom electrics continued to be imported by Merson through most of the ’60s, but by the ’70s distribution had switched to Ampeg, which was responsible for the Swedes, and several thinlines, some of which were designed by Jimmy D’Aquisto. Hagstrom hung around until the early ’80s before disappearing.

First introduced as a 35th Anniversary Edition Guitar in 2009, it joined Taylor’s standard line up as a Specialty Model in 2010. The Baritone model features a Grand Symphony body and a longer 27-inch scale length which enables it to be tuned from B to B while maintaining normal string tension. It comes in either 6-string or 8-string option. The 8-string models incorporates a pair of octave strings that double the 3rd and 4th (D and A) strings. Solid wood back and sides available for the Baritone model are Tropical mahogany or Indian Rosewood with rosewood binding and an abalone rosette.
Gibson sells guitars under a variety of brand names[5] and builds one of the world's most iconic guitars, the Gibson Les Paul. Many Gibson instruments are highly collectible. Gibson was at the forefront of innovation in acoustic guitars, especially in the big band era of the 1930s; the Gibson Super 400 was widely imitated. In 1952, Gibson introduced its first solid-body electric guitar, the Les Paul, which became its most popular guitar to date— designed by Ted McCarty and Les Paul.
Let me begin by saying this guitar is really good right out of the box. It has a booming sound, and really fills a room even when not plugged in. However, to make it really shine, you should perform a basic setup. I replaced the saddle and pins with bone and sanded the bone saddle down to lower the action. The nut is good from the factory. I also oiled the rosewood fretboard and added Martin phosphor bronze medium strings. After doing this work, the guitar sounds every bit as good as my 90’s Martin DR which is stellar. At this price range, I didn’t expect much, but what I received was a very pleasant surprise. Don’t hesitate to buy this package!

The descriptions that follow are very broad, but if you look around the guitar world you can usually pin any solid-body guitar down to one of these general categories. Of course you’ll see wild shapes like the Gibson Flying V, Ibanez Destroyer, Dean ML and Jackson Rhoads. They may look like they’re from another planet, but if you check their specs you’ll see they follow the same basic design principles as any other solid-body electric guitar.
Nut slots too deep: Take a course file and file the top of the nut 1/2 the distance you want to raise the slots. Catch the filings on a piece of paper. Tape both sides of the nut with masking tape and then fill the slots with the filings. Soak the filings with thin superglue. Press into place with a toothpick. When dry, refile the slots. The slots should be made so the string sits in about 1/2 to 3/4 thier diameter. Slots should be wider, and taper downwards on tuner side. Square slots are acceptable.
Super nice guys! They were really helpful from the get go and didn't hover like a lot of shops do to try and make a sale. Found out the gentleman behind the counter was actually from back home in Ohio and we traded some stories. He then directed us to some great places to have lunch and even gave us tips on what airline to take on our next trips out. Will definitely visit again just for the atmosphere and friendliness of he staff.
Because of the way the guitar is tuned and the amount of spread between the notes of each individual strings chords are voiced in certain very particular ways. These voicings are physically impossible to imitate on a keyboard, at least with any reasonable amount of facility. Conversely, keyboard voicings are generally unplayable on a guitar, as you'd have to be playing more than one note on a single string in many cases.
Fender "Squire / Bullet" Strat. Great, low priced project guitar. Black, laminated body, maple neck with Indian Rosewood fingerboard. 4-bolt neck plate. Original, "covered" tuning machines and nut installed. Frets in NEW condition. Neck adjusted well with slight "back-bow" under no tension and does have adjustable truss rod. Body and neck finish in excellent shape. Headstock finish has wear to the word "Bullet" see photos. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Ready for your custom hardware parts. Would make a great project / player or second "don't care if it gets stolen off the stage" guitar.

Most delay pedals have controls for the number of repeats (called “feedback”), the volume of the repeats and the time between each repeat. Some pedals have what’s called “tap tempo”, where you can tap your foot on the pedal and the delay unit will match the speed of the effect to your foot, allowing you to match the delay time to the tempo of a song. Delay pedals are often used to thicken up heavy lead guitar sounds, or to subtly add more to a simple rhythm guitar part.
Modulation is where we step away from the more subtle (relatively) effects which serve to colour an existing tone, and into areas where you can truly begin to add flavour and texture to your tone. There are a few main types of modulation; chorus, phase, tremolo, wah and flange. Chorus subtly mimics your tone with a microscopically detuned duplicate, which when played together adds a nice warm layer to the sound. As an example, play the ‘e’ note on your second string (fifth fret) and the open ‘e’ first string at the same time. Naturally, there is a cent or two difference in the tuning. But you can see that two virtually (but not exactly) instances of the same note makes everything sound a bit bigger and a bit wider. That, in an admittedly basic form, is the chorus effect.
Martin actually got into the electric guitar business in the late ’50s when it started slapping DeArmond pickups onto some of its acoustic guitars yielding the D-18E, D-28E and OO-18E. These pickups were the DeArmond humbuckers with chrome sides and a black center in a trapezoidal hole, large pole pieces along one side and smaller poles along the other. Prototypes of the D-18E began in 1958 and in 1959 production began on it plus the D-28E and OO-18E.
Now we’ve moved away from the three ‘main’ shapes of steel-strung acoustics, we start looking at the off-shoots and variants which exist to give players even more options and opportunity to find the guitar which is exactly right for them. First among them is probably still well-known and identifiable in itself; the round-shoulder dreadnought. Again, these are largely Gibson-led creations, and include among their ranks the famous J-45 style famously employed by the Beatles and Noel Gallagher.
A Reamp® box is essentially the reverse of a DI box and converts a balanced signal into an unbalanced signal suitable for driving guitar amps. Radial makes three different versions of this device with variations in features and in quality of the transformers. For an introduction to reamping there is the passive ProRMP™, for high quality reamping there is the Reamp JCR™, and at the top of the line is the dual-channel active X-Amp™.
There's no denying the popularity of the Stratocaster, thanks to it being the weapon of choice for a long list of iconic players that include Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck to name a few. The American Professional Stratocaster is the latest iteration of this classic, carrying over much of the look and feel of the original, but more reliable and road worthy.
Mic placement is pretty crucial. You can get a million different EQ responses depending on where you throw the mic in front of the cab. I personally have the best luck - or at least I think so - when I back the mic off a little bit. I know a lot of engineers throw it right on the grille to get the bass boost, the proximity effect and all that garbage, but I find that if I back it up about six inches, I get a more balanced EQ curve.
No reference materials are available to me for this early Unicord period of Univox amplifiers, but there was undoubtedly a line. These American-made amps featured tubes and use high-end Jensen speakers. The Univox logo was on the upper right corner of the grille on a large piece of plastic. The cabinet was covered in charcoal-flecked tolex with white beading, with a grey grillcloth. Front-mounted controls included two inputs, volume, tone, tremolo with speed and intensity, plus footswitch jack with footswitch. The jewel light on these early Univox amps was a little red square.

Martin also developed a line of archtop instruments during the 1930s. Their design differed from Gibson and other archtops in a variety of respects–the fingerboard was glued to the top, rather than a floating extension of the neck, and the backs and sides were flat rosewood plates pressed into an arch rather than the more common carved figured maple. Martin archtops were not commercially successful[citation needed] and were withdrawn after several years. In spite of this, during the 1960s, David Bromberg had a Martin archtop converted to a flat-top guitar with exceptionally successful results, and as a result, Martin has recently begun issuing a David Bromberg model based on this conversion.
Now, I'm sure that you're all sensibly busying yourselves with making music, so your lives are, frankly, too short to be sifting through more than a half a million words of interviews. Therefore, I'm going to try to digest what I've discovered during this process for the benefit of those less sad than me! I'm not about to dictate which technique is 'best', though, because if reading this many interviews has taught me anything it is that people will always disagree on what constitutes a great sound. Instead I've recorded a number of different audio examples to allow you to judge for yourselves, just as I did, which techniques are likely to make a real difference to your own productions. I've peppered this article with a number of boxes giving details of these files.
In terms of the electronics, Yamaha went with a System 66 piezoelectric platform. The preamp packs a standard three-band EQ couple with a built-in tuner and a flexible mid-range control. Needless to say, it gives you more than enough room to dial in a decent tone. Quality-wise, this might be the best acoustic electric you can get in this price range, period.
In the earlier days of My Chemical Romance, Iero mainly used Gibson SG's & Epiphone Les Paul guitars (most notably his white Les Paul nicknamed 'Pansy' which proved popular amongst his fans but has since been broken while onstage) and Marshall amps. He has since switched to using Gibson Les Pauls (with the Neck Pick-up removed) and occasionally uses a Gibson SG. He also used a Fender Stratocaster in the Desolation Row video. He has recently collaborated with Epiphone to design the Wilshire Phant-O-Matic guitar which he used onstage for the My Chemical Romance 'World Contamination' Tour, the Honda Civic Tour and for the Reading and Leeds festivals.
what cha got yourself there partner is an awsome guitar! if you dont like the headstock you should have got the exact same but with the strat headstock and their cheaper! or you could change the neck to a blank headstock and there is a guy on ebay that will print you out a vinal sticker for it or if you have the cash get a fender neck and let people think its a fender!

Roland has come a long way from its humble beginnings back in the early '70s as a rhythm machine manufacturer. The company grew to produce various other instruments and amplifiers, and is now one of the biggest music gear manufacturers in the world. With so many guitar brands under their name that could produce amps for them - like Boss and Line 6 - they still take the effort to build their own branded amps, and the success that they are enjoying is proof that they are doing the right thing. Their most popular amp is still the Roland Jazz Chorus, as used by artists like Albert King, Andy Summers, Metallica's James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett, Robert Smith of The Cure, Jeff Buckley and many more. These days they have a variety of amplifiers in the entry to mid-tier market, most of which continue to garner great reviews.
A rivalry sprang up between Fender and Gibson, creating some of the solid-body electrics most coveted by musicians and collectors, including the 1952 Gibson “Les Paul” model with a curved top and a combination bridge-tailpiece (the guitar was designed primarily by McCarty, with input by the famous guitarist who endorsed it), the 1954 Fender Stratocaster, and a 1958 version of the Gibson Les Paul with a new “humbucking” pickup that transmitted less background interference from electrical equipment.
The Guitar Store is not only the best guitar store in Seattle, but the best guitar store in the WORLD. First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful. My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do. Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff. Can't rave enough! Definitely found my guitar store for life! Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you are looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.

Flanger: A flanger creates a "whooshing" "jet plane" or "spaceship" sound, simulating a studio effect that was first produced by recording a track on two synchronized tapes and periodically slowing one tape by pressing the edge of its reel (the "flange"). When the two tapes' audio signals are later mixed, a comb filter effect can be heard. Flanger units add a variably delayed version of the audio signal to the original or signal, creating a comb filter or Doppler effect.[73][74] Some famous uses of flanger effects include "Walking on the Moon" by The Police, the intro to "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love" by Van Halen, and "Barracuda" by Heart.[75][76]
As one user put it, this is one of “Amazon’s hidden little gems”, with a good set of tube electronics that gives out a natural sounding overdrive and some crystal-clear rhythmic sounds. If you want to make your guitar sound clear enough to accompany Porcupine Tree while also having the option for a natural grainy sound that might work well for jazz and blues, then this item is definitely something to look into.  
2. Do your saddles have notches cut into them? If not, then I suspect they could do with some (or if they have, but they're extremely shallow, perhaps they need deepened a little). Just note, however, that this is very easy to screw up and should probably be done by a tech if you're in any way unsure about doing it yourself. Also, you can't just cut a notch in one saddle. You would have to do all of them to the same depth, then raise the bridge a little to make up for the depth you just removed.
no. first of all a bass guitar has 4 strings and a guitar has 6 strings second, u couldn't tune the guitar open notes a whole octave down to create the bass notes as the strings would be too loose. although you can play bass songs on a guitar but it wouldn't be as deep a bass. Actually you can. depending on the kind of way your guitar is built you can remove your guitar strings and replace them with bass strings and finally adjust the setting on your amp so you can have a rich full tone. I have a Fender Squier and made it into a bass by replacing the strings and adjusting the settings on my amp. WARNING: you NEED to know if your bridge or the place where you put the bass strings through can hold the pressure the bass string apply.
In the 1970s and 1980s, with jazz-rock fusion guitar playing, jazz guitarists incorporated rock guitar soloing approaches, such as riff-based soloing and usage of pentatonic and blues scale patterns. Some guitarists used Jimi Hendrix-influenced distortion and wah-wah effects to get a sustained, heavy tone, or even used rapid-fire guitar shredding techniques, such as tapping and tremolo bar bending. Guitarist Al Di Meola, who started his career with Return to Forever in 1974, was one of the first guitarists to perform in a "shred" style, a technique later used in rock and heavy metal playing. Di Meola used alternate-picking to perform very rapid sequences of notes in his solos.
Bass players who do not have a combo amp who are playing live shows can connect their bass to a DI unit and from there to the PA system. In a well-equipped nightclub or music bar, the audio engineer can then route the bass signal to a stage monitor suitable for bass, so the bass player and band can hear the bass tone. Some standalone bass preamplifier pedals have a DI output, so this output can similarly be connected to a PA system. Bass players who are playing in small venues (coffeehouses, small pubs, etc.) will typically need to bring their own bass combo amp (or an alternative amp, such as a keyboard amp combo), because very small venues often have a very small, low-powered PA system which is used mainly for vocals. Some small venues do not have monitor speakers, or they have only one, in front of the lead vocalist. Bass players who do not have a combo amp who are laying down tracks in the recording studio can plug into a DI unit (any professional recording studio will have one), which is connected to the audio console; the audio engineer can provide the bassist with the sound of their instrument through headphones.
EBow is a brand name of Heet Sound Products, of Los Angeles, California, for a small, handheld, battery-powered resonator. The Ebow was invented by Greg Heet, as a way to make a note on an electric guitar string resonate continuously, creating an effect that sounds similar to a bowed violin note or a sustained pipe organ note. The resonator uses a pickup - inductive string driver - feedback circuit, including a sensor coil, driver coil, and amplifier, to induce forced string resonance. The Ebow brand resonator is monophonic, and drives only one string at a time.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Ash - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Natural Blue
*VERY GOOD CONDITION, W/CD (NEVER USED)* PAYMENT is requested within 2 days or 48 hours of purchase.   FEEDBACK: Positive feedback and a 5 star rating is such an important part of the eBay rating system. Please contact me before leaving Neutral or negative feedback, I will try to help you. I will leave feedback when feedback is left for me!   SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE 😎   TRUSTED & ESTABLISHED SELLER!!
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After these is the overdrive/distortion, in this case our ST-2 Power Stack. The CS-3 Compression/Sustainer (and the PW-10 V-Wah) can improve the ST-2’s sustain and tone by increasing the signal to it, so they’re placed before the ST-2. Many players use a compressor just for this reason, and the “fixed wah” sound, which is a wah pedal turned on but not continuously swept, is very common in rock and metal lead tones.
It's always hard to rate amps when mixing high gain with vintage, boutique amps and the mass produced monsters, but including S.S. and digital technology seems to be a unrealistic stretch. That being said, this manufacturer is making some of the best sounding vintage type tube amps I've heard to date. their lineup of vintage Fender style amps are all excellent, and considerably more affordable and reliable. If you are a fan of the tweed, black and silver faced gems, you have to give Victoria a try. If you prefer something with a unique spin they make their own unique creations as well and they are all serious tone machines. In so far as tube amps go, these guys are definitely in my top five. Speaking of boutique, where is Carr?

Compared to other plastic exterior multi-effects, the RP360 XP feels solid and durable. And this is reflected in many reviews, which mention the pedal's reliability as one of its good traits. Versatility and value for money also came up a number of times, both from pedalboard owners that have downsized, and beginners who are just trying out multi-effects.


Boost is an effect which boosts the volume of an input signal, in order to assure that the amplifier is driven beyond its regular dynamic range and thus will produce clipping and thereby distortion. Boosts are very useful for tube amp players who wish to increase the gain on their amplifier without having to modify the tone the way a traditional overdrive or fuzz pedal would. A boost is often measured by how transparent it is--although there are some on the market (such as the Katana by Keeley and the EarthTone by NOC3) that employ JFET designs to produce additional "dirt" when engaged to add a subtle fattening effect to the boost.

Loved this guitar a lot😘, been going back and forth to our nearest guitar center and to he honest with you, I tried the Taylor gs mini, MartIn Black electric acoustic, Breedlove electric acoustc, but man, when I tried and started playing this awesome Ibanez AW54CEOPN, I was blown away!!! The sound was loud and cleat the tone was awesome, the color was fantastic! For the price of $299.00 was very cheap for the quality and sound that this guitar can offer👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽


King V has got to be one of Jackson’s most iconic guitar families. The one we are looking at here is a but underpowered compared to the original King V, however it also comes at a much lower price. The whole package is well made and quality control is top notch. It takes some time to get used to the Flying V body shape, but once you do you’ll refuse to go back. Aside from looking good, this thing also brings a mighty sound.
Jackson is a renowned guitar manufacturing company. It is named after its founder, Grover Jackson. Jackson Guitars was founded in the year 1980 and has its headquarters in the State of Arizona, United States. Jackson guitars are considered as one of the best guitars in the world. Jackson Guitars are known for its slender and elegant designs. Jackson Guitars are popular for their typical pointed headstock which is similar in design with the “shark fins”. This design is most popular and has inspired many other guitar brands to shape themselves as the Jackson’s.
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A direct user interface can give far more musically rewarding results than dozens of parameters, menus and alpha dials. Often, even a panel of knobs isn't anywhere near as natural to play as, say, a Korg Kaoss Pad. Here's something Kaoss Pad 3 owners can try at home: choose effect DL2 (Smooth Delay) in which the pad controls delay time on the X-axis and depth on the Y-axis. Next route your favourite solo patch through it and set the FX depth to about 12 o'clock. Solo wildly whilst simultaneously stroking the top right-hand corner of the Kaoss Pad with short, circular motions. With practice, you should be able to produce delicate pitch sweeps as the delay shifts in time. As you control depth by vertical motion, practise diagonal upwards sweeps followed by vertical downward ones to smoothly dampen the effect. Hey, it takes years to master the violin, so a few evenings spent waggling your finger over flashing LEDs shouldn't be too arduous. Next try the same technique with lush solo pads: simple yet devastatingly effective! Paul Nagle
Dude I totally agree with you,Eddie Hazel was awsome.And Add Ernie Isley (he learned from Jimi Hendrix when he played with the Isley Brothers),And Carlos Santana(his oloder stuff,check out the Borboletta album from 1975),and if you like Hendrix and stevie Ray why isn't Robin Trower (Robin Trower Live) on this list ?Also the guitarist from the band Slave(he was17 when they cut the album with "Slide"on it).Most of these are Metal guitarists,I prefer a guitarist that can make the hair on the back of my neck stand up when they play.Someone that makes you feel different emotions when they play.Just because you can play super fast doesn't make you great.

At that time European craftsmen operated under the guild system. The guitar (in its modern form) was a relatively new instrument, and most guitar makers were members of the Cabinet Makers’ Guild. The Violin Makers’ Guild claimed exclusive rights to manufacture musical instruments. The Violin Makers’ Guild filed appeals on three occasions – the first in 1806 – to prevent cabinet makers from producing guitars. Johann Martin is mentioned in a surviving submission dated 1832.


Even cooler was the ’66 Vibra Twin (Teisco Del Rey EP-12T), a twelve-string version of the Vegas. This had a slothead variation of the check mark head, with tuners facing alternatively out or back. The trapeze tail picked up the same angular design of the Vegas vibrato. Despite the Del Rey number, the EP-12T did not have a vibrato. The Teisco Del Rey in the ’66 catalog differs from the Vibra Twin shown in ’60s Bizarre Guitars in that it adds a third rotary select for solo/rhythm/bass sound tones, whereas the Teisco omitted this feature. Figure on finding either.
When buying any instrument don't buy cheap. I've been playing 5 string for 36 yrs. The most important thing in a 5 string is the tone ring with a resonator. many good brands on banjo's. I have a alverez denver belle flat top tone ring, white eagle arch top tone ring but my favorite is a honher Artist flat top tone ring. Regarding a Good acustic guitar my favorite is a martin D-35 ease of play and tone are awesome. The tone is what you are after.
The Effect:Distortion is one of the most popular and desired guitar pedal effects, especially among rock, hard-rock and metal players, The Kinks, Jimmy Hendrix, Metallica, to name a few. Prior to the introduction of effect pedals on the market, Distortion was mostly achieved by forcing an overwhelming amount of electricity passing through a guitar amp’s valves. Nowadays this is no longer necessary. Arguably one of the most famous and newbie friendly option and at the same time prime example for a distortion pedal is the classic Electro-Harmonix SOULFOOD.
5. Marshall Code 50 1x12 Digital Combo Amp ($249.99): Marshall is the household name of the amp industry and their inclusion on this list was a definite must. The Code 50 boasts more than 100 presets in an easy-to-transport package. As with most of the amps on this list, the Code 50 also includes a mini USB plug-in for ease of recording, headphone capability for practicing late into the night, and even an aux input for jamming along with music on your smartphone. You can even control it directly via Bluetooth and the mobile app. It also delivers 50 watts through a 12-inch speaker so it’s great for practice or rehearsal.
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The tone selector on an electric guitar controls the capacitor, which basically filters out high frequencies. The same way a high-cut filter (or low-pass-filter if you prefer) works on a standard equalizer. By dialing down the tone, you remove brightness and treble. The pickup selector does just what it's called.. Selecting which pickups being used to capture the vibration of the strings, and translates the energy into electric current, though the configuration and number of "presets" can vary from guitar to guitar, depending on how many pickups it has etc. If you're a handyman you can even configure this yourself.
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-
Literal hundreds of years have gone into developing and perfecting the art of guitar making. And unless you have a familiarity of the craft, you probably don’t know how impressive a well-built guitar actually is – even if you do have a base appreciation for the devices and their players. The truth is, making a guitar is an incredibly difficult and drawn out process that requires the utmost attention to detail in order to be well done. From the tonal qualities of the materials out of which they are constructed, to the sturdiness of the overall build, to the dozens of additional fittings, guitars are remarkable gizmos and their developers (alternatively, luthiers) deserve respect for their talents. The following 12 brands, who were started by and have employed many said luthiers, have built their reputations on the creation and production of some of the greatest and most iconic guitars ever to grace this planet.
The free GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is ready to rock right from the start: It offers a supreme selection of modular, high-class components, effects and routing tools, bundled as the free FACTORY SELECTION. For classic power and gain the Tube Compressor and Skreamer really come into their own, while a range of high-end effects such as the Studio Reverb and Delay Man can add that special touch. Choose from many Amp and Envelope modifiers as well as Routing Tools to further shape your sound to perfection.
Are you a seasoned player looking to upgrade you instrument or a beginner starting to learn the ropes and tricks of playing a guitar? Well, in this article we have prepared a comprehensive guide on how to select the best electric guitar as per you needs and the list of the best electric guitars available in India. The guitar is a complex musical instrument with some basic components, a wide range of features and different constructions, so it is important to have some basic idea about these features so that you can make an informed choice.
Starfield was a guitar brand owned by Hoshino Gakki. In the 1970s, Hoshino Gakki and Kanda Shokai shared some guitar designs and so some Ibanez and Greco guitars have the same features. The Kanda Shokai Greco guitars were sold in Japan and the Hoshino Gakki Ibanez guitars were sold outside of Japan. From 1982, Ibanez guitars have also been sold in Japan as well as being sold outside of Japan [3].
While close-miking can indeed be punchy and muscular, you’ll often find it doesn’t capture the full breadth of your electric guitar tone – that is, it simply doesn’t sound the way your amp sounds in the room. That’s because when you stand somewhere near the middle of any room and play an amp that’s placed a few feet away, several other elements affect the sonic picture. The distance between your ears and the speaker (the “air”), the shape and size of the room, materials used to make the walls, ceiling and floor and/or their coverings, the ways in which sound reflects from them, along with other factors all contribute to how your amp really sounds in the acoustic environment. Most engineers find, therefore, that they need to use some form of distant miking when the aim is capturing a realistic amp tone.

Wiring: If you chose the optional snap together wiring, then all of our instruments come pre-wired and pre-soldered, so that you can assemble the instrument without needing to do any soldering. You simply snap a few connectors together to complete the electrical connections before you screw down the pickguard, control panel, and output jack plate. This is detailed on the guitar kit wiring and hole drilling description page. If you would prefer to not have your kit pre-wired and pre-soldered, please let us know.
While production and distribution of guitars under the Ibanez brand began much earlier, the company gained notoriety outside its native Japan when it started importing Ibanez guitars to the United States in the mid-1960s. These first efforts were funky-looking creations which sold at the low end of the guitar market, primarily in department stores. But the company's products continued to move up the quality ladder until the company was perceived as a legitimate market force, selling what were essentially copies of other companies' designs in the mid-1970s. A patent lawsuit from Gibson ended the sales of those copies, but Ibanez had by then gained a foothold in the guitar market globally. (more...)
Note that the information presented in this article is for reference purposes only. Antique Electronic Supply makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this article, and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions on the part of the author. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose, is given with respect to the contents of this article or its links to other resources.
A detailed study on MIT physics students has proven that online classes really do work. Guitar Tricks results show that online lessons not only work for physics but also for learning the guitar. A GuitarTricks member survey in 2010 found that 98% would recommend Guitar Tricks. 80% reported that they were learning faster than with any other method that they had tried before. Most members found that their skills increased from 3 to 5 (on a scale of 1 to 10) within a short period of starting the online lessons with Guitar Tricks.
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The Jeff Beck Oxblood is available in limited numbers. The first 50 of these historic guitars were aged at Gibson Custom to look like Beck’s original, then signed, numbered and played by Beck himself. The next 100 guitars were prepared with Gibson Custom’s V.O.S. finish, bringing the total run to 150 instruments. Each one also comes with a standard Gibson Custom case.
For the last tip/technique, I’m going to shift gears and talk about recording acoustic—upright—bass. This may seem more daunting, but many of the same techniques apply—I’ll mention a few quick items that would be specific to the big box. While the dynamic mics I mentioned above might work fine (especially on stage), a good large-diaphragm condenser would be appropriate in the studio, to capture the high end and air of the acoustic instrument as well as the lows. On stage, the relatively low acoustic volume of the instrument may preclude more distant mic positioning, but you can wedge a small (pencil-type) mic into the bridge, with appropriate foam padding, and this, surprisingly, can often provide excellent sound and much better isolation. 
Not sure I would recommend this for someone over 11 or 12 who is genuinely serious about learning, I probably would have skipped ahead to something larger. But if you are looking for a "toy" that really could inspire a child to develop a talent, this guitar is an ideal choice. One word of caution... the amp/guitar connectors are standard size so there is nothing stopping one from connecting it straight to a much more robust megawatt amp! For the price, five stars easy.
A very useful way of creating space for guitars in the final mix is to use tunable high-pass and low-pass filters to remove extreme frequencies that do nothing to enhance the guitar tone, but invade the space of other instruments that do perform in those areas. Generally speaking, it’s worth losing everything below 80Hz, although it’s not unusual to set the filter a good degree higher. Shaving off some high end may also be useful to help place the guitar in a specific area of the audio spectrum. Filter at the mixing stage, as the sound of the recording will often determine the optimum filtering points.
The tone controls compensate for and complement the somewhat lifeless and mostly midrange-y character of the average guitar pickup. The gain control, often designed with a pull-boost, basically excites and heats the preamp tubes, which along with judicious use of both the amp and the guitar’s tone controls will begin to produce much of the sonic seasoning and flavor that guitarists and their fans crave as it flows from the speakers.
Welcome to Silesia Guitars, the guitar repair shop in Shoreline that is dedicated to taking good care of your dear friend, the guitar. We are located in Shoreline, just 15 min north of downtown Seattle. Our work consists of repairs of anything from broken headstocks and  cracked guitar tops, through replacing/installing electronics and custom inlays. Just need a set up or a string change? No problem! We try to accommodate any needs, big or small. Usually, the cheaper the guitar, the more it would benefit from being professionally set up. Evaluations are free, so stop by with your guitar today and let's talk about how we can help you get the most out of it!
The first step is to determine what’s in your pickup already. The most common magnets for humbuckers are (roughly in order of strength): alnico 2, alnico 4, alnico 5, and then various types of ceramic magnets. In simple terms, the stronger the magnet, the greater the potential output. But you can’t just look at magnetic strength alone, because stronger magnets also affect the string’s ability to sustain.
The Fender Tele Jr. is a variant of the Fender Telecaster electric guitar that the Fender Custom Shop produced in a limited run of 100 units in the early 1990s. It uses a Telecaster body shape, scale length, and electronics controls (albeit, with a reversed control plate). However, many of its construction and electronic features—for example its set-in neck and P-90-style pickups—are similar to those of a Gibson Les Paul Junior (hence the name) and Gibson Les Paul Special electric guitars.

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Because of the high quality, Gibsons are among the more expensive models of guitars. However, Epiphone, of whom they are the parent organization, produces high quality guitars at much more affordable prices. These guitars are usually slightly inferior to their Gibson counterparts, but the playability and style are similar, and they are still a definitely among the good guitar brands.

Tonewood (basswood, mahogany, alder...) doesn't matter in an electric guitar unless you're getting ancient pickups for it. Older pickups used to act more like microphones and picked up sound resonating from the guitar body as well as from the strings. Modern technology has fixed that so the sound comes purely from the strings. Most guitar companies that market their guitars for tonewood are guitar brands that have been around since the times of these ancient pickups and based their marketing off of it. Most of them still haven't changed it. I recently read a scientific breakdown (experiment, analysis and all) that thoroughly proved the tonewood debate pointless once and for all. Every variable was accounted for-only tonewood was changed. So, don't worry about the basswood; it could be made from the least acoustic material on earth, and the pickups would give you the same sound as they would have on a different guitar material. I've spent months researching this in depth. (I play, too.)
Last Update Sept 22nd, 2018 Electric guitars are those that have an amplification feature. You can connect your guitar to a power source and amplify the sound produced onto a loud speaker. They are normally a perfect choice for stage performances and bands. Below are brief reviews of 10 best electric guitars in India, which are among the best in Indian market. These best electric guitars were curated by our experts according to their popularity, reviews and ratings by people across India.
It might be a little overwhelming when you listen to the song being played by the professionals. Try not to listen to all the extra filler that these musicians put into their music and focus instead on the chord progression. Think about the chords that go into making these songs, try to memorize them, and listen to when the chord changes happen in the song.
Myself, were my budget less than a thousand then I'm dropping a big name like Martin of my list entirely, and probably I'm dropping Taylor too. Seagull makes some solid wood instruments for around $700...no idea how much the electronics tack onto the price, but I'm betting a Seagull SWS guitar with electronics could be had at $900 or so with ...just the slightest of scratches or blemishes.
Instrument amplifiers are available in a wide range of price, quality, and performance levels. Some are designed for beginners, such as small, low-wattage practice amps, which typically have a single 8" speaker and about 10 watts, or smaller "combo" amps with relatively low wattage (15 to 20 watts) and a single 10" speaker. Mid- to large-size "combo" amps with 30 to 50 watts and one 12" speaker or four 10" speakers are best for high-volume situations, such as band rehearsals and onstage performances. For large venues, such as outdoor music festivals, guitarists may use one or more 100 watt (or several hundred watt) heads with one or more 8x10” cabinets. Some guitar amps are strongly associated with specific instruments or genres, such as the Marshall amps, which are widely used in heavy metal music.

Guitarists have their own special system of music notation called guitar tablature, or "guitar tabs" for short. Using guitar tabs, a guitarist can play a wide variety of music without ever having to learn how to read standard sheet music. Though guitar tabs aren't a perfect way of describing music, they've allowed newer generations of guitarists to quickly and easily share information about how to play songs across the globe via the internet. Every guitarist should have at least a basic understanding of how to read tablature - it's the de facto shorthand for much of the guitar music you'll find written out online.
Let's look at how the professionals go about combining the close and ambient techniques we've looked at so far, in order to create specific custom setups for different recordings. Joe Barresi, for example, relies heavily on the trusty SM57 and MD421 combination, but he'll choose from a variety of other mics to give character to particular sounds. "The two microphones I use most for recording electric guitars are the Shure SM57 and the Sennheiser MD421, often both, close up, placed at the edge of the speaker, where the speaker centre meets the cone, or, if I'm looking for a more bright sound, dead centre. When I want more low end, I may have an AKG C414 on there, and when I'm after a little more personality, a Neumann U87, backed up a foot, or a ribbon mic, like the Royer 122, or an RCA BK5 or 77."
“Spectrum ‘5’ has an unusually thin neck. To achieve the proper rigidity in this fast action neck Teisco had to select the hardest (and the costliest) material available…Ebony. The adjustable neck is fashioned out of 5 plys [sic] of laminated Ebony to insure maximum strength. The fingerboard of the Spectrum ‘5’ is likewise fashioned out of Ebony. Note the unique position markers and the extra wide, easy to finger frets.
Yea um John Mayers way misunderunstood and under rated, watch the 'where the light is live in LA' DVD(and actually watch it before you think of posting a reply) and tell me he aint an amazing guitarist, im not saying hes a god but hes definetly an amzing guitarist n i rekon he deserves a spot just for the fact that hes one of the few guitarists of this generation with some talent.

I'd never heard of this brand but was recently in a store in North Carolina looking for a nylon string guitar. The salesman asked me if I was "open minded" and if I'd be receptive to trying a brand that I probably had never heard of. He handed me a really pretty instrument with a very different looking headstock. I immediately figured he was showing me a very expensive instrument. I asked how much it cost, but he didn't answer. He simply replied "Try it, then let me know what you think." I had no idea how much this guitar would cost, and honestly I hate guessing games, but the guitar was really beautiful. I played several classical guitars there that day. A Yamaha, a Cordoba and an Alvarez, but the Merida was unquestionably the best sounding (and looking).

“Spectrum ‘5’ has an unusually thin neck. To achieve the proper rigidity in this fast action neck Teisco had to select the hardest (and the costliest) material available…Ebony. The adjustable neck is fashioned out of 5 plys [sic] of laminated Ebony to insure maximum strength. The fingerboard of the Spectrum ‘5’ is likewise fashioned out of Ebony. Note the unique position markers and the extra wide, easy to finger frets.


For subtle modulation just set every knob at about 11 o'clock. You'll get a thin, shimmering layer over your acoustic guitar's tone that doesn't drown out the natural resonance of the instrument. The pedal doesn't boost your signal or add any kind of volume. All you'll hear is a clear, simple effect. Additionally, the CH-1's two stereo outputs allow you to easily split your signal between two amplification sources. Simply plug your primary source into output A (mono) and the secondary source into output B.
The Ibanez JEM77WDP Steve Vai Signature guitar features a rosewood top on a mahogany body. The maple and walnut neck with a slim Wizard neck profile is topped with a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard with jumbo frets and Tree of Life vine inlays. This model also has a striking wooden pickguard and matching headstock, as well as wooden control knobs, earning it the nickname “Woody.”
AT LAST!! some gd stuf about john frusciante, hes the best living guitarist in my opinion. i don't get people who think those random metal shredders should belong in the top 10 list…. bein insanely good just on technical stuff means nothing… its kinda like shredding as fast as possible on a pentatonic scale, people will respect the skills, but wheres the soul? this is the exact reason why hendrix and jimmy page always get on these lists but not guitarists like buckethead, i mean seriously he has less tone then any of the GnR guitarists.. if slash is not on the list, theres no way the kfc man can get any close. to all the haters, tom morello is a very innovative guitarist and by far more creative then buckethead. I swear the world is no longer a place for good music.
This is a special edition by Boss, for one main reason, they’ve collaborated with Fender to design the FRV-1 (click for full review), a dominant manufacturer of guitars which everyone should have at least heard of by now.This pedal is an enhanced remake of its old classic release, the manufacturers have kept everything people loved in the original release, while adding more quality.
by pedalhaven  @airbag3333  has a seriously stacked board! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
Market sentiment is overwhelmingly positive, with many reviewers describing how the Seagull S6 Classic M-450T exceeds their expectations. Build quality and playability gets the bulk of commendations, along with its clear sound and good acoustic projection. Some even dare to compare the Seagull S6 Classic with super expensive guitars from major brands.

Most guitars have at least one tone control installed. They can be either assigned to a particular pickup (Strat or Les Paul) or work as master tone control (Ibanez and others). Electronically, it’s a variable low-pass filter. Lower the resistance, more treble gets cut which means that higher pot values will sound a bit brighter (typically 500K vs 250K). Capacitor values usually traditionally range from 0.022uF (22nF) to 0.047uF (47nF) but many people find these values too large and install much smaller caps instead. Values of 10nF, 6.8nF or even smaller are reported to work quite well (I used 10nF in my latest mod). To help you decide between cap values and composition, check out this site. It hosts a couple of useful videos with cap value and composition analysis.
We spent 39 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. Although none of them go up to 11, we are pretty confident that one of the guitar amps on our list will deliver the perfect level of sound and quality of tone for whatever venue or style you need to play. We've ranked them here by their tonal expressiveness and flexibility, durability, control options, and ease of use. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best guitar amp on Amazon.
A lot of users described the Line 6 Helix Floor as something amazing and too good to be true. Commendations for it's incredible versatility and sound quality are common place, with many describing it as the best guitar multi-effects processor in the market today. There's simply no denying its continued success in the market, along with the high review scores that it continuous to attain. Premiere Guitar properly summed up what most people feel about the Line 6 Helix Floor: "Great sounds. Cool design. Solid construction. Extraordinary connectivity. Good price."
Another factor to consider are the alloys used to make the string. Acoustic strings may be phosphor bronze or an 80/20 bronze/zinc alloy, electric strings may be pure steel or a steel/nickel alloy, and the outer winding on the thicker strings may be either round wound or flat wound, which is typically used by jazz guitarists for smooth fingering with less fretting noise. Acoustic and electric strings are both now available with special super-thin coatings to protect them from sweat and corrosion. Coated strings cost more, but generally last much longer. Find out what type of string your favorite player uses, try guitars with different types of strings at your local guitar store, then try a few different sets on your guitar to see what feels and sounds best for your playing style. Major manufacturers include Ernie Ball, Martin, GHS, D'Addario, and Elixir, among others. Make sure you have a string winder to make installing the strings go faster, and some pliers with a fine wire cutter to clip the excess string from the tuning post, a well as some guitar polish - changing strings is a good time to perform some routine maintenance. Keep a clean cloth in your case to wipe down the strings after each use, along with extra bridge pins for your acoustic guitar. Regular string changes are the best way to keep your tone crisp and clear, so grab a pack and tune 'em up!
The guitars included three bolt-neck Strat-style models, the GS-1 (one humbucker), GS-2 (two humbuckers) and GS-3 (humbucker/single/single). Most had locking Kahler vibratos, although at least one GS-3 has been seen with a traditional fulcrum vibrato. The bodies had a German carve relief beginning at the waist and extending forward to the cutaway horns. The necks had 21-fret rosewood or maple fingerboards with dots. The six-in-line heads were kind of squarish and bi-level, with a carved relief along the lower edge, kind of an Ovation trademark. The logos said Ovation Ultra GS. The GS-1 (volume only) and GS-2 (volume, tone, three-way) had pickups mounted on rings on the top. The GS-3 featured a black Strat-style pickguard. One source refers to a GSL model, but nothing is known about what this means, if it isn’t a typo. Most of these came with typical exposed-pole DiMarzios, but the previously mentioned guitar with the fulcrum vibrato also had twin-blade pickups with DiMarzio stenciled on the covers.
Classical guitars by Martin are equal in craftsmenship to their steel string models. But unfortunately, their sound and feel is not what classical players seem to want. Therefore they do not have the collectability of the steel string models. I group Martin classical models to include the "NY" series and gut string models made from the 1930's and later.
The pitch shifter is one of the most versatile effects in the pitch category.  Often used with a rocker pedal like a wah-wah or volume pedal, the pitch can be swept up or down by a specified amount in a smooth glissando-like bend.  It’s typical to hear a player use a range of one or two octaves for the sweep, so the shifted pitch lands back on its original note, but in a higher or lower octave.

Even with tone control maxed some high frequencies get cut. To let all the frequencies through you can either get a no-load pot or make one. CTS makes them for Fender and what they do is simply break the connection between the wiper and conductive element when pot is maxed. Additionally, they have an indentation so once they reach maximum setting they “click” and it’s not that easy to turn them back. To make your own just cut (or cover with nail polish) the element near the end, so that resistance between the wiper and the opposite lug reads infinite when maxed, at lower settings it should read as usual.

TC Electronic's Hall of Fame reverb pedal is stacked with features and is easily our top recommendation from this list. The first perk is a mode selector that gives you a total of ten different reverb types, in addition to the TonePrint option. TonePrint is TC Electronic's signature feature that allows you to program tones into your pedal designed by artists and popular musicians.
Bass cabinets are more likely to have thicker wood panels than regular electric guitar amps, and to have stronger internal bracing. These design features help to lessen the likelihood of unwanted cabinet buzzes or rattles, which are more likely with bass cabinets than electric guitar cabs because of the low-frequency sounds that bass cabs have to reproduce.
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Yamaha is considered as among largest music instruments selling company in India, which provides a wide variety of guitars. S series, Yamaha RGX, RGZ electronic series, SG series (SG 5,SG 7) etc are the best models of guitar. Now they become the world’s largest manufacturer of a full line of musical instruments. They earned good name by providing super quality guitar at an affordable price. Available price is Rs. 8,000/- onwards (approx).
Tone pot usually connected just as a variable resistor (one lug is not connected), so you got some “small” resistance (when compared to amp’s input) and a cap going to the ground. When you crank your tone there is no significant resistance, so all signal above cutoff freq is shunted to the ground (with graduate slope) — but still this is the brightest position of the tone pot.
This guitar follows after the tried and tested formula of old Stratocaster design, from the double cutaway alder body to the bolt-on maple neck, down to its triple single coil pickup configuration. The scale length follows after traditional builds at 25.5", while the neck profile (modern C) and narrower nut width of 1.65" makes this guitar viable for modern players. While it doesn't have vintage voiced pickups, the default pickups are not so bad either, and will give you the distinctive Strat tone that almost everybody loves.
The intonation here refers to the forward/backward position of the individual string saddles. By moving the saddles forwards or backwards, we are actually adjusting the length of the strings. Without going into too much detail, if the string is the wrong length, the positions of the frets will not be correct and the guitar will be out of tune on some of them. Adjusting the intonation is not difficult. All you need is a guitar tuner and a tool to move the saddles forwards or backwards. Play an open low E string and make sure it is in tune (using the guitar tuner).
The Kay guitar company's origins date back to the 1890's, starting with the Groeschel Mandolin Company of Chicago, Illinois. The company's name was changed to "Stromberg-Voisinet" in 1921, and shortlyafterwards, in 1923, Henry Kay "Hank" Kuhrmeyer (the origin of the name "Kay") joined the company and quickly worked his way up to the top. By 1928, Kuhrmeyer had bought the company and that same year the company started producing electric guitars and amps.
Fender:  These guys have also been around for a long time and are just as iconic as Gibson. Especially for the creation of what could arguably be the most popular electric guitar of all time – The Fender Stratocaster. The Stratocaster may be one of the most popular guitars of all time, but it’s what led to it that really changed the guitar world forever. It’s the fact that the man responsible, Leo Fender, a visionary and dedicated workaholic, invented the first commercially successful solidbody electric guitar –an invention that has led to the incredible array of amazing electric solidbodies of today. It’s important to note that Rickenbacker had created a somewhat solid-body guitar back in 1935. However, it was small, kind of awkward and not completely solid or even actual wood. Some consider it the first solidbody, but by other standards most people still credit Fender for the design. There where still other semi-solidbody experiments at the time created by Les Paul himself as well as Paul Bigsby for Merle Travis but none of those actually caught on commercially the way the Fender (Esquire, then Broadcaster) did. Fender’s original solidbody guitar went through a number of refinements and name changes until it finally came to be known as the, Telecaster.
A towering figure in the Japanese underground beginning in the early ’70s, Keiji Haino plays guitar — often distorted to the point of pure sound — with such a wild diversity that it’s misleading to call him merely a “noise guitarist.” But he is very, very, very noisy. With personas that include blues-sludge hero, noise-blast deployer, and big-eared post-psychedelic improviser, Haino’s renown (and collaborations) spread far beyond Japan, most notably with albums recorded by Fushitusha, his all-improv/nominally rock outfit.
Though the guitar is played through an amplifier which is often miked and recorded, the engineer or producer may later decide to use a different amplifier tone that's better suited to the character and timbre of the song, while preserving all the nuance and inflection of the original performance embedded in the direct track. The re-amp device allows the dry track to be sent to an amplifier again and properly miked and re-recorded for use as the final track.
For instance, during 1970s and early 1980s, Japanese manufacturer Tokai Gakki produced superb replicas of 1957–59 vintage Les Pauls, and replicas themselves were gradually highly regarded. In the 1980s, to respond to the high demand for vintage models, Gibson itself began to offer a line of “Custom Shop models”, almost accurate reproductions of early Les Paul crafted by the Gibson Guitar Custom Shops.
A touring pro friend of my was given one of these years ago by the McPherson company as a promotional endorsement for him to play on stage. After playing his I have wanted one for years. They are indeed expensive, but recently I was able to purchase one. In my 45 years of playing I have always gone through multiple examples of each guitar I've owned before purchasing, and have (and do) own Martins, Taylors, Gibsons, Tacomas, Fenders, Seagulls, Alvarez, Yamaha, etc. which were all really good in their own right. However, nothing I've played has been as good as the McPherson in terms of tone, volume, sustain, note clarity, playability, workmanship; it's useful whether played solo or in an ensemble setting, and for chords or single line playing. It is indeed the last acoustic guitar that I will ever buy.
I started using cobalt .010 and I've found they have plenty of clarity and bite. Please keep in mind there are many factors going into your sound. Amp, guitar pickups, strings, pick type, etc. Don't be disappointed if you get some premium strings that don't change your sound if your pickups can't pick up the movement very well. Start at a regular light. .010 is plenty flexible, and they won't break as often as a 8 or 9. Don't get caught up in the rookie mentality of "THIS is what kind of guitarist I will be, so I need everything to fit that." Experiment with different sizes and types.
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There you go! That's the way to go about it. Now keep practicing till you get perfect. I am sure you would get these bass guitar tabs for beginners in few attempts. These were some of the best guitar tabs for beginners. There are some best acoustic guitars for beginners that you can select among the different types of guitars. Buy the best guitar, so that you do not come across any problems later on. You could also purchase some guitar tab software and practice the notations. There are many musical sites that provide you with free guitar tabs and tutorials, that you can refer to. They may also help you get a broader view on how to play guitar tabs. Learning any instrument is fun and helps you overcome fatigue, thus rejuvenating your power and mood. You can definitely trust me on that!
The Les Paul Custom single cutaway was discontinued in 1961 and replaced with the SG (as we know it) designation for “solid guitar”. This model featured a thin 1-5/16″ body and a double cutaway. Confusion abounds to this day over the name Les Paul Custom. Since the single cutaway was discontinued, Gibson transferred the name Les Paul Custom to the new models.

One of the most important attributes of boost pedals is their transparency. In other words, they need to able to boost the signal without changing the signal itself. As easy as it sounds, achieving good transparency is pretty hard and not many pedals are capable of doing so. With that said, a good booster pedal is a pretty powerful tool in the right hands.

Unlike a piano or the voices of a choir, the guitar (in standard tuning) has difficulty playing the chords as stacks of thirds, which would require the left hand to span too many frets,[40] particularly for dominant seventh chords, as explained below. If in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in closed position, then they often can be played in open position; similarly, if in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in root position, they can often be played in inverted positions. A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Additional chords can be generated with drop-2 (or drop-3) voicing, which are discussed for standard tuning's implementation of dominant seventh chords (below).
There are two main types of pickup you’ll find on a guitar suitable for beginners: a single-coil pickup and a humbucker pickup. Without bogging you down in the details of how they work, the single-coil is the classic original pickup, which typically offers a bright and sparkly sound. As they cut through the mix, single-coils are excellent pickups for lead players. Then comes the faithful humbucker, which – as the name suggests – ‘bucks’ the hum, meaning less background noise. Humbuckers produce full, meaty sounds found across the world of rock and metal, and are great for lead and rhythm guitar. However you can still play fast punk rock powerchords with a single-coil, just like you can play an upbeat country number with a humbucker! You’ll usually find two or three pickups on a guitar, although some models will offer just one. Guitars with two or more pickups will come fitted with a pickup selector switch to quickly change between them.
The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is still a relatively inexpensive option for a beginner amp. In terms of the basic features, it isn’t quite the best value on the market. However, it delivers a better made, better designed beginner amp at a very reasonable price. Beginners that can afford to spend a bit more, but want a standard beginner amp might find the extra cost worth it for the extra quality of the Orange Crush PiX CR12L.
Guild acoustic guitars are played by some of the best professional musicians in the business. From this standpoint, Guild is on par with Martin and Taylor, and completes the triumvirate of American acoustic guitar titans. As you’d expect, the prices follow suit. However, the GAD series offers a way for intermediate players to get a Guild acoustic for a reasonable price.
Gold Coverage goes above and beyond the manufacturer's warranty to protect your gear from unexpected breakdowns, accidental damage from handling and failures. This plan covers your product for one, two, three or up to five years from your date of purchase, costs just pennies per day and gives you a complete "no-worry" solution for protecting your investment.

In fact, at the beginning of this article I mentioned John Mayer’s song, “I Don’t Trust Myself.” The way that guitar tone is achieved is by using a filter pedal called the AdrenaLinn III. That effect is a beat-synced filter effect, meaning it has the ability to sync up the sweeping filter with the rhythm of a song. This is accomplished by either tapping in the tempo on the pedal, or setting the tempo with the tempo knob.


Praises and recommendations continue to flood the reviews of the Fender Super-Champ X2 HD, pointing to its great value for money as its main selling point. Even users who are not happy with some of the extra features agree that the amp gives you more than what you pay for. As expected from a Fender tube amp, clean tone is well received, while others are equally happy with the other voicings. Another plus for the Super-Champ X2 HD is that it gets good feedback from guitarists of different playing styles and instruments, be it single-coil equipped or even those with active humbucker pickups.
If you've NEVER heard of EZMix for effects, Impact Soundworks Shreddage 2 IBZ or Prominy V-Metal for guitar, or Alchemist Studios Texas Grind for bass, or Impact Soundworks Shreddage Drums for drums, then I would say you're right, (Amplitube 4 is out right now, by the way). You need Kontakt 5.5 for all of this to work though, so if you have this already you need to upgrade.
In ’74, Ibanez, which was by then leading the copy pack, followed the suggestions of Jeff Hasselberger and changed its designs by squaring off the end of the fingerboard and lowering the neck into the body to look and play more like a Gibson original. Virtually all Japanese manufacturers followed. Since Univox guitars were primarily made by Aria, it is probable that in late ’74 or ’75, Univox guitars also had these features, although the Gimme shown in a 1976 flyer still has the rounded fingerboard, and this was in a 1980 binder, so you can’t be too rigid in evaluating Univox guitars based on these details.
So, here’s the deal: the M5 is NOT an amplifier modeler (no Marshall or Vox recreations here), nor is it meant to replace your entire pedalboard. This is ONLY an effect modeling pedal, and contains over 100 effects, of which you can have active one at a time. In terms of “extras” it has a tuner and tap tempo. The Line 6 M5 is a perfect first pedal to buy, since with 100+ built-in effects you can play with all of them and find out what types of effects you really like. It’s also a perfect pedal to simply just have on your pedalboard, for situations where you need a certain effect and don’t have a pedal for it. Need a reverb in a pinch? It’s a reverb. Need a compressor? You got it. Need a phaser? Yep, it’s that too. It’s also really inexpensive for what it is, making it a great starting point that you can build upon.

Micro size and simple for live performance. 4 types of guitar effect in one strip: compressor, overdrive, delay and reverb Design for blues, jazz and country music etc. Max. delay time: 500ms Aluminum-alloy, stable and strong, LED indicator shows the working state. Sonicake Multi Guitar Effect strip Sonicbar Twiggy Blues is an effects pedal combo for roots/outlaw rockers. It combines the four most important effects: compressor, overdrive, delay and reverb in one, and it features a built-in cabinet simulator for getting a real stack sound straight from the PA system. It’s a tool that can take you back to the 60's, to that golden age of rock n' roll. Taste it! Specification: Power: DC 9V 5.5x2.1mm center nagative, 105mA Max. delay time: 500ms Dimension: 262mm ( D ) x 64mm ( W ) x 4.


Guitar chords are usually represented by the name of the root note, and the scale it is based on, such as A Major, written as simply A. An A chord built on a minor scale is called A Minor, and written as Am. An A chord built with a 7th is called A7, and so on... Diagrams are used to show how the chord is actually to be played on the guitar, with finger positions mapped out. For a complete overview about chord structure, check this guitar chords formula chart.
Here we have old "3-hole" this is another great Japanese Vintage Guitar! this one is over 40 years old wow! ...its wonderfully aged woods contribute to its rich great sound... this example is one of the greatest Martin style Copies from one of the finest "law Suit" Acoustic instrument builders of Japan Yamaha Nippon Gakki...This model is the very popular FG-140 RED LABEL ....JUST IN!...so more info soon to come please see the detailed pics of this guitar for a link to many more pictures ( 40 ) or more from every angle Very good- excellent condition If your wondering why we call this one "3-hole" is because someone in its past life had an electric pickup of some type and it came to us with 3 tinny holes in the top... we have since filled the 3-tiny holes one on upper treble bout and 2 below the rosewood bridge... we filled & clear coated so its all solid and is very hard to see but are their also a fine hairline crack threw the finish exists at the bottom of the neck the original owner said its been their more than 20 years and has not changed and is solid...if wanted after sale for free at your request fill sand it and fill with lacquer and sand and buff smooth I expect that would do the trick to cosmetically improve the look of that but its really fine as is... What is rare about this oldie but goodie its all original and even has the original gold lined Yamaha logo Hard shell case in pretty respectable shape too...see the extra pics ( I will have a link to those pics posted later ) for those details... Great sound and pretty EZ to play too I just Cleaned it to remove the grime but leave all the original patina and also dehydrated the woods and she drank it up and after drying we finished it of with a fresh coat of wax finish was applied the woods still shine like a shinny new dime.. great old guitar.. JVG Rated in Very good Original Vintage condition with its share of natural play ware visible upon closest inspection of the neck width is 1-3/4 @ nut and the action is set good at 3-16ths @ 12th fret.. the fretboard and frets still playing well no need for a refret some fret indentations yes but its still plays just fine at 80+%, top has aged naturally with nice Patina now and has several fine finish cracks etc..same as a well loved and played 40+ year old Martin would have at several thousand dollars less than a 40+ year old martin. This guitar has been restrung with New Martin Marquis Strings and sounds great...This one you have the option of buying an original vintage Yamaha Hard Shell Case..these cases are rare and hard to find now the handle was warn and has a replacement quick fix and it works perfectly...just $69.00 additional .
If you plan to use your delay in conjunction with other stompboxes, it’s important to consider where to place these effects in the chain—especially if you’re using an overdrive, distortion, or fuzz pedal. The most common setup is to place dirt before delay. This is important because it means you’ll be delaying the distorted signal as opposed to distorting a delayed signal, which will sound mushy and indistinct. Because a distortion pedal has the strongest impact on your fundamental tone, it’s typically placed early in the chain, whereas delay is usually placed toward the end of the chain so it can produce repeats of all of the effects added to your guitar sound. Of course, you should experiment for yourself to see what you prefer.
Surprisingly, perhaps, given their reputation for fragility, ribbon mics also seem to be widely used for electric guitar, with models from Beyerdynamic, Coles, RCA and Royer all putting in appearances. Producers using ribbons include Thom Panunzio, Joe Barresi, Steve Albini, Ed Cherney, Bill Bottrell and Butch Vig — Eddie Kramer even goes as far as to say that "to me, the best guitar mic is the Beyer M160, which I've used for 30 years on Hendrix, on Zeppelin, on everybody."
A humbucker pickup is electrically equivalent to two single-coil pickups wired together in series. Coil splitting involves shorting one of the coils to ground, essentially turning the humbucker into a single-coil pickup (not a perfect replica, though, as the magnetic circuits of the two pickup types are different). This is usually done with a DPDT switch, but can also be done with a push-pull pot. Some manufacturers have used a pot to vary the amount of signal shorted to ground from one coil, thus producing a range of tones between a humbucker and a single-coil. Coil splitting results in a sound that's brighter and has less output than a full humbucker. It also eliminates the humbucker's noise-cancelling properties. This modification requires the start and end of both coils to be exposed, which is more commonly available on aftermarket than stock pickups.[17][18]
Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring and gigging musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1] While we do know that these late 1920s portable PA systems were used by guitarists and singers, it is not known whether upright bass players used these PA systems.
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OCTAVACIÓN (FAT20) Cada una de las silletas está provista de un tornillo de bloqueo para impedir todo movimiento. Para ajustar la octavación, afloje el tornillo de bloqueo de la silleta con una llave Allen de 2 mm. (D) Para ajustar la octavación, introduzca una llave Allen de 2,5 mm en el tornillo de la silleta situado en la parte posterior del trémolo.
A third product which does not fit into the "combo"/"head"/cabinet categorization are powered speaker cabinets designed for use with bass instruments. While these powered speakers share many features with a regular combo amp, a bassist cannot plug her bass directly into a powered speaker cab. The powered speaker system is designed to operate as a "slave" to another amplifier's unpowered signal (or another combo amp which has a pre-amp out jack). Some powered speaker cabs only accept a "link" XLR cable from the main amp. Some powered speaker cabinets are designed as part of a company's line of bass amps; as such, the colour of the cabinet and its grille match the combo amp which will be placed on top of the powered speaker. As well, the powered speaker may have interlocking corners to ensure that the main amp stays put on top of the powered speaker.

Nice 60's, Japanese Hollow-Body. Really cool, "Barney Kessel" style hollow body / Arch top, double cutaway Electric Guitar by Univox. 2-Pick-up. Fabulous Sunburst finish. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. "Trapeze" tailpiece. Separate Volume and Tone for each pickup and adjustable truss rod. White "Mother-of-Toilet seat" headstock overlay. Finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing Logo, Pick guard and whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Some chips on plastic pick-up bezel (see photos). Really cool "Emerald" cap on pick-up selector switch. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, Re-soldered the output jack, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!),  and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .011 "Flat-wound" strings. Dilapidated, but functional gig bag included.
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When it comes to its dimensions, all interested buyers should know that it is quite sizeable on the exterior (the unit has the following external measurements 40″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 15″ (lower bout) width x 3″ height). Likewise, the bag is quite spacious on the inside (39.5″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 14.5″ (lower bout) width and 2.5″ in height).
4. Vox VT40X 40-watt 1x10 Combo Amp ($249.99): The Vox is another modeling combo that utilizes a Valvetronix tube preamp to give you the sound qualities of a tube amp. With 13 onboard effects, you can channel quality effects without having a pedalboard at your disposal. Vox’s Virtual Elements Technology has allowed them to carefully recreate up to 20 realistic models of very sought-after amp tones, all within an attractive looking package.

Get ready to rock with the First Act Electric Guitar with Amp. It's scaled down for smaller players, yet it's designed with the same materials, electronics and appointments as First Act's full-size guitars for full rock sound. Kids will feel encouraged and excited about an authentic music-making experience while playing an instrument designed especially for them.
One question I get asked incredibly often, specially from beginner guitarists is: “What are the best guitar brands.” It’s a pretty valid question given that in just about every industry there are brands that are known to be the most desirable and most reliable (not always at the same time) and therefore, the best. However, it works a little bit differently in the guitar industry. Sound quality often goes on par with price. Reliability is measured a little differently than say, cars, as most guitar companies easily make very reliable instruments. Finally, desirability is usually based on price, looks, artist endorsement and more importantly again, sound-quality.

The first trick is the most obvious one: to double a crunch or heavily distorted guitar with a clean one. By sub-mixing a clean sound, you will be able to retain some precision, which is no minor detail considering that distortion has the annoying tendency of blurring sound. For this trick to be as transparent as possible, the crunch and clean performances must be as similar as can be. That being said, if you have a hard time getting that perfection, you can always "cheat": be it by editing the clean sound to make it match the original performance or simply doing some reamping with the first take, as discussed previously. In both cases the trick ought to work wonders because the clean take is only meant to be "felt" but not distinctively heard by the listener.
By the way, if you like older Japanese guitars, you must obtain a copy of Mr. Noguchi’s book, ’60s Bizarre Guitars (Guitar Magazine Mooks, Rittor Music). It is lusciously printed in color and, while the text is in Japanese, model names and dates are in English, so it is an invaluable reference tool, as well as a fun coffee table book. Some of the following information on specific guitars comes from this source, as well as catalogs and other research materials kindly provided by dedicated guitar fans in both the U.S. and Japan. It’s virtually impossible to reconstruct a comprehensive chronology, but we will attempt to document some broad-brush details and periods of what guitars we can, and with luck you’ll be able to search out and identify your favorite Teiscos with much greater authority. Your corrections and additions are most welcome!
Gibson's factories were raided in 2009 and 2011 by agents of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In November 2009 authorities found illegally imported ebony wood from Madagascar.[37][38] A second raid was conducted in August 2011,[37] during which the FWS seized wood imports from India that had been mislabeled on the US Customs declaration.[39][40] Gibson Guitar Corp. filed a motion in January 2011 to recover seized materials and overturn the charges, which was denied by the court.[41][42]

Bring up the topic of electrics, and Martin is hardly the first name of recall. The term “electrics” is not meant to include the company’s many fine acoustic-electric guitars, many sporting top-notch electronics (which ultimately remain acoustic beasts), but rather electric guitars meant for country chicken pickin’ or raunchy rock and roll. However, beginning in the early ’60s, Martin has launched periodic forays into the electric guitar marketplace with some very interesting, if commercially unsuccessful, results (which explains why the Martin name doesn’t come immediately to mind). Most coverage of the Martin brand is focused, quite rightly, on their substantial acoustic achievements. For this essay, however, let’s take an alternative view and look at the company’s various electric guitars, its thinline hollowbodies and later solidbodies.


Unless you get the guitar that is great for all types of venue, knowing your venue is highly recommended as you might be buying a guitar that has features not suitable or useless to your venue, not only will you be wasting great features for not using it, but you will also be paying for the said features which you will not be using anyway—not practical at all.

There are of course, other buttons and positions featured on guitars. BB king’s Lucille had a switch to toggle different values for R11 (thus going from moody chords to punchy ‘Lead’ with a finger and no need for extra gear). Advanced guitars may have phase and antiphase switches for humbuckers or dual pickups. The jackson 5 Telecaster I think is an example as it has both a phase and anti-phase wiring on their pickup selector.
Nice 60's, Japanese Hollow-Body. Really cool, "Barney Kessel" style hollow body / Arch top, double cutaway Electric Guitar by Univox. 2-Pick-up. Fabulous Sunburst finish. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. "Trapeze" tailpiece. Separate Volume and Tone for each pickup and adjustable truss rod. White "Mother-of-Toilet seat" headstock overlay. Finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing Logo, Pick guard and whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Some chips on plastic pick-up bezel (see photos). Really cool "Emerald" cap on pick-up selector switch. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, Re-soldered the output jack, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!),  and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .011 "Flat-wound" strings. Dilapidated, but functional gig bag included.
Perry has also endorsed an affordable replica version of the Boneyard guitar made by Epiphone that carries the same USA made Burstbucker pickups as the Gibson model. It is a customized Gibson B.B. King “Lucille” guitar; however, instead of the black finish and “Lucille” signature on the headstock, Perry’s guitar features a white finish, a “Billie Perry” signature on headstock and an image of Billie Perry on the front of the guitar.
A well known South Korean guitar brand, cort guitars is swiftly rising up in Indian markets. This brand is famous for producing acoustic, bass and electric guitars at less cost. Its starting price is 10,000 Rs and comprises of some best models like VL, all the G and Aero series and classic rock. If you want to buy this guitar, then you may purchase from online website or firm official websites as well.

:I need to know how to get parts for my old kent guitar.I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.


As a beginner, you are prone to make mistakes while purchasing your guitar due to lack of experience. Many end up buying very cheap guitars that with time start developing technical issues. Being in this business for a good amount of time, we have noted some of the common challenges faced by all beginners. When you want to buy a guitar as a beginner, there are a number of qualities that should be looked into before deciding which one to buy. These factors include:
Gibson and Fender have been ripping the public off for years, they're not even close to being worth what they charge especially Fender with such a mass produced bolt on neck and lame finishes design. Carvin is a superior guitar in every way and what people fail to mention is that you can choose what wood and finish you would like as well as bolt on neck, set neck or neck through designs and their pick up's are impeccable. A truly great guitar co. With excellent customer relations and real musicians will all show respect for Carvin when mentioned if not already owning one.
You wont be sorry with this harness, full size volume pot , push pull tone pot/switch both with good throw torque, great solder connects and a quality, all hardware was intact , just remove replace, I did have to carefully bend the lugs on the input switch to get it to seat properly in my Epiphone but other than that minor obstacle all went well, no hum or noise and the toggle feels solid, man Epiphone put some straight up junk electronics in my guitar so this was a great upgrade, thanks Kmise you got a new customer..will order another for my Jackson Kelly..
One glance at an El Dorado strap and you'll understand why so many musicians choose leather as their go-to pick for stage, studio or practice play. By combining sleek designer style with rugged, durable materials, these straps offer everything you need in a reliable accessory. And when you can keep your guitar secure while rocking out onstage, you'll be free to concentrate on the more important matter of dazzling your fans.
Introducing the next stage in the evolution of the music game. Rocksmith, the first and only game where you can plug into any real guitar. Featuring gameplay that automatically adjusts to your personal ability and innovative game design that makes playing music visually intuitive, Rocksmith will engage experienced musicians as well as those who have never picked up a guitar in their life. You'll unlock mini games to hone specific skills. You'll be able to choose from a large catalog of songs in different styles including:Every copy of Rocksmith will include a revolutionary 1/4 inch USB cable that turns the guitar's signal from analog to digital, allowing it to be played through video game consoles. By plugging into your console, you'll develop real skills and real styles while playing absolutely real music.
The Boss Katana Head is a full featured amplifier head that can handle stage, recording and practice duties. It does this with its built-in power attenuator, which lets you choose between 100W, 50W and a super quiet setting of 0.5W. To complement the 0.5W setting, Boss even added a built-in 5" speaker into the amp head - making the Katana head to be technically a combo amp in head form factor. Complementing its versatile power rating is its built in amp modeling, which gives you five voicings from acoustic, to clean to high-gain. As expected, this amp comes with essential effects from Boss, with over 50 of them to choose from, 15 of which can be loaded to the amp for quick use, albeit limited to just 3 effects running simultaneously. Finally, all these features are packed in sleek looking profile that feels really solid, as expected from Boss.
Another way of creating a huge sound is to split the signal from the guitar – most easily achieved via a stompbox with stereo outputs – and send it to two or more amps. All sorts of combinations of sound can be achieved, especially when panning techniques are employed. Of course, each amp can also be multi-mic’d if desired, and some truly three-dimensional results can be obtained. Different effects can be applied to the various amps, while using combinations of clean and dirty amp sounds can be really effective for delivering overdrive with definition, or grit and

The question is, does koa do anything for the sound, or is it just for the esthetics? The material in instruments always affects the tone, and koa makes the tone brighter while still being deep and satisfying. Sound is always hard to describe in words, because we experience sound differently, but if you’re curious about what it sounds like, just check it out on YouTube.


Hi Timothy, sorry it took a while for me to respond. Yes, from your first statement it sounds like you’ve correctly understood the operation of ‘normal’ guitar pickup selector switches (i.e. standard 3 and 5 position), the wiper contacts overlap as they move across each other. Unfortunately I’ve never seen anything that matches your 4 pick-up idea, if I were you I’d start looking at the 5-position mega switches which have lots of possibilities but can get pretty complicated. Good luck!

Playing guitar is an exercise in memorization. There’s really no way around it. You have to remember stuff, and the primary thing you have to remember is where notes are on the fretboard. Eventually, muscle and ear memory will kick in and the remembering will get easier, but for the first little while, every time you play guitar, it’s like a pop quiz. It’s not fun to memorize something by brute force, but it pays dividends.


Lets face it: when most folks first pick up the electric guitar, the only other gear they think they might need would be an amp, a pick, some cables and maybe some pedals if they are savvy. As these players become more experienced and move from their garage to live music venues and recording situations, they eventually run into some issues and realize there must be better ways to be heard than turning the amp to 11.
Comes with hard case.This is the iconic Yamaha apx-6a. Made in the 1990s it has the iconic Yamaha AMF preamp/Eq system. This specimen is in overall faircondition for a guitar that is over 20 years old. It has normal scratches and other sings of wear. Shipping is free. Estimated arrival is 4-8 business days. A signature is usually required at the time of delivery.
The fit and finish are as amazing as one would expect, and the general aesthetics of the guitars are just awesome to look at. They aren't gaudy or try-hard, but refined and subtle in their expression. Strumming a single cord will tell you all you need to know about the tone quality of this guitar, which is what really matters. It has that Martin twang and a lot of it.
* P A W N S H O P * G U I T A R S * Serving The World With Quality Vintage and Used Gear!- Up for sale is a 1960'S Norma Guitar Japanese Vintage Project As Is!- Good Japanese project- missing nut, bridge, knobs, electronics need work, but pickup is ok- very noisy- lots of body checking and neck needs work- truss barely turns- missing tuner ferrules- head stock logo is loose- even if I forgot something this item is sold as is with no returns!- this is definitely a worthy project- from the MIJ Hay... more
The U130 Bass Amplifier pumped out 130 watts with five inputs covering two channels (high and low each) and one input that bridged both channels. Channel 1 had volume with push/pull high boost, bass, middle and treble contour controls. Channel 2 had volume, bass and treble controls. Both channels had master volumes, plus two, four or eight-ohm output. Cabinet options included the UFO215 with two Univox Pro Mag speakers in a front-loaded horn cabinet, or the U215 with two 15″ Pro Mags in a “tuned duct” reflex cab.
Capacitors are typically used as filters to control tone. In most cases, they are used to filter out very high frequencies before being sent to ground (the output jack) which controls the warmth of your guitar’s tone. Capacitors vary greatly and come in a range of materials from ceramic, film, paper and electrolytic (mainly used with active pickups).
Completely agree. A couple years ago I was also wanting a software guitar to play some simple chords over a track. Instead I spent about $140 on a guitar from Craigslist. A couple weeks and a couple dozen YouTube tutorials later and I was able to play the chords myself. Learning to play the instruments is a valuable skill that will separate you from others who just use software.
Midlands trio The Bad Flowers make a concise, bruising power-blues that will appeal to fans of the likes of Jared James Nichols and Blues Pills, both of whom have offered TBF support slots. September single Thunder Child is the first shot fired from their forthcoming debut Starting Gun and packs an uproarious solo that leaves TG reaching for our wah pedal. Think Rory Gallagher through AC/DC’s amp stack and you’re near Tom’s bar-fight-scrapping lead sound.
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