For someone who’s been playing for a while, your options are a little different. Perhaps they’ve got a certain guitar in mind. If so, get them what they want! Chances are they’ve already done their homework and have their eye on their next guitar. If they’re not sure, you can still make an educated purchase. There are many popular options that should satisfy most experienced players. And there are many lesser-known models that can be the right fit for someone with more specific tastes.
"Craftsmanship, materials, and dimensional design are combined to make this one of Alvarez' most outstanding models. It has fine projection, sensitive response, and speedy action. The inlaid Tree of Life design on the rosewood fingerboard adds to its graceful distinction. Sides and back of flame grained rosewood are bound with ivoroid. Machine heads are chrome enclosed for longer life. Tuning is fast and precise. Slender mahogany neck with adjustable steel rod reinforcement. The top is select spruce chosen for its acoustic quality."
That "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" stigma comes from people who can't use effects. I mean, you can't just auto-set your delay to syncopate with your playing and make you sound like the Edge with every not you hit. You have to figure out the delay's rate, and what notes you can "delay" together so it doesn't sound like a jumble of notes.

Ibanez' strategy to have virtuoso guitarists as endorsers have paid off big time, allowing them to not only produce signature instruments, but to also improve on their production line guitars using the ideas they compiled from various artists. Among their many signature instruments, the Ibanez JEM series is easily one of the most easily identifiable, thanks to its affiliation with guitar wizard Steve Vai and its unique monkey grip handle, which is carved into the body.
Here we have for your consideration the Booming classic vintage Yamaha FG 160 Acoustic Guitar Made in Japan in the early 70's from Nippon Gakki factory. This example is an eary 70's a more RARE version Yamaha FG 160 again this example is the Made In Japan Nippon Gakki and not to be mistaken for the similar Korean version of the FG-160 which is also nice but not the same as these apples/oranges this is a great guitar. This example was built over 35 years ago and was built to very high detailed standards workmanship are wonderful quality as well as some of the best woods available in that time period to compete with the great Martin and now this Yamaha is quite well aged and is a true SINGING vintage guitar in its own right. This one has the Amber/Tan label and not the Red Label. The frets have good height and appear newish and though to probably to have had a fret job done sometime in it's past. The guitar has it's natural age and patina with a few expected minor nicks,dings and scratches from a well loved and played instrument. This fine example is on the way... We upon receiving we will remove strings clean and detail the guitar oil rosewood and polish finish, set intonation and set up this guitar to play very well and may include new bone nut/saddle/strings we have several of these old Yamahas and they are amazing instruments very well compared to Martin, Taylor, Gibson for there fine construction and playability with amazing tone for this kind of money... Here s a link to Harmony Central if you care to rehttp://reviews.harmony-central.com/reviews/Guitar/product/Yamaha/FG-160+/10/1 All New pics and additional info soon to come... Interested ? ask Thanks .

• Trapeze: Although the trapeze tailpiece was original equipment on the very first runs ofGibson Les Pauls, they are mostly the province of hollowbody and semi-hollowbody guitars, ranging from the L-5-CES to the Epiphone Regent. Early ES models also came with trapeze tailpieces. These devices attach to the heel of the guitar’s body and have slots for strings to pass through. Once the strings are installed and tightened to proper tension, the tension suspends the tailpiece in air — providing the appellation trapeze. The principle behind trapeze tailpieces is that they dampen the natural resonance of the strings less than stop tailpieces. These tailpieces also transmit the string tension to the guitar’s side, rather than its belly. The downside is they are the hardest tailpieces to string, since strings tend to drop out of their slots until they are at tension. In that respect, they take some getting used to.


It is easy to make the mistake that the tone control set-up in an electric guitar is a simple single stage Resistor / Capacitor filter, where the two components are in series, the other side of the capacitor goes to ground, the signal is applied to the other end of the resistor and the output is measured across the capacitor. If that were so then your first calculation is roughly correct, while in a practical situation in the second, the capacitor would be fed from the impedance of the signal source. Lets say this is a test generator with an impedance of 600 ohms – the -3dB cut off would be around 12kHz. This is not the case for the typical electric guitar.

The simplest tone control is the one inside practically every guitar. That knob is a single potentiometer set up as in Figure 1. The signal from the pickup coil goes through the internal impedance of the pickup itself, then to the output jack. The capacitor C and resistor R are in series to ground from the guitar signal. C shunts signals above some cutoff frequency to ground. R prevents this by resisting the signal flow to ground. As R is made smaller, more and more treble is lost. However, the bass level remains at the same volume as it was before the treble cut.


One of the quirkier instruments to emerge from the JMI/Vox operation in the 1960's (And that's saying something!) The Mando-Guitar never really caught on in a big way but remains a very cool and actually quite functional oddity. This is essentially an double-strung octave guitar; some describe it as an "octave 12 string guitar" but the strings are actually tuned in unison, not the octave arrangement of a conventional 12-string. The idea was to make an instrument that played in the mandolin range but was tuned as a guitar, as few of the Beat-era guitarists who were JMI's customers had a clue how to play mandolin! A few of the first Mand-Guitars were produced at Jennings' Dartford, Kent factory but the great bulk of extant examples were built by Eko in Recanati, Italy. With its small artist-palette shaped solid body and short 15" scale neck this is a very handy instrument, and with two Vox pickups has a fairly wide range of tones. There have been a number of similar instruments inspired by this design created in more recent decades, but the Vox Mando-guitar remains the original and coolest of all mini-guitar efforts.
The downside of boosting the volume of an acoustic guitar this way is the fact that every microphone adds a color of its own to the end result, not to mention the preamplifier and any compression and equalization applied. In other words, not only do you have to position the microphone correctly, but you also need to be very careful when choosing which mic to use.

The beauty of the Yamaha FG800 Acoustic goes way beyond skin deep with its solid Sitka spruce top complemented by a Nato back and side. The mellow, well balanced tone offers excellent note definition, worthy of dreadnoughts costing far more. Quality materials such as a rosewood bridge and fingerboard, black and white body binding and more make FG Series acoustics sweet buys with a great reputation.
Straight out of the box you have over 68 on-board digital effects, 75 custom designed factory patches for iconic sounds, 5 amp emulations and 5 cabinet emulators, so you’re not going to run out of choices on stage or in the studio. In addition, you have access to the Guitar Lab software app that allows you to download new stomp boxes and patches regularly.

Epiphone is one of the oldest and one of the best American guitar companies. It was formed in 1873 and later acquired by Gibson Guitar Corporation, another leading guitar brand. Epiphone has something for every player in every genre. The company offers a wide range of Acoustic and Electric guitar models. The nylon-string Les Paul Ukulele acoustic guitar is of famous vintage and has been the industry leader over the years. It is a superb instrument for the money featuring a mahogany body and neck with rosewood fingerboard having dots inlays. Epiphone guitars have a great demand in the Indian market, which has set standards for the budget-conscious versions of guitars.
The only guitar instrument I can think of that is NOT sampler-based and that actually sounds decent would be RealGuitar. It's not the most realistic (IMO) and it's $160+. But if you ask most people for recommendations on realistic guitar instruments, you will hear stuff like Shreddage, Electri6ity, ProminyLPC, Lyrical Distortion, Strawberry Electric Guitar from Orange Tree... all Kontakt libraries, and all undoubtedly better than the 3 products you listed in your initial post, two of which are simply synths and not at all meant for realistic playing!
What's funny is that guitars with cheap pickups very often sound better direct than guitars with "good pickups". I have an Epiphone Special I with ( presumably GFS ) P90-style pickups and that thing sounds great direct. It's also fine with a band thru an amp if the band doesn't play too loud - if the band's too loud the low mid buildup means you gotta EQ a lotta bass out and it loses it's girth.
Rosewood » The diminishing supply of Brazilian Rosewood has led to Indian Rosewood replacing it in most markets. While the two look different, the tonal quality is virtually the same. One of the most popular and traditional woods used on acoustic guitars, rosewood has been prized for its rich, complex overtones that remain distinct even during bass-heavy passages. It's cutting attack and ringing tones make for highly articulate sound and plenty of projection. Rosewood is also a popular choice for fingerboards and bridges.
The Acoustic Resonance control gives you the option of adding life back in to your sound. Where some pickups, Piezos in particular can sometimes sound “quacky” and hard, due to the fact they only pick up the sound of the bridge area, the AD-10 analyses your pickup signal and recreates the missing body and string resonances accurately to ensure the subtle tonalities of your playing qualities of your guitar are intact.

• What they’re made of: Frets are typically made of nickel-silver or nickel-steel alloys, or – less often – brass, copper alloy or stainless steel. The harder and more dense the material, with stainless at the top of the scale and soft nickel at the bottom, the brighter and more cutting the notes played on a guitar should sound. Most manufacturers use nickel alloys because the metal is soft and easy to work with. At this point, most guitarists’ ears have been developed to the sound of nickel as well, and most guitar buyers have a tendency to balk at the unfamiliar when shopping for instruments.

: : I own a Decca guitar, it is what I learned to play on many years ago. From what little I have gathered about them they were an order by mail brand, and you could only get them from a catolog such as Sears & Roebuck. I havent been able to find a price for them or any ifo on what catalogs they were from. Mine has a Ernie Ball Musicman-like peghead (4 one side 2 on the other) and has a metal pick guard with 2 giant switches which seem to have no effect on tone. It has a brown & yellow sunburst paint job (ewwww).I thought I possibly had the only one in existence, lol, guess not.
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Fuzz is an indistinct, nasty overdrive that is synonymous with Jimi Hendrix. The Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face is the most famous fuzz pedal, known for the way is breaks up and adds something special to any guitar tone. Fuzz pedals are most commonly used on top of clean or lightly overdriven tones, as this is where the character of the pedal can really come through; used on top of already distorted tones they can be great for making a load of noise! Two main types of fuzz are available – silicon (which sounds softer and more rounded) and germanium, which sounds harsher and more treble-y.
• Don’t always blame the frets: Buzzing doesn’t necessarily mean there’s a fret problem. Some guitar players set their bridges for super-low action in their quest for speed, and that can makes frets buzz. For beginners unfamiliar with how accurately tuned strings sound or more experienced players exploring dropped and open tunings for the first time, buzzing can also be a buzz kill. Low tunings like dropped D and open D and open C may prompt guitars with normal action to buzz due to the slack in the strings unless a guitar is set up properly to accommodate such tunings.
I do all my recording through my Axe FX, though there are many ways to USB record to computer. That being said, I plan to play live using my Ax and my other FRFR gear. I’m using a Matrix 1600-watt amp and a Matrix 2×12 (FRFR) cab and will run direct-out to PA when the time comes. I see no reason to lug around a half-stack or stack let alone the consistency and versatility of this setup. This is my first time using FRFR, and was tempted to go with a hi-end head and cabinet combo, but the up front investment will be worth it. I won’t ever have to buy effects pedals or change heads when I want a different sound. I did add a Mission SP-2 expression/volume pedal and also use my old Pod X3 Live for a midi controller. As for volume, I’m confident that my setup will hold its own vs. most other half-stack setups. I may add an Atomic CLR or another Matrix 2×12 (like the one I have) for a monitor later on. Another important factor is my band does cover songs and the Axe setup allows me to tailor my tone to match the bands we cover at the click of a switch. As a guitarist and computer tech/nerd, it doesn’t get any better than this for me. The configuration possibilities are endless.
The Squier Affinity series is a great beginner instrument. All of the bodies & necks have been CNC manufactured, so they are consistent and solidly built. In recent years, Fender has completely re-hauled the Squier series of instruments to make them decent introductory level instruments, at a great introductory cost to the beginner player. You can choose from Strats, Teles and even Jazzmaster style guitars!

 Everybody needs to start somewhere. However, where you start often decides where you end up. For example, if you buy a bad guitar when you start playing, you are a lot more likely to stop playing, and if it happens, you wouldn't be buying any more guitars. We believe guitar manufacturers have a sort of duty to make and supply reliable guitars for beginners. Guitars at beginners' level are as important as high-end guitars for pro. This is where Smash comes in.
While styles and models may vary, electric guitars operate on the same general principles. The pickup mounted on the electric guitar’s body functions as a magnetic field. When a metal string is plucked and vibrates, it generates a current. That current is transmitted by the pickup through a preamp circuit with tone controls to the guitar cable, and in turn to the amplifier. The amplifier boosts the signal and modifies it with various tone controls and effects, depending on the amplifier's design and capabilities. The signal is then output to a speaker, which converts it to sound waves. The type of pickup(s), tone controls, strings, playing techniques, and other factors built into the guitar's design all influence the signal that is sent to the amplifier. In short, each component of the guitar affects how the guitar sounds.
SOLD OUT ! We are VERY pleased to present a very special example Alvarez Yairi Classical guitar . The condition of this high end instrument is excellent plus and this guitar is simply wonderful. This is hand built example by The Kazou Yairi himself, Japanese Master Luthier. For those of you not familiar with the Premier Japanese Master Luthier Kazou Yairi and his masterfuly built instruments you may enjoy this vidio introduction to YAIRI GUITARS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPRyLPouYZM The model is CY116 and is a very high-end professional guitar and is in excellent Plus condition. Only the highest grade woods used as you can see ...choice AAA Flamed-Quilted and is 3-dimensional depth is a work of art as you can see by the pictures. This guitar plays and sound AMAZING and is truly inspirational. This guitar shows very little fret wear. There are just a few minor nicks or scratches which is normal wear for a guitar of this vintage that has been lovingly played. This one is a one owner adult owned guitar and comes with its high quality custom hard shell case too. General Specs: Alvarez Yairi CY116 Classical Acoustic Guitar The CY116's Solid Cedar Top is adorned by an elaborate wooden mosaic rosette. Burled Maple Back/Sides give this classical amazing clarity and warmth like the fiery Andalusian plains that inspired the music that this guitar was born to perform. With room-filling projection, the CY116 is a guaranteed conversation starter. You hear it in the elegant pacing of a classical air. You see it in the vivid charm of a folk dance. Specs: Burled Mahogany Back/Sides Solid Cedar Top Mahogany Neck Ebony Fingerboard Scale: 25 1/2" (650mm) Width at Nut: 2" (51mm) Rosewood Bridge Ivory Body Binding Wooden Mosaic Rosette Gold Vintage Open-Style Tuning Machines .
Just like in a conventional guitar, an electric guitar also has 6 strings with tuning knobs and frets. However, unlike the hollow body and cavity of an acoustic guitar, a solid body usually forms the lower part of an electric guitar. The long neck of the electric guitar consists of magnetic pickups, parts which produce the magnetic field and which are located just below the metal strings. The magnetic pickups are connected to the amplifier with an internal electrical circuit. The long neck of an electric guitar also consists of knobs for adjusting the elasticity of metal strings.
Vibrato design is slightly changed and enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding a fair amount of firmness to the tone. Likewise, they also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Talking about pickups, pac 112v is equipped with 5-way blade pickup selector. Similarly, master tone and volume controls are also provided for the neatest output.
Capacitors are typically used as filters to control tone. In most cases, they are used to filter out very high frequencies before being sent to ground (the output jack) which controls the warmth of your guitar’s tone. Capacitors vary greatly and come in a range of materials from ceramic, film, paper and electrolytic (mainly used with active pickups).

The Indiana Thin Body Acoustics give you all the sonic punch you need but in a more compact body size. Starting with a spruce top that's matched to mahogany back and sides, the I-TB2 Series were created for acoustic players that find that a traditional dreadnought body size is a bit too bulky. Having a tighter profile gives these guitars and almost electric guitar feel and they're perfect for the stage or studio. Great action and playability right out of the box! An on-board 3 band EQ gives you total control at the touch of a button and all players love the extended cutaway for upper fret access. Sealed diecast tuners, nickel silver frets, gold hardware, high gloss finish and 10 Year Warranty make the Indiana Thin Body Acoustic series a great alternative for any player.
If you’ve never listened to Chet Atkins, you should do it right now. The rockabilly player was a skilled instrumental guitar player, playing most of his songs without any backing from other musicians. For a great sample of his talent, give a listen to his version of “Mr. Sandman.” His alternating thumb rhythm and syncopated melodies are marvels of beauty and precision on the instrument.

The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.

Lastly, we have guitars which combine the two systems and have both the piezoelectric pickup as well as a microphone in the sound box. Both of these sources are fed into a preamp, which often allows you to choose the source of the sound. Not only that, but you can also blend the two together to average out the benefits of both types while minimizing the negatives.


The trusty traveler guitar:  There are many makes and models, and of those that we reviewed, some that are cheaply priced (i.e. under $150) are just that- cheap.  Traveler guitars come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, and some more complex models offer foldaway design that buckle at the neck joint.  Additionally, there are acoustic electric models if you desire the flexibility of plugging in.  First, it is best to determine "why" you are seriously considering a travel guitar before getting into the research.  Answer that question for yourself first, and it could steer you away from a specific traveler guitar and toward a different size acoustic guitar body.  Also, it might re-affirm your choice.  Consider the following questions:
Many guitar and bass bodies are made from Mahogany. There are 49 types of Mahogany, but many are practically extinct because of the wood’s popularity for furniture and musical instruments, and the types used today are not the same as the Mahogany used in guitars in the 1940s or 1950s. Mahogany gives a warm timbre with a lot of bottom end. Les Paul type guitars often combine a mahogany body with a maple top for a total that is balanced overall.
This legendary thinline electric guitar has been in continuous production since 1958 and has been updated for 2019. The new Gibson ES-335 Figured has the classic semi-hollow body construction with a chambered maple center block with a three-ply AAA-grade figured maple/poplar/maple top and back. Its bracing is made of quarter-sawn Adirondack spruce. The center block and bracing are both thermally engineered.
Moving the mic even further back – from a few feet to several – gets into what is generally referred to as “ambient miking” or “room miking.” This can be a great way to achieve even more depth and sense of space in your tracks. Jimmy Page made frequent use of ambient miking in recording his guitar parts with Led Zeppelin, and it was also a major factor in Eric Clapton’s legendary “Beano” tone. The further from the speaker you place the mic, and the more into the center or far side of the room, the great the proportion of reflected to direct sound in the blend, and the greater the sense of “air” and “room” in the sound. Often, it’s combined with a close mic to retain the option of blending in as much punch and directness as necessary, but if you only have one track or one mic available, ambient placement will sometimes do the trick on its own.

So to conclude, you don’t have to spend much money on a beginner/practice amp to have a tremendous amount of fun with it. Be sure to check out MusicGoRound stores near you for amazing deals on used practice/beginner amps. The store employees can help pick out the amp that fits your budget and your needs. Odd are that your practice/beginner amp will wind up becoming an old and dear friend to you over the years. Enjoy every minute with it!
At Ibanez, there has always been a goal to be anything but traditional. For over half a century, Ibanez has been pushing the world of guitar manufacturing forward, consistently breaking new ground. It's this drive that led them to become one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to make a name for themselves in Europe and North America. With unparalleled commitment to quality, Ibanez Guitars are considered among the upper echelon by musicians of all playing styles around the world. A quick look at some of the musicians who play Ibanez guitars is sure to leave you very impressed. Artists such as Head and Munky of KoRn, Noodles of the Offspring, Mick Thomson of Slipknot, Fletcher Dragge of Pennywise, Steve Vai, and Joe Satriani all trust their sound to Ibanez guitars. Now it's your turn to do the same. Ibanez makes an impressively wide selection of guitars, so you're sure to be able to find one that is perfect for you here. Say, for example, you're a beginner who's looking for a great acoustic guitar? If that's the case, you'll love the JamPack IJV50 Quickstart Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar Pack. This set features everything you need to get started, including a beautiful dreadnought, as well as an electric tuner, a gig bag, a guitar strap, and an accessory pouch. If you'd rather a versatile acoustic-electric, you'll love an option such as the V70CE Acoustic-Electric Guitar. This guitar is highlighted by its outstanding playability and fantastic tone. With an incredible response and dynamic range, this guitar is perfectly suited for small clubs and larger venues alike. Of course, if all you want to do is plug in and pump up the volume, you're going to want to check out the JS1200 Joe Satriani Signature Guitar. This candy apple dream is built with top-tier electronics and sleek overall construction. With a resonant tone an impressive sustain (thanks, in part, to its DiMarzio humbuckers), this guitar is a progressive player's dream. Regardless of your playing style, there's an Ibanez here with your name on it that is ready to be played. With expertise that is second to none, Ibanez is a name you can trust in the music world.
Hi Chris. That doesn’t ring any bells I’m afraid. If your customer wants a new scheme I wouldn’t be afraid to replace the stock switch with a standard 5-way and then you know where you are. There’s always a chance that the Vigier switch is doing something funky and it started with slightly different pickup selections so the sound might change with a new standard switch. Obviously make sure you’ve got notes and photos so you can revert back to the stock wiring! Have you tried to buzz out the Vigier switch with a multimeter to see how it works? Alternatively, have you tried touching the pickup magnets with a screwdriver to see which pickups/coils are on in each switch position, that might give you some clues?

The descriptions that follow are very broad, but if you look around the guitar world you can usually pin any solid-body guitar down to one of these general categories. Of course you’ll see wild shapes like the Gibson Flying V, Ibanez Destroyer, Dean ML and Jackson Rhoads. They may look like they’re from another planet, but if you check their specs you’ll see they follow the same basic design principles as any other solid-body electric guitar.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Carved - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Richlite (Paper/Phenolic Resin Composite) - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Resomax - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Godin Tuner, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Cherryburst, Creme Brulee, Black, Burgundy

No, you’re right. The more I think about it, the more I see the attraction. Plus, I was wrong in my previous comment when I said the sides would sound the same up to the limit of the smaller cap. Because I think they’re be audible resonance differences between the two values. It’s the same reason why the scheme I’m discussing differs from a standard tone control. And I sound vague, it’s ’cause I am! One reason I’m eager to explore this …
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.
What can we learn from these restaurant guests? The lesson is that we are very easily tricked into liking things we pay more for, even though they might not be that good after all. We get a particular feeling from thinking that we’re treating ourselves to something luxurious. If we, on the other hand, haven’t spent very much, we usually assume that it can’t be a good product.
When you shop the huge selection of combo guitar amps at Musician’s Friend we make it easy to hone in on what you’re looking for. Just select the type ( tube, solid state, or hybrid), brand(s), and price range, and voila—up pops a selection fine tuned to your specs. To really fine-tune the process you can also dial in the wattage, type (combo or stack), and speaker size/configuration.

ESP is another huge brand in the realm of electric guitar, with huge bands like Metallica, The Rolling Stones, Deftones, Lamb of God, and Slayer endorsements in full swing. Any fan of this kind of acts will be very interested in starting with an ESP of their own. Like Fender and Gibson, ESP has a more affordable range known as LTD. This kit includes an electric blue H-51 guitar with 24 frets and dual humbuckers, as well as a 12 pick sampler set, gig bag, guitar stand, strap, 10-foot instrument cable, and a tuner.

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Martin’s second major innovation, and arguably the more important, of the period 1915-1930 was the dreadnought guitar.[6] Originally devised in 1916 as a collaboration between Martin and a prominent retailer, the Oliver Ditson Co., the dreadnought body style was larger and deeper than most guitars. In 1906, the Royal Navy launched a battleship that was considerably larger than any before it. From the idea that a ship that big had nothing to fear (nought to dread), it was christened HMS Dreadnought. Martin borrowed this name for their new, large guitar. The greater volume and louder bass produced by this expansion in size was intended to make the guitar more useful as anaccompaniment instrument for singers working with the limited sound equipment of the day. Initial models produced for Ditson were fan-braced, and the instruments were poorly received[citation needed].
Reverb: Reverb units simulate the spacious sounds produced naturally in a huge stone cathedral (or other acoustic space such as a hall or room). This is done by creating a large number of echoes that gradually fade away in volume or "decay". One early technique for creating a reverb effect was to send an amplified signal of the music via a speaker to another room with reflective surfaces, such as a tile bathroom, and then record the natural reverberations that were produced. A plate reverb system uses an electromechanical transducer to create vibrations in a plate of metal. Spring reverb systems, which are often used in guitar amplifiers, use a transducer to create vibrations in a spring. Digital reverb effects use various signal processing algorithms to create the reverb effect, often by using multiple feedback delay circuits. Rockabilly and surf guitar are two genres that make heavy use of reverb.[89]
The design of this guitar probably makes it stand out from the “crowd.” This is another awesome six string acoustic guitar from the brand Juarez available in sunburst and black . It is designed for the right handed and mostly comes in Sunburst color without a bag. The body is made from blackwood with the top laminated with Linden Wood. The entire structure has a natural gloss finish, with the fret board having up to 18 frets. The hardware structure has a chrome finish. Prices are quite fair, ranging from INR 2,790. Find more details below.
The body of the instrument is a major determinant of the overall sound variety for acoustic guitars. The guitar top, or soundboard, is a finely crafted and engineered element often made of spruce, red cedar, redwood or mahogany. This thin (often 2 or 3 mm thick) piece of wood, strengthened by different types of internal bracing, is considered the most prominent factor in determining the sound quality of a guitar. The majority of the sound is caused by vibration of the guitar top as the energy of the vibrating strings is transferred to it. Different patterns of wood bracing have been used through the years by luthiers (Torres, Hauser, Ramírez, Fleta, and C.F. Martin being among the most influential designers of their times); to not only strengthen the top against collapsing under the tremendous stress exerted by the tensioned strings, but also to affect the resonation of the top. Some contemporary guitar makers have introduced new construction concepts such as "double-top" consisting of two extra-thin wooden plates separated by Nomex, or carbon-fiber reinforced lattice - pattern bracing. The back and sides are made out of a variety of woods such as mahogany, Indian rosewood and highly regarded Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra). Each one is chosen for its aesthetic effect and structural strength, and such choice can also play a significant role in determining the instrument's timbre. These are also strengthened with internal bracing, and decorated with inlays and purfling.
Boogex is a guitar amplifier plug-in with a variety of sound shaping features.  With Boogex it is possible to get heavy distorted sound as well as slight distortion sound.  Boogex is also able to apply any speaker cabinet impulse response (selection of built-in impulses is available).  Processing latency is very modest - 96 samples (2.1 ms at 44.1kHz).  Boogex comes with several example factory presets.
Bass amp speaker cabinets are typically more rigidly constructed, with thicker wood and more heavy bracing than those for non-bass amplification. They usually include tuned bass reflex ports or vents cut into the cabinet, for increased efficiency at low frequencies and improved bass sound. Preamplifier sections have equalization controls that are designed for the deeper frequency range of bass instruments, which extend down to 41 Hz or below. Bass amplifiers are more likely to be designed with heat sinks and/or cooling fans than regular guitar amplifiers, due to the high power demands of bass amplification. They are also more commonly equipped with audio compression or limiter circuitry to prevent overloading the power amplifier and to protect the speakers from damage due to unintended clipping in the power amp.
Well, that’s not exactly what he said. Although, it would seem that way, if you take time to browse the company's Facebook photos. Every guitar the company makes is truly enticing and a work of art. Moreover, the quality of each instrument is astoundingly good. Take the Xuul Katan VI. While the guitar is certainly unique, it also boasts a strong specs list:
Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, an unforgettable journey, slideshow. This optimistic and festive track can perfectly fit for any corporate media projects. Featuring muted electric guitar, electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.
Another relatively drastic but easy and cheap way to hot-rod your guitar’s sound with its current components is to alter how and where its volume and tone pots are connected to each other. The difference can be subtle—and it’s more a matter of preference than what’s “correct”—but it can make the difference between a guitar that is just OK and one that really is a joy to play.
Another chord you come across every day, the E major chord is fairly straightforward to play. Make sure your first finger (holding down the first fret on the third string) is properly curled or the open second string won't ring properly. Strum all six strings. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the E major chord. 
Giannini guitars were (and are) made by the Tranquilo Giannini S.A. factory, Carlos Weber 124, Sao Paolo, Brazil. They are generally known for being well-made instruments featuring very fancy Brazilian hardwood veneers, as well as for the strange-shaped asymmetrical CraViola models. Probably the most famous, indeed, perhaps only famous, endorser of Giannini guitars was José Feliciano. No reference materials were available on the early Giannini guitars. A catalog from 1971 is available, with a snapshot of the line that probably goes back at least a decade, and certainly forward.
Many readers will already know that germanium has been the effects buzzword of the past many years. These transistors are considered softer, rounder, more musical. Don’t be fooled: that doesn’t mean they make music all by themselves, you have to make music through them. But that’s not such a bad thing. Open up a Fuzz Face for the first time and you’re likely to be startled by its simplicity, and other early fuzzes like Maestro’s Fuzz-Tone (1963) and Sola Sound’s Tone Bender (1965) are equally basic. As far as the Face goes, you’ll find fewer than ten components on the board, two of them being those crucial AC128 or NKT275 transistors. Interestingly, the Tone Bender originally used two OC75 germanium transistors made by Mullard, the revered British tube manufacturer.
All of us got carried away. We had great guitars back in the ’50s and ’60s. Then we went a little crazy. All of us – players and makers alike – started adding features and making demands that drove complexity up, up and away. Silvertone guitars represent the honest character of the guitars that created the classic music that still rules today. ... more ...

Sound quality-wise, it’s too close to call. All modern Zoom, Line 6, Boss, and DigiTech multi-effects units sound excellent. Distortion sounds a bit better on the DigiTech, and if reverb is your thing it doesn’t get much better than the Lexicon verbs. The other multi-effects units might be better if you’re looking for more experimental sounds and textures. The DigiTech RP500 tends to be more conservative, and focuses on nailing the classics.

The other guitarish plugins that contribute to the best most real guitar VST include amp emulators to get that warm, liquid sound of tube amps, along with VSTs for almost any other effect ever hauled on stage. Those amp-and-effects VSTs might be used by actual guitarists as well, in various straight-to-computer workflow setups - either through a DAW host or otherwise maybe straight through some standalone VSTs to amp, headphones, recording device or onboard speakers.
The one-string guitar is also known as the Unitar. Although rare, the one-string guitar is sometimes heard, particularly in Delta blues, where improvised folk instruments were popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Eddie "One String" Jones had some regional success.[citation needed] Mississippi blues musician Lonnie Pitchford played a similar, homemade instrument. In a more contemporary style, Little Willie Joe, the inventor of the Unitar, had a rhythm and blues instrumental hit in the 1950s with "Twitchy", recorded with the Rene Hall Orchestra.

For the hobbyist guitarist this is a great 'bang for the buck' investment. It has practice tools for the beginner but solid tones for the advanced guitarist. For home use, maybe even a garage band it's perfectly adequate. If I were a more serious musician doing gigs with high end audio going to the audience, I'd be investing more than a hundred bucks in my stage rig.
You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 
Gary Moore also created his own signature Gibson Les Paul in the early 1990s. Characterised by a yellow flame top, no binding and a Gary Moore truss rod cover. It featured two open-topped humbucking pick-ups, one with “zebra coils” (one white and one black bobbin). Gary formerly owned Peter Green‘s vintage Les Paul Standard with an accidentally reversed pick-up magnet.
The Indiana Thin Body Acoustics give you all the sonic punch you need but in a more compact body size. Starting with a spruce top that's matched to mahogany back and sides, the I-TB2 Series were created for acoustic players that find that a traditional dreadnought body size is a bit too bulky. Having a tighter profile gives these guitars and almost electric guitar feel and they're perfect for the stage or studio. Great action and playability right out of the box! An on-board 3 band EQ gives you total control at the touch of a button and all players love the extended cutaway for upper fret access. Sealed diecast tuners, nickel silver frets, gold hardware, high gloss finish and 10 Year Warranty make the Indiana Thin Body Acoustic series a great alternative for any player.

Guitar chords are usually represented by the name of the root note, and the scale it is based on, such as A Major, written as simply A. An A chord built on a minor scale is called A Minor, and written as Am. An A chord built with a 7th is called A7, and so on... Diagrams are used to show how the chord is actually to be played on the guitar, with finger positions mapped out. For a complete overview about chord structure, check this guitar chords formula chart.
Warwick Electronics manufactured the first wah-wah pedal,[citation needed] The Clyde McCoy, in 1967 and that same year Jim Morris of Kelsey-Morris Sound developed the first octave effect, which Jimi Hendrix named "Octavio". In 1968, Univox began marketing Shin-ei's Uni-Vibe pedal, an effect designed by noted audio engineer Fumio Mieda that mimicked the odd phase shift and chorus effects of the Leslie rotating speakers used in Hammond organs. The pedals soon became favorite effects of guitarists Jimi Hendrix and Robin Trower. Upon first hearing the Octavia, Hendrix allegedly rushed back to the studio and immediately used it to record the guitar solos on "Purple Haze" and "Fire".[43] In 1976, Roland subsidiary Boss Corporation released the CE-1 Chorus Ensemble, the first chorus pedal, created by taking a chorus circuit from an amplifier and putting it into a stompbox.[44] By the mid-1970s a variety of solid-state effects pedals including flangers, chorus pedals, ring modulators and phase shifters were available.[45][46]
Most models come with single-coil Hi-gain pickups as standard equipment. Many post-British invasion Rickenbacker players such as Peter Buck, Paul Weller, and Johnny Marr have used instruments with these pickups. Rickenbacker’shumbucker/dual coil pickup has a similar tone to a Gibson mini-humbuckerpickup, and comes standard on the Rickenbacker 650 C. Vintage reissue models, and some signature models, come with Toaster Top pickups, which resemble a classic two-slotted chrome toaster. Despite their slightly lower output, “Toasters” produce a brighter, cleaner sound, and are generally seen as key to obtaining the true British Invasion guitar tone, as they were original equipment of the era.
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Another +1 for shreddage. I have the PRS version and was trying it out through BIAS and TH3 the other day. Had an absolute ball, and was able to achieve somewhat realistic results with very little effort. I also love pretty much everything I have from Amplesound, though results through effects engines can be hit and miss. Their Taylor acoustic is lovely if that's what you're looking for. I've not found a really fantastic strum engine/option yet but then I will fully admit I haven't put the time into mastering what I already have in that department. I have heard demos using the guitar VIs that I have that do sound convincing so it is possible though maybe not easy.
Boost effects are simple effects that increase overall volume. However, every boost pedal is very unique and often sounds different. It always comes down to the type of components the effects pedal manufacturer used to achieve the volume boost. Some boost pedals try to maintain the guitar tone while providing a volume boost, others can heavily affect the guitar tone while providing a volume boost. Oftentimes, guitarists will get a specific boost pedal and use it as an always-on effect because they like the way the boost pedal colors their tone.
Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 6 frets (sometimes pearl, sometimes ivoroid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, nickel plated parts, sunburst top finish.
My first Custom was a Charvel/Jackson Star body with a custom white paint with bullet holes and dripping blood from the holes ! My friend and Guitar teacher Randy Rhoads helped me get started on the right track in 1980 ,before I was playing in clubs and headlining shows later in the 80s and 90s,I was set with the perfect guitar! Gibson is just a brand name,Epiphones are better then Gibsons ,your just paying for a name,same with Fender! Remember,one of the greatest guitars was made for less then $300,so you should never really spend more then that unless it is a custom ,then you can do what you have to!
I've been playing guitar for several years now so I have played a wide variety of instruments. Of course bigger companies such as Martin or Taylor are going to be higher up in the ratings because they produce very expensive guitars and their name has been widely spread. My first ever Yamaha six string, which after three years is still my favorite guitar, is amazing. Its deep and rich tones makes it a blast to play. I can find myself playing any genre for hours because of how reliable and durable it is. They are very well priced for there quality and I would label Yamaha as being the working mans guitar.
Its very obvious very few on this list have never picked up a guitar in their life as this looks like a what brand does my favorite band play list... Considering Gibson these days are garbage and only were good for a few style to begin with no way they're number one... Fender has very solid build quality, but to diversify them to play numerous styles takes heavy modification. As far as electric are concerned there is a number that can top the list, as schecter, esp and Jackson are too low on the list and I've heard good things about rickenbacker. Ibanez is also excellent. Its really a toss up for me...I haven't played much esp do I phased them out...I have extensive time with Ibanez schecter and Jackson... Ibanez is gone because the build quality is no better and the playability is pretty much the same as a Jackson but the Jackson gives you far more bang for the buck... As for schecter and Jackson they put out some fully loaded guitars that are only going to rock you maybe a weeks ...more
I have a shecter omen extreme 7 and found that the factor strings they put on were nice for my small fingers. I had to replace because the factor set in general needed some tweaking and they changed all the strings. Now i don't really like the strings they put on. Too small. All they had listed for the strings were 24X jumbo strings. What string set should i buy since i play Ambient, soft, but also djent metal.

Phaser – A frequency-based effect that makes a swirling, swooshing filtered guitar tone. Phasers use the principle of “phase” cancellation in which a filter passes over your guitar tone flipping the waveform at specific frequencies. This signal is then combined with your original guitar tone to give the iconic phaser effect used in songs by Van Halen, Pink Floyd and Smashing Pumpkins to name a few.


Another Martin creation, the 000 shape guitar is almost the perfect halfway house between a dreadnought and a parlour. Its classic hourglass figure meant it sat comfortably on the knee, endearing it to players of folk and other fingerpicking-heavy styles of music. The shape ensured it had the perfect balance between playing and comfort, and was often seen on the lap of no less a player than Eric Clapton. However it wasn’t averse to a bit of heavy strumming when the occasion called, and it’s large bottom end ensured it could keep pace when playing with others.
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Another thing you might want to remember when getting your very first electric guitar is that you will need some other equipment to go with it. You might need a music stand, an amplifier, a mic for the guitar amp (click for full guide), different pedals, and so on. While these things are normally not included with you guitar purchase, you might at least get a nice case to keep and carry your guitar in.
In the early Sixties, Blackmore did sessions with legendary British producer Joe Meek and apprenticed with U.K. session ace (and Jimmy Page mentor) Big Jim Sullivan. Blackmore founded Deep Purple in the late Sixties and led the group through various incarnations. He also spearheaded metal icons Rainbow with the late Ronnie James Dio and has more recently played a role in Blackmore’s Night with his wife Candice Night.
It is typically not possible to combine high efficiency (especially at low frequencies) with compact enclosure size and adequate low frequency response. Bass cabinet designers can, for the most part, choose only two of the three parameters when designing a speaker system. So, for example, if extended low-frequency performance and small cabinet size are important, one must accept low efficiency.[24] This rule of thumb is sometimes called Hofmann's Iron Law (after J.A. Hofmann, the "H" in KLH).[25][26] Bass cabinet designers must work within these trade-offs. In general, to get extended low-frequency performance, a larger cabinet size is needed. Most bass cabinets are made from wood such as plywood. Gallien-Kruger makes a small extension cab made of aluminum.
When creating your tone with effects, understanding the order in which you connect your effects is very important. Creating an effects chain is a lot like making a sundae. The Ice cream is the base of your sundae, followed by toppings and finally sprinkles. If you put the sprinkles and toppings in before the ice cream, the flavours will still be there and it may still be a delicious sundae but it is a lot harder to see what extras you added underneath all that ice cream.
Increasing the bass and treble while reducing or eliminating the centre midrange (750 Hz) results in what is popularly known as a "scooped" sound (since the midrange frequencies are "scooped" out). Conversely, decreasing the bass while increasing the midrange and treble creates a punchy, harsher sound. Rolling off all of the treble produces a dark, heavy sound.
At £499, the MBC-1 is designed to hit a completely different price point to the Muse genius's full-fat Manson models, and although still designed by both Matt and Hugh, it's made in Indonesia by guitar-making giant Cort. Price aside, a quick strum lets you know this is a Manson through and through: it rings like a bell, the sort of acoustic response you'd expect from a quality guitar, but not always at this price. In style, the MBC-1 is a pretty accurate repro of the instruments used by Matt. That big upper shoulder won't be to everyone's taste, but in playing position, it's not only lightweight (3.52kg) but with forearm and ribcage contours, it fits like a glove. And the bolt-on maple neck feels superb, too, with a deep C profile and sloping shoulders that tell your hand it's thinner in depth than it actually is. Unusual at this price, too, is the compound radius fingerboard, which flattens out as you move up the neck; with tidy jumbo - but not over-tall - frets, it's a fast, fluid player, as well, which makes it one of the best electric guitars for hard-rock players. Pickup-wise, we have a fairly hot Alnico-powered humbucker at the bridge and a single coil at the neck. Along with a master volume, tone and three-way pickup selector, the upper shoulder also holds a kill button for stutter effects.

The Hi Flyer guitar and bass would be offered pretty much until the end, in ’77. At some point after, probably around ’73 or ’74, the plastic logo was changed to an outline decal logo. Also, at some point the pickups were changed to the distinctive twin-coil humbuckers with metal sides and a see-through pink insert on top. These changes most certainly occurred by the ’76 catalog, when the Hi Flyers were available in four finishes – sunburst (U1815, U1815B), white (U1816, U1816B), black (U1817, U1817B) and a cool natural with maple fingerboard and black dots (U1818, U1818B).
The four fingers of the left hand (which stop the strings) are designated 1 = index, 2 = major, 3 = ring finger, 4 = little finger; 0 designates an open string, that is a string that is not stopped by a finger of the left hand and whose full length thus vibrates when plucked. On the classical guitar thumb of the left hand is never used to stop strings from above (as is done on the electric guitar): the neck of a classical guitar is too wide and the normal position of the thumb used in classical guitar technique do not make that possible.
Like the Strat above, the Fender Telecaster shares the title of being one of the most legendary electric guitars ever produced, and owes a lot of its authentic vintage sound to its unique pickups – which are both fantastic and frustrating at times. A Tele will usually feature two single-coils: a smaller one at the neck and a larger, slanted pickup at the bridge. They both deliver a twangy sound, with the bridge offering great treble tone and the neck a little more balanced. The neck pickup’s main complaint is that it is often muffled in output – unless you find a good set such as the Fender Vintage Noiseless Tele Pickup Set, which keeps things crisp and clear.
In the Ethereal reverb, you can layer two delay effects, where both have four different delay types to choose from, via the black button labeled "Delay Modes." These modes allow you to assign different subdivisions to each delay layer which, when stacked on top of the reverb effect, give you some really unique decay sounds that trail off from the initial signal. 

Boombox Guitar Tuner will get the party started. Just play a note, and it shows. Other guitar tuners don''t use the microphone, like Boombox Guitar Tuner, because it''s written with cutting-edge Flash 10.1 technology. Boombox Guitar Tuner is free to download or use online, so why waste your money on other expensive guitar tuners at the music shop? Try tuning your guitar once using Boombox Guitar Tuner, and you''ll see that it takes just seconds .

As one of the best electric guitars under 200 dollars, the instrument utilizes an agathis body, a bolt-on maple neck, a sonokeling neck, and a classic rosewood fingerboard with 22 frets and white dot inlays. The electronic section features a peculiar combination of one humbucker and two single pickups, allowing the guitar to cover plenty of sonic ground.


Use of audio feedback to enhance sustain and change timbre. Feedback has become a striking characteristic of rock music, as electric guitar players such as Jeff Beck, Pete Townshend and Jimi Hendrix deliberately induced feedback by holding their guitars close to the amplifier. Lou Reed created his 1975 album Metal Machine Music entirely from loops of feedback played at various speeds. A good example of feedback can be heard on Jimi Hendrix's performance of "Can You See Me?" at the Monterey Pop Festival. The entire guitar solo was created using amplifier feedback.[26]

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