A typical modern guitar tube amp has both a preamp stage and a master power amp output stage. The preamp section will be supplied with a set of smaller tubes (frequently 12AX7 or the lower-gain/lower noise 12AU7), and the power amp section has a set of large tubes (EL34, EL84, 6L6, etc.). The preamp controls input gain and typically provides treble, midrange and bass tone controls.
Though some sophisticated processors combine pitch detection with pitch-shifting, to generate musically correct harmonies in user-defined keys, simple pitch-shifters always change the pitch by the same number of cents or semitones. In musical terms, that means that only the octaves, parallel fourths and fifths are very useful. Other intervals tend to sound discordant, as they don't follow the intervals dictated by typical musical scales.
Volume Swell Normally guitar has a very fast attack. It is at its loudest just after a not has been picked and there is a definite picked sound. You can get a softer pad style sound be picking with the volume off or very low and then raising the volume as the note/chord plays. This can be done with the guitar's own volume knob, but sometimes it is more convenient to leave your picking hand free and use a rocker pedal. By adding delay and/or reverb you can soften the note's ending also so that it doesn't stop abruptly.
We certainly can’t have a best cheap electric guitars list without the awesome Epiphone G-400 Electric Guitar, Worn Cherry. In fact, this guitar will make most peoples’ “best guitars” lists thanks to the fact they’re built to such high standards and they sound absolutely fantastic. The budget friendly price tag makes it an affordable option for beginner guitarists, but you’ll often see these Epiphone SG models on the professional stages of the world thanks to the sheer playability and build quality.
As a trained engineer I just don’t see how contemporary luthiers would be able to control only these three parameters in combination in order to make up a specific tone. There is simply no connection between these and the sonic impact they have–again, in combination. Did anyone ever change the shape due to the wood he uses? For instance wood would be lighter by 5%, stiffer by 8% (which would be very much, by the way, but it happens all the time even with the same species) so consequentially make the horn less thick by 3% and trim the tail by 5 mm. A rule like that would be plausible in case wood would affect the tone that much. But luthiers never do. Thy do not even take care of weight and stiffness.
What about Derek Trucks? Mark Knopfler? Trey Anastacio? Chuck Berry? Even Eddie Van Halen deserves some credit–more than John Mayer does for guitar playing. John Mayer's fame as a guitarist piggybacks on his commercial success, which is a result of targeting a demographic of 13 year old girls. He's no doubt a skilled guitar player, but over-rated as a guitarist relative to guys like Van Halen, Knopfler, etc.

Enough with the American brands, haven’t the rest of the world got something to offer? Well, Japan has come up with a few! Ibanez for example offer amazing guitars, and when they first started out the original idea was actually to offer good copies of American electric guitars! Today they have moved on to doing their own thing, and produce excellent guitars.
Directional mics, such as cardioids and figure-of-eights, exhibit different frequency responses off axis — broadly speaking, off-axis sounds tend to be duller, although it's a complex effect which is different for each model. Professional producers are well aware of this, and employ the effect to refine their sounds. For instance, Chuck Ainlay comments "I'll usually start with a [Shure SM57] on the amp; but not straight on axis with the middle of the speaker; it's usually off-centre, angled towards the middle of the speaker and generally just off the grille." Jay Graydon refers to a fairly similar setup: "I position the mic about one inch left of the edge of the speaker-cone centre, using a 22-degree angle, and about one inch back from the grille cloth." Andy Johns, on the other hand, has said that "the miking technique I used on electric guitars for years was two [Shure SM57s], one straight on, and one at 45 degrees. Put 'em together, and it always works."
If you’re paying attention, you probably noticed that I forgot to mention EQ and volume pedals. Actually I didn’t. Placement of these particular pedals depends more on what you want to achieve with them than any hard and fast rules. For example, you may want to place a volume pedal at the very front of the signal chain to perform dramatic fade in and fade out effects or to better regulate the guitar’s level before it hits any effects (or you could just do what I do and use the guitar’s own volume control). Placing the volume pedal near the end of the signal chain just before the delay and reverb effects allows you to perform professional-sounding fades or mute the guitar’s signal without cutting delay or reverb tails short. If you use a loop switcher, a volume pedal can be paired with a single effect, and you can use the volume pedal to blend or mix that effect independently.
If you’re interested in learning how to play electric (or even acoustic) guitar, you obviously need to pick up an instrument. But that’s only the beginning of the gear you need to get to shredding. Second only to a guitar itself, you’re also going to need an amplifier – the device responsible for projecting the sounds of your chosen guitar. The problem is: for a beginner, this task is as daunting as it is expansive.

There was a lot of tinkering with the Spanish-style electric guitar in the 1930s and 1940s since the electronics in a hollow-body instrument caused distortion, overtone, and feedback—especially problematic for recording sessions. Historians and guitar enthusiasts enjoy debating over who really developed the first solid-body Spanish-style guitar to resolve these sound issues. The National Museum of American History owns a rare Slingerland Songster made in or before 1939. This model is possibly the earliest commercially marketed solid-body Spanish-style electric guitar.
Ibanez' strategy to have virtuoso guitarists as endorsers have paid off big time, allowing them to not only produce signature instruments, but to also improve on their production line guitars using the ideas they compiled from various artists. Among their many signature instruments, the Ibanez JEM series is easily one of the most easily identifiable, thanks to its affiliation with guitar wizard Steve Vai and its unique monkey grip handle, which is carved into the body.
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This truly is a pleasure writing about the best kept secret in the guitar world. The G&L Legacy Tribute. I own a USA Hamer Gold Top Archtop Standard with P-90's and it's stupendous guitar. But like all Les Pauls and high quality Mahoganies, it has a growl suited for certain kinds of Rock N Roll. However, there is another voice in my guitar arsenal and I only have one other. The G&L Legacy Tribute. This guitar can cover the other half. I bought this used for $299 and four years later I still can't put it down. So I have a $2600 guitar and a $299 guitar and love them equally. What does that tell you about the Legacy Tribute?
And therein is the VST guitar's edge, as it continues to improve in quality, not matching that of performances by the late Jimmy or the long-standing Carlos or whomever one adopts as their personal guitar deity, but bringing in new qualities of its own. In computer science terms, improved controllers are providing ever more interesting views of ever more detailed models to listeners attuned to the particular environment augmented by the virtual model. The guitar VST is not your daddy, but it might be the little sibling with your daddy's eyes. In the long run.. well... forget that. We love you pops. My little sisters, brothers and I hope you live forever, or at least as long was we do.
The first recording of an electric guitar west of the Mississippi was in Dallas, in September 1935, during a session with Roy Newman and His Boys, an early Western swing dance band. Their guitarist, Jim Boyd, used his electrically-amplified guitar during the recording of three songs, Hot Dog Stomp, Shine On, Harvest Moon, and Corrine, Corrina.. An even earlier Chicago recording of an electrically amplified lap steel guitar was during a series of sessions by Milton Brown and His Brownies (another early Western swing band) that took place January 27-28, 1935, when Bob Dunn played his amplified Hawaiian guitar.
Can be useful after the distortion pedals to shape the sound, and they can also be used as a boost pedal. Remember that boosting here will increase the signal going into the following pedals, and in some cases this may cause 'clipping' (unwanted distortion if the input to a pedal is too high). I don't tend to use EQ much these days, but this is where I placed it when I did, just be careful with how much you boost.
The tone knob is similar. Like the volume knob, the more you turn down the knob, the more of the sound you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier. But there is an additional trick involved. See, the current generated from each string is quite complex, like the sound characteristics it produces. Think of it like a continuum. On one end, the current is turned into low frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'warm') and on the other end of the continuum, the current generates high frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'bright').
Most users are happy with what they got for the money, from its wood quality, to the included hardware and electronics. As expected, many of its buyers are fans of the Les Paul Jr who want to try their hand at customizing their own straightforward rock machine. Surprisingly, there are some who are happy with its default configuration, including the feel of the neck, the sound of the P-90 pickup and the quality of the tuners.

Spruce has historically been the wood of choice for acoustic flat-top guitar soundboards. However, Luthiers and other large guitar manufacturers very often choose more economical and readily available woods rather than top-quality spruce. Redwoods and cedar, for instance, are often used in soundboards by American guitar-makers to great effect. In some cases, two different woods are used together to give the guitar a distinctive appearance and tone.
The components are adequate. The electronics are good, have good tolerances, but the off board components are cheap and flimsy. The hardware is quite good, especially the enclosure. The PCB is well designed and well labeled. The big problem is that the layout instructions are quite poor and mislabeled in a number of places. There is no bill of materials so the components can be quite difficult to distinguish even when they're labeled. Additionally, product only includes one color of wire and does not include digital instructions as indicated in the product description.

Think of where you presently are in your journey as merely preparation and training. You are getting in shape to learn to play by developing some basic skills and building finger strength and callouses and coordination. Progress will be very slow in the beginning but if you persevere, you will reach a point where progress comes at a far more rapid pace.
In the studio, a dynamic noise filter such as the Symetrix 511A, Drawmer DF320/330, Rocktron Hush or Dbx Silencer can be less obtrusive than a gate for cleaning up guitar parts to which delay/reverb has not yet been added. Very generally, such devices work by progressively reducing the audio bandwidth once the sound falls below an adjustable threshold. Transients pass through with very little change, while high frequencies are removed from the tail end of decaying sounds, which reduces the subjective hiss level. A conventional expander then mutes the signal entirely at very low levels.
I’m Björgvin Benediktsson. I’m a musician, audio engineer and best-selling author. I help musicians and producers make a greater impact with their music by teaching them how to produce and engineer themselves. I’ve taught thousands of up and coming home studio producers such as yourself how to make an impact with their music through Audio Issues since 2011.
We are recording between June and July our new album entitled "Brutal Agression" which should be out in October/November, also we were recently invited to Rock al Parque in Bogota, which is one of the biggest festivals in Latin America, joining Cannibal Corpse, Havok, Symphony X, Internal Suffering and many more. After that we will play at other festivals such as Mamut Fest y more to be confirmed, then we will concentrate on album release and touring, which will be accompanied by one or more videos.

SCALE LENGTH What is a "Scale Lenght?" The scale lenght is the lenght the string travels between the nut at the top of the fretboard and the bridge at the mid section of the base of the guitar. To determine the scale length of your guitar you would measure from the front part of the nut where it meets the fretboard to the center of the 12th fret on the neck and multiplying that by 2. Add about 3/16" to that on the low e string and taper that to about 1/16" added to the high e string. This is called compensation and that is why you see that tapered line on a bridge. Go to Stewart MacDonnaldfor more info. They also have a Fret Calculator that helps you determine your particular scale length in addition to a page dedicated to helping you out with tons of free info for your guitar building projects.The fret is the metal of nickle wire that is raised up off the fretboard. I would suggest buying a neck that has been pre made from a manufacturer that fits the design concept that you want to go with. I bought mine from Guitar Parts USA for about $70. You can pay anywhere from $50 to $300 for a neck at online retailers, but surf around and make sure you are satisfied with what you get. Guitarpartsusa will tell you to buy an expensive neck if you are building an expensive guitar, not a $70 neck. But for mine the $70 neck works just fine. Once you get the neck in and you determine what the scale length is you can lay it all out on paper. I recomend buying all your hardware, pickups and knobs before you draw your final template. This will allow to place everything where you want it and know what size holes to drill for the electronics and how big the cavites will need to be for them and the pickups.

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Of course, the effect is not as good as using a professional studio but most users report that reproduction is very good for a simple computer application. The interface of Guitar Rig is extremely well laid out and even for those new to amps and guitar effects, it doesn't take long to navigate your way around. If you intend to use Guitar Rig for live performances, a convenient Live View displays the most essential readouts and level monitors to keep your eye on.
The solid body electric guitar is the most common body type and is made from a solid slab of wood. Solid body guitars can range from a simple, single-pickup model, to an ornately figured and decorated, multi-pickup instrument with a slew of electronic options. Although solid-body guitars don’t produce as much resonance as hollow-body models, the woods used still have an impact on the instrument’s sound.

The thoughtful design and close-tolerance machining of the mechanical components of most electric guitars enables them to be set-up and adjusted with great precision. But it is important to make these adjustments in the correct order- Neck-Nut-Bridge saddles. Making fine tune adjustment to any of these elements without reference to the others, or out of this order, will prevent a guitar's true potential from being realized.

Just ask any savvy stompbox builder or low-tuned 7-string player: Sometimes the best way to add power to your low tones is to remove a bit of bass. That’s because the lowest frequencies in your signal disproportionately overdrive your amp and effects. Siphoning off just a bit of bass can add clarity and focus. At extreme settings, the filtering can produce sharp, squawking tones akin to those of a ’60s treble booster pedal (not a bad thing). If you’ve ever grappled with high-gain tones that make your amp fart out, here’s your flatulence remedy.
A record store owner named Leo Mintz explained his observation to his friend, DJ Alan Freed.  Freed had a popular show on WJW in Cleveland Ohio and loved finding and playing new music to his large audience. Mintz told him of a new trend he saw in his record store where many teenagers from white families were coming in and buying Rhythm and Blues records.
FYI, Dave might be backed up due to demand if he is still working, so I'd call those places up and ask them in advance. Twin Town isn't too bad a drive if you've got a car, maybe 15 minutes from Bloomington, but the place up in Fridley is about a 20-25 minute drive. They might be the best at working on short notice though as they're a smaller place. Definitely give them all calls.
Gretsch re-emerges with this awesome rex acoustic-like electric guitar that defines quality and perfection in terms of style and elegance. Te Jim Dandy Flat Top G9500 is one of the Gretsch best electric guitars which effectively brings back the quality and sound that characterize one of their most famous guitars throughout the 30’s, 40’s and the 50’s era.
I, too, am searching for more info on my Kent. It's a Model 834, violin shaped with a cutaway. Mine is red with "racing stripe" binding on the edge. It's sounds INCREDIBLE (very vintage) and plays well, though I find the neck very narrow. There was an E-Bay auction for a couple of framed ads which featured this model, plus the 833, 835 and 836 from 1967 (one of the pictures, from what I could tell, looked exactly like mine). I also tracked down a picture of one that is a Yellow 67 with a Bigsby-Style vibrato (mine lacks this). If anyone finds a source for more Kent info, I'd love to hear from you...
Since National had applied for a patent on the single cone (US patent #1,808,756), Dopyera had to develop an alternative design. He did this by inverting the cone so that, rather than having the strings rest on the apex of the cone as the National method did, they rested on a cast aluminum spider that had eight legs sitting on the perimeter of the downward-pointing cone (US patent #1,896,484).

These special qualities have been used for centuries to create and build various instruments with differing levels of success. Some tone woods do it better than others so, are often more vigorously sought out and because of their growing rarity (due, primarily, to over harvesting) also vary in expense, the rarest most hard to find being the most expensive, of course.
The Effect: Compression rose to fame in the rock and roll era, many famous musicians used (and still do) compressor pedals in order to add distinctive sustain in their performances, attracting the listener’s attention and making them stand out from the diverse instruments playing along. Some of the most famous compression pedals are the “Ross Compression” and the classic “MXR Dyna”, which have been subject to imitations and remakes ever since their original releases. Compression pedals have remained popular to this day, and are considered a must-have in many guitarist’s arsenals.

While most instruments made by Harmony and Kay were much cheaper than Martins, Gibsons or Fenders, the upper-level, more elaborate ones actually cost more money than some lower-end and even mid-priced Gibsons and Martins. A top-of-the-line Harmony, Kay or Silvertone made by Harmony featured inlay, binding and multiple pickups, switches and knobs, and cost more than a Les Paul Junior or Special and in some cases fully as much as a Les Paul Standard. While one of these instruments in near-perfect condition today might fetch $1,000 or more, it certainly would not have been nearly as good an investment as spending less to buy a Les Paul Junior and sure enough not as good an investment as spending an equal amount to buy an original 1959 sunburst Les Paul Standard.
This aim of this site is to provide high quality SoundFonts (virtual musical instruments in sf2 format) that can be played using a midi keyboard connected to a computer, tablet or smart phone. Emphasis has been placed on real or acoustic instruments particularly piano and other favourites for keyboard players (pads, strings, electric pianos, organs and orchestral) but some SoundFonts here also include high quality guitars, some synths and ethnic instruments. There is also a nice GM set for playing general midi files. The SoundFont format sf2 is widely supported by lots of programs/apps and devices.
This is a nice improvement on the ME-70, which I owned previously, except for one thing: plastic expression pedal. That's why it got 4 stars from me. The ME-70 had a metal pedal, and it was substantially larger. This plastic pedal does not have the same feel. Feels chintzy. I was expecting similar quality but in that one regard the quality is inferior to the previous version.
The S2 Custom 24 features a mahogany body with book-matched flame maple top, that follows the same double cutaway shape and detailed arch as the original Custom 24. The guitar's mahogany neck is also not far off, being rafted from mahogany with PRS' distinctive 25" scale length. It has a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard that has a comfortably narrow nutwidth of 1.656". Finally, the S2 Custom 24 owes its voice to its dual humbucker pickups that include the S2 Vintage Bass and the S2 HFS Treble - which provide PRS' characteristically open and clear tone. You can push or pull the tone knob for single-coil tones should you need them.
There is a weekly newsletter that features lessons from different genres and difficulty levels. Whenever I open that newsletter I feel compelled to try out that featured lesson. I believe that this is a big reason why my guitar playing is improving so quickly. I am continuously trying out different styles and techniques and I get better overall while doing this and having fun.

Every generation there's one guitar master whose touch can make a guitar purr; whose grasp of his skill is so complete that just by looking at the guitar, he knows her problem; and whose ears can pinpoint what your tone is lacking. They are legends. And the mystique that surrounds these guys is hard to penetrate. Swank is one of those guitar masters. "I think part of my mystique now is that I'm just flaky and don't return phone calls," he says. "It's not that I'm some kind of badass." Swank was first introduced to the business of guitar repairing when he saw another master's work. "I just thought it was a pretty noble pursuit."


Like all Vintage electrics, it comes as standard with Trev Wilkinson designed hardware and pickup. The VS50IIK Vibrato system can take some serious abuse and yet still return to pitch time after time, thanks to the added inclusion of Wilkinson WJ07LH E-Z-Lok machine heads. Meanwhile, the Wilkinson WHHB double-coil pickups provide tight bottom end and crisp highs, perfect for a variety of genres.
The Fender Stratocaster Squier is possibly the most recognizable shape in electric guitar history. The Fender Stratocaster design is mimicked by manufacturers all over the world. Fender produces its own line of budget “Strats” called the Squier series. If you want to start with an electric guitar, chances are you’ll buy something like this for around $130 USD.
What's funny is that guitars with cheap pickups very often sound better direct than guitars with "good pickups". I have an Epiphone Special I with ( presumably GFS ) P90-style pickups and that thing sounds great direct. It's also fine with a band thru an amp if the band doesn't play too loud - if the band's too loud the low mid buildup means you gotta EQ a lotta bass out and it loses it's girth.
WET SANDING You can wet sand with 600 or 800 grit wet sanding papers that you can get from the hardware or auto body shop before you apply the clear coats. You can get precission paper from Stewart Mac Donald that are suppose to cut better, last longer and yeild a better result, but I have never tried them so that's up to you. When wet sanding there are a few things to keep in mind. First you will need to soak the paper overnight in water. You can add a little Murphy's Oil soap to it. It will act as a lubricant and help it cut better. You could even soak the paper in a solvent if you use a laquer finish but I use water because it cleans up easier and dosen't smell. Next be sure not to overly soak the areas that you have drilled holes in. If the water get in the wood it can cause a lift in the lacquer that could lead to cracks in the finish. This is why some people choose a solvent to sand with because it is more forgiving in that area. Start wet sanding with a 600 to 800 grit paper and gradually work your way up to a 2000 plus grit. If you use water you may experience a condition in you finger tips that comes with a prolonged exposure to it called "raisoning". Just let them dry out for a while and get back to work!
For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave.
A low latency audio card will allow to run your guitar signal (via an adapter cable or a mixer) into the PC and through the Amp Sims, (the M-Audio 2469 is a good card for this and reasonably priced), this will allow you to drive/crank the simulators as loud as you'd like to get the tone you want; and control the overall volume with your PC, good speakers/monitors are a must for this.
A note on acoustic guitar pickups (piezo, in particular): Making crazy 10 dB cuts? Contemplating making some absurd boost? You're probably not wrong – the acoustic pickup world can be the Wild West when it comes to tone. Some are great, and some are downright questionable. There are too many variables to even begin suggesting frequencies, so use your ears to guide you home on this one.
I have owned Fender amps and Line 6 amps and while they have been "ok" amps, none of them come close to my newly acquired Mesa Mark V 90watt and 4� - 12 rectifier cab. Amp is super versitile and the time is out of this world. I knew I'd hit the jackpot the first time I plugged up to one. Mark V pairs nicely with my variety of guitars including PRS Holcomb sig, Fender Tele and Strat, Schecter Hellraiser, and Epiphone Les Paul. There's a tone in there for everyone, every guitar and every style of music... you just have to be willing to sit down and get to know the amp. Mesa Boogie is definitely the brand for me so I cast my vote in with them. Great company with quality amps and super friendly/helpful custom service.
Like many others, Reinhold Bogner (born in Ulm, Germany, like the EL84 tube!) started his career with Fender mods. He founded his company in 1989 in Los Angeles and succeeded in earning a reputation among guitar amp manufacturers. His brand became famous with models like the Ecstasy 100A and 100B, where "A" stands for American (with 6L6 tubes) and "B" for British (with EL34 tubes). Among its famous users, you'll find Steve Stevens and Steve Vai (apparently your name must be Steve to be Bogner's friend).
1979 Alvarez 5053 - D-45 Martin Style Replica Japan Crafted Exotic Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood Here we have a really great one from our 30 years of Alvarez collecting and she is absolutely one of the finest Alvarez model Martin Copies crafted in Japan from this golden era the late 1970's.. This example is a 1979 #5053.. its ALL ORIGINAL with the only exceptions being we changed the old cheap tone defeating plastic nut & saddle for the preferable upgrade to a Martin bone nut & compensated saddle set and of course the Martin Marquis 80/20 Phosphorus bronze strings 12’s strings along with the Martin Bridge pins as seen. This is a unique & exotic true Vintage Japanese version of the classic ornate Martin D-45 again this one was Crafted in Japan by one of the finest acoustic instrument builders from this time period Alvarez, This guitar is possibly even a bit more fancy than even the actual Martin D-45 with the intricate exotic woods used see this examples exotic Beautiful 3-piece back simply gorgeous! The Martin D-45 version just has a 2-piece back in most cases...This example is a RARE Alvarez with such woods and its workmanship level is very ghigh suggesting a master luthiers hand its model #5053, with the date stamped inside on the label reads ( 1979 ).,,see pic detail. Bound body(front w/b/w/b/w/b/w, back w/b/w/b),bound neck(white),bound peg head(w/b/w). See the Beautiful detailed Abalone inlay around the sound hole with its white mother of pearl fret markers. With an adjustable Ebony bridge with a bone saddle and the sweet smelling Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood fretboard its simply stunning. Special truss rod cover that has the word Alvarez in gold lettering and SLM (Saint Louis Music)in gold also. Medallion on the back of the headstock says imported and customized Saint Louis Music since 1922. Choice Sitka AAA Spruce top, with old highly exotic looking Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood - awesome landscape figure sides are very figured exotic looking Jacaranda. Smells great. Wonderful exotic figuring. for the back and sides Better looking we haven’y seen...The Perfling between the woods on the back is just absolutely stunningly gorgeous,unbelievable craftsmanship!!. I've only seen one other like it. Real difficult to find much info on these rare exotics. A truly Beautiful vintage Japanese acoustic guitar and quite the collectible instrument ...for the person wanting only the best at a fair price...not on sale for $6,000-8000 like the Martin this one is a true bargain Vintage exotic WoW! What a great find. JVG Rated at a solid 8.8/10 very good original Vintage condition. I suggest you get his before she's gone..don't know when I'll find another like it. .
So, I’m 50+, I’ve never played a guitar, and I’m trying to decide on an electric guitar. I’m less concerned with the brand name, more concerned with high quality and workmanship, and last, I like the tone of the guitars played by the late Pete Ham of Badfinger (especially Baby Blue), and Joe Walsh. I know Ham played a cherry red Gibson SG standard, but I’m seeing quite a few mixed reviews on the quality control and workmanship of the current SGs. I listen to a lot of jam band music (i.e. Widespread Panic) and enjoy the rhythm guitar best. So, where to start and stay under $2000 to get a guitar that will produce the type of sound I’m looking for?
The 50-watt version is driven by seven 12AX7 preamp tubes with two 6L6s powering the amp, which is surprisingly huge in output – capable of filling an auditorium no problem (depending on your cab, of course). Other features that make this such a popular choice among gigging guitarists include three customizable channels and a four-button footswitch.
In the 1950's company called Don Noble and Co, was founded in the 1950’s by Don Noble, a well-known accordion player and entrepreneur.  He began by importing Italian made musical instruments, mainly accordions, in an era when the "stomach Steinway" was very popular and accordions were being sold door-to-door, and accordion academies were common in most larger cities. But he also imported guitars under the Noble brand name.
Before World War II, Epiphone was one of Gibson's fiercest competitors in the guitar market—especially when it came to archtops. With legendary models like the Broadway, Deluxe, Emperor and Triumph, they were a force to be reckoned with on the hollow-body electric guitar scene. In the 1940s, Epiphone went from one of Gibson's competitors to one of its subsidiaries, paving the way for Epiphone Electric Guitars to become synonymous with many Gibson models.  Despite this drastic shift, Epiphone continues to be renowned for their archtop electric guitars even today. Models like the Wildkat Royale and the limited edition ES-335 Pro are worthy throwbacks to that golden era of electric guitars, giving you authentic vintage sound that's perfect if you're into classic rock. Another Epiphone original that's still available today is the solid-body Wilshire. The impact that the Wilshire had on guitar design is so strong that it's still one of the first mental images that comes to mind when we think ""electric guitar.""
An amazing electric guitar player pack that is suitable for use by beginners. It has a mahogany body, with its fret board having been made from rosewood. The neck is also made from mahogany. Most interestingly, it comes with passive fienzo pickups, and an exclusive guitar player pack with gig bags, strap, cord, tuner, and an instructional DVD. It is well design to assist the beginner to better access the frets and practice through to perfection. Prices range from INR 12,650. Find it on the link below:
Check out a set of Elixir strings for yourself to hear and feel the difference.  The coating actually reduces string squeaks as well, providing a consistent sound for close miking and recording acoustic players.  The squeak of the finger over the round wound strings of an acoustic has always been an intrinsic part of the instrument, but hearing the guitar performed without such extra squeaking may change your mind.

Ibanez Mikro GIO Electric Guitar in Black w/ Bag. The guitar is in good working condition does have few marks and one nick. Does not include stand just used to take pictures. Includes guitar strap and Ibanez bag. Please contact me if you have any problems with your purchased item and I would be Happy work with you to help make your Transaction a Pleasant Experience.           Please check photos carefully and use the enlarging tool. Some photos are taken with a flash and may cause the image to appear darker in some areas. Photos are an important part of the description and the condition of each item.Thanks for Looking!!           Also please verify the correct shipping address before bidding. Payment is expected within 48 hours.    


Get ready to rock! This kid's electric guitar set has everything little rockstars need to jam out in style and foster a growing passion for music. Whether a child is just learning the basics or has mastered every chord, this guitar is the perfect practice tool to lift them to the next level. Hook it up to the included 5-watt amplifier and let your kid experience music like never before!
This guitar has an interesting makeup of tone wood. First, the body is Mahogany just like the Iron Label model. The top of the guitar is Poplar Burl, where a burl is actually a type of growth on a tree in which the grain has become somewhat deformed. It sounds bizarre but, Burl is highly prized for its rarity and beauty and is often sought after by wood sculptors and luthiers alike.
Some of the energy is not translated to string movement because it is lost. Where? To the body. Dependant on hardware and body composition, certain amounts of frequencies are absorbed by the body and therefore lost to be seen by the pickups. Body resonance is the OPPOSITE of what most people think. Those prevalent frequencies you hear ringing out of the wood are now unavailable to be transferred to the pickups. Remember, we can't create energy, only move it around. If a guitar is prominent in specific frequencies, it is only because other frequencies have been "removed" to make them stand out.
Wah – a frequency-based effect that creates a sound similar to a voice saying “Wah”. A Wah pedal uses a filter that sweeps across the frequency band. In a pedal wah, pressing the toe down will make the guitar signal brighter; heel down makes the signal darker. The filter can be controlled either automatically by electronics within the pedal or manually by the use of an expression pedal giving the guitarist’s hands-free control over their tone.
Wow, didn't expect a budget-priced instrument to perform this beautifully! I had planned to use this as an introduction into nylon-string (from electric), then upgrade to a better (i.e. more expensive??) model. That won't be necessary! The NTX700C is absolutely perfect for me and will remain the nylon-string guitar in my stable. I am a professional solo jazz guitarist and ventured into a nylon-string for my Brazilian jazz set. Being an electric player, the transition with this model has been much easier than a traditional classical. The onboard electronics are great with my Bose L1 system. I have the cedar top, and the tone is very mellow, and already opening up with only three weeks of playing.
In 1952, Alfred Dronge – co-owner of small New York City music shop Sagman & Dronge – registered the Guild Guitar Company. The following year, they began producing deep hollow body guitars, a reflection of Dronge’s love for jazz music. The brand grew steadily through to the 70s – when Alfred Dronge died unexpectedly in a plane crash – getting their instruments in the hands of musicians such as Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, and Bonnie Raitt. In the 80s, Guild began producing signature guitars for musicians Hank Williams Jr. and Brian May of Queen. The brand moved around frequently and it wasn’t until 2014 that they settled in their present headquarters in Oxnard, California – where all of their line of USA made guitars are now produced. To this day, they still produce a wide variety of hollow, semi-hollow, and solid body guitars that look as beautiful as they sound.

The best choice for ambient miking is most likely to be a good condenser – probably a large-diaphragm type, though a small-diaphragm type will work. Plenty of ribbon mics give good service as ambient mics also, if you have a clean, high-gain mic pre-amp to track them through. And where do you put it? Well, three or four feet back from the speaker will start to get a significant amount of room sound into the mic, but for more-ambient placements, try six feet or more, and experiment with different heights from the floor, far corners, and so on. One nifty way to find a cool ambient placement is to use your own ear like a mic, and stick the mic at the position in the room where the guitar tone sounds the best to you. This is ideally done with another person playing the guitar; cover one ear and walk around the room listening to the sound in different positions. When you hear a sound that really nails what you’re trying to capture, set up the mic right there. Done.

What’s the point in having these lists anyway? There’s always going to be anger over people who were left out/included on the list when they didn’t deserve to be… And to say that any of the musicians mentioned so far aren’t talented is ridiculous, there’s no limit in the world on how much talent there is, so why does this list have to be limited to 10? Just saying…
If a player uses a separate preamplifier and power amplifier, she or he can buy a power amplifier intended for a sound reinforcement system or PA system or pick a power amplifier designed specifically for bass instruments. These preamps and power amps come in two formats: 19 inch rack-mountable units and units with their own wood or metal case. If a player uses a rackmountable preamp and power amp, these units and any effect units, such as an audio compressors, can be mounted in 19" rack mount road cases for safe transport. When a bass player selects a variety of different preamps, effects units and a power amp and puts them all in a rackmount case, this setup is colloquially called a "bass rig". Amp heads with their own wood or metal case may use many of the same appearance and transportation-oriented design features used on combo amps. For example, if a bass amp head is designed with a wooden case, it will typically have a vinyl, felt or sturdy fabric (or painted coating) to protect the wood case during transport; a carry handle; and corner protectors.
Tube amplifiers are the original amplifier and still seen as the best way to amplify an electric guitar – and for good reason! Despite impressive advances in amplification technology, nothing beats the natural sound of a vacuum tube that has been pushed to its very limit. In fact, for many guitarists it’s either tube or nothing, as the volume, vibe and fluid sound profile of these amps is extremely hard to replicate. One model we really like is the Hughes & Kettner TubeMeister TM18H, which has killer looks, delivers a delightful tube tone, has switchable wattages, and doesn’t break the bank.
There is something special about musical instruments of a certain age. Guitars built from the mid 1950s until the late 1970s are generally held in high esteem; techniques and materials, particularly pre-1970 were vastly superior to today's 'mass-produced' standards. But is a vintage guitar really much different to a modern day equivalent? People often say wood is wood, but this is simply not the case. Centuries old trees that were regularly harvested for guitar manufacture in the 1950s are now protected, and it is these old trees with close grains and unbeatable tonal qualities that make the very best guitars. With rainforests rapidly diminishing their protection can only be a good thing. But it does mean that good quality older guitars, perhaps with a few modern upgrades can make some of the very best instruments available. What's more, much of the painstaking attention to detail lavished upon fine old jazz guitars by special order/custom departments and aimed at serious guitarists has been replaced by the continual churning out of 'limited editions', aimed at serious collectors. Whether these rare, but ultimately not-so-special guitars will be quite so desirable in 30 years time remains to be seen.
Thanks for this explanation. I have built a few electric guitars, but they have been in the Gibson style with two humbuckers. I am now working on a guitar with an HSH configuration, so for starters, I needed to understand the basic 5 way switch, which if you just looked at it, it makes no sense. Now I see that the wipers of each pole are on the opposite end of each side.
The two piggyback guitar amps included the 1010 Guitar Amplification System ($605), which offered 10 tubes, 105 watts, two channels, four inputs, volume, bass, middle and treble controls for each channel, presence, reverb, tremolo, variable impedance, and a cabinet with eight 10″ Univox Special Design speakers with 10-ounce ceramic magnets and epoxy voice coils. The cabinet grille had eight round cutouts. The 1225 Guitar Amplifier System ($435) had eight tubes, 60 watts, two channels with the same controls as the 1010, and a cab with two 12″ Univox speakers with 20-ounce ALNICO magnets and 2″ voice coil. The grille had two large round cutouts with two small round cutouts on the sides. The amps had handles on the top, the cabs handles on the sides, to make life easier for your roadies.

Ever since Christmas Day 1967,I have been trying to find out who made my MIJ guitar I got as a gift that year.Today I found out who made my little Dover when your excellent book came in the mail.I was always puzzled I’ve never seen another Dover and despite many inquiries to guitar mags-nobody else had heard of the brand either.Back in 2009 I sent several pix of my whole collection to Vintage Guitar Mag-they only printed on pic,and that was the one with the Dover-even though there were several others that I thought were more historically significant.The guitar looks like a 3/4 size attempt of making a Jazzmaster copy as it had the strange Meito plastic pickups with the 6 little chrome triangles where the pole pieces usually go.I noticed that Sakai Mokko also made Sears guitars and that really clicked with me as my mother worked at Sears in Toronto at the time and that’s where she bought my Dover.I will try to send some pix your way.
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During final construction, a small section of the outside corners is carved or routed out and filled with binding material on the outside corners and decorative strips of material next to the binding, which are called purfling. This binding serves to seal off the endgrain of the top and back. Binding and purfling materials are generally made of either wood or high quality plastic materials.
National Dobro’s involvement with electrics began, indirectly, with experiments conducted by George Beauchamp, who designed his first “electro” guitar in 1931, while actually still with the National company (not yet merged with Dobro). This was a wood-bodied “frying pan” with a pickup probably designed in conjunction with Paul Barth and Harry Watson, another National employee.
When Eric Clapton plugged his 1960 Les Paul into a Marshall Bluesbreaker in the mid 60’s (the set-up used to record Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton, the “Beano album”) he created a new rock tone that immediately became a standard.[15] Clapton played a 1960 Standard as a member of John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and in the early days of Cream. The guitar was said to have been stolen while Clapton was preparing for the first Cream tour in 1966, following the recording of Fresh Cream, and was long considered an iconic instrument by Clapton’s fans and Les Paul guitar admirers. Gibson announced production of the Clapton 1960 Standard, also nicknamed the “Beano Burst”, in 2010. Gibson says the instrument “accurately represents what Eric Clapton personally feels his 1960 Les Paul should be”, with Clapton consulting on the design of the guitar. Production is limited to 55 hand-aged instruments signed by Clapton (who was allowed to keep the first five of these instruments), another 95 hand-aged instruments, and 350 Vintage Original Spec instruments, but all five hundred instruments feature period-correct hardware, two Gibson reproduction PAF humbucking pickups, and subtly figured “antiquity burst” maple tops.

The 4000 series were the first Rickenbacker bass guitars, production beginning in 1957. The 4000 was followed by the very popular 4001 (in 1961), the 4002 (limited edition bass introduced in 1977), the 4008 (an eight-string model introduced in the mid-1970s), the 4003 (in 1979, replacing the 4001 entirely in 1986 and still in production in 2012), and most recently the 4004 series. There was also the 4005, a hollow-bodied bass guitar (discontinued in 1984); it did not resemble any of the other 4000 series basses, but rather the new style 360-370 guitars. The 4001S (introduced 1964) was basically a 4001 but with no binding and dot fingerboard inlays. It was exported to England as the RM1999. However, Paul McCartney received the very first 4001S (his unit was left-handed, and later modified to include a “zero fret“).
The ’55 hollowbody line consisted of no less than eleven guitars. Models included the EP-4, EP-5, EP-6, EP-7, EP-11, EP-12, EP-13, EP-14, EP-15, EP-16, and EP-23. Clearly, in these instances, the numerical designation indicates appointments, not the number of pickups. Some of these are likely to be thin-bodied archtops with no cutaways, some thinlines with a single cut, and some full-bodied archtops with a single cutaway, with either one or two pickups, and probably no vibratos.
A favored brand of a number of against-the-grain musicians – like Jack White of The White Stripes, Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys, and the late great David Bowie – Eastwood is unique in that, alongside their catalog of more traditional guitars, they’ve also taken it upon themselves to bring back a number of more obscure models through the revived Airline brand. For instance, the ’59 Custom 2P pictured above was originally offered by VALCO in a catalog sale through Montgomery Ward from 1958 to 1968. Their vintage style instruments are updated with modern manufacturing techniques, giving players the opportunity to pick up rare offerings at a reasonable cost. But perhaps the coolest thing about this company is their custom shop. Set up almost like a Kickstarter, the shop allows customers to bid on defunct, new, and bizarre guitars and go on to build whichever models meet their funding requirements.
Players perceived a loss of the initial high quality of Fender guitars after the company was taken over by CBS in 1965. As a result, the late-1960s Stratocasters with the large “CBS” headstock and (from the mid 1970s) the 3-bolt necked models (instead of the conventional 4 bolts) with the “Bullet” truss-rod and the MicroTilt adjustment system fell out of fashion. However, many blues-influenced artists of the late 1960s soon adopted the Stratocaster as their main instrument, reviving the guitar’s popularity. Also, so-called ‘pre-CBS’ Stratocasters are, accordingly, quite sought-after and expensive due to the perceived difference in quality even compared with contemporary post-CBS models. In recent times, some Stratocasters manufactured from 1954 to 1958 have sold for more than US$175,000.
I play in cover bands. Own large collection of pedals, some I love, some stink. Then I found out that the only people that care about the effects are other musicians. The people( girls dancing mostly) could care less. So now I got a tuner, and drive pedal for solo tone....that's it, and my tone is awesome and hassle free. For studio cats it may be a different story.
Run a length of wire (approx two feet is usually plenty) through the jack mounting hole and down into the cavity. When you see the wire in the cavity pull it up through the F hole. Make sure the wire is long enough for one end to stick out the jack hole, and the other to stick out the F hole. Tape the jack hole end of the wire to the guitar with masking tape, or tie it to the strap button. This will ensure it doesn’t fall through the jack hole while you’re working on the other end.
Looks awesome. Great tone. Had A LOT of fret buzz out of the box (EADG strings from 7th-11th fret). Got it set up to try to eliminate buzzing...only way the guitar tech could seem to get rid of it was by raising the action quite a bit, so now it's much higher than I like...bummer. No buzzing and sounds great, but the playability is definitely not what I was hoping for considering the price.
For better or worse, by 1982 the taste for natural-finished, neck-through guitars with lots of switches and active electronics had begun to move on. On the horizon were the brief affair with weird-shaped “heavy metal” guitars and the impending first Strat-mania and the rise of Superstrats which would pretty much define the remainder of the decade. 1982, and the 18 and 28 Series, marked the end of Martin’s direct manufacture of electric solidbody guitars.
He has a way about him that makes you stop and listen, but he isn’t in your face. His sound is very melodic, which is why his tone was so perfectly matched to answering the needs of the vocals, yet he still holds his own in every tune. Bright, confident and edgy, he is a serious guitar-player and he has no intentions of holding back! People often say that he carries humour in his music, which is quite a clever characteristic to portray with this piece of equipment.
Below you’ll find the 33 most prominent guitar manufacturers, listed alphabetically. Some specialize in one type of guitar (acoustic or electric), while others do well with both. Some focus on a specific genre, such as metal or jazz, and some do it all. I’ve tried to give a good overview of each brand, along with a few notes on any significant changes for 2018.
Dexter Holland (b. 1965) is the rhythm guitarist of punk rock band The Offspring and has played Ibanez guitars for most of the band's existence. He currently uses a custom diamond plate RG with a custom Jägermeister logo on the twelfth fret, as well as DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups, though he used to use a brown and green custom RG and has been seen with a custom Purple RG.
We’ve already shown you how you will sometimes want more than one mic on your amp to achieve ideal sound in your tracks. Many semi-distant and ambient techniques will be most useful, along with a close mic, but on a separate track, to retain the option of blending a more-direct tone to create your overall sonic picture. Any single-mic positions discussed thus far can be combined into multi-mic sounds in the mix when recorded to different tracks. There are also several other approaches to multi-miking that might come in handy now and then, and which are worth some exploration.

Our Parlor size guitars are approximately 25% smaller than our full size guitars but what really makes them special is they have a 2 inch shorter neck design. This means children and small adults (under 5 ft tall) don’t have to reach as far holding certain chords making playability even easier. Most of our customers buying our Parlor guitars are coming from little Martins and Taylors.  They say the Easy Play Parlor has 30-50% easier playability and sound is slightly richer and deeper.  Shipped from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska.  100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
A fuzz pedal is essentially an extreme distortion effect. Because fuzz so radically alters the signal, it is often used sparingly for contrast, rather than as a meat-and-potatoes sound. Since it thickens up the tone so dramatically, fuzz can be fun for intros and solo guitar parts when no other instruments are playing. Jimi Hendrix playing "The Star Spangled Banner" is a classic example of fuzz-infused guitar.
Which tonewood works the best for you will depend on your personal preference as well as the genre of music you're playing. Electric guitar bodies come in a whole range of styles. You have classics such as the Stratocaster and the Les Paul shape, but there's much more out there to explore. Granted, a vast majority of these were heavily inspired by the aforementioned models and you probably don't want to go too far off into the realm of the strange.
Did I say WoW....your going to love this one...Here we have a VERY rare GREAT FIND and premium example at that this over 35 year old vintage mandolin has absolutely beautiful flamed AAA Fiddle grade Maple to both the back chevron 2 piece & sides .... this piece is simply gorgeous and has an aged & wonderfully grained figured Sitka spruce top this a VERY High Quality. This is a Japanese made Artist grade Mandolin from the prime Japanese Law-suit era ... the very talented Luthiers built this example... this one was made in the mid 1970's at the famous Ibanez factory in Japan this example is cleverly labeled with a beautiful mother of pearl logo then unheard of " CARLO ROBELLI "... This is a Gibson exact REPLICA of the " F Style " MANDOLIN this M-700 M700 ACOUSTIC Mandolin in excellent vintage condition WoW! its so nice dare I say Near Mint...its over 30 years old and has that aged and mellowed tone and has emerged as a great sounding professional quality constructed PRO level beauty that is available for a fraction of what the very same vintage Ibanez or Aria m-700 Logo'ed Mandolin will cost... ( same factory built those to ) same luthiers same materials... as seen with the great original golden plush lined hard shell case.. all & all one of the best sounding & playing mando's available under $1600.00 vintage F style and beautifully flamed & figured Maple ..looks like old school nitrocellulose lacquer but no visible checking cracks but just one short 3" finish check on back and is almost impossible to see... a few buckle mars on back but so faint not threw finish and again almost impossible to see... guard is also in top shape not all scratched up..this baby is in under the bed for 30 years condition it looks more like its one year old condition wise as it is actually 30+ years old...as you can tell the finish has that aged patina and warm appearance of a vintage Mando.. here is a great one w/ its original hard shell case ..WoW! Its being cleaned up now and is looking as new... the guard's glue just came loose so it will get cleaned prepped & re-glued and ready for another 30 years. I will also be restring her with a new set D'Addario strings we have in stock and set her up... she will ring like a sweet bell and be ready to record with or tour. Copy & paste this link to view many new pics of this beautiful Vintage Japanese crafted Mandolin... https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sCarloRobelliFMandolin?authkey=Gv1sRgCNbp6p6_1cicsQE#slideshow/5588480984817011186.

The Ovation Guitar Company, a holding ofKaman Music Corporation, which itself is owned byFender Musical Instruments Corporation, is a guitarmanufacturing company based in New Hartford, Connecticut. Ovation primarily manufactures steel-string acoustic guitars. They have been credited with “by far the most significant developments in the design and construction of acoustic guitars” from the 1960s through the 1980s.[
Includes hand cutting and shaping new fingerboard nut from scratch, and fitting it specifically for each instrument. Some variation in pricing is due to the unexpected difficulty in removing some nuts. It is highly recommended each instrument be set up to ensure optimal playability. Restringing is NOT included. Price excludes cost of blank ($6 for bone/synthetic)
Along with these effects are 10 guitars: Strat Marshall, Valve ODX, Garcia Guitar, Bleeding Guitar, Blues Guitar, Power Guitar, Mondo Guitar, Synth Guitar, Clean Guitar, and Electric Sitar. The sound of each somewhat matches the guitar it’s supposed to be, but more importantly, there is a notable change in tone with each and since it’s free, I was happy just to have that.
If you like the traditional look of a Fender Stratocaster, but want something a bit more modern with a little more output for heavier blues, rock, and metal tones, the ESP LTD SN-200HT is a fantastic value for the money. You’ll get a great range of tones thanks to the humbucker in the bridge position, and two single coils in the middle and neck positions.
This guitar has a mahogany neck topped by a 20-fret rosewood fingerboard. It has a scale length of 25.62", while the nut width is 1.69". Since the AW54 is from Ibanez, you can expect the neck profile, string action and overall playability to be comfortable and beginner friendly. Wrapping up this affordable guitar's premium-like specs is its Open Pore Natural finish, which gives the instrument an earthy appeal that's easy on the eyes.
Paul Reed Smith is a relative newcomer having been born just 2 years after the Stratocaster was created, and founding PRS Guitars in 1985, but in that relatively short period of time PRS have made a huge impact on the guitar world, have been used by the likes of Carlos Santana, Ted Nugent, Dave Navarro. and Mark Tremonti, are now the 3rd biggest electric guitar manufacturer in the USA, and have earned their place among the best electric guitar brands.

Regardless of the invention debate, it is clear that former radio repairman Leo Fender was the first to mass-produce and sell a successful solid-body Spanish-style electric guitar. His company’s simply constructed 1950 Fender Broadcaster (renamed Telecaster as the result of a trademark dispute), with its flat body and a neck bolted onto it, was initially derided by competitors as too simple and lacking in craftsmanship. Gibson’s president Ted McCarty dismissed it as a “plank guitar.” Yet everything about its patented, practical design was optimal for mass-producing an inexpensive solid-body guitar, earning Fender the moniker “the Henry Ford of the electric guitar.”


Im wanting to build my own 8 string fanned fret with a 30" scale length and a bit more string spacing than a standard 8 string. My Ibanez rg8 has about 9mm from center of string to center of string. I figure I will build a few with cheap lumber from home depot without expecting to play it at all. I want a neck through style as well. Does anyone know where to find some info on building something like this and specifically how to properly set up the frets?
REGOLAZIONE DELL'INTONAZIONE (FAT20) Per garantire l'assenza di movimento, ogni selletta è provvista di una vite di fissaggio. Per regolare l'intonazione, allentare la vite di fissaggio della selletta con una chiave a brugola da 2 mm (D). Per regolare l'intonazione, inserire una chiave a brugola da 2,5 mm nella vite della selletta sul retro del tremolo.
I only dealt with them directly on my SX Mahogany Strat w P90s. For $119 I got a really nice beginner guitar. I added cheap grover tuners, I filed a few frets and polished them, shimmed the neck, sanded (more scuffed really) the sticky finish on the back of the neck, and I've got a nice little beater that sounds awesome (to me at least), and has nice low action. I'm a relative newbie, but got some good experience with guitar setup and didn't risk trashing a expensive guitar.

Chorus – This is the subtlest type of modulation effect. It does exactly what its name suggests, making it sound as though multiple instruments are all playing in unison. The effect could be compared to running a signal through two amps at once and setting one on a slight delay; in fact, that’s how many artists created chorus effects before these pedals were commonplace.

"The library has a huge amount of great samples covering every nook & cranny of the electric guitar, and it really is of the highest quality... I could tell that they must have put in a gigantic effort into the scripting, sampling, and design... It’s easy to use, has extensive options for articulations, sounds even better with its effects, and yet it can have a pristine, clean sound as well. I highly recommend it... When they say 'Absolute Electric Guitar' on their website, those words are a lot to live up to [and] they achieved this with a brilliant product and awesome sound." Rob Mitchell (SoundBytes Magazine)


In any case, by late 1933 or early ’34, Dobro expanded its amp line to include what is probably the first twin-speaker amplifier! This had a football-shaped speaker grille with lyre and Dobro insets, and two 8″ Lansing field coil speakers. Nothing else is known about this amp, but it may have had the same chassis as the single-speaker version. It can be seen on page 104 of Guitars, Guitars, Guitars (All American Music Publishers, 1988).

The Marshall CODE412 - 4x12 Speaker Cabinet is a powerful monster designed as a companion to your CODE 100 head. A classic angled cabinet that is packed with four 12” speakers, each with a 30-watt output. This extremely affordable 4x12 amplifier cab is perfect for those in need of a high-quality option for their set up, whether you have a CODE or not. A single input makes it easy to plug and play and the 24kg weight ensures you won’t break your back carrying it to practice. It’s also Marshall’s most affordable friendly speaker cabinet, making it a great choice for those on a budget.
One day I went over to hang out with a friend on Long Island’s prestigious, luxurious north shore. He was also an amateur, aspiring, guitarist, and perhaps slightly more advanced than me – after all, he wrote a solo, even if it didn’t belong to a song yet. But he was very excited when I arrived and wanted to show me something cool in the family room. When I stepped inside, what did I see strewn about the floor but a whole bunch of effects pedals surrounding his electric guitar like a battalion about to march on and conquer a fierce enemy.
If you’ve read our full reviewof the 50s Stratocaster, you’ll know that this Classic Vibe Stratocaster is an excellent prospect for any beginner who loves the good old days of rock n’ roll! Made by Squier, this 50s-inspired electric has huge vintage appeal, with a modern feel thanks to a trio of Alnico III single-coil pickups and a smooth, modern C-shaped maple neck (with 21 medium jumbo frets).
Rule 1 – There are no rules. The sound you’re after might not be made by what we could call the appropriate or logical signal path, but that’s not always the issue. The issue is this: what does it sound like? If it makes the sound you’re after, then it’s right…although, you may have to do something about the noise. Traditional pedal board arrangements were designed for certain reasons, and keeping the noise down is one biggie. Following the principles of how sound is made in physical space is another (see Rule 4 coming up). But the final choice is yours. As a very wise man said: if it works, don’t fix it.
Pyle Pro’s PEGKT15SB package is the next step up. This guitar has more of a vintage feel thanks to its sunburst finish. Like the Silvertone above, it features 3 single coil pickups, two tone knobs, a tremolo bridge system, and a full-scale neck complete with a 22nd fret. Also included in the package is a Pyle Pro gig bag, a small 10-watt amp with cable, 3 guitar picks, a strap, and extra strings.

Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back
Unless it's broken and will need to be replaced, start with obtaining a new nut that is anything to your liking, preferably a blank nut rather than a pre-cut to avoid improper string height. If cutting a blank try copying your old nut and make adjustments if needed using the neck as a guide after cutting out the nut. To do this take a sharp blade that is easy to work with such as an X-acto and cut the finish that holds the sides of the nut. Make sure to cut all of the finish as it will break apart when you take out the nut.
I am sorry to hear this, Andrew. Rear shifted bracing should help protect against the kind of top bulges normally seen behind the bridge. Unfortunately, when it comes to guitars made by hand out of organic materials like thin, solid wood, some pieces of wood will misbehave. The old saying is a guitar takes about two years before the wood stops trying to turn back into a tree.

Whether you are a guitarist looking for new tones, or a sound designer looking for new ways to mangle your audio, virtual guitar amps and effects are a great way to achieve new sounds and enhance your productions. There are many great guitar amp and pedal effects plug-ins available on the market today to purchase, but there are also numerous effects that are available for free. In this article I'll offer up some professional guitar effect plug-ins from around the internet that you can use on your next project, completely for free.

Guitar straps may be small, but they play a big role in your performance and comfort level during gigs or practice sessions. A top quality strap keeps your axe securely in place while you're shredding on stage, and reduces stress on the arm and shoulder. More than simply functional, guitar straps add a decorative look to your stage presence to complement your own personal vibe. To that end, El Dorado offers a variety of stylish, durable guitar straps to add to your accessory collection, allowing you to spend less time wrangling straps and more time focusing on the more important task of making awesome music.


Other unique features of this wonderful guitar are the 70’s styled headstock logo which effectively rounds out the look of this American instrument very nicely. Weighing just 7.2 pounds, the guitar is of pure single coil bliss! It sounds great as all Teles do and it plays like a dream. For every guitar lover, this is a true workhorse instrument to get.
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Lyle guitars were some of the best COPY CAT guitars made during the LAWSUIT years - years where Lyle (made in Japan) attempted to COPY higher end American made Gibson and Fender guitars - hence 'lawsuit' guitars. There are some other companies that attempted to 'copy' American instruments but many of those were made in Korea or other countries and were not of the quality that the Japanese 'Lyle' copies of American instruments. They would have done well to make their own branded guitars - they're very well made. Another 'copy' company from that era is Ibanez - they made excellent instruments, too, and they paid quality guitarists to help them market their marque - George Benson, for example. Enjoy your guitar.
Color styles – Is this important to you? We know it is for us to an extent, especially if you’ll be performing live regardless of venue size. Even if you’re going to your band-mates place to rehearse, the look of our guitar represents us and our own style. Luckily many of these have awesome options when it comes to makes, colors and designs. Although it wouldn’t necessarily steer us completely in a particular electric guitars direction since sound and feel are still most important.
The golden question is: What is the difference between acoustic and electric guitars. The primary difference between the two types of guitars is that acoustic guitars produces sound entirely through vibration. Its sound is emitted through the vibration of the string when it’s plucked back and forth. Electric guitars, on the other hand, are powered through electricity and electromagnetism generated through its components are what drives the sounds that come out of it.
Another example is Ovation, the company that almost single-handedly created the acoustic/electric category and radically altered views about how acoustic guitars should be constructed. No matter how hard they tried, Ovation’s repeated attempts to enter the solidbody electric area have failed. Instead, Ovation finally purchased Hamer. However, Ovation’s marketing failures do not mean it hasn’t made some pretty interesting – even innovative – electric guitars over the years, and these represent one of few areas in guitar collecting where you can find excellent, historically significant instruments, often at remarkably reasonable prices. Here’s the scoop on Ovation electrics (touching only briefly on acoustic/electrics).
Now, let’s get to the amplifier. If you’re a traditionalist, this means you aren’t using some kind of high fidelity audio reproduction system to expose that weak signal for the anemic, naked thing that your tone really is at this point. You’re like the rest of us, depending on that signal working with a classic tube guitar amp to shape your sound and help you get awesome and loud. Well, that amp has got a host of things going on. The signal hits the high-impedance input and visits the preamplifier. See, the “natural” sound coming straight from our guitars, as big and tough and old school special as we might think think it is, really isn’t strong enough to directly power the power amplifier. It’s depending on a series of fairly intricate pre-amplifer gain stages to give the Popeye signal the spinach it needs before any filtering or equalization (oh, they don’t use them? Really? What do those knobs marked ‘bass’ and ‘treble’ say? Just because someone leaves them at “5” doesn’t mean they aren’t in use). It then may visit a phase inverter before hitting the tube power amp section, which finally gives you the high current signal to cause those speakers to go back and forth.
A DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) on/on switch has two channels (poles), each having three lugs. This is like having two SPDT switches in one. It’s the standard configuration for most push/ pull or push/push pots, and you can use it for almost all mods, including the seven-sound mod (if you leave one pole unconnected), coil-splitting a humbucker, out-of-phase mods (by adding some jumper wires from pole 1 to pole 2), a direct-through mod, and countless others. Let’s see what’s going on here.
Ibanez Artcore AF75 Electric Guitar Another hollow body guitar to whet your appetite! The Ibanez Artcore AF75 isn’t as “old” as the other models here but it has earned a huge following because of its affordability, quality workmanship and versatile sound. Suitable for a variety of music styles, the Ibanez AF75 Artcore is also perfect for beginners eager to get started on a moderate budget.
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The Teisco J-1 was a natural maple-topped guitar with a single pickup near the adjustable wooden bridge, a large affair with a metal cover with six slots parallel to the strings and two round bulbs on either side, very space-age! The stop tail was probably rounded, allowing strings to pass through the body, and was covered with a square metal plate. A small pickguard sat between the pickup and the neck. A volume and tone control sat on another little piece of plastic down on the lower treble bout. Knobs were white plastic knurled with a silver ring around the top.
Pre-delay on the reverb can help separate it out from the source sound. If your reverb has no controls for pre-delay, you can simulate this using a simple delay on an aux track before the reverb. Decay Settings: Choosing the most appropriate reverb treatment for a song can be surprisingly difficult, especially if you have hundreds of presets to choose from. So, instead of regarding reverb like the glue that holds the mix together, try adjusting its parameters (and in particular the decay time) while listening to the reverb return by itself. If the decay time is too long you'll hear a continuous mush of sound; if it's too short you'll scarcely hear it unless its level is turned right up. Somewhere in the middle you should find a setting that adds rhythmic interest to your song, without overpowering it, making the reverb work for its keep. This is also a useful technique when using several reverbs in a song, to make sure they complement each other. Martin Walker
This is another 6 stringed electric guitar form the Givson brand. It is a right handed model and is wooden in color. It has a solid body of basswood and kneck of rosewood. It is provided with high quality cover and the best part is that the guitar is budget friendly. Prices range from around INR 7,100 depending on the prevalent market factors such as whether there are offers or discounts available. You can find more details regarding this model by clicking on the link below:
David Gilmour: Two models of Gilmour’s famous “The Black Strat” are available from the Fender Custom Shop: One is an American ’69 Strat body with an ’83 remake C-shaped ’57 RI maple neck (labeled as New old stock) with electronic and cosmetic modifications. The other is a”relic” style guitar that replicates the “The Black Strat” down to every scratch and dent. The relic version has two completely different coats of paint, just like the original.[16]
Lists like these come down to personal taste, but since you like Ryan Adams you should give Uncle Tupelo’s album March 16–20, 1992 a listen. After Uncle Tupelo pretty much defined the modern alt-country genre with the electric guitar driven albums “No Depression” and “Still Feel Gone” they released one of the best acoustic albums you will ever hear.

The process of building our kit guitars and basses is straight forward and requires little experience in woodworking or in instrument building. The entire instrument can be assembled with a few simple tools. Setting the instrument up for your playing style is also straightforward. We will guide you though the basic process in our instruction manual. For more complex or particular setup requirements, we suggest that you work with a professional for setup - just as you would with any instrument that you purchase.
On paper it looks fantastic for the money, but having Google'd it I found some people were less than happy with the fit & finish. But I value the opinions of my fellow MLP'ers a bit more than those found on some other forums so I'd like to hear what you all think. Aside from the electronics, which I'd replace, how is the quality of this instrument? Is it as good as the singlecut models?
Here we have a well aged Vintage Washburn D12/br from 1989 its a D-18 type with a cedar top and man does this cedar top sound great…it was surprisingly sound and deep for a late 80s it has a mature balanced tone…I like it with its pretty good bass response and all. Its structurally great no cracks and no playability issues what so ever its neck and alignment integrity is also excellent as the action is good and the guitar is as a result easy to play. Cosmetically this guitar has been around the block its no sissy its stood the test of time and its previous owner and still all in all with all its obvious nicks and scratches and various doinks man it looks pretty darn vintage COOL and I loved it I thought you might like it too just take a good look for yourself if your the type that likes a well warn in vintage guitar and you don't really mind that it has some extra character and soul this just may be a guitar you might appreciate….. its own beauty from life playing and enjoying the music experience this guitar has been well loved and played yet it is no where near warn out it has years of life left in her she just wants to really sing for someone and in my assessment she’s ready to be enjoyed for another 30 years or more! Very cool vintage Washburn Dreadnought guitar. Its neck is straight and has the proper relief its Tuners are real good sealed gears and doing an excellent job to this day, This one has the medium slim taper neck with the Diamond volute like the old Martin style…nice touch Washburn. Mahogany Back and sides and neck with rosewood fingerboard its neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut. This a a well built good player folks if you don’t mind it not being exactly mint cosmetically its actually beautiful in its own vintage appeal. Any questions or to make the purchase you can contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
There’s 12 footswitches for you to control all your sounds and effects as well as a smooth expression pedal that can control swells, wah and even make parameter changes. A looper with 20 mins of record time is ideal for songwriters, buskers and those who need to be able to write music anywhere. It especially shines when coupled with the HeadRush FRFR-112 2000 Watt Powered Speaker.
PLOTTING OUT THE PEICES Once you have drawn out the shape of the body you can then locate and draw the cavaties that the pickups and electronics will go and set you bridge placement. It is good to know wher the center of the guitars boy is so you can make sure that the pickups and bridge are in good alignment with the neck pocket. I like to take a piece of poster board and trace the fretboard of the neck on it and cut it out, that way I can properly place my bridge according to my scale length. 

Great pedal! It is small, but is very sturdy and the design looks great. Each effect sounds great and the controls are easy to use. I would put each effect in this pedal up against any single effects pedal that I currently have and this multi-effect was cheaper than all of those. I play a lot of genres from country, classic rock, and metal and these effects can get you the tones you need for each! I am thoroughly impressed.
Takamine has been known for their high quality and highly affordable guitars for years. Their GD51CE comes in just under $500, and is a cutaway dreadnought. It is my top pick if you are looking for the best cutaway acoustic guitar under $500. It has a slim neck for great playability, something that beginners and experts both love. It has a spruce top with rosewood back and sides. You will also be able to amplify this guitar, as it is an acoustic electric. It comes in natural or sunburst finishes. Owners describe it’s sound as loud and balanced, which is expected of a dreadnought cutaway. You can’t go wrong either, as it has an onboard tuner. See more pictures and reviews of the guitar here.

But narrower frets were also used on Gibson Les Pauls prior to 1959, so their characteristics apply to these guitars as well. Does a ’57 goldtop with PAFs sound thin or whimpy thanks to its narrow fret wire? Not likely, largely because so many other factors also affect its tone—body woods, set-neck construction, scale length, pickups— and the impact of narrow-gauge frets doesn’t outweigh any of them. It does, however, influence the overall sonic stew of guitars of that era, which is always the product of many different ingredients.
Wes Borland (b. 1975) guitarist for Limp Bizkit has owned many Ibanez guitars, including a custom 4-string baritone guitar, although he no longer endorses them. He was mainly noted for playing an Ibanez RG7 CST which had selectable piezo and magnetic pickups, only 18 of these were made in 1999. Borland has a signature Yamaha guitar, but has been seen playing a Jackson with the reformed Limp Bizkit.

• Brute force game : Offers the same realistic engine that can be found in STRUMMED ACOUSTIC 1 and 2 – ideal for chord accompaniment. It also contains riffs and a new game mode by picking Picking: just play a chord for creating very convincing arpeggio patterns. Reproduction of these new types of patterns should be completely familiar to users of STRUMMED ACOUSTIC.
Guitar chords songs refers to songs that sound great when played using nothing but chords, whether on acoustic guitar, electric guitar, or both. These songs range from simple arrangements of rock, pop, and country favorites to more songs using more complex guitar chords. The arrangements you decide to play will probably be determined by how advanced your knowledge of chords is.
Why We Liked It - Given the price, the hardware, and the attention to detail, this would undoubtedly be a contender for one of the best all-round choices on our list. There aren’t many other options that come from a premium manufacturer and give you all this for such a good price. The looks however will divide opinion. This is a must consider if they’re to your tastes however.
Since there are 2 coils, you can have up to 4 wires with which to work, providing you with a great many tone options. Almost all independent pickup companies manufacture humbuckers with 4 conductor cable. Stock guitar humbuckers rarely have 4 wires coming out of them but sometimes it is possible to convert 2 wire humbuckers to 4 wire types. This is an exacting procedure with little room for error but the tone rewards can be well worth the effort. If you really want to give this a try, then click here.
Barely used in my home, NUX Cerberus multi pedal. Not a modeler, it has true bypass distortion, overdrive, modulations(chorus,flange, phase, univibe and trem) as well as delay and reverb- all completely programmable and can be used as a pedal board or as presets. Built in tuner and cab simulator- great multi pedal can be used as a fly rig or in front of an amp- Comes in the original packaging with power supply. US buyers ONLY- I will not ship internationally- No returns accepted
Up for sale, a 1961 Fender Super in excellent condition and in perfect working order. And of course this is the most compact Brownface-era amp to feature the "Harmonic Vibrato" circuit. The circuit has just been thoroughly tested by our techs here at Mike & Mike's Guitar Bar and almost all of the original blue Ajax capacitors in the preamp are intact.
Her dad was Broadway star John Raitt, but Bonnie's artistic parents were blues giants like Howlin' Wolf and Mississippi Fred McDowell, whom she met and performed with early in her career. She learned fast: Starting with her acoustic slide workout on 1971's "Walking Blues," Raitt rolled out a fearsome repertoire of blues licks, fingerpicking with the best and wielding a slide like an old master. Most of all, she set a crucial precedent: When guitar was still considered a man's game by many, Raitt busted down that barrier through sheer verve and skill.
This guitar has a maple neck which is coated with a thin satin finish and has a C-design which is easy for beginners to handle. It features an alder solid body. The vibrato design is enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding firmness to the tone. They also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Speaking of pickups, the PAC 112v is equipped with a 5-way blade pickup selector. There are master tone and volume controls for the neatest output. This guitar is available in seven finishes, natural satin, old violin sunburst, raspberry red, sonic blue, black, and silver metal.
Wengrow said that Gibson got outmaneuvered by its competitors. “In the 1950s and 60s, it was really just Fender and Gibson as the two main guitar makers and they became the standard bearers. But other guitar makers such as Ibanez, Jackson, Yamaha and Paul Reed Smith, came to existence and copied their standards but continually updated many features and customizations that better reflected the idiosyncrasies of the times, often for cheaper prices.”
In more recent years, a diverse cross-section of artists have started to favour Rickenbacker guitars. In 1979, Tom Petty and Mike Campbell of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers would adopt the Rickenbacker 12-string “toaster” jangle into their records and still use the vintage 1960s models. The post-1960s “Hi-gain” pickup-equipped guitars are associated with The Jam and REM. The “Hi-gain” pickups are well suited to harder spiky pop/rock sounds as well as the classic clean chime.

However, unlike a boost pedal, the overdrive effect is not dependent on the amplifier to have a distorted sound. The overdrive pedal will internally boost the input signal so much that the top of the signal wave will be forced to naturally shrink itself. This is called soft clipping and it simulates amplifier like clipping as though an amplifier was being overly driven, hence the name overdrive. The distortion pedal will also boost the input signal but will then add resistors within the circuitry to not just shrink or soft clip the wave form but completely flatten the wave peaks. This is called hard clipping. For more understanding on the differences between soft clipping and hard clipping see the illustration below.
But where do you start? What do all these different pedals do? In this guide we will give you a brief overview of what each different type of effect does so you can make sure you are looking for the right gear. If you're new to the pedal world, you might wanna check out our selection of best guitar pedals for beginners while you're here. And if you already have some pedals but want advice on which pedalboard to get, click here!
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That's a bit if an exaggeration but you're allowed. I would venture to claim that the snobs are those who proselytize Fender and Gibson as being the best (especially Gibson). It's been demonstrated a million times over that they are not. Which does not mean they don't make guitars many people want and like. Especially Fender (I have a GREAT Highway One Strat) who have managed to reach a wider audience with the pricing structure of the Fender brand than Gibson has with the Gibson name. The reason we see so many of them in the hands of pros (and their sheepish followers) is that these companies can afford to buy "stage presence". I would put PRS in that group too; however PRS makes better production guitars than both the above. And I'm not being a snob since I can't afford a PRS.

Legend has it that funkadelic's "Maggot Brain," the 10-minute solo that turned the late Eddie Hazel into an instant guitar icon, was born when George Clinton told him to imagine hearing his mother just died – and then learning that she was, in fact, alive. Hazel, who died of liver failure in 1992 at age 42, brought a thrilling mix of lysergic vision and groove power to all of his work, inspiring followers like J Mascis, Mike McCready and Lenny Kravitz. "That solo – Lord have mercy!" says Kravitz of "Maggot Brain." "He was absolutely stunning."

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