So, here's the story I heard from the guys in this shop, one of whom claims to have met Trev at NAMM. He said Fender (and maybe Gibson?) owe him a bunch of money for custom parts and design fees and whatnot, so he started the Vintage line as a sort of f*** you to them. Don't know if it's true but they're so much like a real tele I could see him getting sued, assuming they're not afraid of him countersuing for unpaid invoices. Who knows, maybe it was all a sales ploy. In any case all the sales pitch I needed was playing one. Plays as nice as my MIM Deluxe for half the price.
If you're in need of some assistance, you've come to the right place. At BestReviews, our goal is to help you find the perfect products to fit your individual requirements. We test items in our labs, gather feedback from existing customers, and consult experts. The result? Fair and thorough reviews that help you cut through the jargon. Read on for our full guide to electric guitars to learn all you need to know to pick the right one for your next jam session.
Don't forget that you can use MIDI velocity and other controller data to create quite complex effects — and this approach can take up much less computing power than using audio effects. Don't forget that you can create audio-style effects purely through MIDI. For example, using a grid-style sequencer, it's very easy to program in echo and delay effects, just by drawing in the repeated notes and then putting a velocity curve over the top to simulate the echoes fading away. By combining this with automated MIDI control of other parameters — reverb send, filter cutoff and resonance, for example — you can alter the timbre of the repeated note and create dubby-sounding, feedback-style delays. Stephen Bennett

For notation and composition work, some of the common choices are Avid Sibelius 7, Makemusic Finale and PG Music Band-in-a-Box. Or, for DJ-ing and remixing, check out the Native Instruments Traktor series, Avid Torq or the software packages from Venue Magic. There truly are dozens of options available for you to take advantage of the benefits digital editing has to offer. Whether you're an independent artist mixing tracks on your own laptop or a professional sound editor working on a major TV series or indie film, the right music software is here to handle your needs.
“Volume pedals work well just before any delay or echo effects, as you can fade in and out of delays smoothly. A volume pedal at the very end of the chain just before the amp input will control master volume, and can also be used as a mute. Reducing the signal at this point will also reduce any noise. I put clean boosts right at the end—also just before the amp input—to ensure that any effects earlier in the chain would not be overloaded.”

So I was all, "oh no...I want this one." So I did leave with it, and without even asking they sold it to me at less than the price on the thing because it was the demo and had a tiny belt buckle type scuff or two on the back. I think I actually wound up saving a few hundred dollars. I don't know if they figured a percentage of the total should be knocked off, or what.


You may also be looking to get into individual guitar effects pedals right away, and maybe you’re wondering what are some of the popular overdrive, dynamic, or modulation pedals. If that’s the case, please stay tuned for our upcoming series of articles where we explore individual categories of pedals. In those articles, we will discuss price ranges, popular pedals, and the pedals that your favorite artists use.

A six-string guitar has five musical-intervals between its consecutive strings. In standard tuning, the intervals are four perfect-fourths and one major-third, the comparatively irregular interval for the (G,B) pair. Consequently, standard tuning requires four chord-shapes for the major chords. There are separate chord-forms for chords having their root note on the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth strings.[41] Of course, a beginner learns guitar by learning notes and chords,[42] and irregularities make learning the guitar difficult[43]—even more difficult than learning the formation of plural nouns in German, according to Gary Marcus.[44] Nonetheless, most beginners use standard tuning.[45]


The product also has an original feature, called ISF, advertised to “give you infinite sound possibilities, from the USA to the UK” by using pre-set bass, mid, and treble setting that the user can select between. Some customers remarked that the feature doesn’t seem to make much of a difference, but praise the tone quality and good functionality of the product nevertheless.  

If you’re making the crossover from electric to acoustic, then Takamine won’t be a particularly well known brand to you, but rest assured that they’re a top make when it comes to acoustics, and of course electric acoustics. The GN93CE-NAT is a mid-range electric acoustic that features some really nice touches, such as the rosewood fretboard, and is an interesting choice.
The company was founded in 1931 as the Ro-Pat-In Corporation (ElectRo-Patent-Instruments) by Adolph Rickenbacher and George Beauchamp in order to sell electric Hawaiian guitars. These instruments had been designed by Beauchamp, assisted at the National String Instruments Corporation by Paul Barth and Harry Watson.[1] They chose the brand name Rickenbacher (later changed to Rickenbacker), though early examples bear the brand nameElectro.[2]
R.E.M.'s guitarist was a less-is-more master who never needed much more than swarming melodies and spangled riffs. From the laser-guided arpeggios on "Radio Free Europe" to the supersize power chords of "The One I Love," his sound was both gorgeous and matter-of-factly aggressive – a DIY style that helped Eighties underground rockers push beyond punk rock. "They created 50,000 guitar bands after them," noted Billy Corgan, "America was inundated with jangly R.E.M. type bands."
As we’ve shown here, a lot of relatively small—and inexpensive (many are practically free)—tweaks can hot-rod your tone and maneuver it to an array of differing ports of call. In some ways, it’s like tossing a handful of dice instead of just two—because the way small tweaks interact can lead to exponential changes in sound. For that reason, my advice is to take it slow and only make a single change at a time to understand what it delivers. Besides, it’s more fun (and less stressful) that way, anyway!

A noise gate allows a signal to pass through only when the signal's intensity is above a set threshold, which opens the gate. If the signal falls below the threshold, the gate closes, and no signal is allowed to pass. A noise gate can be used to control noise. When the level of the 'signal' is above the level of the 'noise', the threshold is set above the level of the 'noise' so that the gate is closed when there is no 'signal'. A noise gate does not remove noise from the signal: when the gate is open, both the signal and the noise will pass through.
The strings on your electric guitar have a major impact on its sound and playability. If you’ve taken a look at the huge Musician’s Friend guitar string assortment, you’ve likely realized that there’s a lot to consider in figuring out which strings are right for you and your instrument. Keep reading to find the strings that best match your electric guitar, music, and playing style.
And it's not just about looking different because it does follow conventional acoustic guitar builds with its solid spruce top, scalloped X-bracing and laminated mahogany back and sides. For plugging in, it comes with the Fishman Sonicore under-saddle pickup and Isys+ preamp system, which comes standard with many acoustic-electric guitars in the market.

Some studios are too small for regular amp miking, and even if they're not there are sometimes occasions on which you need better separation from the other instruments playing at the same time. A neat way around this is to use a soundproof box containing a guitar speaker and a microphone. Various commercial models are available where your guitar amp output feeds the speaker inside the box and the microphone feed comes out to the mixer in the normal way. The designer's challenge is to make this work without the resulting cabinet being too large or too boxy sounding. The DIY alternative to this is to place the combo or speaker cabinet in an adjoining room, or maybe even a cupboard or wardrobe (along with the mic, of course!).
Gibson and Fender have been ripping the public off for years, they're not even close to being worth what they charge especially Fender with such a mass produced bolt on neck and lame finishes design. Carvin is a superior guitar in every way and what people fail to mention is that you can choose what wood and finish you would like as well as bolt on neck, set neck or neck through designs and their pick up's are impeccable. A truly great guitar co. With excellent customer relations and real musicians will all show respect for Carvin when mentioned if not already owning one.
For players that want to start off purely in the world of metal playing, this Schecter bundle should be right up their alley. The guitar itself has a lovely midnight satin black finish, with ready access to its 24 frets thanks to a generous cutaway. The dual humbucker pickups will put out plenty of power as well, allowing for more extreme styles of music to be played with ease. This particular set skips the accessories in favor of a mere amp, gig bag, and instrument cable, but the quality of the main instrument makes up for the omission of picks and the like.

In 1942, Valco unveiled a new Hawaiian lap steel, the Irene, which was offered as a Silvertone in the ’42 Sears catalog. Clearly inspired by the Supro’s first wood-bodied Hawaiian with the pear-shaped body from ’36-37, the Irene had a slightly narrower body and more squared-off corners, and was covered in white pearloid. It also featured a light-colored, painted-on pickguard with dark position markers. Basically, this had the same pickup and control plate as featured on the Clipper.


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What I am saying that we should look at the first three or four on each persons list and discard the rest. Then we’ll have a better estimate. Of course we always forget some fabulous guitarists and often some that deserve number two even number one on the list. Thats what statistics is good for. HOwever that said statistics is often a pillow for people. Faith and loyalty to true values is what brings success and fucks statistics. THings untoched statistics works but its the respect of god that changes things.
Fawned over by hard rock-loving guitarists the world over, Marshall is one of the few amplification brands that really needs no introduction. And if you’re looking for aggressive, overdriven rock – this amp is one of the best beginner’s options. What makes this one really special, however, is the sheer number of sound-shaping options it gives you – thanks to its ability to model a whopping 14 MST preamps, 4 MST power amps, and 8 MST speaker cabinets. That’s 448 possible combinations, if you’re keeping score. You can even connect it to your computer via USB or use it as a Bluetooth speaker. If versatility is your top concern (it probably should be), look no further.
Lastly, if you fancy yourself the next Slash, Jimmy Page, or Pete Townshend… you’ll want to pick up a Les Paul style guitar. It’ll get you that classic rock sound that you’re looking for. Les Pauls are equipped with “humbuckers” which produce a fat, meaty sound that’s rounder and less sharp than the single-coil pickups of a strat. The signal is also stronger so you’ll get more sustain.
Now, if you're just getting started and breaking strings every time you try to tune up because you hit the wrong octave, then start out with the cheapest strings.  Once you can reliably tune and play without destroying them, you can work you way up.  Once you have the hand coordination, your learning will be accelerated too.  The right tool for the right job, as Old Grandpappy always used to say.  The best electric guitar available will be garbage with the worst strings on the market.  Choose wisely!
Adding effects at the mixing stage gives the engineer greater creative flexibility, but if the guitarist needs to hear the effects to play, then you may get a better artistic performance by recording them with the take. All I'd say on this point is that editing is much more difficult if the sound is recorded with delay or reverb, so an alternative is not to record these effects initially, but still add them to the monitor mix for the player's benefit during performance. Effects like chorus and wah-wah can be recorded straight off, if required, as they don't affect the ease with which a part can be edited. Ultimately, the performance is what really counts, so compromise in favour of the player's artistic needs rather than your technical needs where a choice has to be made.
i like ‘The Final Word’ statement, my first recording use Yamaha Shen-Shen FG-50 guitar (i don’t know that original production of Yamaha affiliate or not, but i feel the fingerboard bigger than standart), with electric guitar strings (9|42), etc, getting the course prior to learn more chord but jamming in the gig give more experiences….apologies me if there wrong word, best wishes
The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.
Okay first of all yes, John Mayer deserves to be on this list. I would've probably put him even higher. I understand if you don't agree but go listen to his Where The Light is album and get back to me on that. I think Eric Clapton should've made the list though. And, although I'm not a big fan of metal I can say as a guitarist anybody can go up and down scales and embelish notes and sound like a metal genius. The artists above put real soul into their music. I think you have an amazing list though. Many people probably would've have thought of some of the people on here… but what about Derek Trucks?
With the Orange Terror series, you can have premium high-gain tube tone without having to lug around heavy equipment. The Orange Micro is among the smallest in the Terror series of amps, following the same streamlined design of its siblings, but with a different "dark" tonality. This lunchbox amp combines a 12AX7 preamp tube with a solid-state power amp, all packed in a compact and lightweight profile.

Tom Petty's lead guitarist for more than 40 years, Mike Campbell never clutters up a song with notes when two or three bull's-eyes will suffice. "It's a challenge to make your statement in a short amount of time," he has said, "but I prefer that challenge as opposed to just stretching out." Listen to the skeletal hook that holds "Breakdown" together or the laconic, tone-bending solo in "You Got Lucky" to hear Campbell's ingenious use of negative space. "Michael is not one to show off," Petty once said. "What he says is essential."
I wish I knew what goes on in there. I'm told it is a simple cut of the laminated neck and then the tone block is glued to the back. I hope it is that simple as I am about to perform some major surgery on my 9 ply neck to acomidate this construction technique . If any body out there can lend some advise on this , please do so I don't turn my bass into a clock!
By the 1950's, brands like Gibson and Fender were gaining notoriety thanks to the popularity of rock 'n' roll and its stars weilding electric guitars. Guitarists like Dick Dale, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry and Chet Atkins could all be found carving their own places in music history with the electric guitar, and by the early 60's the instrument saw an extraordinary upsurge in popularity. Today, there are an endless amount of rock sub-genres, making no shortage of superbly crafted electric guitars from the world biggest brands, including Ibanez, Epiphone, and Danelectro, as well as Godin, Gretsch, Peavey and more. Whether you're into black metal or folk rock, you can be sure that there's an electric guitar that perfectly matches your own style and tastes, and it can easily be found right here, regardless of your skill level or budget.
In terms of the Teisco brand, the moving force was Jack Westheimer and his W.M.I. company in Chicago. According to published accounts, Westheimer began importing Teisco-made Kingstons in around 1961, although these were not promoted in the trade press until the beginning of ’64. It was this connection that would make Teisco the dominant powerhouse it was to become.
Also, if your slide playing includes any fretting at all, FORGET IT. While it certainly raises them well away from the neck, the strings are lifted to a height that makes trying to fret them pull them off pitch well before you reach the fret... and there is NO adjusting it. I used one on a wide neck 12 string strung for six. A neck designed for the tension of 12 strings easily takes the tension of a heavy gauge set in a raised open tuning. The "Slide Guitar Extension Nut" is ideal for such an application (if you don't want to even try any fretting) but I doubt Stewey Mac's sells very many of them.

Not sure I would recommend this for someone over 11 or 12 who is genuinely serious about learning, I probably would have skipped ahead to something larger. But if you are looking for a "toy" that really could inspire a child to develop a talent, this guitar is an ideal choice. One word of caution... the amp/guitar connectors are standard size so there is nothing stopping one from connecting it straight to a much more robust megawatt amp! For the price, five stars easy.
Rhythmically I can make Shreddage II sound as authentic as a mock up can get for that instrument (which means, mostly authentic)...through conscientious (more like anal-retentive) programming and manual round robins. But of course it's always a much better idea in this case to just do the mock up and eventually get an actual guitar player yourself to record. It's extremely hard to get that edgy lead thing going, bent up and held vibrato notes.

When it comes to multi-effects pedals, the Zoom G3X delivers big-time. Voted the top multi-effect pedal in our research by a large margin, the G3X hits high marks for quality, value for the money, portability, and most of all ease of use. Aside from giving you a multitude of effects, this unit is also an amplifier simulator, tuner, fully functional looper, doubles as a USB audio interface, and has a built-in expression pedal. Zoom has stiff competition in the multi-fx “battle of the brands,” and we were surprised to see their G3X come out on top against solid offerings from Boss, Digitech, Line 6, TC Electronic, and more. When you watch some videos or demo this unit yourself, it’s hard to not get excited about it.
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if you wish to use your computer as an "effects pedal", I recommend IK Multimedia's Amplitube 3 - it has an extensive array of effects and amplifiers with all kinds of crazy and fun tones to mess around with. Theres a ton of effects, so I recommend you check it out. It is a bit pricey though ($199 for the standard edition). If I were you, I would download the Amplitube CustomShop, which is basically a free demo version of the full software.
Learning guitar chords is often one of the first things beginner guitarists do. You only need to know a few popular chords in order to be able to play a huge amount of songs. This beginner’s guitar chords article will provide you with the necessary chords you’ll want to learn for both beginner and intermediate players. Before jumping into learning the chords provided in the guitar chords chart below, I wanted to first explain what a guitar chord actually is. What Is a Guitar Chord? As wikipedia defines it, “a guitar chord is a set of notes played on a guitar”. Although a
Delay/echo: Delay/echo units produce an echo effect by adding a duplicate instrument-to-amplifier electrical signal to the original signal at a slight time-delay. The effect can either be a single echo called a "slap" or "slapback," or multiple echos. A well-known use of delay is the lead guitar in the U2 song "Where the Streets Have No Name", and also the opening riff of "Welcome To The Jungle" by Guns N'Roses.[86]
A closer look at a 1981 Gibson Victory MV-II electric guitar. The Gibson Victory MV, or 'Multi-Voice' guitars had very wide tonal palettes; with coil-tapped humbuckers they could produce typical Gibson tones, but were also designed to 'out-Fender' Fender. Two models were launched in the summer of 1981. Whilst the MVX, was designed to do everything a Stratocaster could do, the MVII was 'primarily for the discerning country player' - placing it squarely against the Telecaster.

I recently purchased this guitar,and was wondering if you had any insight of it? i.e.-the pick up selector switch has a reverse,mono,& off setting.Question is:I would like to know if their are certain settings that only work,because I'm just not hearing that much of a difference in sound with this thing? I am running through two amps with the "VOX" original stereo chord,it has 12 volume & 12 tone knobs.


Have a Columbus series 3 superstrat. Jackson/charvel knockoff. It plays ok with a dimarrzio bucker and 2 single coils od unknown origin. It original had a locking trem which could only dive and I replaced with a FR that can only do same because I wouldn't risk routing the ply body. Anyway the interesting point (and I'd love to find out) is that under the "Columbus series 3" badge can clearly be see the faint etching of another badge in gothic script "Winchester". Any thoughts?

THIS IS THE ONLY WIRING GUIDE YOU WILL EVER NEED TO BUY. Learn step by step how to completely wire Telecaster, Stratocaster, Esquire, and Les Paul guitars and all of the potentiometers, capacitors, switches, ground wires, hot wires, pickups, output jack, and bridge ground. Even if you dont have a Fender or Gibson, this guide will teach you how to wire a guitar with 1, 2, or 3 pickups. Also learn where you can get the complete wiring kits for dirt cheap, and learn essential soldering tips. Why not learn how to change your pickups, tone or volume controls, switches, and capacitors yourself? There are a ton of modifications you can do to your guitar for dirt cheap. This book will also show you some secret "hot rod" techniques that the pros use. This book will teach you how to do coil tapping, coil cutting, phase switching, series wiring, parallel wiring, bridge-on switching, mini toggle switching, varitone switching, mega switching, yamaha switching, blend pots, and much more !!!
A while back I bought a GuitarPort, a product from Line6 that was one of the earliest guitar-to-PC interfaces. It cost me $99. It connects through USB and I could plug the guitar into it. I could play amp models and effects through my PC and the sound would come out of the computer speakers. (Headphones are of course an option through the PC speakers)
At least five sunburst hollowbodies were offered in ’61, the PE-7, PE-8, PE-13, PE-14 and PE-51. These appear to have glued-in necks, by the way, with the open-book head, circular sticker logo and rectangular metal-covered pickups. The PE-7 was a non-cutaway thinline with dots, a single neck pickup, elevated pickguard, a fancy lyre trapeze tailpiece and volume and tone controls mounted on the lower bout. ’60s Bizarre Guitars shows a ca. ’61 PE-8 with a single black-plastic-covered pickup with Teisco printed on the top, small strip inlays, wooden pickguard, a fancy harp tailpiece and volume and tone mounted on the lower bout. The following year this model would have two pickups, so whether this is typical or not is unknown. The PE-13 and PE-14 were single-rounded-cutaway archtops, the difference being in finish, the former being blonde and the latter sunburst. Both these were full-bodied jazz guitars, with the small block inlays, twin pickups, chicken beak selectors, elevated ‘guards and two volumes and two tones mounted on the lower bout. Some of these carried fancy Gibson Johnny Smith trapeze tails. The PE-51 was a twin pickup, single-rounded-cutaway thinline archtop, with a chicken beak selector, ordinary trapeze tail and one volume and tone on the lower bout.
Developed by Martin in 1916, the dreadnought shape changed the landscape of acoustic guitars. Thanks to its punchy sound, loud volume and improved bottom end, dreadnoughts quickly rose to popularity and has since been copied by virtually every acoustic guitar manufacturer. Today, if you're thinking acoustic guitar, the most probable image in your mind would be of a Martin Dreadnought or one of its many clones.
Just SOLD #2 another fine example of the vintage 1960s era J200 copy by the great luthiers at Alvarez in the mid 1970s - the 80's WoW very well done impressive... Alvarez from over 40 years ago. This example is JVG rated at very good + 8.6/10 vintage condition with beautiful patina and character mojo as well so cool Gotta love this Beauty! This instrument has received our JVGuitars "set up" and several upgrades as well we have installed a new set of Martin 80/20 bronze Marquis strings for a crisp tone with great bass and volume as well as a Martin solid natural bone nut & a compensated saddle set custom fit into its original fully functional adjustable bridge with plenty of room for up or down adjustments to your personal taste further upgrades do include throwing out the old plastic tone robbing bridge pins for the superior resonation of solid ebony wood with brass ring and beautiful abalone inlay bridge pins and this was for tonal reasons and it looks much more high end as well, then we removed the old economy tuners of the era ( a weak point ) and installed a set of Grover tuners old holes were touched up in the process looks good and works excellent now to keep this guitar in tune and as a side benefit the added girth at headstock increases sustain as well. The medium slim profile C shaped neck is 1-11/16ths at the nut and also is pretty much the same as the 60's Gibby profile the frets are the originals as well and still playing well without buzz as per JVG set up. Truss rod is working fine and the headstock is looking cool with its Old School script Alvarez mother of pearl logo and crown design with its patina and cool old Alvarez Truss rod cove this guitar is striking as well. Great sounding like a Piano wow and she's playing with ease with excellent string action now. She retains her excellent vintage Sunburst and finish still shines nicely of course she is not new or mint it has some natural finish checking several that only adds to its Mojo along with several doinks here and there on the body and top a few that caught edge near binding on front and back not so big rather small and small paint had chipped off and so I addressed them with a fine tip matching color lacquer tip pen to touch up and to help preserve original finish integrity and looks much better as well. We also installed a replacement pickguard and it fits perfectly and looks great too. The 1960's VIBE and this instruments playability makes this an excellent choice for that SWEET Jumbo tone well crafted over 40 years ago Vintage Script Logo on headstock inlayed in mother of pearl on correct law suit era open book Gibby style headstock. Made in Japan well taken care of all these years and ready for you to enjoy another 40. Overall she is SWEET! Contact Joe to buy: jvguitars@gmail.com.
The transformer matches the impedance of the driver amplifer to the reverb driver coil and allows a dual phase driving signal to power a reverb coil with one grounded side. The transformer is a standard "70 volt" audio line transformer that is often found on PA systems. One reader reported having good results using a Mouser 42TU013 (1K to 8 ohm) transformer. If you can find a reverb tank with a high impedance driver coil, the transformer may be eliminated, the driver coil will require isolation from ground.
Tonewood (basswood, mahogany, alder...) doesn't matter in an electric guitar unless you're getting ancient pickups for it. Older pickups used to act more like microphones and picked up sound resonating from the guitar body as well as from the strings. Modern technology has fixed that so the sound comes purely from the strings. Most guitar companies that market their guitars for tonewood are guitar brands that have been around since the times of these ancient pickups and based their marketing off of it. Most of them still haven't changed it. I recently read a scientific breakdown (experiment, analysis and all) that thoroughly proved the tonewood debate pointless once and for all. Every variable was accounted for-only tonewood was changed. So, don't worry about the basswood; it could be made from the least acoustic material on earth, and the pickups would give you the same sound as they would have on a different guitar material. I've spent months researching this in depth. (I play, too.)

The Truetone Rock Star has a classic 1960s Fender Jaguar - inspired body with a cherry & black sunburst finish and swank natural wood grain finish neck. The headstock has an odd, but killer-looking shape, an elaborately cut pick guard and what might be the world's coolest pickup; a chrome-cased body with a shimmery red marblized pickup cover. The guitar is 100% original with no replacement parts. We  rescued this one a while back and it was rusty and did not work when first tested. We meticulously detailed and cleaned it and removed the rust. We also re-soldered a few wires inside, and this fab Japanese guitar was ready to rock again. It sold and was shipped France, and the Rock Star is pretty rare, but there are lots of cool retro Truetone / Silvertone Japanese Guitars for sale below! Scroll Down for more from our collection!
Martin factory action was traditionally higher than that used by makers like Taylor. Bob Taylor made his bones by offering acoustic guitars that felt and played like electric guitars. Martins had thicker necks, and higher action often called “Bluegrass action.” If you pick very hard, or do a lot of heavy hammer ons, lower action can be more of a problem if you want clean or pure notes.

The tone knob is similar. Like the volume knob, the more you turn down the knob, the more of the sound you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier. But there is an additional trick involved. See, the current generated from each string is quite complex, like the sound characteristics it produces. Think of it like a continuum. On one end, the current is turned into low frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'warm') and on the other end of the continuum, the current generates high frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'bright').
In 1962 or 63 (possibly as early as 1959) Guyatone guitars began arriving in the U.S.. If you look around the internet you will see that they could be found under a variety of brand names and were sold in drug stores, department stores, even auto parts stores, as well as music stores. There were two lines of Kent guitars: a Standard series and a “Pro-series”. They were made by Teisco and Guyatone. I haven't been able to get my hands on any of these early solidbodies so I don't know if "the Professional Group" guitars are actually worthy of the "professional" designation and slightly higher pricetag or if it was all about marketing.
Technically, distortion is defined as being any change to the original signal other than in level. However, we tend not to think of processes such as EQ and compression as distortion, and the term is more commonly used to describe processes that change the waveform in some radical and often level-dependent way. These include guitar overdrive, fuzz, and simply overdriving analogue circuitry or tape to achieve 'warmth'. In the analogue domain, heavy overdrive distortion is usually created by adding a lot of gain to the signal to provoke deliberate overloading in a specific part of the circuit. Such high levels of gain invariably bring up the level of hum and background noise, so it may be helpful to gate the source. Though overdriving analogue circuitry is the traditional way of creating intentional distortion, we now have many digital simulations, as well as some new and entirely digital sound-mangling algorithms.
Unfortunately, National’s line of instruments was not well diversified and, as demand for the expensive and hard-to-manufacture tri-cone guitars began to slip, the company realized that it would need to produce instruments with a lower production cost if it was going to succeed against rival manufacturers. Dissatisfaction with what John Dopyera felt was mismanagement led him to resign from National in January 1929, and he subsequently formed the Dobro Manufacturing Corporation, later called Dobro Corporation, Ltd, and began to manufacture his own line of resonator-equipped instruments (dobros). Patent infringement disagreements between National and Dobro led to a lawsuit in 1929 with Dobro suing National for $2,000,000 in damages. Problems within National’s management as well as pressure from the deepening Great Depression led to a production slowdown at National, and this ultimately resulted in part of the company’s fractured management structure organizing support for George Beauchamp’s newest project: the development of a fully electric guitar.[5]

THIS IS THE ONLY WIRING GUIDE YOU WILL EVER NEED TO BUY. Learn step by step how to completely wire Telecaster, Stratocaster, Esquire, and Les Paul guitars and all of the potentiometers, capacitors, switches, ground wires, hot wires, pickups, output jack, and bridge ground. Even if you dont have a Fender or Gibson, this guide will teach you how to wire a guitar with 1, 2, or 3 pickups. Also learn where you can get the complete wiring kits for dirt cheap, and learn essential soldering tips. Why not learn how to change your pickups, tone or volume controls, switches, and capacitors yourself? There are a ton of modifications you can do to your guitar for dirt cheap. This book will also show you some secret "hot rod" techniques that the pros use. This book will teach you how to do coil tapping, coil cutting, phase switching, series wiring, parallel wiring, bridge-on switching, mini toggle switching, varitone switching, mega switching, yamaha switching, blend pots, and much more !!!


Semi-hollow guitars are guitars which have an exposed opening, generally in the form of two f-holes on the top of the guitar’s body. The inner chamber of the guitar is then divided into two by a block of wood which runs through the body. A perfect representation of this type of guitar is the Gibson ES-335, which has been used at some point or another by musicians such as: Eric Clapton, Otis Rush, Warren Haynes, Dave Grohl, and B.B. King.
If we've learned anything from this experience, it's that Rocksmith 2014 will do everything it can to try and teach you how to play the guitar, and it's got an amazing array of tools and lessons to do just that. But just like taking lessons from an actual instructor, you have to be willing to put in the time and practice, Practice, PRACTICE, even if it's boring—there are no shortcuts to properly learning your craft. And no matter how many zombies I kill in Rocksmith 2014's Return to Castle Chordead, I'm not really learning chords; instead, I've just learned how to play a video game with a real guitar as the controller.
In August ’68, Ovation added three more models – the Hurricane 12-string and the Typhoon I and II basses, all with chrome hardware. The K-1120 Hurricane was a Tornado with the extra strings, advertised as offering a “harpsichordian” effect. This lasted only a year and was gone by ’69. The initial Typhoon basses had slightly smaller bodies than the guitars, with stubbier, more flared horns. These lasted only a year until ’69, when the body styling changed to that of the Gibson-style guitars. The K-1140 Typhoon I bass had one Schaller pickup and a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The K-1240 Typhoon II was a two-pickup model with a three-way select. This was also called the Williwaw (“mountain wind”) in some Ovation literature, but it was never really called that. The Typhoon I was only available in the stubby body and was discontinued in ’69. The Typhoon II changed model number in March ’70, becoming the K-1222. This model made it until June ’72.

#5? Are you joking? I have a PR-200 that I've owned for 15 years. I hate it. The action is ridiculous unless your fingertips are made out of adamantium or whatever the heck Wolverine is made from. The sound is muddled and a clash of midrange. Sustain is nonexistent. The frets have flattened on the high strings. News flash- I'm not spending $350 to re-fret a $279 guitar. Epiphone may make some good high end guitars but I don't trust them. If you make crappy low end guitars why should I trust your brand? You were supposed to get me to fall in love with the brand but you've made me hate it. My next guitar will be a Yamaha, Martin or Taylor.
The lowest note on the double bass or four-stringed electric bass is E1, two octaves below middle C (approximately 41 Hz), and on a five-string it is B0 (approximately 31 Hz).[22] The requirement to reproduce low frequencies at high sound pressure levels means that most loudspeakers used for bass guitar amplification are designed around large diameter, heavy-duty drivers, with 10", 12" and 15" being most common. Less commonly, larger speakers (e.g., 18") or smaller speakers (e.g., the 8x8" cabinet, which contains eight 8" speakers) may be used. As a general rule, when smaller speakers are used, two or more of them are installed in a cabinet (e.g., 2x10", 4x10" and 8x8"). For 12" speakers, combo amps and cabinets are available with 1x12" and 2x12"; less commonly, 4x12" cabinets are seen. For 15" speakers, combo amps and cabinets usually have 1x15", although 2x15" and even 4x15" cabinets exist (Lemmy Kilmeister of Motorhead used 4x15" cabinets). A small number of 1x18" bass cabinets are sold (e.g., Trace Elliot).
The written history of the classical guitar can be traced back to the early 16th century with the development of the vihuela in Spain. While the lute was then becoming popular in other parts of Europe, the Spaniards did not take to it well because of its association with the Moors.[citation needed] Instead, the lute-like vihuela appeared with two more strings that gave it more range and complexity. In its most developed form, the vihuela was a guitar-like instrument with six double strings made of gut, tuned like a modern classical guitar with the exception of the third string, which was tuned half a step lower. It has a high sound and is rather large to hold. Few have survived and most of what is known today comes from diagrams and paintings.
Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet An empty sheet of chords templates to print out and use. Basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A Free lesson on the basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A. The following chords are 7 of the most basic open position chords. An open position chord is one that contains at least o
You may not have considered Orange Amplifiers before, but they’re a company with a history that dates back to the early days of hard rock. If you watch footage of rock bands from the 1960s you’ll see Orange amplifiers onstage almost as much as Marshalls. The British amp builder has had its ups and downs since those glory days, but today Orange is as strong as ever.
Like his conversational singing, Willie Nelson's guitar playing is deceptively laidback, playfully offbeat and instantly recognizable. Amazingly, Nelson has been playing the same Martin M-20 classical guitar, nicknamed Trigger, since 1969; it has defined his sound, a nylon-stabbing mix of country, blues and Django Reinhardt's gypsy jazz. Though the guitar now has a large gaping hole, Nelson still plays it nightly. "I have come to believe we were fated for each other," he said. "The two of us even look alike. We are both pretty battered and bruised."
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Steve is the best! He does great work and loves talking about all kinds of guitars. I brought my Squier Affinity Stratocaster to him for a setup and a pickup replacement job, and I learned more about Stratocasters from him than I ever would have expected. I will definitely be a repeat customer! From what I've seen, he treats all of his customers' guitars, from my Squier to an Eric Clapton signature Strat, with the same level of respect and quality of work.
It's pretty common that your fingers hurting at first. We all went through it. It does not matter what kind of strings you use. You will pay the price…. Think of it as a Right-Of Passage, or an initiation of sorts. If you think about it, everything in life that is pleasurable comes with a certain amount of pain that must be endured, whether it is financial, such as buying something you really want, emotional, as in love, or physical, such as building your muscles and playing sports.
I bought my amp at my local music store. When I walked in, I told the sales person that I got my El Dorado and I wanted to buy an amp. I asked him if he would mind playing my guitar through the amps in my price range. He readily agreed because he is the person who found Big Lou Guitars on the internet after I tried every brand of electric guitar in the store and believed I needed a big nut guitar because my hands needed an action with more space between the frets and strings. He told me to bring it in when I got it because he wanted to try it. He plugged it in and went up, down, and across the fretboard playing riffs and chords. When he finished, he said “great action, I’m surprised – and the price!”
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A variation of the wah pedal is the auto wah. Not to be confused with a city in Canada, auto-wah effects do the same things a wah does, but without the foot treadle. Usually, you can adjust the attack time (how fast the tone shifts toward the treble) and the depth of the cycle. Some auto-wahs also let you set a constant up and down motion that's not triggered by the note. You’ll find auto-wahs included in many multi-effects processors. One of the newer developments in this area is the Talking Pedal from Electro-Harmonix. While eliminating the moving parts of traditional wahs, it produces amazing male-vocal and vowel-sound effects that harmonize with your guitar’s notes. A fuzz circuit lets you dial in more growl and grit.
Gibson’s electric guitars generally sport humbucker pickups, known for their thicker, rounder tone. You also get less feedback, which limits the types of delay and overdrive tones you can experiment with, but ensures a cleaner and more consistent sound. Gibson mainly uses mahogany for their guitar bodies, which is what gives it that slightly darker sound.
The playing of conventional chords is simplified by open tunings, which are especially popular in folk, blues guitar and non-Spanish classical guitar (such as English and Russian guitar). For example, the typical twelve-bar blues uses only three chords, each of which can be played (in every open tuning) by fretting six-strings with one finger. Open tunings are used especially for steel guitar and slide guitar. Open tunings allow one-finger chords to be played with greater consonance than do other tunings, which use equal temperament, at the cost of increasing the dissonance in other chords.
• I like to insert a compressor after this, to add some sustain and even out the guitar's dynamics, for a more consistent distortion sound. So for the second insert slot, choose Dynamics/Vintage Compressor, then click on the insert's Edit button to see the compressor's interface, and set up the parameter values as desired. A good starting point would be Input at 17 and Attack at 8.9, with Punch and Auto set to On. You'll probably need to adjust the Input (effectively the Threshold in this case) according to the level of signal coming into the plug‑in. Set the Output to a level that's as high as possible, but doesn't approach clipping.
The best choice for ambient miking is most likely to be a good condenser – probably a large-diaphragm type, though a small-diaphragm type will work. Plenty of ribbon mics give good service as ambient mics also, if you have a clean, high-gain mic pre-amp to track them through. And where do you put it? Well, three or four feet back from the speaker will start to get a significant amount of room sound into the mic, but for more-ambient placements, try six feet or more, and experiment with different heights from the floor, far corners, and so on. One nifty way to find a cool ambient placement is to use your own ear like a mic, and stick the mic at the position in the room where the guitar tone sounds the best to you. This is ideally done with another person playing the guitar; cover one ear and walk around the room listening to the sound in different positions. When you hear a sound that really nails what you’re trying to capture, set up the mic right there. Done.
The pre-amplifier section of a guitar amplifier serves to amplify a weak instrument signal to a level that can drive the power amplifier. It often also contains circuitry to shape the tone of the instrument, including equalization and gain controls. Often multiple cascading gain/clipping stages are employed to generate distortion. Because the first component in a valve amplifier is a valve gain stage, the output level of the preceding elements of the signal chain has a strong influence on the distortion created by that stage. The output level of the guitar's pickups, the setting of the guitar's volume knob, how hard the strings are plucked, and the use of volume-boosting effects pedals can drive this stage harder and create more distortion.
In January 1986, Gibson changed ownership and began manufacturing a range of varied Les Paul models to suit different user needs. The 1980s also saw the end to several design characteristics that were classic to the Les Paul, including the volute and maple neck. However, due to consumer demand, the Gibson Les Paul guitar is available today in an array of choices, ranging from guitars equipped with modern digital electronics to classic re-issue models built to match the look and specifications of the guitar’s earliest production runs from 1952 to 1960.
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-

Just in...We are proud to offer this fine rare example of a Washburn vintage instrument .... This is super guitar! .. Wow talk about some beautiful exotic woods have a look at the Koa sides & back ,its a Solid Sitka Spruce top, Super high AAA grade 3 piece flamed Ribbon Mahogany & walnut neck with the Martin style Diamond Volute on back.... bone nut & saddle this is first class sound & playability & craftsmanship for a song.... Just look at that workmanship.... Great Tone woods with some ager to her now she a real Singer all right... rare to see one of these with such exotic woods makes it specially beautiful. I would compare the feel & tone and volume to that of the Old FG180 Yamaha's very similar ...Just in and its SUPER CLEAN collectors example so get her before she is gone... any questions .... ask please Thanks for your interest and looking....
If you mean the Guitar Hero III guitar then there are two switches on the back. The one just below the neck of the guitar (It looks like a quarter of a circle.) detaches the neck so you can store the guitar AND the neck in a smaller space, and the switch towards the side of the guitar detaches the faceplate so you can put a different faceplate on, or play without a faceplate.

As their categorical name suggests, extended chords indeed extend seventh chords by stacking one or more additional third-intervals, successively constructing ninth, eleventh, and finally thirteenth chords; thirteenth chords contain all seven notes of the diatonic scale. In closed position, extended chords contain dissonant intervals or may sound supersaturated, particularly thirteenth chords with their seven notes. Consequently, extended chords are often played with the omission of one or more tones, especially the fifth and often the third,[92][93] as already noted for seventh chords; similarly, eleventh chords often omit the ninth, and thirteenth chords the ninth or eleventh. Often, the third is raised an octave, mimicking its position in the root's sequence of harmonics.[92]
Semi-hollow designs are similar to hollow-body guitars, but typically feature a thinner body with a central wooden block inside. This helps to control feedback while giving the instrument some of the same tonal characteristics as a hollow-body. This type of guitar has been used successfully in just about every genre of music, with the exception of extreme metal.
Before you start thinking your pickups can kill you, bear in mind this is a very small signal (2 volts) that requires amplification (this is where your aptly named guitar ‘amplifier’ comes into play). To put things in perspective, the little rectangle shaped batteries (D) found in distortion pedals are 9 volts…as mentioned it’s a very small signal.

Given the small amplifier that comes with the Rise by Sawtooth, one would have thought it wouldn’t offer much, but it turns out to be just everything you ever wanted in a beginner or intermediate electric guitar, even as it is capable of giving that adequate sound and melody when connected to the guitar using the connecting cable that comes with it.
So when you plugged your guitar in and tried to play it electrified, you couldn't get any bass tone out of the guitar-the bass strings didn't go over the polepieces of the pickups! When you tried to fret notes along the low E string, your fingers would fall off of the fretboard. That one error turned an otherwise beautiful, comfortable and very functional instrument into something that played and sounded like crap.
More theory: tone knobs are basically adjustable resistors with certain values. The higher the value of your potentionmeter (hence “pots”), the more treble you allow to pass. This is why Fender guitars with their bright single coil pickups have 250K pots, while Gibsons with humbuckers have 300K to 500K pots. Some guitarists emply 1000K pots for maximum treble, and some make pots that when maxed out, make it seem to the circuit that it is not present, allowing all frequencies to pass through.

For the uninitiated, effect pedals usually take the form of small-ish metal boxes which sit on the floor in front of you. These can be switched on and off using your feet. Hence, pedals. The technology contained within these pedals is designed to alter your tone in any number of ways. For example, cleaning it up and making it louder through to adding layers of shimmer, fuzz, whammy or ‘verb. Don’t worry, we’ll refer back to these terms later because they are genuine terms in the wacky world of pedals.


Here you will find a list of beginner guitar chords. These chords are very commonly used through many popular songs and so learning them is a great foundation for your guitar future. With the chords below you will be able to play thousands of songs, including most of your favourites. And once you have learnt these chords and the changes between them you will find it very easy to learn new chords and add them to your repertoire.
In addition to choosing between laminate and solid wood, you also have to consider the type of the tonewood. Of particular importance is the choice of top wood, because it greatly affects the resulting sound. Spruce is popularly used for the tops of acoustics because of its punchy and bright tone. Mahogany tops on the other hand is preferred for its warm tone, with more emphasis on the lower mid frequencies. There are other types of wood that fall between the two, each one bringing a subtly different flavor to the resulting sound.
Coming in as the fourth-most recommended multi-effects unit is the Boss ME-80, which is the upgrade to the older Boss ME-70. This is probably most comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X in terms of having an all-in-one, full-featured multi-effects and amp-modeling unit. But the great thing about the Boss ME-80 is that it costs nearly half what the Line 6 does! Furthermore, the Boss is a very different animal in how you interact with it, which you can pretty much tell just by looking at the two pedals side by side.

Whether your style is searing rock or acoustic folk, the right guitar will help you sound and feel like a superstar. From acoustic guitars to electric hybrids to bass guitars, there’s a guitar designed exactly for the way you play. You’ll be rocking out in no time when you choose a guitar from Best Buy’s selection of top brands like Fender, Yamaha, Squier, Schecter, Mahalo, Dean Guitars and more.
These guys are the best in town! I had my Gretsch 6120 Upgraded with a new Pickup. They were quick and at a reasonable price. They do amazing work. They also have a great selection of guitars and Amps for sale. I highly recommend stopping by. If your looking for a new guitar for yourself or your kids they will help you find the perfect guitar for your price range. I highly recommend stopping by. They also do amp repair! Stop by and see for yourself.

Just in early Red Lable Nippon Gakki FG150 in excellent Vintage Condition CLEAN!.............. rare to find one pretty, then to be straight, then sound deep and loud like this one sounds but to have great action too its intonation is dead on upgraded nut & saddle & strings to Martin Marquis 80/20 - 12s This is a pleasure to play with wonderful tone its like 45 years old and the tone woods always sounded great but even better now its the one!!!... serious collectors guitar and is Recording worthy... shes somthing special. to buy it contact Joe: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
As I tried to point out, what is high action is based on personal taste for the most part. Also, Martins traditionally have higher action than many other manufacturers. But unless it is a true defect in the particular guitar, from wood swelling or shrinking, etc. action is easily adjustable, but it is recommended that you have a certified Martin warranty repair person do that, unless you are comfortable with such adjustments.
Previously, Epiphone guitars were considered to be the biggest competitor of Gibson. However, they were later acquired by Gibson who has retained the name of this brand to distinguish them from their pricey brothers. You can certainly consider it a budget-friendly production from the high-end guitar makers. Epiphone, just like the Gibson’s Les Paul, shares the same design but is available at a much lesser price. When it comes to craftsmanship, then we must say that Gibson is much better than this one. Unfortunately, Epiphone utilizes low-quality products such as mahogany and other electronic components.
There are tons of new tidbits of FU-Tone.com news! First off we would like to welcome Stephen “Stef” Carpenter of DEFTONES to the FU family! Recently I started working closely with Rem Massingill (Stef’s Tech) on this monster project. It started as most of these projects do – with lots of conversations and planning before turning the first screw. I work with dozens of techs in this business and I can tell you that Rem is “one of those guys”. He really knows his stuff, is a stickler for details and most importantly he knows TONE! Little did I know what I was getting into and the first two guitars on the slab were ESP 8 String models! This was out of the normal scope of my 6 and 7 string clients… I consider the guitar and guitar tone a never-ending learning process. I am constantly looking to learn from anyone that I can on my journey. Anyone who presents themselves as a know-it-all is full of shit or trying to sell you something (usually both!). After lots of twisting, tweaking and testing we got this off the ground and I am here to tell you that the tone was massive and bone crushing all while having an insane amount of note separation and clarity! Not to mention sustain for days that would make Nigel Tufnell jealous… As I stood on stage with Stef and Rem at sound check in New York while he put the 8 String ESP through its paces, I was pleasantly surprised to hear how brutal the tone was. All of the power and growl of a monster truck with the precision and control of a Ferrari. The smile on Stef’s and Rem’s faces said it all! This was just the first hoop that we jumped through together with a bunch of stuff in the hopper for these guys. If you have not been to a Deftones show on this tour, I highly suggest going out to catch them!
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The first step in deciphering the serial number is determining the country or facility in which the guitar was produced. In most cases the country of origin is provided in the same location as the serial number. In cases where you have a serial numbe r but not a country of origin, the origin can sometimes be deduced from the serial number, although in this case it's very helpful if you have at least a rough idea of the date of manufacture.
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The so-called modeling amps can be said to differ from both tubes and solid state ones as they employ modern processing technology to apply preloaded characteristics to the sound. This can alter the output in a variety of ways, from imitating certain classic styles to rendering something entirely new. Needless to say, they are favored by cover bands and electronic music fans, but many guitarists don’t appreciate their “artificial” sound, although they can serve as good practice amps.   
It has a sensitivity of 96 dB, just two units short of the M50x’s 98, but the maximum input power is less than half of that model’s, at 700 mW. The impedance is somewhat higher at 47 W vs. the M50’s 38 W. Besides the price, another identifiable upside would be the lower weight, of 6.7 oz, a feature that won’t be easy to discard after spending the whole day with the headphones on.
This Japanese company produces a wide range of musical instruments, but the real draw for guitarists will be with beginners and intermediate players. Yamaha offers a solid selection of products at a price that is more budget friendly than some of the other entries on this guide, making it a good place to start for players getting their first guitar.
It was founded by Orville Gibson in 1902 as “The Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co., Ltd.” in Kalamazoo, Michigan.    Gibson is known for its innovation and supreme quality. Gibson’s Les Paul is very famous Guitar which creates the wildfire in the hearts of million fans. Gibson is always committed to provide the best quality with minimum disorder in all over the world. To enrich your experience the can prefer this wonderful Guitar.
Let’s not beat around the bush. The accessories that come with this package (tuner, amp) aren’t the greatest. But they make do. The REAL strength of this package lies solely with the guitar. The guitar is fantastic. Super easy to play (and thus play fast), and to learn on. I’ll explain why that’s important later on. But bottom line, this is a great choice if you want a quick all-in-one package that includes a great guitar.
1939: The #1 brace inside near the neck block changes from 5/16" wide to 1/2" wide, making it roughly twice as wide. This happened at the same time as the popscicle brace addition. The neck block thickness was also reduced by 1/4". About the same time neck width reduced from 1 3/4" to 1 11/16" at the nut, and the bridge spacing reduced from 2 5/16" to 2 1/8".
accessories aeolian mode analog basic chords basic guitar chords beginner best guitar brands cheap guitars chord diagrams digital dorian mode easy guitar songs effects guitar guitar amp photos guitar buying guitar effects guitar equipment guitar kits introduction ionian mode lessons locrian mode lydian mode major key major scale mixolydian mode music studio natural minor scale noise control pedalboard pentatonic major pentatonic minor phrygian mode pickups practice room recording scale diagrams soundproofing theory used guitars

A lot of people will tell you that Jackson is not what they used to be. I’m not really going to try to refute or prove this claim, but their guitars are holding up pretty well at this moment. It’s still a brand you can trust to build you a solid guitar. Case in point that JS32 Dinky. It’s my favorite Jackson even though there are much better models in their current lineup.


Most newbie guitarists want a small amp that sounds good but doesn’t cost too much. The amps listed above are that and more. However, there are some guitar players who mean business from the beginning, and won’t want to waste time on small beginner amps when they have the resources and ambition to grab an intermediate or pro-level amp. If you know you are going to stick with playing guitar, and if you can justify it in your budget, that’s not a bad idea.
Sure, Marshall and Vox contributed to the sound of British rock in the Sixties and Seventies—but let us not forget the mighty Hiwatt DR103. Although it's often associated with the Who's Pete Townshend (who would test their durability night after night), it was a favorite of Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, not to mention the Moody Blues, the Stones and beyond. Although the DR103 looks a bit like a Marshall, it certainly doesn't sound like one. This was the result of a vastly different design.
Another thing that endears them to many guitarists is that they source 100% of their woods from sustainable sources and they use hydro-electric power. When it comes to the environmental footprint of a guitar, this is an area where Seagull are out in front and the big name brands, who while working hard to improve their own environmental impacts, are still playing some degree of catch-up.
My first guitar, bought out of an advert in Kerrang over 20 years ago. I think it was branded "Axe" and it had absolutely nothing good about it. Some sort of MDF body, horribly bowed neck (couldn't be adjusted as the truss rod was broken), high frets everywhere (you could pull them out with your fingernails, fortunately), slipping tuners, hopeless bridge, hopeless nut, everything. Nearly put me off playing before I'd got started.
Gibson guitars have a shorter 24.75-inch scale length, giving them a looser feel and a somewhat warmer tone. They feature resonant tonewoods, typically mahogany for the body and neck. The neck is set in place and glued instead of bolted. Les Paul-style instruments have carved tops made from another tonewood such as maple, but other instruments such as the SG have flat tops like the Strat. If something goes wrong with this kind of guitar you may be able to repair it yourself, but issues like broken necks and headstocks require work done by a professional luthier.
A low latency audio card will allow to run your guitar signal (via an adapter cable or a mixer) into the PC and through the Amp Sims, (the M-Audio 2469 is a good card for this and reasonably priced), this will allow you to drive/crank the simulators as loud as you'd like to get the tone you want; and control the overall volume with your PC, good speakers/monitors are a must for this.
But Zoom also served as the perfect foil for X’s principal songwriters, singer Exene Cervenka and bassist John Doe, who were arty, bohemian denizens of hip L.A. environs like Silverlake and Venice. Zoom was a politically conservative Christian greaser from the notoriously uncool southern L.A. suburbs of Orange County. In the now-classic L.A. punk documentary The Decline of Western Civilization, he is famously shown refusing to get a tattoo.
Cool guitar! You really don’t see many of these anymore. You are correct that it’s similar to the Washburn Wing series, specifically the Washburn Eagle from the late ’70s and early ’80s. In fact, aside from different fretboard inlays and brand names on the headstocks, when you compare the two they’re nearly identical. If this connection seems odd, the occurrence of very similar guitars with different brand names is more common that many of us would think.

Octave ('Other' category): This effect really surprised me because it tracks well, but inserting the compressor before the Octave plug-in improves the tracking even further. Distorting the post‑octave sound with the AmpSimulator gives a big distortion sound, even with only the Octave 1 level turned up. If you want more of a brontosaurus guitar, turn up Octave 2 as well. In general, I like to leave a fair amount of direct sound in the output mix. You can just as easily go in a cleaner direction by using only the Octave 1 output, and bypassing the AmpSimulator. Select the neck pickup on your guitar, pull back a bit on the tone, and you'll hear a sound that recalls jazz great Wes Montgomery.
Stay tuned for the second part of our series/parallel discussion next month. We’ll pick up the soldering iron and explore some sweet parallel/ series switching options for our Strats. This will also close out our run of Stratocaster mod columns. When we finish the series/parallel discussion, we’ll switch over to Telecaster and Esquire mods. Until next time, keep on modding!
There were few things more powerful than Stevie Ray Vaughan with a guitar in his hands. Though he was deeply entrenched in the blues idiom, he took it to an entirely new and original level. Heavily influenced by Jimi Hendrix, his triple string bends and lightning fast double stops were things of absolute beauty. While every one of his songs is an electric blues guitar masterclass, perhaps his most impressive performance is in the song “Texas Flood.”
A towering figure in the Japanese underground beginning in the early ’70s, Keiji Haino plays guitar — often distorted to the point of pure sound — with such a wild diversity that it’s misleading to call him merely a “noise guitarist.” But he is very, very, very noisy. With personas that include blues-sludge hero, noise-blast deployer, and big-eared post-psychedelic improviser, Haino’s renown (and collaborations) spread far beyond Japan, most notably with albums recorded by Fushitusha, his all-improv/nominally rock outfit.
The phrase “guitar amplifier” in itself is almost a bit misleading. Sure, it “amplifies” your guitar — but guitar amps really do so much more. Arguably, even as much as your choice of guitar, your amplifier will have an immeasurable influence on your sound. Beyond the basics of volume, bass, midrange and treble, your amp can provide warmth or bite to your sound, or anything from a sparkling clean tone to a blazing distortion. Amplifiers are constructed utilizing different size (or even multiple) speakers and can derive their tone from tubes, transistors, or even digital modeling. They can be very basic with just one volume knob; or they can offer a variety of gain and EQ options along with built-in effects.
Compared to building something from scratch, the kits listed here are relatively easy to work with. Still, there are some that require more patience and experience, like those with set-necks and hollow bodies. On the flipside, there are kits that make life easier for you with their no-soldering required electronics and bolt-on necks. It is recommended that beginners go for easier builds, but with so much information available in the internet age, it should not hinder you from getting what you really want - just make sure to be patient and do your homework.
Comfort is at the top of the SUB Silo3’s priorities. Its curvy body has contours in all the right places, its asymmetrical neck profile—it’s slightly slimmer towards the treble strings—feels natural in your hand, and even the vintage-style tremolo bridge has a flat surface to rest your palm on. Add a light basswood body, and you’re ready to rock for hours on end.
In comparison with an electric guitar equalizer, a bass equalizer usually has a lower frequency range that goes down to 40 Hz, to accommodate the electric bass' lower range. Some bass equalizers designed for use with extended range basses go even lower, to 20 Hz. Equalizers can be used to change the tone and sound of the electric bass. If the instrument sounds too "boomy", the bassist can lower the frequency which is overly resonant, or if there is too much fingernail or pick noise, the higher frequencies can be reduced.
Of all the guitars in the world, this ends up as number 42!?! OK, amateurs, time to tell the truth, these guitars are the best, simply flawless and amazing. Don't talk about your Yamahas or your Ibanez or even Fender for that case! Those are just decent guitars. You will fall in love with the John Petrucci models; they have clobbered, I mean nearly humiliated Gibson. Try these, then think again.
Top 4 in my opinion. Countless guitarists have played them on some of the best albums ever written. I've owned numerous vintage guilds and still own a vintage f50 and d55. Recently Fender bought guild and I bought a new d55 which was a bit over rated and over priced in my opinion. But Fender has sold Guild and I sold my fender owned guild d55 only to buy a brand new by the new owners who moved Guild to a California facility and I must say it holds its own with the vintages I have. Guild is back! A great name in acoustic guitars. A great build (thank God once again), and the quality has always been with the best. Long live guild and it's a top 4 brand just behind Martin, Taylor and Gibson.

A more affordable but still high-quality pair from Audio-Technica would be the M20x, which still shares some features with the premium products offered by this manufacturer. The drivers — in this case at 40 mm in size — feature the same rare earth magnets, and the voice coils are made of copper clad aluminum wire to provide for the clearest possible tones.

The Boss Waza 212 Guitar Amplifier Cabinet has been specially designed as a partner to the awesome Waza Amp head. Packed with 2 custom made 12 inch speakers and ready to roar! You can even select whether you want the back to be open or closed, allowing you to make whatever sound you want! If you want extra speakers, there's also the Boss Waza 4x12 Guitar Amplifier Cabinet with 2 x 12" speakers to pump out your riffs with.


Justin actually has two YouTube channels, one for his guitar lessons and one for teaching particular songs. While his channels are excellent, you’re better off to access them from his website at www.justinguitar.com where you’ll find full, comprehensive menus and links to each video along with explanations of the content. You’ll have no problems of watching a full video, only to discover it doesn’t include what you wanted.

While SG Guitars kits are sold in a number of different timber varieties, if you are looking to match the original as closely as possible you will be best selecting a model constructed with a Mahogany body and Maple neck with Rosewood or Ebony fretboard. * Gibson has recently transitioned from Rosewood to Richlite due to New CITES Regulations For All Rosewood Species.


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The Jeff Beck Oxblood is available in limited numbers. The first 50 of these historic guitars were aged at Gibson Custom to look like Beck’s original, then signed, numbered and played by Beck himself. The next 100 guitars were prepared with Gibson Custom’s V.O.S. finish, bringing the total run to 150 instruments. Each one also comes with a standard Gibson Custom case.
The tone selector on an electric guitar controls the capacitor, which basically filters out high frequencies. The same way a high-cut filter (or low-pass-filter if you prefer) works on a standard equalizer. By dialing down the tone, you remove brightness and treble. The pickup selector does just what it's called.. Selecting which pickups being used to capture the vibration of the strings, and translates the energy into electric current, though the configuration and number of "presets" can vary from guitar to guitar, depending on how many pickups it has etc. If you're a handyman you can even configure this yourself.
Want to write blazing leads and screaming solos? Crank the pitch bend up, use one of four vibrato modes, and shred to your heart's content. Need some ultra-chunky rhythm chugs? S2 features both single-note and powerchord palm mutes with up to 5 layers and 8 variations each, offering superior realism and maximum options. While it excels at rock & metal playing (both lead and rhythm alike), it is also well-suited for many other genres thanks to its clean tone and huge range.

Frank Bowers Interestingly enough, they have completely different approaches to the job. Bo cranks his Gibson Firebird straight through a Peavey 6505 half stack with nothing in line but a tuner, while Frank rocks out on his Gibson Les Paul Customs through a Digitech GSP-2101 preamp, a Mesa/Boogie TriAxis preamp, a TC Electronics G-Major processor, a Mesa/Boogie 2:90 power amp, and a Marshall 4x12 cabinet. During their show, they each take jaw-dropping solos, and they share the spotlight on some of the best-executed twin leads since Thin Lizzy’s “The Boys Are Back in Town.”


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The top of the archtop line featured two very nifty new models called the Vegas 40 and Vegas 66. The Vegas 40 (Teisco Del Rey EP-11T) double-cutaway thinline was promoted both in Japan and the U.S. It was a full size ES-335-style with two pickups (the large rectangular type with chrome sides and black insert, square poles), bound f-holes, volume and tone controls on the lower bout (no plastic plate) and a fancy new angular archtop Bigsby and roller bridge. The pickup selector was a rotary switch on the lower horn with a new round knob with a lever (versus the old chicken beak). The bolt-on neck had a new three-and-three head with a flared “check mark” indentation in the top, with wide wings on either side, a shape that would characterize a number of other models later in the decade. The fingerboard was bound, with dots. On the Japanese version, the headstock carried a zippy new typeface proclaiming “Vegas 40,” while the pickguard used a similar angular script for the Teisco logo. The Teisco Del Rey carried its regular sticker.

For those students who want a simple path to good sound and don’t want to confront a wide range of tone and effects options, we recommend the Orange Crush 12. It’s a fairly traditional amp with controls for Bass, Midrange, Treble, Volume, Gain, and Overdrive (distortion). There’s nothing on the Crush 12 that can’t be sorted out with a few twists of a knob and strums of the strings.
AMAZING. Awesome place. Will NEVER go anywhere else for guitar work again. I am sitting in the parking lot of this place writing this on my phone, THAT'S how good of an experience I had. I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL. What a wonderful person, awesome shop, honest, quality people. And for a steal. Cannot recommend enough!
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A while back I bought a GuitarPort, a product from Line6 that was one of the earliest guitar-to-PC interfaces. It cost me $99. It connects through USB and I could plug the guitar into it. I could play amp models and effects through my PC and the sound would come out of the computer speakers. (Headphones are of course an option through the PC speakers)
In a nutshell: Lowell Kiesel is the name of the guy who founded Carvin. He originally sold guitars under his own name, but later changed the company name to Carvin, a melding of the first names of his two sons. So, when Carvin changed the name on their guitars to Kiesel, they were actually reverting back to their roots. Kiesel is Carvin, and Carvin has always been Kiesel.
There are nine types of guitar here: four folk, two classical, one flamenco, one jumbo and one gypsy, as well as a choice of nylon or steel strings. It works like Kontakt in that you have MIDI keys for playing notes and then control keys for the playing articulations, such as legato, palm mute, harmonics, sustain or chord detection. There are different chord types and a strumming engine to recreate the action of playing.
Some of the first Kents to have been imported into the U.S. were made in Sweden by Hagstrom. (Some sources, or maybe just one source quoted all over the net, states that they may have actually been Czech-made and sold by Hagstrom.) The Hagstrom HI, HII, and HIII (those are the letter H with roman numerals representing the number of pickups the guitar had) were branded Kent for sale in the U.S. and as Futurama for the U.K. They had the Kent name on the headstock and sometimes the upper bout. They were similar to Fender Stratocasters. They also made some Strat-shaped basses. There are several photos on the net showing David Bowie in his Ziggy Stardust days playing a red Hagstrom with Kent branding on the headstock.
View a complete range of budget friendly electric guitars over at PMT Online today or call in to your local PMT store to see a full range. We have many electric guitars spanning all budgets, styles and genres including a complete range of guitar starter packs. Alternatively, call 0151 448 2089 to speak to one of our guitar experts to discuss your needs.
Echo is a naturally occurring effect. Since the first days of recording, men have attempted to create an artificial method of duplicating this effect. The first attempt were echo chambers (or rooms) that created a “natural” echo. These rooms still exist at some recording studios. Tape echo effects came next, offering portability and variable rates of echo. These units were often noisy, but are still favored for their warm echo tone. Analog delays solved the problems inherent with tape (bad tubes, noisy tape, and misaligned or worn out tape heads) but had limitations in the length of their delay. Finally, digital delays appeared in the 1980s and offered more delay time and added features, but also came with a more sterile sounding tone. Many digital delays now simulate tape, analog, and digital delays
Some bridges allow players to introduce vibrato into their performance by means of moving a vibrato arm (aka a whammy bar) that moves the bridge up or down. Bridges with this function are often called tremolos. (Note that this is musically incorrect since tremolo means a repeating variation in volume, not pitch, but has been used so long it is accepted terminology.) A tremolo system allows the player to rock the bridge back and forth to adjust the pitch of the notes being played. This is called a floating bridge, and is popular on many guitars. For beginners, it may be better to avoid a locking tuning system for their first guitar. They can be tricky to adjust properly, and can make even a simple string change frustrating for the inexperienced. However, if your budding Steve Vai has his heart set, don’t let that stand in the way.

From Clean to Modern, chose from 8 amp settings, four modulation effects and four delay/reverb effects, with tap tempo. Its Hi-Fi sound can be sculpted by a three-band EQ, giving it a lovely spacious sound distribution; and special off-stage circuit gives it excellent overdrive qualities even at low, discreet volumes. Finally, its sleek designer looks will fit into any living space, especially with its soft tube glow.


The descriptions that follow are very broad, but if you look around the guitar world you can usually pin any solid-body guitar down to one of these general categories. Of course you’ll see wild shapes like the Gibson Flying V, Ibanez Destroyer, Dean ML and Jackson Rhoads. They may look like they’re from another planet, but if you check their specs you’ll see they follow the same basic design principles as any other solid-body electric guitar.
Late 1938: Scalloped "X" bracing with "rear shifted bracing", where position of the "X" moved further than one inch from soundhole (exact measurement varies, for example: a 1941 D-18 has 1 7/8" distance). So the X-braces were moved about 7/8" further down. And the tone bars were angled more parallel with the length of the guitar and further apart. These late-1938 to late-1944 guitars had deeper scalloped braces than the 1938 and prior forward or advanced braced guitars. This gives the late 1938 to late 1944 Martin guitars improved bass response (don't let anyone tell you that war-time Martins are not as good as pre-1939 Martins!)
The Effect:To this day, there are 3 main delay pedal types coexist, Tape is usually the most expensive and sough-after (especially Vintage releases) type as they provide very natural sound reproduction. Analog were modernized in the 70’s and they worked on electronics, with a minor drawback according to some as they store up to 3 seconds of Delay time. Digital pedals is the type met with most frequency on today’s market, offering longer-than-usual Delay times and pristine sound reproduction, these are usually your best pick. A lot of players know that they want a delay effect but have no idea from where to start, if you are one of them, try the Boss DD-7 Digital Delay Pedal The most basic and often met controls on Delay pedals are Time, Level and Feedback, you’ll sometimes find them labeled differently but with the same function and purpose.

While guitar straps come in a variety of different materials, El Dorado only uses leather in theirs, so rest assured you're getting exceptional quality here. If you're going for a cool western persona, try starting your search with the top-rated Vintage Hand-Tooled Leather Guitar Strap, featuring classic basketweave embossing backed with genuine sheepskin shearling. This hand-engraved strap is finished with a solid nickel buckle and loops for a truly sophisticated look you'll be proud to showcase.


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