In 1931, Martin reintroduced the dreadnought with X-bracing and two years later gave it a modified body shape to accommodate a 14-fret neck, and it quickly became their best-selling guitar. The rest of the industry soon followed[citation needed], and today the “dreadnought” size and shape is considered one of the “standard” acoustic guitar shapes, iconic for its use in a wide variety of musical genres.

Tapping, in which both hands are applied to the fretboard. Tapping may be performed either one-handed or two-handed. It is an extended technique, executed by using one hand to tap the strings against the fingerboard, thus producing legato notes. Tapping usually incorporates pull-offs or hammer-ons as well, where the fingers of the left hand play a sequence of notes in synchronization with the tapping hand.
Their selection these days is insane, especially since they target a lot of awesome smaller brands that NOBODY else in the area carries. I'm pretty sure this is the only place in town you can go to play the Reverend line, not to mention damn near every PRS model currently in production. The locally-made boutique stuff they stock is awesome too, and I would have never even known about it had it not been for the shop.
Seagull Guitars is a sub-brand of Godin that utilizes their modern design and production capabilities in building classic looking instruments. The S6 Original exemplifies what the company can do, combining Godin's build quality and attention to details with old school aesthetics and playability, and it does all of this while retaining a very reasonable price tag.
Just like Fender, Epiphone – the Gibson subsidiary – know a thing or two about budget acoustics, and this DR-100 (reviewed in full here) more than proves that! With a range of finishes, the DR-100 features a classic dreadnought body shape, with back and sides made from laminated mahogany, with a select spruce top, and black pickguard sporting Epiphone’s iconic E logo.
If you want to take your tracks to the next level, a multi effects processor can do the trick. For a high-end example of what one of these units can do, check out the Eventide H8000FW 8-Channel Ultra-Harmonizer Effects Processor. It supports 24-bit audio and comes with an impressive 1,600 pre-set effects. Some are even pre-customized for 5.1 surround sound, so production for home theater playback is a cinch. Its smorgasbord of I/O options includes AES/EBU, ADAT, S/PDIF and FireWire with sampling up to 96kHz, so whatever you're looking to connect to the H8000FW, it's a safe bet that you can get the job done. Of course, not all of the processors here are quite as advanced. There are plenty of setups out there that just need a straightforward solution, and if that sounds like yours, don't worry: you'll find plenty of those here as well. Take the TC Electronic M350 Reverb and Effects Processor, for instance. This single-space rackmount is easy to fit into any budget, living up to TC's reputation of delivering amazing bang for your buck. It's loaded with 15 different effects plus 15 reverbs, and even includes control software for your AU/VST environment.
There is a beauty to the guitar-cable-amp approach. It doesn’t get any easier, unless you take up playing the flute. And the lack of toys to mess with will certainly make you focus on playing more. By changing your pick attack, vibrato, or the volume and tone controls on your guitar—you’ll rely on your hands instead of stepping on a box to change tones. I believe it’s beneficial for all of us to just plug straight in at least once in awhile and rock out with unadulterated tone. 

Recently Vox has emerged as a leader in the digital amp modelling market[citation needed] with the release of its Valvetronix line of digital amplifier modellers. Utilising Korg's REMS modelling software, the Valvetronix are driven via a low-power tube preamp stage and a solid state power amp. The latest line, the AD15VT / AD30VT / AD50VT / AD100VT, has received awards and praise[citation needed] for its recreation of eleven classic guitar amplifiers. The company did not reveal which non-Vox amplifiers were modelled in the product manual. The eleven amplifier types as named on the dial are:

Wes Borland (b. 1975) guitarist for Limp Bizkit has owned many Ibanez guitars, including a custom 4-string baritone guitar, although he no longer endorses them. He was mainly noted for playing an Ibanez RG7 CST which had selectable piezo and magnetic pickups, only 18 of these were made in 1999. Borland has a signature Yamaha guitar, but has been seen playing a Jackson with the reformed Limp Bizkit.
It should also be mentioned, that LX does not just stand for U.S. made. Originally LX was an indicator for an Ovation guitar that included several new features that were not available on previous guitar models. Back in 2007 Ovation explained on its website, that the new features included the new OP-Preamp, an advanced neck system (lightweight dual-action truss rod, carbon fibre stabilizers), a patented pick-up (made of 6 elements), inlaid epaulets, scalloped bracing as well as a new hard composite Lyrachord GS body.[25] Back then, no such thing as an AX model line existed (the first AX models appeared on the Ovation-website in 2010). Based on the website’s history the LX features must have been introduced in 2004.
 You will not grow here or learn anything that will be useful in any other company unless they employ 1950's management techniques. Maybe a screenwriter for "Madmen" would find some material here but as someone trying to grow their career you won't learn anything useful. The pay will be no better than your last job minus your previous bonus and 401k match which to my knowledge they do not contribute. So next question, your not making any more money and probably less, not learning anything useful and will need to explain why you left after 6 months, how are you going to position this to beat the competition going after your next job?
The honest truth lies with the listener’s ear and capability to identify a sound with an individual player.  B.B. King was known for his tone and only later revealed his secret mentioned above.  It wasn’t even really a secret; it was more of a physical shortcut that allowed him to express himself.  You should choose what feels and sounds best for your own musical expression.
Just like Fender, Epiphone – the Gibson subsidiary – know a thing or two about budget acoustics, and this DR-100 (reviewed in full here) more than proves that! With a range of finishes, the DR-100 features a classic dreadnought body shape, with back and sides made from laminated mahogany, with a select spruce top, and black pickguard sporting Epiphone’s iconic E logo.
Our first recommendation in this list is the epic Les Paul model by Epiphone. The Special II model of Epiphone is specially made for beginners. If you are just starting to play the guitar and looking for a good quality one from the trusted band, you can buy this one. This one is very low cost and offers a lot more features than other Gibson guitars.
With expiration of the Fender patent on the Stratocaster-style vibrato, various improvements on this type of internal, multi-spring vibrato system are now available. Floyd Rose introduced one of the first improvements on the vibrato system in many years when, in the late 1970s, he experimented with "locking" nuts and bridges that prevent the guitar from losing tuning, even under heavy vibrato bar use.
Up for auction is an approximately 1973 fender champ cabinet, grill, and Weber sig8 speaker. Chassis was removed and rehoused years ago and this cab has been collecting dust. Tolex was removed and the solid pine cabinet has a nice amber shellac finish. Good sounding cab With a great sounding Weber speaker perfect for a restoration or new build. Handle, Grill, and chassis mounting straps will also be included.
Ibanez: Ibanez is a Japanese company whose origins date back to the early 1900’s with a company named Hoshino. They where distributing Spanish guitars with the name Ibanez around the middle of the century and in the 60’s where shipping guitars to the USA. Back in the 1970’s, they became quite known for making copies of famous guitars, putting the Ibanez name on them and selling them for considerably less than the original models they emulated. During that time, Ibanez got really good at making guitars so they started creating some original models of their own. The production of copies finally ended in the late 70’s after a big lawsuit by Norlin (Gibson parent company) against Ibanez. This is the reason why the Ibanez Les Paul copies with the iconic “open-book” headstock are called “lawsuit” or “pre-lawsuit” models. Interestingly enough, although not very expensive, those lawsuit models are quite desirable today fetching interesting prices on eBay.

I played power cords and picked blues sounds 15- 18 years ago and started back playing but decided to learn actual cords I never actually learned anything about strings back then my girlfriend at the time had three awesome guitars so I was able to read tabs and just play so what's a good set of strings for someone who can pick the blues but is a beginner in ways at learning actual cords I was told the guitar I have is four years old and never been restung


I'm not sure if it's been made clear or not yet, but the imported firewood that had a Kay brand name on it in the seventies bears no relation to the products of the the Kay Co. of Chicago USA. It's not all plywood either; they had a range of total crap to not-so-crappy models. I never much liked their p.u.s or their necks. This is a good body (late 40's K-44) with a better (Harmony!) neck.
The electric guitar was at the heart of popular music for the new generation. Fender released the Telecaster – the first mass produced solid body electric which made it possible for the average Joe to buy a guitar and start a band to express themselves.  With amplifiers and solid body electrics the volume could be cranked and every bit of emotion displayed through the music.
AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!
BOO TO AMAZON FOR CARRYING A MISREPRESENTED PRODUCT. Due to the description I thought we could use this for lessons. It is NOT an instrument it is a toy. It doesn't stay tuned for even a 1/2 hour lesson and the teacher won't allow him to use it for fear that it will hurt his ability to hear when a real guitar is out of tune in the future. I tried to return but they didn't respond for weeks and told me it was too late after they finally responded. The guitar has barely been used at all and won't be used since it is clearly doing more harm than good for a young musician! AMAZON you should drop this product, it is NOT what is presents itself to be!!!

An Auto-Wah is a Wah-wah pedal without a rocker pedal, controlled instead by the dynamic envelope of the signal. An auto-wah, also called more technically an envelope filter, uses the level of the guitar signal to control the wah filter position, so that as a note is played, it automatically starts with the sound of a wah-wah pedal pulled back, and then quickly changes to the sound of a wah-wah pedal pushed forward, or the reverse movement depending on the settings. Controls include wah-wah pedal direction and input level sensitivity. This is an EQ-related effect and can be placed before preamp distortion or before power-tube distortion with natural sounding results. Auto-Wah pedals include:
The 600 series pairs maple back and sides with a spruce top that has gone through Taylor’s torrefaction process, which accelerates the wood’s aging process through heat. We couldn’t find a single fault with this guitar’s build quality and the 612ce is an unbelievably comfortable guitar to play. The tone is still that of a maple guitar, but a more refined one than we’re used to. Likewise with the torrefied spruce: it’s immediately familiar, but with enough difference to cause a cocked ear. Strumming out chords and standard singer-songwriter fare was pleasing, and it put in a good shift with some country-style flat-picking, but it is fingerstyle playing that this guitar lives and breathes. By any token these models from the 600 series are stunning guitars. They have a laudable ecological footprint, they look superb and they have rich, unexpected tonal qualities. 
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With $500 in your pocket, buying a good amp becomes a lot easier. In fact, it’s probably as expensive as most casual guitarists would ever need to go. This category includes a big choice of both amp heads and combos, solid-state and tube amps. While they make great practice amps, they are all worthy of small to medium-sized gigs and studio recording. For example, you can find the excellent Peavey ValveKing II. This little amp head offers the same beastly tone as the iconic full-size 6505, with 20 watts of power and solid controls.
For example, if you plug into a .7V power amp and you get good sound – great! However, if you plug into a 1.25V power amp and find the signals are weak, it’s not the tonal lack of the power amp that’s the problem. The preamp signals are too weak to be driven to the powerful 1.25V power amp. The issue is the sensitivity input of the power amp is too high for the preamp to be driven well.
Want to get a good impression of how the SJ 200 sounds? Well Dylan can show you how it strums, Emmylou how it picks, or listen to Pete Townshend thrashing nine bells out of his one on Pinball Wizard. You might also want to take in George Harrison’s Here Comes the Sun or anything by the Everly Brothers. As you'd expect, given the "reassuringly expensive" (i.e. enormous) price tag, the build quality throughout is faultless, superb. The first thing you notice when you sit down to play it is just how sweetly the neck sits in your hand and how easy it is to play. It’s a big lump of money, but when you buy the SJ 200 we guess you’re not just buying the guitar, you’re buying a piece of history.
The Epiphone Company is a musical instrument company which was founded in the year 1873. Epiphone is specialized in making Guitars and are one of the largest producers of guitars in the world. Epiphone has several ranges to choose from, as they brand them in different groups. Few of the Epiphone ranges of guitars are, Epiphone Sheraton, Epiphone Casino, Epiphone Texan and The Dot etc. Besides guitars Epiphone also manufactured upright basses, banjos and other forms of stringed instruments.

The ’62 EG-NT, EG-K and EG-Z were fairly primitive and appear to be leftover from the mid-’50s. The EG-NT had a small rectangular body with the bass side flush with the neck and the treble sticking out a bit to handle the controls. The head was stubby three-and-three with a circle Swan logo sticker and the fingerboard had painted diamond markers. The pickup looks to be the old slotted pickup of the early J-1, but may not be, with volume control. The EG-K was the Teisco version of the Rickenbacker Frying Pan, with a round body and neck with a head wider than the neck. This, too, had the rectangular head with a circle Swan logo. Markers were diamonds, the pickup was the slotted J-1 pickup, with one volume control. The EG-Z had an asymmetrical body with a short width on the bass side and a longer width on the treble side, with diamond markers and the stubby head. This had the old slotted J-1 pickup with volume control.
As discussed, Delay pedals add so much more weight to your sound and gives your guitar a doubling effect, which is really useful to make it sound like there’s two guitars on stage. They’re also great for creating psychedelic sounds and experimenting with riffs. Again, you don’t have to dial in big delay effects and can use the pedal subtly to add resonance.
Maton Guitars - Australia's leading manufacturer of Acoustic and Acoustic / Electric Guitars. Until the late 1930's the Australian guitar manufacturing industry was virtually non existent and good quality guitars were hard to find. The best guitars, it was well understood, came from the U.S.A. Bill May, a Melbourne born jazz musician, woodwork teacher, and luthier, decided to change all that.

This is such a trite discussion. There are many more choices than Fender and Gibson, and to boil it down to those two players is detrimental to the industry and by extension musicians of all skill levels. Those companies made great innovations and came out with classic models, and the industry owes them a whole lot. But to me, you get more points for continued innovation, not making a few great models then resting on laurels for the next 100 years.
Distortion was not an effect originally intended by amplifier manufacturers, but could often easily be achieved by "overdriving" the power supply in early tube amplifiers. In the 1950s, guitarists began deliberately increasing gain beyond its intended levels to achieve "warm" distorted sounds.[29] Among the first musicians to experiment with distortion were Willie Johnson of Howlin' Wolf,[29] Goree Carter,[30] Joe Hill Louis,[31][32] Ike Turner,[33] Guitar Slim,[34] and Chuck Berry.[35]
The Epiphone Les Paul Special II Vintage Sunburst has a mahogany body and neck which gives the guitar a nice thick sound. The quality of the tuners and pickups are okay, not superb, but good enough for any beginner. If you are into metal, rock or blues the two Epiphone humbuckers do a pretty nice job, they sound really good and give you a nice fat sound. A pretty reliable and solid guitar even for live playing.
Maintaining these items does help though, perhaps every year or so remove the cover plate or pickguard and clean out any dust building up on the switch and contacts, it'll make them last for years to come so it's worth the minimal effort. You'd perhaps clean the fretboard and frets, so it's worth thinking about the other, hidden, functional parts too. 
We guitarists can be slow to come around to new ways of doing things, heck we still prize the 1904 technology of the vacuum tube in guitar amplifiers, so it's a huge testament to Ovation's success that they've managed to be so successful while breaking the most sacred rules of guitar material and construction. Great examples of this are their Celebrity Elite CE44 and their entry-level Applause Balladeer AB24.
Nearly all Martin instruments come in different styles. The higher the style number, the more fancy (and collectible) the instrument. Again starting in October 1930, Martin stamped all flat top guitars with the style number, directly after the body size (and above the serial number). Style numbers can range from 15 to 45. A letter can follow the style number too, giving some additional info about the instrument. For example, a "T" after the style number indicates a Tenor guitar. See the general specs section for a full list of these suffixes.
OK, when the list started it was hard to tell if the author was knowledgeable on the subject because of the automatic “Go To” names. Unfortunately, by the time I got to the end I realized this was the author’s favorites list versus the Top 10 Greatest Guitar Players. Kirk Hammett, Slash, Jack White, Chuck Berry??? You can’t put them on any list and not mention the guy who influenced so many, and who Eric Clapton called the best guitarist in the world, SRV. Richards biggest claim to fame it the amount of drugs he’s done that haven’t killed him,… Read more »
: I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
This string overview is useful for understanding what choice to make that suits your play style the best.  As players, we are always searching for the highest possible functionality, while balancing tone and playability for the genre we play.  Check out what brand and gauge your guitar heroes use to help you zero in on your perfect string set and keep on rocking!

List of electric guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Electric guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson and more. This list answers the question, 'What are the best electric guitar brands?' Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.


The ‘HSS’ refers to the pickup combination, with a humbucker and two single-coils, which is a versatile arrangement for both clean and distorted playing, especially when coupled with two tone controls and a five-way pickup selector switch. An excellent price for a good brand, and perfect for newbies. Make sure to check out the full review of this guitar.
However, John Leckie states an interesting preference for an SM58 and U67 rig instead: "SM57s tend to be that little bit brighter than the SM58, which really isn't what you want when you're miking up an electric guitar amp. You really want to pick up a flat signal, an 'unstimulated' signal I suppose is the word... The U67 gives you the warmth and a broader sound."
* P A W N S H O P * G U I T A R S * Serving The World With Quality Vintage and Used Gear!- Up for sale is a 1960'S Norma Guitar Japanese Vintage Project As Is!- Good Japanese project- missing nut, bridge, knobs, electronics need work, but pickup is ok- very noisy- lots of body checking and neck needs work- truss barely turns- missing tuner ferrules- head stock logo is loose- even if I forgot something this item is sold as is with no returns!- this is definitely a worthy project- from the MIJ Hay... more
The Whammy pedal is truly one-of-a-kind. It gets its name from the slang term for a tremolo arm on a guitar, which allows a player to control the pitch of the strings while playing. In much the same way, The Whammy pedal allows a player to perform radical pitch-shifting in real time by rocking the foot treadle back and forth, sweeping between the intervals set on the pedal. This pedal is a lot of fun and allows guitarists to create the dive-bomb sounds that are associated with JImi Hendrix, Eddie Van Halen, and Joe Satriani.
To capture aggressive, distorted guitar sounds, my studio partner Bart Thurber likes to use two mics in an XY configuration on a single speaker: a Shure SM57 aimed at the middle of the speaker and a Sennheiser 441 (with the high-end boost switch engaged) pointed at the edge of the cone. The SM57's signal is sent to a compressor, and the two mic signals are then mixed together and recorded to one track. This technique provides some compression for the harshest high frequencies and strong, midrange volume peaks picked up by the SM57, while simultaneously delivering full highs and lows through the 441.
DIY Guitars is Australia’s home of the best guitar kits. We stock a large range of kits at great prices, which will be delivered to your door! Whether you’re looking to shred like a madman, or play some classical blues riffs, we have the guitar kit for you! We also stock high quality ColorTone guitar stains and plenty of guitar accessories to help make the perfect guitar to suit your needs.
The one major drawback of Guitar Tricks is the almost overwhelming amount of material that is available. There is a chance that you get distracted into trying out many different styles and techniques. You may find yourself jumping around from song to song and lesson to lesson wanting to see whether you are up to it. As a result you may not be able to follow your curriculum as initially planned. On the other hand, I strongly believe that this will broaden your horizon and make you a better and more versatile guitar player.
The chord below (an Am) is going to be used for demonstration. Firstly, you'll notice the name of the chord labeled up the top. Next you'll see a "grid" below it. This grid represents your guitar fretboard. The 6 lines running downwards represent the six strings on your guitar with the fattest and lowest sounding string on the left hand side. The horizontal lines represent the frets on your guitar neck. The top line is the top of the neck.
Straight out of the box you have over 68 on-board digital effects, 75 custom designed factory patches for iconic sounds, 5 amp emulations and 5 cabinet emulators, so you’re not going to run out of choices on stage or in the studio. In addition, you have access to the Guitar Lab software app that allows you to download new stomp boxes and patches regularly.
Another clarification about brand names is in order. Teisco guitars can be found mainly bearing at least eight brand names: Teisco, Teisco Del Rey, Kingston, World Teisco, Silvertone, Kent, Kimberly and Heit Deluxe. Teisco was the name used mainly in Japan but also on a few occasions here in the United States. Most Teisco guitars were imported into the United States by Chicago’s W.M.I. Corporation � originally owned by guitar importing pioneer Jack Westheimer � bearing both the Teisco Del Rey and Kingston brand names. By the mid-’60s W.M.I. was providing Teiscos to Sears and Roebuck carrying the Silvertone moniker. I’m not sure the World Teisco brand ever got to the U.S.; my guess is that it was an export designation that went to other markets. Some of the early Kent guitars imported by New York’s Bugeleisen and Jacobson were purchased from Teisco. The distributors responsible for either the Kimberly or Heit Deluxe brand names remain a mystery at this time. It is possible that you may encounter other brand names on Teisco-made guitars sold through other distributors, but these will be in a minority. If you know of any other names, please let us know.
The kind of interface that you want should connect to your PC and the DAW (digital audio workstation) software installed on it so that you can record your playing. The Guitarport didn’t allow for recording without buying additional software that cost as much as the device; the device is essentially obsolete now but still supported. Years later I upgraded to their Toneport UX2, meant for recording and DAW compatibility. The accompanying Podfarm 2 software is quite good. The UX1 costs half as much with the same software if you don’t want or need 2 inputs (microphone or instrument). Presonus sells an interface that is quite popular, for less than $99
Hand built with the same precision as our larger guitars, just 25% smaller.  Great for travel, ideal for children struggling to get their arms around full size guitars, fantastic second guitar for the office.  Because it has a smaller box design our Travel will have a smaller sound (like any smaller guitar) but our Travel Electric with built in auto tuner allows you to plug into any amplifier or PA system giving you the same power as our full size guitars.
Those items considered -- performance notation and computational capacity for emulation of stringed instrument sounds otherwise reinforced by the same speaker systems that amplify synthesized sounds -- the other significant factors in the realism matrix involve economics of VST production, listener preferences and, least we forget, performer or producer preferences.
Guitar picks are really cheap, maybe $.25 to $.50 each. The best way to know which kind you like best is go to a music store and buy $5.00 worth of picks of different thicknesses, sizes and materials, take them home and try them out over the course of the next several weeks or months as you learn to play. There is no right or wrong answer to this question, its all a matter of personal preference. You'll figure out for yourself which you like best.
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A great app for playing and basic editing of general midi files is Sweet Midi Player which includes a lyric viewer for midis with lyrics/chords. You can load one of the General Midi SoundFonts above to greatly improve the sound quality. For Windows PC use the free program Coolsoft VirtualMIDISynth to install a new GM SoundFont (Get the latest version 2.1.0 for Windows 10).
While an acoustic guitar's sound depends largely on the vibration of the guitar's body and the air inside it, the sound of an electric guitar depends largely on the signal from the pickups. The signal can be "shaped" on its path to the amplifier via a range of effect devices or circuits that modify the tone and characteristics of the signal. Amplifiers and speakers also add coloration to the final sound.
The National STEM Guitar Project, in partnership with NSF Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Centers with funding provided through a grant from The National Science Foundation (#1700531, #1304405, & #0903336), hosts innovative Guitar Building Institutes throughout the US. Five-day institutes, combined with additional instructional activities comprising 80 hours, provide middle, high school, and postsecondary faculty training on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) applications as they relate to the guitar. The institutes present and teach participants hands-on, applied learning techniques to help engage students and spark excitement for learning STEM subject matter.
We’ve all been there, and it’s actually pretty easy to fix once you know how. The reason we hit those walls in our playing or get bored with what we’re currently doing is that we start falling into set patterns with our playing (pentatonic scale over and over again, anyone?). Whatever we’re playing starts to feel stale and derivative because we’ve gone over it so many times, and it can end up being a pretty frustrating experience.
Slot Peghead vs. Solid Peghead (steel string models): Most models converted from a 12 fret slot peghead to a 14 fret solid peghead around 1934 (except the OM series, which went 14 fret in 1929/1930 and the style 17 and 18 models which were available in 14 fret style in 1932). Basically if the guitar has a 14 fret neck, it will have a solid peghead. If it has a 12 fret neck, it will have a slot peghead. Note there were some post-WW2 gut string and classical models (i.e. 0-16NY) and some post-WW2 special order steel string guitars (i.e. 1967-1993 D-18S) which always have a slotted peghead.
You need to know what colour code your pickup wires are. If the 4-wire pickup is a Seymour Duncan then the link above should work for you, if it’s another brand of pickup then you’ll have to figure out how to correct for the appropriate colour wires e.g. DiMarzio pickups use a different colour code on their wires to Seymour Duncan and they’re all fairly easy to find on the web.
The size and power rating of the amp, as well as the size and type of the speakers within the cabinet, will have a significant impact on the recorded sound. Obviously, huge stacks will produce a very different sound from small combos. That said, many recording engineers have found that a small, low-powered amp cranked right up can sound more exciting than a big powerhouse. Even cheap transistor amps with tiny speakers can sound great in the right context. Don’t be precious and don’t rule anything out; it’s all about the end result!
The short-lived Elite Telecaster of 1983 incorporated two specially designed humbucking pickups powered by an active circuitry that featured a “TBX” guitar expander and an MDX midrange booster with 12 dB of gain. Other features included a “Freeflyte” hardtail bridge and die-cast tuning machines with pearloid buttons. This guitar was among the latest CBS-era Fenders to feature a BiFlex truss-rod system, low-friction EasyGlider string trees and active electronics. After CBS sold Fender to a group of employees led by Bill C. Schultz in 1985, production ceased on the Elite Telecaster and other Elite models. Fender Japan made its own version of the Elite Telecaster in late 1984, which featured a 22-fret neck with medium-jumbo fretwire and a modern 9.5 inch fingerboard radius. Notable Elite Telecaster players include Johnny Hallyday and Dave Davies of The Kinks. Michael Houser w/ Widespread Panic and Andy Summers of The Police.
Heck, if you decide to pay for a setup when you buy a guitar they'll set it up right then and there. They're not gonna have you buy a guitar and have you wait a week or two to take it home just for a setup. Everyone else has brought in personal guitars that weren't just purchased and most times not purchased there, and they have their own waitlist. But they make more money prioritizing a setup to make a sale rather than doing a stand alone setup.
Was skeptical at first since I own a couple of vintage Martins. Aside from the LX1E being a sustainable responsibly built guitar that has HPL back/sides, hybrid neck/fingerboard, and whose soundhole smells like a Lincoln Log toy set this is an amazing find. Yup- it’s perfect for the overhead bin on airplanes, comes with a good gig bag, and sounds great plugged in. Experimented with .11 gauge string set, but this guitar is really made for either .12 gauge or a true .13 (medium gauge) strings set. This guitar is designed for the combination of heavier strings and assertive strumming or picking to create a sound that belies its small size. It welcomes being pushed, muted, and/or percussively played. Found the same to be true of Martin’s DX regular size guitars which sound amazing for what they are. While the E Sheeran LX model has his logos on it, this

My 15 year old daughter recently renewed interest in the guitar she had bought a few years ago but had never really played much. She was disappointed when she noticed the strings were loose. We brought it here and Ted was so helpful and engaging. He recommended new guitar strings; normally you can buy the strings and do it yourself, or pay them to do it. He readily understood that while my daughter didn't know how to do it herself, she would like to know. He showed both my girls how to string a guitar, talking them through each step while he expertly strung the guitar and got it in perfect tune. Ted teaches guitar and his tutorial was an excellent recommendation of his teaching skills. He also threw in a cleaning cloth and gave us chocolates - how much better does it get than that?! We will definitely be coming back!
by pedalhaven  @airbag3333  has a seriously stacked board! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
While production and distribution of guitars under the Ibanez brand began much earlier, the company gained notoriety outside its native Japan when it started importing Ibanez guitars to the United States in the mid-1960s. These first efforts were funky-looking creations which sold at the low end of the guitar market, primarily in department stores. But the company's products continued to move up the quality ladder until the company was perceived as a legitimate market force, selling what were essentially copies of other companies' designs in the mid-1970s. A patent lawsuit from Gibson ended the sales of those copies, but Ibanez had by then gained a foothold in the guitar market globally. (more...)
Traditional sets can sometimes feature vastly different tensions between strings, causing players to compensate with altered techniques. New York string icon D’Addario set out to even the playing field with its Balanced Tension XL sets, which boast mathematically equalised resistance for a similar feel from string to string. That means even effort when bending, strumming, plucking and slapping, and even improved dynamic control.

*We build all of our Custom Shop and Semi-Custom instruments from scratch and on demand - therefore, Custom Shop and Semi-Custom orders are fulfilled in the order in which they were received. These times can vary due to demand and the custom options you choose. Our production/assemble time frame: 20 - 25 working days since our professional Control Team and Supervisor Engineer will ensure that your ordered guitar is top notch considering the fact that this guitar is intricate to assemble and they check very carefully every detail such as the finish, fret work, pickups, strings. And also, they will test the sound quality. We do not rush up the process of manufacturing your guitar since we would like to deliver to you best quality performance.
Feedback is essentially the presence of a sound loop where the guitar’s amplified sound causes increased vibration in the strings. The sound of this vibration then gets further amplified, continuing the loop and resulting in distorted sound. Usually the source of the feedback is the guitar’s amp, but in cases of hollow-body guitars, the amp’s output resonates in the actual guitar body. For many music styles feedback is an undesirable trait, but it’s also been used as an awesome effect by prominent guitarists such as Jimi Hendrix and Kurt Cobain.

This is a very cool goldtop Vox SDC 33. Ultra slim body and neck makes playing extremely smooth and comfortable. Coaxe pickups provide a unique array of tones. Has some natural wear from normal use, like the buckle rash and a chip on the neck finish shown in the pictures. Overall a very clean and well playing guitar with a unique look and sound. Contact us with any questions! Thanks, Fondren Guitars
Color styles – Is this important to you? We know it is for us to an extent, especially if you’ll be performing live regardless of venue size. Even if you’re going to your band-mates place to rehearse, the look of our guitar represents us and our own style. Luckily many of these have awesome options when it comes to makes, colors and designs. Although it wouldn’t necessarily steer us completely in a particular electric guitars direction since sound and feel are still most important.
Peavy amps are especially well appreciated by the metal community, thanks to their good overall reliability and the high volume of sound some models produce. The 6505 Series is a favorite of metal guitarists due to its power and versatility. This is most often used as a head for double stacks of speakers, but it can also be purchased as a 2×12” and 1×12” combo for convenience.
Clean or replace jacks. To clean jacks use solvents such as contact cleaner or other solvents as a spray and spray the metal parts, clean any excess solvent with a rag. To replace jacks first obtain a similar one that complies with your guitar, then soldering in properly. Work in well-ventilated space to avoid harmful fumes from solder or solvents.
The beauty of the Yamaha FG800 Acoustic goes way beyond skin deep with its solid Sitka spruce top complemented by a Nato back and side. The mellow, well balanced tone offers excellent note definition, worthy of dreadnoughts costing far more. Quality materials such as a rosewood bridge and fingerboard, black and white body binding and more make FG Series acoustics sweet buys with a great reputation.
It can be tough to know where to start when you’re looking at as many options as there are in the world of effects pedals. In fact, your first pedal may not even be a pedal at all – many amplifiers have built-in effects sections so you can get your introduction without having to attach an external stompbox. But if you have a more straightforward amp, or if you’re ready to try effects units that go beyond its built-in capabilities, there are some great varieties for novice users. And don’t forget that you can always look up the preferred pedals of your favorite guitar hero to inspire your own collection.
Popular music typically uses the electric guitar in two roles: as a rhythm guitar to provide the basic chord progression and rhythm, and a lead guitar that plays melody lines, melodic instrumental fill passages, and solos. In some bands with two guitarists, both may play in tandem, and trade off rhythm and lead roles. In bands with a single guitarist, the guitarist may switch between these roles, playing chords to accompany the singer's lyrics, and a solo.

We have already covered one Behringer reverb, which was the epitome of affordable and functional simplicity. However, this brand has a couple more aces up their sleeve, including the more advanced RV600 (click for full review). What this pedal offers is a significantly more versatile solution that brings you additional flexibility at a bargain price.

If you’re old enough and like whacky guitars, like me, you probably remember the great Guitar Player “Off the Wall” columns by Teisco Del Rey, the nom de plume of journalist Dan Forte. His was the first, and sometimes the only, story I’d read for a long time. Dan was perhaps the first to celebrate guitars whose names didn’t begin with M, G, or F. Dan usually worked the humor angle, but for those of us with an aesthetic eye, the guitars he featured became Holy Grails. One of the holiest of those was the 1968 Teisco May Queen guitar, a rare red version of which you see here!


A steel-string guitar tuned to concert pitch endures a tension of about 180 pounds (800 N) on the top of the guitar from the strings[citation needed]. The X-bracing system has been shown to be an efficient technique for preventing the top of the guitar from warping under this force. The braces are generally carved, scalloped and tuned to improve resonance and integrity of the guitar top, such capability being performed by skilled artisans and not readily reproducible by machine[citation needed]. This work is an important factor in determining the timbre of the guitar and a major determinant in the observation that rarely do two guitars ever sound alike, even though they are ostensibly identical in construction.
You can get a rough idea of what the All-Electric looked like in Gruhn/Carter’s Electric Guitars (Miller Freeman Books, 1995), although this example has been refinished and replated, with a new fingerboard, tuners and added tailpiece, and is an atypical 14-fret Spanish model, possibly assembled at the end of the ’30s from leftover parts. Toward the end of National Dobro’s presence in Los Angeles, a great many guitars were assembled and shipped from remaining stock, often as exports.
Overdrive / distortion pedals are one of the most important effects on your board and are very much a personal taste. The ones on my pedal board change all the time, I have more than a few that I really like; Analogman King Of Tone, Pete Cornish SS-3, Ibanez Tube Screamer, Boss Blues Driver, Nobels ODR-1,  Zen Drive, MXR Distortion +... and I like and use all of them. Probably my all-time favourite os the King Of Tone, but on a budget, the Nobels ODR-1 is great value and runs with the very best!
The Epiphone Les Paul Special II Vintage Sunburst has a mahogany body and neck which gives the guitar a nice thick sound. The quality of the tuners and pickups are okay, not superb, but good enough for any beginner. If you are into metal, rock or blues the two Epiphone humbuckers do a pretty nice job, they sound really good and give you a nice fat sound. A pretty reliable and solid guitar even for live playing.
In 1968, Jimi Hendrix talked about his love for a Houston blues luminary who wasn't known outside the region: "There's one cat I'm still trying to get across to people. He is really good, one of the best guitarists in the world." Albert Collins, who died of lung cancer in 1993, played with his thumb and forefinger instead of a pick to put a muscular snap into his piercing, trebly solos. His fluid, inventive playing influenced Hendrix, sometimes overtly: Jimi liked Collins' sustain in the song "Collins Shuffle" so much that he used it on "Voodoo Chile."
The standard practice for many distributors was to offer a line of guitars based on popular American designs like Les Pauls and Strats, for example, along with a few original designs. And all were offered at a bargain price or were at least inexpensive enough to compete with the American manufacturers. While the majority of imported Asian-built copies from the era aren’t considered to be of very good quality, the Lotus brand was an exception, mainly because of the factories they were built in.
These pickups rely on electromagnetic induction to "pick up" the vibration of the strings.  Basically, it emits a magnetic field and as the string vibrates through it this generates an electrical current, which is your audio signal. This information is then sent on to an amplifier. The reason why you need an amplifier is that the original signal from the guitar is not strong enough to be pushed through a loudspeaker without a boost from the amp.
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FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer (and practical playability). Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.
In addition to choosing between laminate and solid wood, you also have to consider the type of the tonewood. Of particular importance is the choice of top wood, because it greatly affects the resulting sound. Spruce is popularly used for the tops of acoustics because of its punchy and bright tone. Mahogany tops on the other hand is preferred for its warm tone, with more emphasis on the lower mid frequencies. There are other types of wood that fall between the two, each one bringing a subtly different flavor to the resulting sound.
The problem of the recent Gibson bashing is well-founded. There were quality issues over the last maybe 15 years. The thing is that a Gibson is still a dream for a lot of people. They get better and giving themselves a present after putting money away. Then, after several years, maybe decades of anticipation they get crappy quality for several thousand dollars. The brand is alive, they can bounce back, but the managment...instead of the elevator, they should take the japanese business shortcut. As soon as the quality and passion is back, people will love to buy one. Hope they'll get back on track before 2020. - MountainGoat
Sennheiser's cardioid MD421 crops up almost as frequently in interviews, and has a wider frequency response, none of the low mid-range suckout, and an even heftier sensitivity boost upwards of 1kHz. This microphone also has a larger diaphragm than the SM57, and the off-axis response anomalies of the larger diaphragm, in particular, give a different character to the sound. Although obviously very popular, this mic seems more often to be used in combination with other mics than on its own.
Starfield was a guitar brand owned by Hoshino Gakki. In the 1970s, Hoshino Gakki and Kanda Shokai shared some guitar designs and so some Ibanez and Greco guitars have the same features. The Kanda Shokai Greco guitars were sold in Japan and the Hoshino Gakki Ibanez guitars were sold outside of Japan. From 1982, Ibanez guitars have also been sold in Japan as well as being sold outside of Japan [3].

Ovation are relative newcomers to the world of vintage guitars, only launching their range at the 1967 NAMM show in Chicago. Ovation started as an off-shoot of founder Charles Kamen's work in the aviation field, studying vibration and resonances in helicopter blades. Whilst other respected American manufacturers relied heavily of quality nautral products and the artistry of their master luthiers, Ovation came very much from a science and engineering perspective: they used oscillographs to test existing instruments, and came up with the famous Ovation rounded back design, and suggested the use of a synthetic material, Lyrachord, claiming it to be more resonant that any wood.


The first “real” guitar I ever bought for myself as a teenager was an Ibanez RG much like this one, and I played that guitar for almost 10 years before buying yet another Ibanez RG. Note that this model does not have a tremolo, which means great tuning stability and fewer headaches when it comes to changing strings, tuning, and setup. However, you won’t be able to perform any crazy whammy tricks, so be sure you’re okay with that. Mahogany body, two hot humbuckers, jumbo frets, and an ultra-stable 3-piece maple neck. Hard to beat at this price point. Love it.
Okay so the pictures of the guy in white sneakers are super dumb- but the book IS very helpful for a beginner; It comes with small stickers to place underneath the strings to practice fingering per different color stickers numbered 1-5 indicating 1st, second, third... fingering- you get the idea; I wrote on the stickers the letter of each note so I wouldn't have to remember which colors indicated which notes; and the stickers come off clean with no residue; this is just an added bonus- b/c I initially bought this book over others- b/c it shows pictures of a players' hand with fingers on the correct frets along with the actual chart; Personally, it is much easier for me to look at a picture of someone playing the note rather than a chart with dots.And as I said the stickers make it a breeze- I don't have to look down every time I want to play a note to see if my fingers are in the right place. Also the book comes with a pic and a full length poster labeled "notes and scales" to refer to for all of the notes.I haven't really read through the book- I'm a scimmer anyway- and the first chapter is all about positioning and tuning- which I already know; But if you are a visual learner- and have had trouble in the past- get this book to start with; It's definitely learn at your own pace- and doesn't remind me of a boring text book- other authors should be as innovative;
This deal leapt out of the page at me straight away. The Fender Squier series has been around a while and even though it’s a budget guitar, you can always rely on Fender for great quality. But what I like the most about this package is that everything you need is included (apart from a guitar stand) and the Frontman 10G amplifier has some extra features that are excellent. The amp has an input for a playback device to jam along to (like your iPad or Smart phone, or even a CD player) plus a headphone output for when the neighbours get too annoyed. A Gain control and Overdrive switch let you grunge everything up, or you can dial it back to a classic, clean Fender sound.
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Fender made some pretty big waves when they announced their latest line of Mustang amplifiers – primarily because of their sound-shaping abilities. You see, the brand’s modeling amp line has 17 preprogrammed amp models to choose from, as well as an auxiliary input so you can play along to your favorite tunes, and a wealth of included effects. The real highlights of this particular amp, however, can be found outside of the amp itself. You see, it includes a smartphone app that will let you shape the sound of the amp easily and remotely. Better still, the amp comes with its own recording software, so you can capture your songs at your leisure. For something so inexpensive, this amp packs a serious wallop.
One other thing to note is during the 1960's there was a lot of consolidation in the Chicago guitar manufacturers. In the 1940's National and Dobro merged to form Valco. One of Valco's sub-brand's was Supro which sold guitars under the Sears moniker Silvertone but they also manufactured guitars for Montgomery Wards as the "Airline" brand (Jack White of the White Stripes plays an Airline "Layfayette" reso-glas guitar) and there were a few other house brands too. In 1968 the conglomerate Valco closed it's doors. Also in 1968 Danelectro was shut down by MCA which had purchased it in 1966. Kay also went out of business and the remains were bought by Teisco. The only major brand that survived the 1960's to continue making these amazing guitars through the early 1970's was Harmony. We believe that's because they were the largest of all guitar manufacturers in the 1960's.
C.F. Martin & Company is a U.S. guitar manufacturer established in 1833 byChristian Frederick Martin. Martin is highly regarded for its steel-string guitarsand is a leading mass-manufacturer of flattop acoustics. Martin instruments can cost thousands of dollars and vintage instruments often cost six figures. The company has also made several models of electric guitars and electric basses.
Synthesizer: Plug your bass guitar into a synthesizer pedal and you can access four different waveforms (saw-tooth wave, square wave, pulse wave, or your own bass wave form) that give you a wide variety of synth tones, each of which can be tweaked in several different ways. Some synth pedals offer a hold function that continues to play the tone as long as you depress the pedal, allowing you to play other musical phrases over the tone that's being held.               
You might have read our review about the C40 GigMaker kit from Yamaha earlier on. This is a similar guitar, but it’s the C40II, and the black color makes it a limited edition instrument. The inlay is less “traditional” looking. Instead of an ornate “rosette” style, the inlay is a stripe pattern all the way around the sound hole, making the guitar look somewhat “jazzy,” to use a more descriptive term. So if this is the look you prefer, read on for more details.
They are the most common effect group and are used by almost every guitar player from Stevie Ray Vaughan to Yngwie Malmsteen. Most amplifiers have channels for overdrive or distortion, but having these effects as pedals allows you greater variation in tone and allows you to “push” the cleaner channels of your amp harder, giving a different sound to the overdrive channel.
Lastly try a fuzz pedal like a Fuzz Face or Big Muff. Fuzz pedals offer huge amounts of drive and low end but are generally used for single notes and power chords. Regular chords can sound pretty nasty with fuzz and it’s probably a bit wild for acoustic guitars. Although if it works with your style and draws the congregation into worship, then why not? The important thing is to be tasteful and selective in how, when and how much you use effects. Follow the golden rule; a little ‘salt’ can bring out flavour but too much kills the dish altogether.
Firmly intended to compete with Gibson's ES-335, the Starfire IV, V and VI retain plenty of Guild style, not least the more spacious cutaways and the wooden foot tune-o-matic-style bridge. Placed side-by-side with an equally new Bigsby-equipped Gibson ES-335, the Starfire V somehow looks more 'retro', more 60s. The body here is made from mahogany laminates with a distinct striped figure under the Cherry Red finish, which was introduced with the first Starfire. Then, as now, it all creates a different aesthetic to the Gibson ES-335. A major difference is the control set-up, which here augments the Gibson layout with a smaller knobbed master volume control on the treble horn, just behind the three-way toggle pickup selector. The pickups here replicate the early-60s introduced 'Anti Hum Pickups' and are period correct, along with the black plastic, chrome-tipped control knobs. It's a fairly weighty guitar for a semi, thanks to the full-length maple centre-block, and has a classic strapped-on feel. It is, of course, thinline depth and feels every bit an ES-335. It has a 'clean' sound, with low-end definition, slightly bright on the treble pickup with decent sustain and, importantly, a very respectable feedback threshold. It likes volume, and while similarly evocative of virtually all those classic styles, it's the stage version and effortlessly takes you on to early The Who, The Jam or Britpop voices, while seemingly equally at home with rootsy, strummier Americana.
Re-amplified Distortion: This re-amplified distortion is audible by comparison, when switching between a solid-state and valve amplifier in real time. By paying close attention, it is heard as a fine spurious inter-cluttering within the music. This is clearly noticeable with efficient speakers but not with inefficient speakers. Valve amplifiers are inherently linear. Their natural gain is small and therefore require minimal or no negative feedback.
The Teisco J-1 was a natural maple-topped guitar with a single pickup near the adjustable wooden bridge, a large affair with a metal cover with six slots parallel to the strings and two round bulbs on either side, very space-age! The stop tail was probably rounded, allowing strings to pass through the body, and was covered with a square metal plate. A small pickguard sat between the pickup and the neck. A volume and tone control sat on another little piece of plastic down on the lower treble bout. Knobs were white plastic knurled with a silver ring around the top.
Chorus – a frequency-based effect that makes your guitar sound like more than one guitar is playing. The effect is created by doubling your guitar tone one or more times (using a short delay) and then varying the pitch of the double slightly up and down against the dry guitar tone. Chorus pedals have at least two controls: Depth and Rate. The Depth controls the lowest and highest pitches that the doubled tone varies between. The Rate controls the speed that the doubled tone moves up and down in pitch.
I participated in what I think was perhaps Gibson's best SG...a prototype made for Robbie Krieger. It had my then-patented carbon fiber "T" cross section fingerboard which absolutely took care of the #1 problem with SGs...the rubber neck syndrome. It also had a beautiful flame maple top on the mahogany body and it got a cherry sunburst. Fabulous guitar. Robbie must still have it.
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The core metal used for strings is an important variable to consider.  Not only does the string core affect tone, but it affects the tension strength as well.  The heavier the string gauge, the stronger the core metal needed.  You don’t want premature string breakage, especially during a gig.  Your options absolutely depend on the tone you desire, but they also depend on the string gauge you prefer for the genre of music you play.
The key to getting a great guitar sound really is in the hands of the engineer, not his equipment. I've gotten great sounds in multi-million dollar rooms, and topped them in the smallest of home studios. You can do it too. The key is to constantly experiment and apply some basic physics. Try different mics, try moving them closer and farther, try different angles, try putting the amp in a corner, try putting the amp on a concrete floor, try it on a wood floor, try it on a floor with green shag carpeting, just try anything!
First, let’s start with the switch. Like the Gibson-style switch, the Stratocaster’s is used to select between different pickups and combinations thereof. In this picture of Jimi Hendrix and his Stratocaster, the switch is just above the knobs. It’s a little hard to see because of the white pickguard, but if you have this type of guitar, you’ll have no trouble finding it on your own instrument.
Anyone who wants a guitar that can handle both the expected twang and bluesy yield of a traditional Tele, along with the hard rock and punch of humbucking pickups will find a rather ideal companion in this guitar. I like it for studio guitarists in particular since it gets you a professional brand along with a wide range of tone capability that can help you be more accommodating to clients.
The Last of Us™ has been rebuilt for the PlayStation®4 system. Now features full 1080p, higher-resolution character models, improved shadows and lighting, in addition to several other gameplay improvements. 20 years after a pandemic has radically changed known civilization, infected humans run wild and survivors are killing each other for food, weapons and whatever they can get their hands on. Joel, a violent survivor, is hired to smuggle a 14-year-old girl, Ellie, out of an oppressive military quarantine zone, but what starts as a small job soon transforms into a brutal journey across the U.S. The Last of Us Remastered includes the Abandoned Territories map pack, Reclaimed Territories map pack, and the critically acclaimed The Last of Us: Left Behind single-player campaign that combines themes of survival, loyalty, and love with tense, survival-action gameplay.

If you love the Telecaster look and sound, then here’s a great entry level Tele for beginners. In fact, “entry level” really doesn’t do this Telecaster justice. I’ve considered buying this exact model for myself–for times when I need to record some true single coil tones. If country twang is your thing, this is the guitar to get started with. But the Telecaster isn’t a one-trick pony. Plenty of rock (and even metal) players have used Telecasters over the years. Swap that bridge pickup with a single coil-sized humbucker and you’ve got a guitar that can do rock and metal with the best of ’em.
Epiphone's Les Paul series were originally designed to allow the budget crowd to experience this awesome guitar without investing thousands of dollars. That's something that hasn't changed to this day. The Epiphone Special II is among the most basic Les Paul designs on offer, making it perfect for beginners. We've chosen this particular guitar because of its neutral configuration which will keep up with you even after you've built plenty of skill.

Double bass players playing in genres where a louder amplified tone (emphasizing the fundamental frequencies) is desired for the bass may be more likely to face the problem of audio feedback. Feedback for double bass generally manifests itself as a sharp, sudden high-volume "howling" sound that can damage loudspeakers. When acoustic instruments with resonant bodies are amplified with microphones and piezoelectric transducer pickups, the common approach used for amplified double basses, they are prone to have feedback problems. For acoustic bass guitars, soft plastic discs are available to block the sound hole, thus reducing feedback. Upright bass players sometimes use homemade foam or styrofoam inserts to fill in the "f" holes of the double bass, which can reduce feedback.


FYI, Dave might be backed up due to demand if he is still working, so I'd call those places up and ask them in advance. Twin Town isn't too bad a drive if you've got a car, maybe 15 minutes from Bloomington, but the place up in Fridley is about a 20-25 minute drive. They might be the best at working on short notice though as they're a smaller place. Definitely give them all calls.
However, these two companies were not always in as direct competition as might be assumed; yes they both made guitars, basses and amplifiers, but both tended to play to their strengths; Gibson's expertise was it's luthierie; they stuck to high end electric-acoustics, semi-acoustics and skillfully made solid bodies, whilst Fender excelled at electronics; they made amplifiers and easily built solid body basses and guitars.
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Through the 19th century, guitars were part of a musical ensemble. As performance spaces increased in size, stringed instruments like guitars were hard to hear over other instruments, especially horns. As a result, the traditional Spanish-style acoustic guitar—wooden with a flat top, a symmetrical hollow body, a sound hole in the center, and gut strings—began to change in size, shape, and construction. For example, in the late 1890s, Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company, designed a guitar with an arched (or curved) top that was stronger and louder than the earlier flat-top design.

However, these two companies were not always in as direct competition as might be assumed; yes they both made guitars, basses and amplifiers, but both tended to play to their strengths; Gibson's expertise was it's luthierie; they stuck to high end electric-acoustics, semi-acoustics and skillfully made solid bodies, whilst Fender excelled at electronics; they made amplifiers and easily built solid body basses and guitars.
I purchased this about 8 months ago (it is my first acoustic guitar) so I could learn to play again, I'm a singer by trait, but wanted to pick up a guitar again after a very long break. I did not want to spend a lot of money, but I didn't want junk either, while at the same time I wanted something that would translate well into performing live too. I did my research, and personally, it came down to this or the Yamaha APX-500 (But I really want the Mrk 1 not 2), so I settled for this.
One of the most important things when choosing your guitar is of course the sound - read the study on electric guitar sounds. It’s best if you’re able to try different guitars out in a music shop, and the staff there will most likely be happy to present you with different options that are good for beginners. There you will also have the chance to see how the different guitars feel to play, and have the opportunity to ask the staff if you have any questions or need any advice.

SJ Series: The SJ is Collings’ version of what is commonly called a small Jumbo. Although the 16 inch lower bout is slightly wider than a dreadnought, and the sides almost as deep, the tight curve at the waist creates in a very different sound chamber. SJs, especially examples in maple, typically have a more pronounced midrange response when compared to a dreadnought.

There were differences between the pickups as well – the National had slanted units under enormous covers, while the Supro featured 8-string versions of the Alnico V pickups found on many Spanish-style guitars. The difference in tone proved to be minimal. The Supro has a more refined sound than its cheaper cousins with the famous string-through pickup, but it can still be raw and biting when required. Although it is a single-coil pickup, it has excellent hum rejection and sounds wonderful either overdriven or clean. The guitar has plenty of sustain and a surprising level of output, making it an excellent instrument for rock and roll as well as country music.

The lower strings of a guitar (E, A & D) will often have a nickel winding over their steel core. Nickel also makes an appearance in the frets of most guitars, which are commonly made from nickel-silver. Despite the name, this alloy doesn’t actually contain any silver, but is named for its silver appearance. It’s actually an alloy of copper, nickel, and zinc. These nickel-silver frets aren’t as hard-wearing as steel, so some guitar manufacturers use stainless steel instead to give the frets more longevity.

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This is not a complete list of former or current American guitar companies. Among the omissions are Steinberger electric guitars and basses, now part of Gibson and Carvin, who is still independently owned and sells only direct, not through distributors or stores. I have not included the past great archtop luthiers such as D’Angelico, D’Aquisto or current archtop makers such as Bennedetto. Nor have I included the many smaller USA luthiers who are currently building excellent guitars such as Huss & Dalton, Foggy Bottom or Collings.
One of the most important Telecaster players was Clarence White, who, during his short career, contributed more to country electric guitar than almost anyone else, along with being a phenomenal bluegrass flatpicking guitarist and a pioneer of thecountry rock genre. He played with the Byrds, and Nashville West along with the bluegrass bands the Kentucky Colonels andMuleskinner. He enlisted the help of Gene Parsons and invented the StringBender, a device inside the body of the guitar that raises a string’s (either the B- or G-string most of the time) pitch when pressure is applied to the strap. His Telecaster is one of the most recognizable and is now owned by Marty Stuart.
Visit “mom and pop shops,” big-name musical instrument retailers, Craigslist, eBay & Amazon to compare the reviews and prices of various models. The ability to make an educated decision based on the feel, sound quality and playability is important. Consider renting a guitar for the first month of lessons. A good teacher will serve as a guide throughout the buying process and will teach you to play well enough to “test drive” your options.
These Gibson Les Paul Reissue guitars simply perform better than those made the year after or the year before. Gibson is aware of this and has been for quite some time. That's why they've decided to push out a series of Les Pauls which aimed to match the ones from 1959. Are they equally as good? Probably not since the old ones are legendary, but they're as close as you'll get for a brand new guitar.
Now, instead of just containing part of the sound completely, the tone knob is hooked up to a capacitor. The capacitor doesn't let everything through. Basically, it starts with the highest frequencies, letting them through to be contained rather than go to the amplifier. The more of the signal you send to the capacitor, though, the more of the spectrum it is forced to let through, meaning that more and more of the high end of the continuum is let through - the rest of the current is sent back and is let out through the line to the amp.

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The C-series archtops were long scale until mid-1934, same as the 000 models. Sometimes a C model is converted from an archtop to a 000 style flat top. A conversion of a short scale C-2 (mid-1934 and later) won't exactly be a 000 either. The neck must be shortened to get the shallower angle required for a flat top. This amounts to about 1/3 of a fret, so the guitar ends up having a 13 2/3 fret neck. This puts the bridge position a little lower on the top, closer to the OM bridge position (but not exactly the same). The other feature on the C models that is different from a 000 is the back arch and the back braces. The archtops have more arch in the back and taller #3 and #4 back braces. Note the 1939 and later C-2 models have no abalone, the neck inlays are pearloid.
You need to know what colour code your pickup wires are. If the 4-wire pickup is a Seymour Duncan then the link above should work for you, if it’s another brand of pickup then you’ll have to figure out how to correct for the appropriate colour wires e.g. DiMarzio pickups use a different colour code on their wires to Seymour Duncan and they’re all fairly easy to find on the web.
It's pretty common that your fingers hurting at first. We all went through it. It does not matter what kind of strings you use. You will pay the price…. Think of it as a Right-Of Passage, or an initiation of sorts. If you think about it, everything in life that is pleasurable comes with a certain amount of pain that must be endured, whether it is financial, such as buying something you really want, emotional, as in love, or physical, such as building your muscles and playing sports.
1967-1969: about the coolest guitar Danelectro ever produced. Has 13 drone strings that move from the vibration of the usual 6 strings. Three pickups, 2 for the 6 stings and 1 for the drone strings. Crinkle burgundy finish, 3 point body shape. Has a "buzz" bridge which similate the sitar sound. The resonation from the buzz bridge vibrates the top of the body and the drone strings. Clear pickguards protecting the drone strings and Vinnie's name on the lower 6 string clear pickguard. Body is made entirely from Poplar, with a semi-hollow construction.
Back again! I sold the Eagle Jazz bass copy, but have acquired a hollow body 3/4 bass that we believe said Lyle or Aria on the peg head (badge gone). Interestingly it seems like possibly a copy of a Kay design, florentine cutaway with a sunburst. Three of the tuners are missing the bushings, and I'd love to know how to get replacements! I may have to manufacture something, but don't own a metal lathe. Also found a Strat copy that says Mark II on the peg head, nice mahogany neck, in a dumpster along with a Jackson Dinky. Stole parts off the Dinky to make the Strat copy whole, and I like it better than the Mexi-Strat and Squier Affinity start I had, so I sold those, and the Jackson after replacing the bridge parts I'd stolen off it. Besides, I still haven't got all the magic marker off the pick guard on the Mark II (recently heard they were made by Cort, or whoever makes Cort). I bought a Telestar (believe it was made by Teisco) in a thrift store for maybe $12.99 or something like that. I love the pickup sound, but the neck doesn't get any wider as it approaches the body and the frets get closer together. I also have a San Antonio made Alamo like that, and sold off a Silvertone (made in Japan) tiny hollow body with that issue. The necks are hard to play! But I like that pickup on the Telestar so much I can't part with it.
One of the most important Telecaster players was Clarence White, who, during his short career, contributed more to country electric guitar than almost anyone else, along with being a phenomenal bluegrass flatpicking guitarist and a pioneer of thecountry rock genre. He played with the Byrds, and Nashville West along with the bluegrass bands the Kentucky Colonels andMuleskinner. He enlisted the help of Gene Parsons and invented the StringBender, a device inside the body of the guitar that raises a string’s (either the B- or G-string most of the time) pitch when pressure is applied to the strap. His Telecaster is one of the most recognizable and is now owned by Marty Stuart.
The Chapman ML2's classic, single-cut body, two chrome-plated humbuckers and a black pennant headstock that’s not a million miles away from Gibson’s Les Paul. But appearances can be deceptive: this instrument is a very different beast. Chapman pegs its weight at a relatively svelte 3.5kg, so it’s unlikely to see you turning over your salary to the chiropractor. It’s also heavily contoured with its cutaway and heel carved for easy access to the upper frets. It has a modern, satin-smooth C-profile neck, hewn from maple (another deviation from the LP blueprint) and glued neatly to the body. The 25" scale lends it a unique feel - and with 24 jumbo nickel frets, the ML2 Modern is hugely shreddable. Both pickups feature an Alnico V magnet at the heart (think tight low-end, brightness, a little less on the mids), but with a coil-split, accessed by pulling up on the master tone pot, you can split the signal of these humbuckers for some single-coil snap and sizzle. The ML2 Modern makes a good claim on being all things to all guitarists. With coils split or not, we love its tone. That bridge ’bucker really sings with some gain. While the neck pickup is a great ‘rhythm’ humbucker - articulate and dynamic. Whether you find the modernity in its versatility, or in a feel that’s more Jackson than Gibson, the ML2 Modern sure lives up to its name.
The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place...  Click To Read More About This Product
When I first plugged it in, it made a sound like it was "fretting out" if you put a bar at the twelfth fret position. That's a pretty good feat, given that the guitar has no frets. It turned out that someone had cranked up the pole pieces for extra gain, but had cranked them so far that the strings made contact with them when the guitar was played. A quick tweak right in the store with a jeweler's screwdriver sorted them out and revealed the lovely vintage sound of this little beastie. Supro developed a neat strings-through pickup system with staggered pole pieces that this guitar features.
Awesome for the money! I have had my guitar for about a month now. The guitar itself is worth the money. I play on a 100w amp at church and it sounds good. Definitely not the highest quality but still a good full body sound. (After restringing it. The strings it comes with are garbage) The amp that this comes with is nice ... I actually was using it as a practice amp with my bass and it did fine. Nothing that I could play with any other instruments but definitely can hear what I'm doing. My son also uses it as a practice amp on an electric guitar and it does fine, it doesn't have any functions just meant to be an accustic amp. Definitely worth the money.
The bass guitar has a long neck (scale-length) and thick strings. The open strings of the bass guitar corresponds to the four lowest strings of the guitar and are pitched an octave lower. The standard bass has four strings though five and six string basses are available which extends the range of the instrument. Though the bass guitar is the bass instrument of the guitar family and the double-bass is the bass instrument of the orchestral string family their similar roles have drawn bass players to both instruments.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Amber
When starting with the electric guitar, it’s not uncommon to look at experienced player’s pedal board and think “Wow, so many pedals, with different names – wonder what should I get”. And while everyone knows that the core of your sound comes from the sensibility of your touch, your guitar and your amplifier, it is also true that certain pedals can transform and shape your tone to make it more unique and personal. Before shelling out all your beloved savings on unnecessary pedals, take a look at this guide to understand the 10 basic pedals, the so-called “must-haves”. 
Power amps are rated in volts and generally come in .7V, 1V, and 1.25V. Most preamps don’t produce strong enough output to power a 1.25V. Most manufacturers don’t rate the average output of their preamp which makes things even harder in determining compatibility. What you can look for is the “line level“, “dBu”, or “dBv” information when researching this aspect of your acoustic electric guitar.
I Shopped for a long time looking for a suitable nylon for both around the house and live performing. I ordered this Yamaha sight unseen and couldn't be happier with it. Fit and Finish is top notch. Price for value is incredible. playability is remarkably nice. Sound is great. I love the 14th fret to the body configuration vs my other nylons. The dual volume controls on the preamp give me a chance to glisten the high end in a band situation when my lines call for it. Honestly, i am a big fan of the Fishman electronics in my other acoustics, but this yamaha system leaves little to be desired. I did call yamaha support tto order a fitted soundhole cover and it took them a couple of days to get to me, but eventually called me until i
My fav...So fun...And I love the color duty Siri since the first one came out and this one definitely does not disappoint it is a great game and I have not stop playing and I love the color duty Siri since the first one came out and this one definitely does not disappoint it is a great game and I have not stop playing it Since I got it...I only viewed the trailer and sales figures as this is a very popular game before purchasing this game and it seemed like it had a lot of action but it's not really my taste for a military game as it has some fictional characters like zombies in it and there are no fighter jets.
: I own a Decca guitar, it is what I learned to play on many years ago. From what little I have gathered about them they were an order by mail brand, and you could only get them from a catolog such as Sears & Roebuck. I havent been able to find a price for them or any ifo on what catalogs they were from. Mine has a Ernie Ball Musicman-like peghead (4 one side 2 on the other) and has a metal pick guard with 2 giant switches which seem to have no effect on tone. It has a brown & yellow sunburst paint job (ewwww).I thought I possibly had the only one in existence, lol, guess not.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst
While production and distribution of guitars under the Ibanez brand began much earlier, the company gained notoriety outside its native Japan when it started importing Ibanez guitars to the United States in the mid-1960s. These first efforts were funky-looking creations which sold at the low end of the guitar market, primarily in department stores. But the company's products continued to move up the quality ladder until the company was perceived as a legitimate market force, selling what were essentially copies of other companies' designs in the mid-1970s. A patent lawsuit from Gibson ended the sales of those copies, but Ibanez had by then gained a foothold in the guitar market globally. (more...)
The Marshall Mini Jubilee 2525C Combo amp is closely based on the highly-coveted Marshall Jubilee series of amps. The powerful preamp has been designed to the specifications of the original 2525 Silver Jubilee diagrams, making this an authentic reproduction of these now out-of-production monsters of rock. Don’t let this little beast fool you though, the ECC83 & EL34 valve set produces some seriously loud sounds through the single 12” Celestion G12M–25 Greenback speaker. Perfect for lead and rhythm, this great combo amp is ideal for both stage and studio!
Some bass amps may have additional controls for onboard effects such as bass chorus or a knob for controlling a multi-effects unit (which might include a suboctave generator, chorus, reverb, fuzz bass etc.). Some 2000s-era amps may have a knob to control digital amp or speaker emulation settings (e.g., emulating the tone of a huge 8x10" speaker stack or a vintage tube amp by famous makers, such as the Ampeg SVT).
You should visit a local guitar shop to purchase your first guitar. You will benefit immensely from their experience, and they will be able to support you after the sale. Avoid places like Walmart, Best Buy, etc., because all they can do is sell you a guitar, and a poor one at that. Most local guitar shops have gone to great lengths to select guitar lines that are serviceable, and play and sound good. As a beginner, you will appreciate their service and commitment to you, even though a local shops pricing may be a touch higher. Most local shops offer lessons, as well.
Lest anyone think left-handed guitarists are at a disadvantage compared to their right-handed contemporaries, consider this list of some of the best known lefties: Paul McCartney, Dick Dale, Jimi Hendrix, and Albert King are just a few of the world’s most esteemed left-handed guitar players. In the 1950s and ’60s, though, left-handed guitars were often difficult to come by, especially for guitarists on a budget. This makes left-handed...Continue Reading
From the 1920s to the 1940s, upright bass players who wanted to strengthen the acoustic sound of their instrument had to use small portable PA systems or guitar amp combos designed for acoustic guitar or archtop guitars. Since these systems were not specifically designed to amplify bass instruments, it is unlikely they provided good low-frequency sound reproduction (particularly guitar amps, which are not designed to go down as low in pitch as the low E (41 Hz) and A (55 Hz) strings). In the early 1920s, it was very hard for an upright bass player (indeed for any musician) to find any amplifier and speaker system to make their instrument louder. The only speakers that could be bought during the early 1920s were "radio horns of limited frequency range and low acoustic output", and the cone speaker (which is widely used in modern-era amp cabinets), was not offered for sale until 1925. The first amplifiers and speakers were PA speaker setups; while an upright bassist could potentially have used one of these early PA systems, they could only be powered with large batteries, which made them heavy and hard to carry around. When engineers developed the first AC mains-powered amplifiers, they were soon used to make musical instruments louder.
Students and expert alike describe this guitar as a fun instrument, and goes further by commenting that it has exceeded their expectations. From its fast action playability to the quality of the finish, the Epiphone SGSpecial continues to rake in compliments. Several people even said that it comes surprisingly close to the feel and sound of a Gibson SG.
As suggested by the numerical designation, Martin’s 28 Series was essentially an upgrade or refinement of the earlier 18 Series. Martin typically indicates fancier materials and appointments with a higher number (a D-28 is fancier dreadnought than a D-18, etc.). These consisted of one guitar, the E-28, and one bass, the EB-28. The first prototypes appeared in June of 1980; production began in January of 1981.

If you are interested in a more a price friendly model, it is recommendable that you give this model produced by Davison Guitars a good look. According to its manufacturer, the unit comes shipped with a handful of useful accessories such as a practice amp, a case, a strap cord and a very practical DVD that is said to help beginners play the instrument in no time.
Before taking the plunge, make sure that you have the necessary tools to build the guitar of your dreams. Most kits will require you to have screwdrivers, pliers and soldering iron for the assembly process. While others require more, like wood glue, bandsaw and other wood routing tools. Once you've decided on the finish, you'll also have to get finishing tools like sandpaper, wood sealant, primer, paint and more. It is also recommended to have a dedicated room or space for you to work on, a nice working table would also make work a bit more easier.

The best guitarists of all time, voted on and ranked by many music fans, with photos and other info. With help from the wisdom of the crowd, you'll find a comprehensive ranking of the greatest guitar players in history. All the top guitarists are on this list - monster guitar heroes from rock, metal, blues, and alternative music. Are you on Team Eddie or Team Jimi? How about both!
Rickenbacker is another famous American brand created in 1931 to build Hawaiian guitars, called "Frying pans" due to their typical shape. The brand incorporated guitars to its catalog a bit later. The models created by Roger Rossmeisl (Combo 4000 guitar, 4000 bass), a former Gibson collaborator and future Fender man in the 1950's, enjoyed a lot of success and became the brand's most typical designs. The 360, 370, 620, 660, and 4003 models can be connected to a Rick-O-Sound unit (a box with two mono outs) via a stereo 1/4" jack, which allows the two or three pickups to feed different amps. Most instruments have a dual truss rod and a varnished rosewood fretboard. Their distinctive jangle and chime emphasizes high frequencies, giving pretty good results with clean sounds. The Beatles, and especially John Lennon, often played Rickenbacker guitars at the dawn of their careers. Tom Petty, The Jam and R.E.M. are also Rickebacker users.
Because of this, the VI opens the door for critique at the smallest degree, but I couldn’t even get that far before finding problems. The strumming is so terribly robotic out of the box, and the sounds divided among the four guitars (Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster, and “bright” and “normal” versions of a Duesenberg StarPlayer) aren’t screaming authenticism either.  
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The herringbone purfling (binding) was discontinued on style 28 guitars in 1947. The binding was made in pre-World War II Germany and was not replaceable from American sources. When the stockpile ran out in early 1947, D-28s (and all style 28 guitars) were bound with a new decoration scheme of alternating black and white celluloid (originally used on the Martin archtop C-2 model). Hence the term "herribone D-28" or "bone 28" is heard amoung Martin collections, signifying a pre-1947 style 28 Martin guitar.
Either today or tomorrow my SSS Mexican Stratocaster will be arriving at my local Guitar Center and I'm not sure if I should pay to get it setup. The guy that worked there, Jon, suggested I get my guitar setup as soon as I go and pick it up since its 50% off for a first time setup. He said the technician would adjust the guitar strings, double check the action or height of the strings or something. It sounds like something I wouldn't really need but then again I'm just a beginner - maybe some of you more experienced guitarists can let me know if Jon was trying to do me a solid or if he was just trying to make a sale. He also said they'd help me get my guitar in tune which was pretty cool.

Thanks to its small size and slim neck, you get to play this guitar and improve your skills with ease. The cutaway design also gives you easier access to the higher frets for tapping or other more advanced techniques. This guitar has a spruce top that improves the sound quality as it ages, meranti back and sides, and rosewood bridge and fingerboard.


Fender, or the Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company, as it was properly known, was started in 1946, in Fullerton, California, by Leo Fender. The early designs effectively wrote the book on the solid body guitar manufacture; his approach of simple guitars using quality parts, easily assembled (most specifically the replaceable neck) proved an immediate sucess. Guitars like the Fender Stratocaster, Telecaster, Jaguar and Precision bass have barely changed since their very first inception; Fender simply got it right first time round.
Some emulator designs include switchable filters, enabling them to simulate open or closed-backed speaker cabinets, and can come very close to the sound of a close-miked amp, while ambience can be simulated using a reverb processor or plug-in. Even if the amp has a good spring reverb, a little additional digital ambience (mainly early reflections) will help create the illusion of the amplifier being recorded in a room.
Chorus: Generally you won’t hear delay during the chorus, though guitarists who strictly play lead can still find ways to utilize it.Verse: It’s probably the most “delay friendly” portion of a song, providing the lowered intensity that makes room for the extra noise of the delay effect.Bridge: A short solo or lead guitar segment will usually be pretty tame in Christian songs, allowing for the use of heavy delay, as well as other effects.
Scott Knickelbine began writing professionally in 1977. He is the author of 34 books and his work has appeared in hundreds of publications, including "The New York Times," "The Milwaukee Sentinel," "Architecture" and "Video Times." He has written in the fields of education, health, electronics, architecture and construction. Knickelbine received a Bachelor of Arts cum laude in journalism from the University of Minnesota.

You didn’t think we would forget bass amps, did you? Due to their inherent differences in design, bass guitars require a dedicated amplifier – using your old Fender Champion isn’t going to cut it. Bass amps offer more power, with some outputs reaching 1000 watts or more. Like guitar amps, bass amplifiers come in many shapes and sizes – including heads and combos – although the mid-range Hartke HD500 offers a stage-worthy 500 watts of power in a portable combo unit, with great controls and an excellent balanced tone.


SOLD OUT: Super condition its been kept in the case over 25 years WoW!... JVG just set-up and plays wonderfully no buzz no drag its EASY to play now and it has NO WEAR almost like owning NEW Vintage! Sounds good ! its loud and robust TONE this is a great deal on an absolutely wonderful guitar. This was well crafted in Korea in the late 1980's same as Japan spec incredible. Lots of vintage guitar for a great price Its woods are as follows... Top is Spruce nice straight grained and may be solid cant see a seam it is what it is as made, the back and sides are all a fine instrument grade mahogany as is the neck a medium slim profile neck feels great , the headstock has the rosewood overlay with Fender logo in mother of pearl with gloss finish to front headstock as the body is gloss front - sides and back and the back of neck smartly in satin finish to not show finger prints easily.. Fit and finish is rated JVG at very good - excellent vintage easily Near Mint rating I'm still looking for a dink and cant find one yet, but thats not to say there may be something minute somewhere but I looked it over good and she qualifies for near mint rating vintage and is WAY BETTER than average. The fingerboard I believe is ebonized rosewood and shows no divots at all... same with frets I polished them pre set up and I can attest they are excellent too... Neck angle and action is very good straight and as a result the action is set to within Martin spec and plays excellently with no buzzing. Original tuners on board and are good quality and do the job well, intonation on this guitar is good so it sounds sweet up or down the fingerboard... surprisingly great tone for a guitar anywhere near this price point, You will be very pleased. Comes with its original semi hard chipboard case black good all latches and handle are good, Here is a great sounding and playing Vintage Korean guitar that will be sure to please. Questions ? asl Joe jvguitars@gmail.com .
Much of a B3's magic comes from good mic placement and the player (the right drawbar settings are game changers). EQ should be applied sparingly and mainly as a corrective measure. Usually it's good to look to anything clashing with the bass (80 to 180 Hz), and if it's feeling a little "chubby" in the middle and either can't get out of its own way or doesn't play nice with other mid-heavy instruments or guitars, look to make cuts somewhere between 300 to 500 Hz.
Compared to, say, an Epiphone Dot, the Coupe offers a ‘woodier,’ more acoustic timbre. “Sparkly,” “bell-like” and “jangly” are descriptors often associated with the guitar and its stock pair of P-90s, and cranking the gain up elicits more a sizzle than roar. Be careful with the distortion, though—without a center block like those you’ll find on semi-hollows, the Coupe is still fairly susceptible to feedback.
The Vintage Modified Jazzmaster has the tried-and-tested dual circuitry of the original models from the ’60s. The “Rhythm” circuit activates only the neck pickup, while the “Lead” circuit lets you pick between neck, bridge and both at the same time. Each circuit has its own dedicated master volume and tone knobs. (In comparison, the Fender American Professional Jazzmasters don’t have this circuitry.)
Great Gretsch "pumpkin orange color", and a great sounding, and playing import reissue. Knobs replaced with dice, and a couple of decals added. Has factory installed Epiphone labeled Bigsby trem-tail piece, no longer available on this model. Chrome p-90 pick-ups. Guitar, and original hard-shell case in like new cond. New list on these is $1195.00 with original hard shell  case.
C.F. Martin & Company is a U.S. guitar manufacturer established in 1833 byChristian Frederick Martin. Martin is highly regarded for its steel-string guitarsand is a leading mass-manufacturer of flattop acoustics. Martin instruments can cost thousands of dollars and vintage instruments often cost six figures. The company has also made several models of electric guitars and electric basses.

If you haven't tried a higher end Yairi then you have missed it. These are great hand crafted guitars with a very good neck and great sound. They are branded Alverez in the US but be sure it is one of the Yairi made. There are not lots of them made due the the complete hand crafted design. You don't find them in the music stores much but they should be there. I have owned one for many years and have yet to pick up any other guitar that can match it in my opinion
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Seagull S6 Original Acoustic guitar is one of the best gadgets for the beginners in the list. It comes with the beautiful texture of domestic wild cherry back and sides that give it a unique tone. In addition to that silver leaf maple neck with a rosewood fretboard lets the fingers to have a perfect grip and easy tuning. It’s a power pack guitar to get you the best playing experience and hands on many of the tricks you are looking for.
To be able to buy a name brand guitar like this at such a great price was a real steal. One of my sons is a beginner learning to play, so it was great for me being able to purchase a guitar like this that would carry him from beginner into an intermediate player in later years. It is a well-made and beautiful guitar, and it produces a wonderful sound that you would expect from a name like Fender. Plus, with my son being left-handed, I thought it would be difficult to find a good affordable left-handed guitar for him. Not only was able to find this high quality one, but the price couldn't be beat.

Now you see why these Spectrum 5s are so desirable! It is not clear, by the way, how many (if any) were ever made with ebony necks. The few I’ve personally seen had maple necks. Certainly the expense of the ebony would have been enormous and hard to justify on the Teisco brand name. Also, with the density of ebony, the guitars probably would have been hard to balance. In any case, these are the Holy Grails of Teisco!


The Builder’s Edition V-Class K14ce - one of four new 2018 V-Class launches that also include a K24ce, 914ce and PS14c - is quite a statement of intent. It combines the new V bracing with a notably different, more comfortable, Grand Auditorium style. Of course, its build-quality is nothing short of exceptional as we’d expect, and not least at this price. We’re also reminded of the K14ce’s high-end lineage, however, by the paua ‘spring vine’ inlay that lies down the majority of the black/dark brown ebony ’board, while a lighter koa purfling stripe sits just inside the ebony edge-binding and continues around the headstock, which is again ebony-faced with a relatively demure paua inlay. The aged-gold Gotoh tuners perfectly fit the slightly worn-in vibe - hugely understated class, just like the green abalone dots in the ebony bridge-pins. While there’s plenty for those who love details to admire, the modern Taylor guitar is hugely sorted in terms of playing feel. V-Class, Builder’s Edition? Get used to those terms. Taylor has upped the ante. Considerably.
The BOSS ME-80 multi effects pedal is an excellent entry point into effects as it contains just about every type of effect you can think of. The ME-80 allows you to chain eight effect groups together in one patch with 36 preset patches allowing you to seamlessly switch from rock to funk to jazz at the push of a footswitch. There are also 36 user patches so you can create your own tone.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 44.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - String Instrument Finish: Light Violin High Gloss Sunburst, Dark Violin High Gloss Sunburst
Eric Clapton was in a bad mood during the photoshoot for Blues Breakers. The 1966 Clapton/John Mayall collaboration sees Clapton on the album art reading a copy of UK comic book the Beano. He was so aghast and bored by the idea of a photoshoot that day that he refused to make eye contact with the photographer, therefore settling on staring at a comic instead. Nicknamed “The Beano Album”, it’s often considered to be one of the most important guitar recordings ever made.
Austin-based John Grammatico is building some of the best amps available, and with his current range of products he’s managed to capture the spirit of legendary vintage amps while utilizing modern reliable components. The LaGrange is a small 15 watt amp that will sound great with either single coils or humbuckers. Expect a warm, woody sound with throaty mids and bell-like highs. The sound is transparent, harmonically rich and well worth the investment.
Sometimes people forget that the greatest musician is not the one who can plays faster. I play guitar and I admire who plays fast, but i admire more the ones who can make beatiful music, even if it's simple. Frusciante is one of the few guys who can do so (beside Hendrix). And Frusciante could play all of Jimi's songs when he was 12 years old, and I guess he still can. So for those who compare them to Steve Vai, you should listen to music and not watch to the speed of their fingers.

This tonewood is nearly always seen in the material used for a fretboard on the neck. The various species of Rosewood add their own harmonic overtones with Indian Rosewood being the most warm. In general, Rosewood provides incredible harmonic complexity, personality, and resonance that’s worthy of stage and studio recording as can be seen on the solid Rosewood body of the Yamaha A3R A-Series Guitar.


The playing of (3-5 string) guitar chords is simplified by the class of alternative tunings called regular tunings, in which the musical intervals are the same for each pair of consecutive strings. Regular tunings include major-thirds tuning, all-fourths, and all-fifths tunings. For each regular tuning, chord patterns may be diagonally shifted down the fretboard, a property that simplifies beginners' learning of chords and that simplifies advanced players' improvisation. On the other hand, in regular tunings 6-string chords (in the keys of C, G, and D) are more difficult to play.

When it comes to classic British amp manufacturers, Orange is certainly one of the most legendary. And while many of their amps are pretty inaccessible unless you have many many zeroes in your bank account, they do offer a few superb inexpensive options – one of the best being the Micro Terror half stack you see here. Sold as a set, this tiny titan of an amp has all the brand’s classic style and sound in a package that’s just a fraction of the size. You might think that, with such limited functionality, it’s a bit of a one trick pony – and it is, except it does that one trick better than anyone else. Of course, if you’re looking for a more aggressive hard rock sound, you could always opt for the Micro Dark version for the same price.
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I have been playing guitar, banjo, and harmonica for 60 years. I started when I was ten-years-old. I have taught guitar and banjo for a number of years. My guitar of choice is a Martin D-41, an affordable guitar that is much like the D-45. The woods and construction are famous. There are other makes but none surpass Martin. My harmonicas are Hohners given to me by my father when he passed-on. Anyone can learn. I learned the fiddle after I reached my 70's. Just listen, play, and learn. Don't give-up. There are many good guitars, and banjos. Martin makes the best, and Stelling makes the best banjos. I started-out with a japanese banjo in the 1970's. A white Eagle, distributed by Alvarez.

But no all are created equal, and I don’t really do this — I have live performance gear for anything I do, actually, way more than I need at this point. But a good friend of mine does the whole live-thing-throug-PC and has completely sold his soul to Ableton Live (Music production with Live and Push). You can find Ableton Live Intro online for about $99. It’s not just a live performance tool but also a DAW, you can use it for recording, composing, etc. Again, not one I use, but probably what you want if you’re going for live playing.
Rickenbacker has produced a number of uniquely designed and distinctively trimmed acoustic guitars. Although a small number of Rickenbacker acoustics were sold in the 1950s and were seen in the hands of stars like Ricky Nelson[9]and Sam Cooke,[10] the company concentrated on their electric guitar and western steel guitar business from the early 1960s onward. From about 1959 through 1994, very few Rickenbacker acoustic guitars were made.
Effects Pedals are electronic devices that modify the tone, pitch, or sound of an electric guitar. Effects can be housed in effects pedals, guitar amplifiers, guitar amplifier simulation software, and rackmount preamplifiers or processors. Electronic effects and signal processing form an important part of the electric guitar tone used in many genres, such as rock, pop, blues, and metal. All these are inserted into the signal path between an electric instrument and the amplifier. They modify the signal coming from the instrument, adding "effects" that change the way it sounds in order to add interest, create more impact or create aural soundscapes.
There's just no getting around the Martin brand when there's talk about good acoustics. And since we're talking about the best of them, it's not surprising to find their name filling up multiple slots in this list. The Martin DRS2 acoustic guitar is special because it gives us a true all-solid wood body Martin acoustic guitar - at a very reasonable price point, in the dreadnought shape that the company themselves developed.

To combat this, many jazz players began to favour semi-acoustic guitars. These often came with feedback reducing wooden blocks installed inside the body, which addded extra weight to the instrument. But, with the welcome side effect of increasing the amount of sustain produced. Gibson and Ibanez cornered the mass-production market, offering a range of hollow bodied guitars which were well received by jazz players as well as players of genres like blues and rock n’ roll. As time went on, many players even gravitated towards solid body guitars, on account of the unique and arguably more versatile palette of sounds on offer.
“The tremolo tail assembly was engineered specifically for the Spectrum ‘5.’ The bridge is an integral part of the whole assembly and is, of course, universally adjustable. The marvel of it all, however, is that the tremolo does not exert any friction (hence no wear and tear) on the strings. The tremolo action causes the whole bridge assembly to move smoothly back and forth.

Strongly influenced by Stevie Ray Vaughn, Albert King, and Johnny Winter, Garrett is also a longtime fan of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Allen Collins. Following the path that led Collins to his biting, cutting tone, Bo plays the same type of guitar as the Skynyrd legend, and gets tremendous versatility from his Gibson Firebirds. Incidentally, Winters and King are also notorious Firebird pickers. Bo says that his Firebirds (one of which is a rare collectible) allow him to go from nasty drive flavors to cleaner, Strat-like tones when he needs them.
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Add to this the physical attributes and ergonomics of a .strandberg* that work together to relax muscles, joints and tendons when playing. Some players are freaked out by the low weight, others by the lack of headstock and some have a natural playing position that places their thumb right at the edge of the EndurNeck™ and is not comfortable at all.
Seriously, Yamaha above ESP?! Japanese made ESP guitars are among the best in the world, no wonder so many people play them. They have great designs and an ESP standard is not to high in price compared to a USA Jackson or custom shop guitar. Ibanez prestige are very nice to (I hate the necks personally) but the build is really good. ESP blows Gibson out of the water by a VERY large margin. Gibson has lawsuits against them for selling "USA" made guitars that were discovered to be imports from cheap labor offshore factories. All ESP and Ibanez prestige guitars are made in Japan and are immaculate in terms of quality and consistency. ESP is more a metal guitar but they have much better tone than any of the others listed, the only one here that might have a sweeter tone is prs but for $8,000 and only a fractionally better tone that is subjective they can keep it. I personally like ESP and Schecter best but Jackson is really good too. Not to knock Ibanez, but their necks are way to thin ...more
The Tele is often called a workingman’s instrument for its simplicity.  It also happens to offer tons of tone variants, just like the Strat.  The neck pickup, with its distinctive “lipstick” look, can go from perfect blues tones to jazz, just by rolling back the tone knob.  Danny Gatton was known to take full advantage of the many sounds the Tele could produce, even in one song, by rolling the tone knob to produce the “wah wah” effect that most players achieve through a foot pedal.

Rather than superfluous power, I suspect the copywriter really meant something like superior!! However, then again, maybe they did get it right, because they featured a 6A6 preamp tube that was exceptionally weak and microphonic. These amps also had a chassis built in Chicago, by Chicago Electric, with a cabinet made in Chicago, by Geib. These had performance problems and in 1937, National Dobro went back to using Webster chassis with Geib cabinets.
@Dax – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble with the pedals in your setup. If the pedals work on their own in front of the amplifier isolated one at a time, this is likely related to a setting or connection with the pedals. Please shoot us an email to support@strymon.net with full details on the amp make and model, the inputs and outputs used on both the amp and each of the pedals, and the setting of the switch on the back of the pedals. Also, include whether this happens on every preset or only certain presets with each pedal.

Description: 1997 Non Left Handed Model. Body: Laminated Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - String Instrument Finish: Ebony, Natural, Vintage Sunburst


On August 21, 1965, during a Beatles concert tour, Randy Resnick of B-Sharp, aMinnesota music store, presented Harrison with a second model 360/12 FG “New Style” 12-string electric guitar, distinguishable from Harrison’s first 12-string by its rounded cutaways and edges. There was a television documentary produced by KSTP TV in Minneapolis documenting this event.
A difficult effect to explain, the compressor’s value is in it subtle and careful use. A compressor acts like bumpers on your signal's amplitude, preventing the volume from spiking too loud while also preventing the volume from decaying too quickly. Because of this, it increases sustain - which is great for solos - while evening out playing dynamics. Country and funk players use compression heavily to achieve spanky and crisp punctuation within their playing. Compressors will add noise to the signal, so many higher end boxes will have a noise gate feature. Other than making cleans sparkle, you can also front-load your distortion or overdrive to get great clear sustain.
In 1958, Gibson introduced the ES-335 as part of its Electric Spanish line of guitars, and it was the world’s first commercially released semi-hollow guitar. Featuring a solid center block in an otherwise hollow thinline body, the then-radical design effectively combined the round, airy tone of a traditional archtop with the sustain and feedback-fighting benefits of a solidbody. Its groundbreaking design is one of the most imitated around.
Why the Ultra Hard Bodies flopped is a mystery, since they certainly fit with the superstrat rage of the times, but they hung around for only a year or so. According to Walter Carter, Ovation briefly contracted for a shipment of solidbodies made by a Japanese manufacturer. No information is available about these, but it doesn’t really matter since only one carton of 100 or so guitars ever came in. If you find an animal that doesn’t fit the descriptions here, take a picture and let us know about it.
Of all the guitars in the world, this ends up as number 42!?! OK, amateurs, time to tell the truth, these guitars are the best, simply flawless and amazing. Don't talk about your Yamahas or your Ibanez or even Fender for that case! Those are just decent guitars. You will fall in love with the John Petrucci models; they have clobbered, I mean nearly humiliated Gibson. Try these, then think again.

Based out of Scottsdale, Arizona, Fender offers a few levels of quality of guitar, depending on where they’re made. Their high-end models are all made in the United States — as is designated on the headstock — while their less expensive models are made in Mexico. Most Fender guitars feature single coil pick-ups, lending to a very distinct bluesy sound with more twang and less punch than a humbucking guitar.
Copyright © 2016 Sonoma Wire Works. All rights reserved. RiffWorks and the RW Logo, RiffWorld, RiffCaster, RiffLink, RiffRumble, InstantDrummer, StudioTrack and the StudioTrack iPad App Logo, the FourTrack iPhone App Logo, GuitarTone and the GuitarTone Logo, GuitarJack and the GuitarJack logo, DrummerPack, KitPack and Discrete Drums are trademarks of Sonoma Wire Works. DrumCore and KitCore are registered trademarks of Sonoma Wire Works. iPod, iPhone and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Android is a trademark of Google Inc. ReWire and REX2 are technologies licensed from Propellerhead Software. VST is a trademark of Steinberg Media Technologies GmbH. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

An electric guitar is an expensive toy, so deciding who to buy it for is very important. Depending on the electric guitar’s purpose, its size and sound have to align with the player’s taste and goals. Profciency is also another deciding factor. If you are a beginner electric guitar player, the most important things to keep in mind is how easily you can play the electric guitar. What type of body style is suitable? What types of tones suits your tastes? These are the types of questions anyone should ask themselves when deciding who to buy an electric guitar for.

Both Brian May from Queen and Ritchie Blackmore did use treble boosters for sure in their rigs to get more gain out of their amps. Germanium transistors are very inconsistent and are subject to temperature changes so they can be finicky. They also certainly color your tone to a large extent, which is something you may want. Clean boosts that use silicon transistors are much more common and reliable, they can also boost your signal without effecting your tone too much. For a general clean boost I would go for a modern one. If you want an old school sound, I’d check out a germanium based unit. Or like me, I’d get both.

InstantDrummer provides tempo-sycronized drum loop sessions that can be accessed easily from within RiffWorks guitar recording software. Most RiffWorks InstantDrummer Sessions are loop recordings of professional drummers brought into the InstantDrummer format for easy manipulation by RiffWorks users. Play along with InstantDrummer sessions by famous drummers like Alan White (Yes, Lennon), Jason McGerr (Death Cab for Cutie), John Tempesta (Rob Zombie, Exodus, Testament, Tony Iommi, The Cult), Lonnie Wilson (Brooks and Dunn, Faith Hill, Tim McGraw), and Matt Sorum (Guns N Roses, Velvet Revolver). Use them in your recordings royalty free!
1960's Harmony H-54 Rocket 2 Redburst- Here's a excellent example of rock-n-roll to jazz all rolled up in one. For not much coin the Harmony Rocket was a great choice of hundreds of thousands from music stores to Sear Catalogs. This guitar is in very near mint condition as you can see. We repaired a slight crack at input jack common area. Yes, someone years ago stepped on the cord. We professional glued it from the inside and it's stronger than new. All that shows is a slight line about 1 1/2" long on bottom edge. Anyway, the Rocket 2 is getting harder and harder to find. Two DeArmond Gold Foil Pickups power this baby. It's all original, except for the pick guard, which no one can detect. Condition other than slight repair is a 9 3/4 for this great 50 year old beauty. Guitar comes with period clip board case. SOLD
A guitar recital may include a variety of works, e.g. works written originally for the lute or vihuela by composers such as John Dowland (b. England 1563) and Luis de Narváez (b. Spain c. 1500), and also music written for the harpsichord by Domenico Scarlatti (b. Italy 1685), for the baroque lute by Sylvius Leopold Weiss (b. Germany 1687), for the baroque guitar by Robert de Visée (b. France c. 1650) or even Spanish-flavored music written for the piano by Isaac Albéniz (b. Spain 1860) and Enrique Granados (b. Spain 1867). The most important composer who did not write for the guitar but whose music is often played on it is Johann Sebastian Bach (b. Germany 1685), whose baroque lute works have proved highly adaptable to the instrument.
There are a huge number of different style tone controls in musical equipment; this hardly scratches the surface. If you’re interested in what your tone controls do to your sound, agood place to look is at Duncan’s Amp Pages, where there is a tone stack calculator that shows frequency graphs of several different types of tone controls. Check out http://www.duncanamps.com/tsc/ for more info.
Another way to apply vibrato is by way of the whammy bar, AKA the vibrato arm. This comes especially in handy when you’re fretting high on the neck in areas where it would be difficult to apply finger-based vibrato. Another instance is bending. Some players find it more comfortable as well as stable to use the bar while holding a bend steady to ensure better overall intonation.
You should add the plugins on Igniteamps.com They are all free and are great. They use them as tools to help them design physical amps, so they are very accurate and almost zero-latency. They have a few amps and pre-amps, 2 OD pedals and even a cab modeller which is more than enough to get you started. The Emmisary is a freakin' miracle. It can do any tone (I use it for metal, blues, clean) but it's best for molten, in-your-face heavy metal since it has a 4-way EQ on the lead channel.
The advantage of this specific package is that you’ve got everything you need to get started right away: guitar (duh), amp, strings, tuner, guitar cable, picks, gig bag, strap, and instructional DVD. Those of you who just wanna get a guitar and start, this is your choice. Squier also makes similar package, but I recommend this over the Squier because the parts (electronics) are higher quality, although the Yamaha costs a little bit extra.
The VOX Pathfinder 10 is one of the best cheap amps on the market today, but don’t be fooled by its budget friendly price tag – this is a powerhouse of tone. Its pricing and ease of use makes it ideal for beginner guitarists but its signature, high quality VOX sound is why it’s also relied upon by professional guitarists and studio engineers everywhere.
The original  Owner purchased this guitar new at Ideal Music in Atlanta and loved her for the last 50 years. Vintage 1967 Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins Nashville model,factory bigsby replaced "kill switch" tip (the white one) I have an original tip now, to lazy to take new pictures...and reproduction armature inside body for string mute / Muffler system...SEE MORE HERE...

Presuming it is at least theoretically possible to digitally document in computational language every nuance of Eddie Van Halen's performance, the other aspect on the rendering side of the best-most-real equation is the guitar - from the pick or fingers on the strings, to the resonance of the wood body, the dynamics of pickups, the amps, the effects and such other processing gear.
Effects are electronic devices and circuits that process the electronic signal input from an instrument or mic. Also referred to as FX, they run the gamut from limiter or expander settings so subtle you can barely detect them to sci-fi modulation effects so extreme that the original sound is virtually undetectable. Think of your guitar or bass as your artist’s palette of primary colors. Effects are the equivalent of your brushes, tools, and color-mixing skills that add near-limitless creativity to your artistic vision.
I am old enough to remember Kay guitars back in the 70's. And what I remember of playing them is they were poorly put together, poor action (like mile high action), poor sounding pickups etc...They also seemed to always be the guitars that were the cheapest in all the mom n' pop stores, and the ones that were just sold to students, if they were sold at all. In other words,
To celebrate the new generation of shredders profiled in our May/June “Loud Issue,” the SPIN staff decided to find some wheedle in a haystack, taking on the impossible task of ranking our favorite guitar players of all time. Traditionally, the “greatest guitarist” timeline begins with Robert Johnson magically conjuring the blues, nears perfection with Eric Clapton mutating it beatifically, and then ultimately reaches a boomer-baiting Rock and Roll Hall of Fame apotheosis with the free-spirited Jimi Hendrix shooting it into space like feedback-laden fireworks. For this list, we veer toward the alternative canon that kicks in with the Velvet Underground trying to erase that form entirely, making guitar solos gauche and using instruments as sadomasochistic tools for hammering out sheets of white heat.
Replace components. From plugging in and unplugging my guitar so much, the stock input jack lost its grab. So I had an extra Radioshack one lying around, and I soldered it in. Now all my cords are held tight. I also had a problem(common with Teles as I understand it) with my input jack "cup" coming out with wires and all. Once you take a look at how it's held in there, it's an easy fix.
You have 6 strings that are always made of metal. Then you have a number of pickups - these are actually magnets. Sometimes you can see a round magnet under each string. When a metal string vibrates over a magnet, a current is produced; this current is what ends up being converted into sound waves, but it is very weak. Thus you have to send it through an amplifier.
My Les Paul never did sound quite right. It was always off somehow. I discovered it had the same problem like yours with the intonation being off the scale. Once I followed your guide, I discovered the neck adjustment was far too loose, and gapped it properly. Shazaam, the intonation problem disappeared, and now it plays like butter with all the notes dead on! U R the MAN!
“I was trying to help Henry and shoo him away from areas that he was spending a whole lot of money in,” Schon says. “All this electronical, robot crap. I told him, point blank, ‘What you’re doing, Roland and other companies are light-years in front of you, you’ve got this whole building you’ve designated to be working on this synth guitar. I’ve played it. And it just doesn’t work.’ And he refused to believe that.”
The Ibanez TSA15H gets most of its high ratings from users who love the sound of a cranked tube amp, because this is where it excels. This is especially true of guitarists who use single coil guitars, but there are some humbucker users who are just as impressed. Even experts commend the amp's dynamic response, Premiere Guitar's Kenny Rardin comments: "It feels and responds like a good tube amp, and varying the controls dials in the response even further". Value for money and reliability are also commended, as expected from Ibanez.
Left Handed 1968 Fender Strat with an insanely rare Blonde Custom Color! This had to have been a special order guitar – has “Blond” written in the neck pickup cavity(see pic). I think I’ve seen one other factory left-handed Blonde Strat, but certainly not from the Hendrix era(both the white Woodstock and black Band of Gypsies Strats were from 1968).
Check the action and clearance of the guitar strings by playing it before you begin setup. There should be 3/64-inch between the fret and the string on the treble side, and 5/64-inch on the bass side. Check that there is no buzzing when you play high up on the neck, and that the strings are not too difficult to push. If you hear buzzing, the neck must be corrected for underbow; if the strings are too far from the frets, the neck must be corrected for overbow.
In this modern world of in-ear monitors and digital consoles, both guitarists’ amps face the back wall of the stage rather than forward toward the audience. This allows them to crank their amps as loud as they need to achieve their signature Skynyrd-like drive without blowing out the Front of House engineer or the first three rows of the arena they’re performing in.
Sooner or later you may want to experiment further: What happens if I use a different opamp here, or change a capacitor value there? Specifying your own components is the next step. Two of the specialty jobs in building a typical effects pedal are the design of the circuit itself, and the production of the printed circuit board (PCB) on which to install the components. The next logical step from a kit is to order a pre-built PCB and then customize the component and enclosure choices yourself. AMZ effects, is the go-to place for a huge variety of pre-designed PCB’s. The cost is quite low and the projects include clear documentation providing guidance on different options and components.
Jazz guitarist Les Paul spent years tinkering with his own electric guitar designs, but his first creations were initially rejected by Gibson’s parent company in 1946. But just a few short years later, on the heels of Fender’s success with the Telecaster and Paul’s growing popularity as an artist, Gibson struck a deal with Paul to play and endorse their new design for a solid-body electric. Gibson released the guitar as the Les Paul signature model in 1952, and since its release, it has become one of the world’s most imitated and sought-after guitars, with late ’50s vintage models being among the most prized instruments in the world.
Across the United States, there are increasing concerns from businesses about the supply of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics trained workers. Although science and math test scores in the US are among the lowest around the world, the US educational system is in the process of revitalizing the “hands on” learning techniques as a way to enhance the participation and success of students. Our project meets the needs of applied learning with the flexibility of being modular in the classroom.

Merson emerges again as an importer in the late ’50s and early ’60s (as the guitar boom was building), marketing Giannini acoustic guitars made in Brazil and Hagstrom electric guitars made in Sweden. Recall that in the ’50s, the accordion craze had given great impetus to the success of music merchandisers. But by the end of the decade, the collapse of the fad left them holding the squeeze-box, as it were. After some meandering, the Folk Revival picked up at the end of the decade, creating a growing market for acoustic guitars. Hence the Gianninis.

Sounds cool! You’re right that flats are a key to the ’50s Nashville sound. But a lot of guitarists forget that almost EVERYONE used flats until the latter part of the ’60s. Early Beatles, Stones, Who, Kinks, Motown and other R&B, surf, and of course anything jazz-related — it’s all flatwound guitar work till ’66, ’67 or so. Also, the main reason we migrated away from nickel is because the material became markedly more expensive at the end of the decade. (Though yes, some did prefer the brighter tones of replacement materials.)


A musician's pedalboard can be a cluttered place, with lots of stompboxes all competing for room, not to mention creating a virtual spaghetti of patch cables. Wouldn't it be nice to swap out some of those pedals in exchange for a single unit? Of course it would, and that's why multi effects pedals exist. With one of these babies at your feet, you'll have multiple pedals in one. That does more than just clean up the visual look of your effects loop - it also makes your pedals easier to manage and use, and if you're a beginner, you'll appreciate how much simpler it is to put together your board with the most common effects all gathered in one unit.
Paul Landers, of Neue Deutsche Härte band Rammstein has a signature guitar based on his custom-built guitar. It features a mahogany body with a maple cap finished in satin black with silver binding only around the front of the body. The neck is also made of mahogany and features an Obeche fingerboard with no inlays or binding. Hardware includes a hardtail tune-o-matic bridge and Grover locking keystone tuners. The guitar also feature chrome-covered EMG pickups; an 81 in the bridge, and a 60 in the neck. It also only has a single volume control and a 3-way pickup toggle switch.
Tube amps use the height of the 1940s electronic technology to give out what is widely considered the best sound quality to date. Since some people tend to be confused by this, it’s important to note that only their sound rendering circuitry is based on vacuum tubes (or lamps) while the equalizers and assorted bits employ transistors like any other piece of modern electronics, with no bearing whatsoever on how the sound will come out.
Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Sunburst
For many people, Yamaha isn’t a brand that immediately comes to mind when they hear “electric guitar.” Yamaha’s artist roster isn’t filled with many high profile endorsers nor is the Pacifica carried by the big online retailers. This is a shame and why (in my opinion) the Pacifica is one of the most underrated electric guitars available today. It’s a guitar I wish more people knew about: the PAC112V is very well made, sounds and feels great, and is suitable for a number of styles thanks to its H-S-S pickup configuration and 5-way pickup selector.
If you want to take your tracks to the next level, a multi effects processor can do the trick. For a high-end example of what one of these units can do, check out the Eventide H8000FW 8-Channel Ultra-Harmonizer Effects Processor. It supports 24-bit audio and comes with an impressive 1,600 pre-set effects. Some are even pre-customized for 5.1 surround sound, so production for home theater playback is a cinch. Its smorgasbord of I/O options includes AES/EBU, ADAT, S/PDIF and FireWire with sampling up to 96kHz, so whatever you're looking to connect to the H8000FW, it's a safe bet that you can get the job done. Of course, not all of the processors here are quite as advanced. There are plenty of setups out there that just need a straightforward solution, and if that sounds like yours, don't worry: you'll find plenty of those here as well. Take the TC Electronic M350 Reverb and Effects Processor, for instance. This single-space rackmount is easy to fit into any budget, living up to TC's reputation of delivering amazing bang for your buck. It's loaded with 15 different effects plus 15 reverbs, and even includes control software for your AU/VST environment.
Fujigen Gakki began operation in 1960 as a classical guitar manufacturer, moving into the lucurative electric guitar markets in 1962. The company was the largest producer of Japanese guitars during the 1960-1980 period. They were known for producing high quality products, especially for the badged guitar market, which is why the company was selected by so many major American brands. It wasn't until 1970 that the company began making products for the venerable Ibanez brand, which was an unqualified success. Fujigen Gakki was the main manufacturer of choice for Greco badged guitars in the 1970 to 1980 period. They also produced guitars for major manufacturer Yamaha. Badged guitars made by Fujigen include Antoria, Epiphone, Jason and Mann. Badged guitars that may have been made by Fujigen Gakki were Marlin and St. Moritz.
"I wanted my guitar to sound like Gene Krupa's drums," Dick Dale said, and the hyperpercussive style he invented for his jukebox wonders – including a juiced-up arrangement of the old Greek tune "Misirlou" – pioneered the sound of surf rock. Dale played as fast as possible, at max volume; Leo Fender once attempted to design an amp that wouldn't be destroyed by Dale's sheer loudness. "His arrangements were really complex, really unruly," said Rush's Alex Lifeson. "It was all staccato strumming reverb, but with a reverb that just sounded so cool."
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