This guitar manufacturer started out as a parts supplier in the early 1970s. Atlansia didn't begin production of guitars under their badge until infamous engineer and designer Nobuaki Hayashi of Matsumoku fame became the company's president and chief designer in the late 1970s. Since then, Atlansia has continued to produce cutting-edge guitar designs in Nagano, Japan. The company did not make any other badged guitars other than namesake Atlansia.
For the acoustic guitar player, plugging in to an external amp and effects processor can be quite fun, and can add a lot of 'spice' to your playing, just by virtue of having access to a wider range of sounds. But whereas hauling an acoustic guitar with you isn't a big deal, hauling an amp and accessories with you (and finding a place to plug in) can be challenging.
By the 1980s and 1990s, software effects became capable of replicating the analog effects used in the past. These new digital effects attempt to model the sound produced by analog effects and tube amps, with varying degrees of quality. There are many free guitar effects computer programs that can be downloaded from the Internet. Now, computers with sound cards can be used as digital guitar effects processors. Although digital and software effects offer many advantages, many guitarists still use analog effects.
Schecter has built a strong reputation for itself as one of the best manufacturers of affordable guitars for musicians worldwide. Their commitment to quality and innovation has made them a leading brand name for high quality guitars that are affordable for every budget. The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar is one of their flagship electric guitars that not only delivers performance, but also uncompromising quality.
Frets are positioned proportionally to scale length—the shorter the scale length, the closer the fret spacing. Opinions vary regarding the effect of scale length on tone and feel. Popular opinion holds that longer scale length contributes to greater amplitude. Reports of playing feel are greatly complicated by the many factors involved in this perception. String gauge and design, neck construction and relief, guitar setup, playing style and other factors contribute to the subjective impression of playability or feel.

The Dobro Standard Guitar is not shown, but this is described as a “…conventional arch top body” with Dobro electric amplification. Like the first National Spanish, this had f-holes and was made by Regal. The Dobro Mandolin is also described as having a “conventional” body, probably a pear-shaped mando, again, by Regal. These were probably introduced slightly later than the Hawaiian.
This guitar comes with an undersaddle piezo pickup system and a ¼-inch output. You also get a detachable lap rest so you can comfortably play this miniature guitar. The rosewood fingerboard has 22 medium frets, while the D’Addario EJ15 steel strings ensure superior playability. This compact guitar is small enough to fit even in airline overhead compartments.
The Alvarez AG75CE is on the upper range of $500 acoustic guitars. This particular model is a cedar top with rosewood back and sides. It also features scalloped and forward shifted bracing which makes for a bigger sound. Owners of this guitar are posting rave reviews citing it’s quality of build and great tone. The cutaway is a nice feature for those that want to reach the upper register of the guitar, and it looks cool too! It is a grand auditorium body, which does not quite have the bass of a dreadnought but offers a more balanced sound. Great for singing along. This guitar is a great choice for intermediate players looking to not break the bank.Check it out here.
The final spot in our top 5 list goes to the DigiTech RP500, the second-largest of the DigiTech RP line of multi-effects pedals, but definitely the most popular out of the lineup. Like Boss and Line 6, DigiTech is no stranger to making very good guitar effects. Their parent company Harman also owns Lexicon, famed for their top-of-the-line reverb sounds, which DigiTech very much benefits from. The DigiTech RP500 is a multi-effect unit with amp modeling, a looper, USB connection, and an onboard expression pedal. Out of the 5 pedals on this list, it draws the most comparisons to the Zoom G3X and the Boss ME-80 (both in terms of price and features). Throughout this review we’ll make sure to cover how it stacks up against those.
He’s sauntered down through the decades unfazed by stints in jail and hospital, heroin addiction, assorted femmes fatales, copious boozing, rampaging Hells Angels and assaults from fellow icons like Chuck Berry and Peter Tosh. Unconstrained by the grinding gradations of clock, calendar, public morality or legal prohibition, he has defined life on his own terms.

Let's begin by getting clear on what we mean by 'effect': an effect is a device that treats the audio in some way, then adds it back to a dry or untreated version of the sound. Echo and reverb are obvious cases, and you can use pitch-shift and pitch modulation in a similar way. 'Processors', by contrast, generally are those devices that change the entire signal and don't add in any of the dry signal. Things like compressors and equalisers fall into this category: as you'll see from the tips and tricks, processors can often be used as effects in their own right, or as part of an effect chain, but until you know exactly what you're doing and what the consequences are likely to be, it is a good idea to stick to these guideline definitions, as they dictate how you can connect the effects into your system.

Flanger effects simulate the studio trick of repeatedly putting your thumb on a tape recorder’s reel for a second and then letting the reel (and music’s pitch) catch back up while a dry (unaffected) signal plays alongside. Flangers usually have a depth setting, which controls the intensity of the effect, and a rate control that adjusts the speed of the cycles.


A rivalry sprang up between Fender and Gibson, creating some of the solid-body electrics most coveted by musicians and collectors, including the 1952 Gibson “Les Paul” model with a curved top and a combination bridge-tailpiece (the guitar was designed primarily by McCarty, with input by the famous guitarist who endorsed it), the 1954 Fender Stratocaster, and a 1958 version of the Gibson Les Paul with a new “humbucking” pickup that transmitted less background interference from electrical equipment.
The reality is, each of these approaches to adding effects to your tone has advantages and disadvantages. Are you a no-effects type of player, or a pedalboard kind of player? Maybe you like some pedals for your dirt, but would like your delay and reverb in the effects loop of your amp. Or maybe you would like to go the full on w/d/w route, for the ultimate in power and programmability! Let’s take a closer look at the options that are out there.
There is no such thing as a best amplifier. It's all about what kind of music you want to play and what sort of sounds are in your head trying to get out. Different amplifiers have different characteristics. Some have amazing cleans, some are known for their heavy distortions, some take pedals very well, some are built trying to be a "jack of all trades."  Only way to know what amp is best for you is to plug in and try them out. Try to "A-B" them,  trying one amplifier and then plugging into another immediately after with the same settings, playing the same thing. It will give you a good idea about how their characteristics differ. If you have favorite pedal effects that you  know that you're going to want to use, make sure you try those two.  Petals can sound quite different going into various amplifiers.

Both pickups were controlled by a separate volume control, with one master tone control. Another toggle served as a coil tap. The Ripley project went nowhere, however, the body styling would reappear on the upcoming Korean Celebrity series. It is very possible, since this shared the Ultra Hard Body model designation and was made in Japan, that the mystery Japanese guitars were essentially the same.


• Brute force game : Offers the same realistic engine that can be found in STRUMMED ACOUSTIC 1 and 2 – ideal for chord accompaniment. It also contains riffs and a new game mode by picking Picking: just play a chord for creating very convincing arpeggio patterns. Reproduction of these new types of patterns should be completely familiar to users of STRUMMED ACOUSTIC.
Whether you are a beginner or the pro guitarist, choosing the right guitar brand is always essential. We are sure you will find your desired electric guitar from the range of best electric guitar brands we review above. If you want something different or best acoustic guitar brands, do share with us your thoughts in the comments below. Maybe we missed out something that you would remind us.
hi-can you put two caps on your two tone pots or will just the one do as is mormal-aslo on a push pull pot do you need two tone caps one for the bottom half as regular-if putting on the square part  of the push pull pot -can you put on any of the six lugs ie the ones not used -i have instaleed a push pull swich but when down the tone on the neck pickup does not seem to have any effect -when i pull it when usingn the pull pull it does have a effect is this normal-i have now neck-bridge-and all three in a row-when not pulled which would be normal five wat switch sound i seem to get a telecasster sound ,i thought this was the case when i pull it up=i have now a nice selection of sounds—thankls sean
Non Locking Tremolo TREMOLO FAT/SAT MONTAGGIO DEL BRACCIO DEL TREMOLO L'inserimento e la rimozione del braccio del tremolo sono operazioni estremamente semplici. Inserire il braccio nell'apposito foro sulla piastra di base del tremolo. Tirare il braccio per rimuoverlo. REGOLAZIONE DEL BRACCIO DEL TREMOLO (SAT PRO) Per regolare l'altezza del braccio, rimuovere il coperchio della molla del tremolo dal retro della chitarra e utilizzare una chiave a brugola da 3 mm per girare la vite di regolazione dell'altezza sulla parte inferiore del blocco tremolo.

Top 4 in my opinion. Countless guitarists have played them on some of the best albums ever written. I've owned numerous vintage guilds and still own a vintage f50 and d55. Recently Fender bought guild and I bought a new d55 which was a bit over rated and over priced in my opinion. But Fender has sold Guild and I sold my fender owned guild d55 only to buy a brand new by the new owners who moved Guild to a California facility and I must say it holds its own with the vintages I have. Guild is back! A great name in acoustic guitars. A great build (thank God once again), and the quality has always been with the best. Long live guild and it's a top 4 brand just behind Martin, Taylor and Gibson.
Fender guitars are the most popular and are considered as one of the best brands in the world. Fender guitar is manufactured by the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation of Scottsdale, Arizona. They are specialized in making stringed instruments and are best in making the solid body electric bass guitars. Fender Musical Instruments Corporation was incorporated in the year 1946 and is a relatively new company, but with the quality of products they make and the success they achieved, Fender is easily the best guitar manufacturer in the world.
Nice-Keys-CompletePlus-JNv2.0  A large set with three different piano types plus all the nice instruments.  All in a package of 943mb.  Pianos have different brightness and resonance settings available and all the nice instruments from EPs, Pads, Organs, Strings, Orchestra and Synths are included.  A printable link to the list of available instruments is here  Nice-Keys-CompletePlus-Instrument List
Polytone Mega Brute, Jazz guitar amplifier fully functional. Has loads of clean head room but also has 3 settings: Warm, Edge and drive.  I think they’re rated and 65watts, into 8ohm 8” speaker. Super light and portable, approx. 22lbs. Probably from the mid ‘80s production. Hi and low gain inputs, bright switch, effects loop. Spring reverb. Mint condition and everything works like brand new. Shipped to the lower 48 for $50.00. Local pick up would be great. Return if unhappy but ship in same packing and also pay return shipping. Thanks  

While hollow guitars are best suited to jazz, there have been a handful of cases where rock musicians have utilized fully hollow jazz box guitars in rock and roll. Chief among these would be Ted Nugent, who actually used the excess feedback produced by his Gibson Byrdland as a musical tool. Hollow ES-335 style guitars are used in blues and rock more frequently than the jazz box (the Beatles used the Epiphone Casino extensively), though because of the feedback they produce most musicians stick with semi-hollow instruments.

Acoustic amplifiers produce an uncolored, "acoustic" sound when used with acoustic instruments with built-in transducer pickups or microphones. The amplifiers often come with a simple mixer, so that the signals from a pickup and condenser microphone can be blended. Since the early 2000s, it has become increasingly common for acoustic amplifiers to provide a range of digital effects, such as reverb and compression. As well, these amplifiers often contain feedback-suppressing devices, such as notch filters or parametric equalizers.[22]


Growing popularity of the guitar in the early 1900s, fueled by the growing popularity of folk music and country and western music, led to a demand for louder and more percussive guitars. In response, many companies began to use metal strings instead of catgut. These became known as steel-string guitars. By 1921, Martin had focused production towards this type of guitar.
The massive slabs of rock-candy noise that J Mascis heaved from his Fender Jazzmaster in Dinosaur Jr. contained multitudes: Black Sabbath savagery, melodic Neil Young soul, punk-rock pig slop. As his recent solo set, Several Shades of Why, showed, he can get shamelessly pretty with an acoustic, too. "I remember seeing Dinosaur play this soft, plaintive song – and then it was just completely detonated by this ravaging solo that J did," says Sonic Youth's Thurston Moore. "The whole room was incinerated."
In addition to acoustic and electric guitars, the company now also makes mandolins and ukuleles. Their mandolins are highly regarded, they “more or less rule in the bluegrass market” in the United States.[5] As of May 2012 the company has about 85 employees and manufactures six to seven acoustic guitars, three electric guitars, two mandolins, and two ukuleles per day.[4]
First off, in any discussions about any effect pedals, no one is asking for or cares the slightest about the opinion of people who categorically don’t like pedals. While the Internet is a wonderful medium that expedites the broadcasting of a personal opinion (as I am doing here), I’m always curious about what motivates the person who categorically dislikes something to show up uninvited to express their feelings. Imagine you start a chat thread or post a status update or tweet with something like “Those of you who’ve seen The Avengers – how did you like Mark Ruffalo as Bruce Banner/Hulk?”. Now imagine you get a reply such as “I didn’t see The Avengers because I think movies suck. People should get back to reading books” – excuse me, but what on earth is that person contributing towards the discussion, and who the hell asked them?
Steel-string Acoustic Guitar The steel-string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar that descends from the classical guitar, but is strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. The most common shape is the dreadnought (originally developed by C.F. Martin & Company), which incorporates a deep soundbox and a smaller and less pronounced upper bout, giving it a wedge-shaped appearance. Other popular body styles include the larger jumbo body shape, as well as the smaller auditorium (000) body style and even smaller grand concert (00) body style. Check out the Martin Ed Sheeran X Signature Acoustic Electric for a smaller body type with a punchy sound.
Designed to be the greatest all-rounder, the Grand Auditorium shape was the perfect blend of size, shape, volume and comfort, and its modern-day incarnation has seen the likes of the biggest pop star on the planet these days, Taylor Swift pick one up. People forget that before mega-stardom, Taylor was a respected country artist, and it was on a Taylor Grand Auditorium that she plied her trade.
Great playing and sounding bass. The Ibanez BTB series in a 'very playable' 4-string version. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. We believe the pickups are actually made by Bartolini. 'Locking' 1/4 jack. Solid wood, natural finish body. Rosewood fingerboard on maple neck. Tuning is accomplished via quality, 'sealed' tuning machines. Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up great! Currently has 'nylon wound' strings for a softer 'jazz' tone. Frets show virtually no wear. Body finish has VERY little wear. Includes gig bag.
The SG Standard is Gibson’s all-time best-selling guitar. It was conceived in 1961 and originally released as the new Les Paul. It featured distinct horn-shaped cutaways, and the neck joint was moved three frets, which made the guitar lighter and allowed easier upper fret access. In addition to these changes, the body was slimmer than the Les Paul Standard and the neck profile was more slender. However, with Mr. Paul preferring the sturdier design elements of his original model and due to contractual complications, his name was ultimately removed. Where Les Paul saw a mutation of his original design, others saw genius—from ’63 on, the Les Paul name was removed and the SG, or “Solid Guitar,” was born.
It doesn't even seem to matter which kind of Guitar amp you have or when plugged into any PA system. This guitar is a keeper. it comes with Godin Nickel Strings which is why unplugged it may sound too tinny to some ears, but after changing to Elixer Acoustic Strings, it sounds much better unplugged and really shows off plugged in. It now can give my Acoustic six strings a real run for my attention. At gigs and open mics, people come up and ask,,,what the Heck is this Bruce? Looks and sounds amazing. My only wish is that it had the same Pick-up system as on my A6 Ultra, two separate Pick Ups and Controls and two 1/4 in outputs.

Read Full Review It’s amazing to see a company that excels in all the products and services they offer, while other companies are struggling and scratching their heads to find a way to break through in the market. The best example of such success on Yamaha is with their long line of guitars and two of those guitars they have are considered by many is best for beginners. The guitars I’m taking about is the Pacifica Series PAC112 together with the PA012 featured here, which is also available on a guitar package.


When two pickups are wired in series, a good portion of the treble frequencies is lost because the long pickup wire works like a resistor. Any resistor in the signal path will suppress the signal. The formula works like this: The longer the wire, the higher the resistance, and the more treble is lost. We all know this from guitar cables: When you use a very long guitar cable, the sound isn’t as detailed and transparent as it is with a shorter cable. A long cable acts as a resistor.
All mass-market brands offer at least one distortion pedal—and often many. Boss, for one, tries to cater to all possible tastes. Its DS-1 (not to be confused with the SD-1 overdrive mentioned above) is one of the workhorses of the breed, with some big-name players happy to stomp on its rectangular switch, including both Steve Vai and Joe Satriani. The DS-2 takes things a step further, while the MT-2 Metal Zone and MD-2 Mega Distortion get successively more evil. And Boss isn’t the only one, with DOD, Ibanez, Marshall and many, many others playing the game too, along with a few of the boutique makers. The proliferation is most distinctive in many “metal” pedals that go beyond even the standard distortion sounds. These generally offer the archetypal scooped-mid sound with thudding lows and crispy highs. Many are adjustable for anything from classic rock to metal sounds, with a tone control that acts more to reduce or accentuate mids rather than the usual high boost/cut, and often a “resonance” control or similar to adjust the fullness of the bass.
Looking at the front (or top rather) panel of the Boss ME-80 is where it gets interesting. Don’t let the sheer number of knobs intimidate you. Shaping your tone with the ME-80 is a very tactile experience, just like you would if you had a pedalboard full of pedals. The ME-80 is made for the guitarist that doesn’t necessarily want to lug around (or spend money on) a large pedal collection, but still loves the feeling of turning knobs and instantly hearing results. The interface is actually pretty easy to understand. Every major section is surrounded by a white border, and to design a sound (a.k.a. patch) you just move through the sections and set the effects to your heart’s content. We should mention that the Boss ME-80 has 59 different effects and nine guitar preamps which you can use. The first section labeled PREAMP is where you set your amplifier model, and should feel familiar if you’ve ever messed with a guitar amp. Next you have an EQ section, REVERB, COMP, OD/DS, MOD, and DELAY. You can look at the front panel for yourself in a closeup photo to see the various effects available within each of these groupings. The 8 black footswitches along the bottom are what you use to switch effects on and off, as well as move through banks and presets. They’re not your traditional stompbox footswitch, but they feel pretty nice. As is the norm with the larger multi-effects floor units, the ME-80 incorporates an expression pedal, which is assignable to different effects via the knob next to it. Very easy to use, very intuitive.
As we mentioned, this is both a multi-effects unit and an amp modeler. Like the Boss ME-80, you can use it in a regular editing mode where you set up your signal chain using buttons and knobs, or “Pedalboard Mode” which when activated lets you turn 5 effects on/off via the 5 footswitches along the bottom, much like if you had separate pedals on a pedalboard. This is a nice bonus if you play live and want that immediacy. To sculpt your sounds, you use the small up and down arrow buttons to cycle through your effect types, or slots. You’ve got WAH, COMPRESSOR, DISTORTION, AMP/CABINET, EQUALIZER, NOISE GATE, CHORUS/FX, DELAY, REVERB, and EXPRESSION (which sets what your expression pedal is used for, like wah or volume) available for use. For each type, you can cycle through which effect models you want. There are a ton to choose from, over 70 by our rough count. The DigiTech RP500 probably has the most comprehensive list of all the classic effects, from Tube Screamers, to Pro Co RAT, DS-1, Fuzz Face, Boss CE-2 Chorus, EHX Small Stone Phaser, and many more. All the classic amp models are there too, like Vox, Marshall, and Fender, all with appropriate cab models. If you have your own amp or just don’t care for the amp and cabinet modeling, you can bypass it which leaves you with just stompboxes and effects.

Sound engineers prevent unwanted, unintended distortion and clipping using a number of methods. They may reduce the gain on microphone preamplifiers on the audio console; use attenuation "pads" (a button on audio console channel strips, DI unit and some bass amplifiers; and use electronic audio compressor effects and limiters to prevent sudden volume peaks from vocal mics from causing unwanted distortion.
The chord below (an Am) is going to be used for demonstration. Firstly, you'll notice the name of the chord labeled up the top. Next you'll see a "grid" below it. This grid represents your guitar fretboard. The 6 lines running downwards represent the six strings on your guitar with the fattest and lowest sounding string on the left hand side. The horizontal lines represent the frets on your guitar neck. The top line is the top of the neck.

When Martin turned to jobbers rather than direct sales, more variation in cases took place. Depending on what part of the country you bought your Martin, the jobber would supply a similar range of cases - chipboard, hardshell, or deluxe hardshell, from the case manufacturer of their choice. So cases on old Martins can vary greatly. This changed in 1972 with the blue thermoplastic case which was included with the sale of all new Martins.
Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
Being relatively new to the ABQ area, I've been checking out the local music shops and finding myself underwhelmed - that is until I walked into Grumpy's. Kevin is probably the last honest guy in the business. His pricing is more than fair - whether you're looking for repairs, custom builds, or gear - and he's more than willing to dispense advice or talk shop (not to mention his sense of humor). To put it succinctly; he knows his shit and doesn't blow smoke up one's ass! Sure, the shop doesn't have the "selection" that a place like GC might have, but Kevin can probably get anything you need. (Besides, what's more important - knowledgeable, down-to-earth customer service at a locally owned shop, or being ignored by douchebag wankers who came of age playing along to Miley Cyrus?!) Go to Grumpy's!
We don’t know about other early guitars, but Univox probably augmented its offerings with other offerings from the Arai catalog, similar to what Epiphone would do with its first imports slightly later, in around 1970. Evidence this might have been so is seen in the book Guitars, Guitars, Guitars (American Music Publishers, out of print) which shows a Univox 12-string solidbody with a suitably whacky late-’60s Japanese shape, with two equal cutaway stubby/pointy horns. The head was a strange, long thing with a concave scoop on top, and the plastic logo. This is the only example of this shape I’ve encountered, but it had two of the black-and-white plastic-covered pickups used on Aria guitars of the period, and the majority of later Univox guitars were indeed manufactured by Arai and Company, makers of Aria, Aria Diamond, Diamond and Arai guitars. These pickups have white outsides with a black trapezoidal insert and are sometimes called “Art Deco” pickups. Perhaps the coolest feature of this strange guitar is a 12-string version of the square vibrato system employed on Aria guitars of this era. You can pretty much assume that if there was a strange-shaped solidbody 12-string Univox, it was not the only model! These would not have lasted long, probably for only until 1970 at the latest, and are not seen in the ’71 catalog.
Body tops are optional. If you're just starting out, you should either skip this option, or choose the veneer top that appeals to you most. We offer veneer tops (paper-thin layer of wood) and cap tops (thick layer of wood). Most people will add a top to their instrument because of the top’s naturally beautiful appearance. Some people will add a top to their guitar because it can affect the overall sound of the instrument, too (only applies to cap tops, not veneers).

Note that the competition for our pick in this “simple beginner’s amp” category was much more hotly contested than our other picks in this guide. The Crush 12 just barely edged out two other amps that our panelists liked. One is the Stage Right 611800, a very loud, 40-watt amp with built-in reverb that’s a great choice for those who need a powerful amp on the cheap (although that person probably isn’t a beginner). The other is the Vox Pathfinder 10, an amp with a simple control setup that our panelists loved, but a rather bright and blaring sound that some liked and some didn’t. Both are mentioned in the competition section below.


Each option has a unique tonal quality, some may not seem all that useful in some situations.  2 adjacent pickups that are out of phase, can sound very tinny and weak but often cut through better in the mix as they occupy a different placement in the spectrum.  Consider Brian May's (Queen) tone as some of his selections rely on 2 single coil pickups being out of phase
The trust you place in a guitar master's steady hand, keen mind and eye for detail when you hand him your baby is almost too much to bear. It's more hope than faith. For you need someone who's knowledgeable, but not just book smart. A guitar master needs to know more than just how to solder the yellow and green wires together, glue a new bridge and replace a few strings. He must know its rhythm, that steady beat pulsing through the wood.
Let’s start with body style. This is quite simply the shape of the guitar’s body, and there are potentially a lot of them to consider. As a general rule, the larger the body, the more resonant it will be, giving it a deeper, richer tone. This is clear for things like the hummingbird, with the big square shoulders, and the dreadnought style body, which is generally the largest body type you’ll encounter. The drawback of larger bodies of course is that they’re more cumbersome and less ergonomic to play.
The late 60s and 70s produced even more bizarre and berserk creations. The birth of Mayfield and Mullen’s VOX King Wah pedal sealed its place in guitar history during overbearingly long, Clapton-esque guitar solos. The 1978 Pro Co RAT, whose design was a re-imagining of the Arbiter Fuzz Face, arose partly from error: A botched resistor band created a harsher, clipped audio waveform. Its use has supported nearly all “alternative” rock genres in the last 30 years: 80s punk, American indie rock, Grunge (the RAT played a crucial part in Cobain’s quiet-loud-quiet-loud composition), not to mention Britpop and grindcore.

It’s interesting to note that luthier Steve Klein introduced a guitar that got a lot of press in the early ’80s with a body virtually identical to the Ovation Breadwinner. According to Charles’ son (and future president of Kaman Corporation), Bill Kaman, Jr., Ovation considered “pointing this out” (i.e., legal action), but given its bad track record with solidbodies, figured it wasn’t worth the effort.


Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Edge III - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Devil's Shadow
Additional mics can be used to capture different tones from the amp and/or some ambient room sound. When recording open-backed cabinets, great results can be obtained by using a second mic at the rear of the cab. When this technique is employed, it’s wise to invert the phase on one of the channels. To create a sound that’s larger than life, try recording a part with close and distant mics and pan the two channels, then repeat the process, panning the channels in the opposite direction. Two close mics pointing at different parts of the speaker – one dead-centre and the other towards the far edge – will pick up the full range of the speaker’s tone.
Re-amping a DI'd keyboard or bass can really liven up a sound, but if you don't have access to a nice amp or amp modeller, you can simulate the effect by sending the audio to a bus with a delay plug-in set to a short delay time and with the wet signal set to 100 percent and dry to 0 percent. Then send the bus's output to another bus with a distortion (or better still, a guitar amplifier emulator) plug-in inserted. This simulates the delay you get from miking up a speaker, and if you blend this in with the DI'd sound, it can give the recording a live feel — especially if you use a convolution reverb to add some 'room' ambience. You may also want to roll off the very low and high frequencies to help get rid of that DI'd vibe. Nicholas Rowland
Soft and soulful is the second name of Fender guitars and basses. They are famous for their fruitful and enchanting tone. It is one of the most recognized brands in the world. Every note that is played on this guitar is pleasant and pure. There are two factors that contribute to such a thrilling tone. Firstly, the majestic shape of the 'strat' in resonating wood and secondly, the perfect configuration of three pick ups. The pick ups are usually singe coiled. However, there are cases where double coiled third pick ups have been used. Fender is a very popular guitar brand, and artists like Eric Clapton who plays extremely soft music, and heavy metal bands such as Iron Maiden have also used the same brand. Models like Stratocaster and Telecaster have etched their names among the greatest guitars ever made. Fender offers myriad of designs, styles, and configurations. If you are a beginner, then go for any Fender model, it's probably the best guitar for novices or amateurs.
Once you've mastered the intricacies of single-transducer miking, it's fun to start working in stereo. For true stereo recording, you need a matched mic pair as well as a twin-speaker amplifier, preferably one with built-in stereo chorus and vibrato (such as a vintage Magnatone or a Roland Jazz Chorus). Two separate amplifiers fed by the same stereo delay or multi-effects unit will also work.
8e FRETTE HAUTEUR La hauteur des cordes est réglée lors de la fabrication des guitares et des basses Ibanez. Néanmoins, plusieurs facteurs peuvent provoquer la variation de hauteur des cordes d'un instrument. Les guitares sont sensibles aux variations de température et d'humidité. Une hauteur de cordes trop importante peut rendre l'instrument difficile à...
Lastly, we have the M-100FM. This guitar features a body that is similar that Super Strat style Ibanez is known for, packed with a great set of pickups. This is a mid range guitar, but one that is very capable compared to its immediate competition. If you need an axe that looks good and plays good as well, ESP LTD M Series M-100FM is the ESP for you.
I once did a setup on one that belonged to a friend but it was really wrecked so it wasn't perhaps a fair representation. It seemed to be well built though and the neck was nice enough. The tone was decent too although not exciting - exactly what you'd expect from such a guitar. Overall I'd say it was better than the cheaper squiers (SEs, Affinities etc).

Visually, what sets this guitar apart is its distinct headstock shape, but there's more to this guitar than meets the eye. Firstly, the guitar's top is crafted from solid cedar, an interesting wood choice because this type of wood is more commonly used on nylon string guitars. The warm tone of cedar matches nicely with the bright sound of wild cherry, a staple tonewood used on the back and sides of most Godin guitars. This combination gives the instrument a more distinct appearance and sound. Other features that don't follow the usual convention include the use of maple for the neck, and its B-Band M-450 T preamp system.
If, like me, you're a complete and utter sucker for watching musicians strip their songs down to the barest essentials and perform them with minimal accompaniment, then you're going to lose your mind over the stripped down, guitar version of "Wildest Dreams" that Taylor Swift has just dropped from her acoustic session at the Grammy Museum Sessions last year. Performing the hopelessly dreamy song with just her voice and her electric guitar, the performance is jaw droppingly good and the song honestly sounds even better than it does on the studio track from 1989.
Reverend guitars are known to sport many premium appointments despite their modest price tags. And the Jetstream HB is no exception. It has a comfortable roasted maple neck, a Wilkinson WVS50 IIK tremolo, pin-lock tuners and high-end electronic components. A korina body and a 12-inch-radius roasted maple/blackwood fretboard (depending on the finish) complete the other notable specs on this guitar.
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We’re bookending this article with two Epiphone guitars. Why? Because Les Paul was the man. And G-400 Pro was actually a successor Les Paul model from ’61 to ’68, making this guitar a true icon of rock, power, and endless sustain. With a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, this guitar has the looks and, with Alnico Classic Pro humbucking pickups, the tonal quality is excellent. 


The theory of evolution says that the longer something has been evolving the more complex it tends to get, and this is certainly true of the electric guitar, which has been evolving for over half a century. Electric guitar sounds rely on the instrument itself, the amplifier through which it is played and also on the loudspeaker system used. Further variables are introduced when miking techniques are taken into consideration, though these days miking is only one of the ways of recording an electric guitar — we also have a number of effective DI techniques from which to choose.
when FINALLY picking up he was running down the stairs leaving early, i barely caught him so didn't get a chance to play it before taking it home, or would have had a chance to address this disappointment. there were dead frets all over the high strings. he clearly didn't perform the service that i paid for. a year later that vintage les paul is still in the same unplayable condition and needs a full service by a real luthier.  
• Stop: A stop tailpiece is a bar, typically made of an alloy, which is held to the body of a guitar by large screws threaded into embedded sleeves. They are most often aluminum, zinc or brass based, with the latter the most costly. Aluminum has a few advantages. When the stop tailpiece was perfected by Gibson over a half-century ago, the originals were made of aluminum. Many players prefer those today for the vintage vibe, but aluminum is also the lightest weight tailpiece alloy, which some believe allows the strings and the guitar’s body to connect — which is another function of the tailpiece — in a more resonant fashion. It’s best to be careful while changing strings with a stop tailpiece, because they sometimes fall out of their sleeves and can scratch the finish.
AGE CAN’T HINDER YOU – Working off of muscle memory and visual assistance, ChordBuddy is designed for players of every age. In fact, ChordBuddy is well-suited for those looking to play guitar with arthritis, offering a pain-free method of playing your favorite song. Utilizing ChordBuddy also allows you to learn the guitar on your own, eliminating the need for long guitar lessons with an instructor, which can result in prolonged joint pain.
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In fact, guitarists are on a whole different planet when it comes to defining cool. When you play guitar, you can get away with all kinds of acts normal people could never attempt. Face it: An ordinary dude could not walk down the street wearing a leopard-skin jacket, high-heel cowboy boots, flowing silk scarves and dozens of silver bangles without getting beaten up within minutes.
The guitar is one of the most beloved musical instruments of all time. Guitarists tend to wear that title with pride, and their instrument becomes an extension of the player’s distinct personality. Because of this, players tend to develop a strict loyalty to the guitar brand of their choosing. Luckily, there are many great options out there today, with niches that cater to virtually all genres and styles. This guide will weigh the pros and cons of the five best guitar brands on the market, to help you make as informed a decision as possible on which brand will best suit your needs.
Following on from the previous article, we look at the grand-daddy of all pickup selectors: the 4-pole super-switch. The possibilities with this switch are endless, and we scratch the surface by coming up with a wiring scheme for an HSH guitar that auto-splits the humbuckers in the 2 and 4 positions, and combines both humbuckers in the middle position.
Add bite or presence by boosting between 2kHz and 6kHz, depending on the tone you're after. Little over 4-5kHz is produced by a guitar speaker, though going for a brighter DI'd clean sound is quite legitimate for artistic reasons. Similar-sounding electric guitars that may be conflicting within a mix can be separated to a limited extent by adding bite at different frequencies, though choosing two different-sounding guitars and/or amp sounds and examining the arrangement carefully usually works better. As a rule, single-coil guitars are best for cutting through a busy mix without taking up too much space, while humbucking pickups create a thicker sound which may be beneficial in recordings where there is only one guitar part.
Near the beginning of Epiphone's thinline semi-acoustic range is 'The Dot', based on the timeless and legendary Gibson ES-335. The Dot feels comfortable to hold and play, and the neck, while by no means clubby, feels substantial in your palm, probably due to the 43mm width at the nut. Its slightly flattened C-profile increases marginally in depth further up the neck, making for a suitably vintage feel. An acoustic strum issues forth a pleasing, resonant ring. We'd wager that the Dot's all-maple construction has got something to do with that, but more obviously, the hollow bouts bolster the acoustic tone, inducing wry smiles to those listening. Before plugging in, listen to Ronny Jordan, then Noel Gallagher, then BB King, then George Harrison and John Lennon. It becomes immediately apparent that this style of guitar is hugely versatile. This Dot is no exception: the pickups, while not packing the punch of USA PAFs, offer everything form smooth and moody, front-position mellowness to screeching, bridge position rawk. It's one of the best electric guitars for jazz at this price point, too. The Dot looks fine, sounds great and plays great. To our minds, that's value for money indeed.
I lost a wonderful EMPRO les paul custom model In a plain top brown finish (it was at a friends house in Dallas Texas who died in 2002 and was auctioned off before I could get down there from Michigan). It was my first electric guitar, bought at a pawn shop in Sulphur Springs, TX in 1989. I loved that guitar and have only seen about three other Empros since then. I did not see the Empro badge on this site. Anybody know the maker?
George Beauchamp was a vaudeville performer, violinist, and steel guitarist who, like most of his fellow acoustic guitarists in the pre-electric-guitar days of the 1920s, was searching for a way to make his instrument cut through an orchestra. He first conceived of a guitar fitted with a phonograph-like amplifying horn, and approached inventor and violin-maker John Dopyera to create a prototype which proved to be, by all accounts, a failure. Their next collaboration involved experiments with mounting three conical-shaped aluminum resonators into the body of the guitar beneath the bridge. These efforts produced an instrument which so pleased Beauchamp that he told Dopyera that they should go into business to manufacture them. After further refinements, Dopyera applied for a patent on the so-called tri-cone guitar on April 9, 1927. Thereafter, Dopyera and his brothers began to make the tri-cone guitars in their Los Angeles shop, calling the new guitars “Nationals”. On January 26, 1928, the National String Instrument Corporation was certified and, with its new factory located near a metal-stamping shop owned by Adolph Rickenbacher and staffed by some of the most experienced and competent craftsmen available, began to produce Spanish and Hawaiian style tri-cone guitars as well as four-string tenor guitars,mandolins and ukuleles.[3]
I purchased a Lyle model A690 recently from an old man in northern California who had gone blind and developed arthritis and didn't feel like playing anymore. He mentioned in passing that he had found (?) The guitar somewhere. The case was thickly covered in dust and pretty much rusted toast, but the guitar is immaculate, looks brand-new with the exception of the tuners, rusted tight. The serial is #480 so I guess its fairly old, but how old is my question? A weird aside; in the case was a handful of fender-style medium tortoise-shell picks monogrammed Eddie Kramer. Does that ring a bell for anyone? Any and all information would be appreciated! Thanks!

The Perform page allows for editing articulations, adding effects like pedals, and adjusting parameters like monophonic mode, round robin, and the special tapping mode. The Fretboard page displays parameters for the virtual guitarist, such as hand size and fret preference; these parameters are translated into real behavior for the string selection algorithm, mapping MIDI notes to frets and strings intelligently.
Large-scale traffic in guitars between Japan and the United States began in the very late ’50s. Jack Westheimer of Chicago’s W.M.I. corporation has published his recollection of having begun to bring in Kingston guitars purchased from the Terada Trading Company in around 1958. The Japanese themselves began advertising their wares to American distributors as early as July of 1959, when Guyatone ran a small space ad touting small pointed single cutaway solidbodies more or less resembling Teisco’s mini-Les Pauls.
The Erratic Clutch Deluxe is a unique effect pedal kit that gives you fuzzy square wave distortion as well as a monophonic sub-octave square wave using a total of only four transistors. The two signals can be used individually or mixed together for a raw and sonically rich synthy output. Full of character and quirk, this pedal will give you a truly original sound. The middle knob is the bias control. This adjusts the pulse width in the initial fuzz stage of the pedal. Set this knob to fit your pickups and playing style. The closer to the center the longer the note will sustain but with that comes more chaotic tracking for the divider. Moving it more clockwise or counterclockwise will give you more predictable note tracking on the divider with less sustain.
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The Epiphone LP Special II has a mahogany body and neck. The fretboard features dotted inlays and is made of traditional, unfinished rosewood – a standard choice that yields a sound consistent with the aesthetic standards of a Les Paul. If you want a Les Paul but you don't want to pay a fortune for it, this mahogany beauty is worth your consideration.
The electric guitar was essentially born in 1929—long before the advent of rock and roll music. The first commercially advertised electric guitar was offered that year by the Stromberg-Voisinet company of Chicago, though it was not a smash hit. The first commercially successful electric, Rickenbacker’s “Frying Pan” guitar, didn’t kick off rock ’n’ roll yet either, but it did inspire competitors to jump into the electric guitar market. Invented in 1931, the Frying Pan had an electromagnetic pickup made out of a pair of horseshoe magnets placed end-to-end to create an oval around the guitar’s strings, with a coil placed underneath the strings. The pickup, a device that converts the strings’ vibrations into electrical signals that can be amplified, was bulky and unattractive, but it worked. The commercial version of the Frying Pan was a hollow cast-aluminum lap-steel guitar, and wasn’t an immediate hit beyond some Hawaiian, country, and blues musicians. It differs from the traditional Spanish-style guitar in that it is played horizontally, on a stand or in the player’s lap, and has a sliding steel bar that can be moved along the frets for a gliding effect.
The first of these guitars was the Slash “Snakepit” Les Paul Standard, which was introduced by the Gibson Custom Shop in 1996. It has a transparent cranberry red finish over a flame maple top, a relief carving of the smoking snake graphic off the cover of Slash’s Snakepit‘s debut album, It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere, hand carved by Bruce J. Kunkel (owner of Kunkel Guitars – kunkelguitars.com), and a mother of pearl inlay of a cobra wrapped up the length of the ebony fretboard. Production was limited to 50, with Slash receiving the first four including the prototype, the only one with the carving on the body turned 90 degrees to be viewed right side up when displayed on a guitar stand. In 1998 Slash’s studio was broken into and his guitars were stolen, including the “Snakepit” prototype, so the Gibson Custom Shop built him a replica. These guitars are by far the rarest and most collectible of any of the Gibson Slash signature guitars, they sold for around $5,000 when new, the Hollywood Guitar Center was asking $20,000 for one in 2002.[citation needed] In 1997, Epiphone released a more affordable version of the “Snakepit” Les Paul, featuring a decal of the smoking snake logo and standard fretboard inlay.[32]
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For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best selling electric guitars. And the new Les Paul Special VE—inspired by the Les Paul, the greatest electric guitar in rock—continues the tradition of giving new both players and pros a real Les Paul at a price anyone can afford.

Case sold separately.

Classic Les Paul profile
The Les Paul Special VE has a Poplar body with a sleek look thanks to the Vintage Worn finish and no binding on the neck or body. The Les Paul VE is cut to the same classic profile of all Les Pauls and has a comfortable and fast Mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1960's SlimTaper D profile. The Rosewood fingerboard has traditional Pearloid "Dot" inlays, a 24.75” scale, a 14” radius, 22 medium jumbo frets, and a standard 1-11/16” nut. Just below the headstock is the famed “bell” shaped truss rod cover found on every Les Paul since the early '50s with “Vintage Edition” in white. 

Epiphone Open Coil Humbuckers
The Les Paul Special VE features Epiphone’s world famous open-coil humbuckers with a warm 650R in the neck position and a slightly hotter 700T in the bridge or lead position.Controls include a 3-way pickup selector switch, a Master Volume, and a Master Tone control, each with traditional “Black Speed Knobs” pots with long lasting
500K Ω potentiometers.

All-Metal Hardware
Epiphone features all-metal rock solid hardware on all of its instruments. The Les Paul Special VE comes standard with the legendary Locktone Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece for easy set up. Tuning is fast and reliable with Epiphone Premium Covered tuners with a 14:1 ratio.The higher the ratio, the more accurate your tuning. The tuners are mounted on an Epiphone Clipped Ear headstock with Les Paul Model in gold and the Epiphone log in silver. In addition, a "2016" Edition logo is on the back of the headstock. 

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Delay is essentially echo, but it can be so much more when used well. The two most important knobs are “time” and “repeats”. Time will increase the length between repeats, and repeats will adjust how many echoes are heard. While it is tempting to max the repeats and enter space rock land, less can be more. Used gently you can get reverb or slap-back rockabilly sounds. With careful knob setting you can even create harmonies and loops like The Edge.
Compared to an acoustic guitar, which has a hollow body, electric guitars make much less audible sound when their strings are plucked, so electric guitars are normally plugged into a guitar amplifier and speaker. When an electric guitar is played, string movement produces a signal by generating (i.e., inducing) a small electric current in the magnetic pickups, which are magnets wound with coils of very fine wire. The signal passes through the tone and volume circuits to the output jack, and through a cable to an amplifier.[22] The current induced is proportional to such factors as string density and the amount of movement over the pickups.
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