The standard practice for many distributors was to offer a line of guitars based on popular American designs like Les Pauls and Strats, for example, along with a few original designs. And all were offered at a bargain price or were at least inexpensive enough to compete with the American manufacturers. While the majority of imported Asian-built copies from the era aren’t considered to be of very good quality, the Lotus brand was an exception, mainly because of the factories they were built in.
The Wire. You'll see a lot of vintage spec wordings bounced around here and that pretty much boils down to the aesthetics. Those early Fenders and Gibsons we all know were wired at the original factories with a cloth covered 'push back' wire, whereas as some modern factories, far east predominantly use standard plastic coated wire today. But the important detail is the 'AWG', or American Wire Gauge. Widely used in the guitar world for optimal results, is 22AWG wire. I would go into detail on this, but THIS site has some superb facts about AWG, which if you'd like to find out more I'd recommend a read of! So back to the cloth/plastic thing. Personally, the 'push back' cloth wire is much easier and tidier to work with and I fully hold my hands up to saying it looks much better too. I always use this for any guitar wiring, the results are always great and it's a pleasure to wire up with. I personally use 22AWG copper, solid core wire, great to work with and consistent. 
As a side note, many guitarists refer to the vibrato as “tremolo” or, worse yet, “whammy bar”. (I sometimes do, too, when my mouth is moving unaccompanied by my brain) Vibrato refers to varying the pitch while tremolo is varying the volume. Leo Fender himself is largely responsible for the misuse of the words. He called the bar on his guitars the “tremolo” and even had the tremolo effect on his amplifiers labeled as “Vibrato”.

The construction allows the soundwaves to resonate freely within the body’s hollow airspace as well as around the violin-style F-holes and throughout the solid glue joints. Everything – from the body wood and construction to the neck wood and pitch – contributes to the tone of the 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured guitar. This model boasts impressive depth and sustain in addition to an exceptional resonance that you can feel through the guitar’s body.
I started playing harmonica when I was a little boy. I used to get pushed out to entertain adults at two o'clock in the morning. I also had a kind of obsession about the guitar. The first actual toy that I had that I loved was a little wooden guitar that my folks brought me from a shop that sold brooms and buckets and stuff like that. I used to carry that guitar around like my friends would carry a football. I took this thing with me everywhere.

When it comes to guitar amps, American Musical Supply carries iconic cornerstone brands such as Fender, Marshall, Vox, and Orange. These are the names that have formed the foundation of guitar rigs worldwide for decades. We also stock the most innovative new models from such brands as Blackstar, Fuchs, Line 6, Paul Reed Smith, Supro, and a host of other incredible companies anchored by passionate engineers, technicians, and designers. With the myriad of choices available from AMS, how does one decide? All it takes are a few questions to get started.


This is probably the most iconic guitar effect ever – from Slash to Jimi Hendrix to Mark Tremonti to SRV, the list of players who use wah pedals is almost never ending. Originally created to emulate the muted sound possible on a trumpet, it quickly became an iconic effect in its own right. The sound is pretty self-explanatory – rock your foot back and forth of the pedal to shift the EQ from bass heavy to treble heavy and you’ll get a nice “wah wah” as you play.

Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Ash - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 42.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Medium - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 34" (86cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome - Pickups: CAP Double Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Black
This is a gradual and repetitive change in volume, going up and down. Done slowly and subtly it can be very gentle, but turn up the controls and you get a surf-guitar like shimmer. On extreme settings the signal turns from fully on to fully off sharply and repetitively, giving a robotic sound. Controls are usually rate and depth, with a third control to affect how sharply the volume changes occur – whether they are smooth and gradual or sharp and sudden. Tremolo pedals are often equipped with tap tempo too, allowing you to match the volume changes with the tempo of the song.
What guitar you get will heavily depend on what style you want to play. If you like death metal you probably don't want to buy a pink Telecaster... think about what you like and what you are going to play! But maybe you want to make a statement and be the guy playing a pointy metal guitar at a jazz jam? The guitar should reflect your personality to some degree at least!

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The idea behind a piezoelectric pickup is more or less the same as with any regular electric guitar pickup. Guitars which utilize this system have a piezoelectric pickup located under the bridge. Once you pick a string, the sound vibration from the string is then interpreted by the pickup, generates an electrical signal, and is then fed into the preamplifier to be boosted to line-level.  You can think of it like a microphone's diaphragm.
This guitar is based on Loar's U. S. Pat. 2,020,557 (filed 1934, awarded 1935), in which electric amplification is combined with an acoustic guitar body. The design offered a player the option of switching between electric and acoustic amplification, or combining both, with metal posts through the bridge that transfers vibrations from the strings to the bar-armature. With the posts raised, the bridge comes in contact with the soundboard for exclusively acoustic amplification; with the posts lowered to contact the metal bar-armature, both acoustic and electric amplification is engaged, and with the posts lowered completely, the bridge is lifted off of the soundboard and supported only by the bar-armature for exclusively electric amplification. The back of the guitar, made from arched spruce, with two f-shaped soundholes, incorporates another of Loar's ideas, covered more extensively in U. S. Pat. 2,046,331 (filed in 1934 but awarded in 1936), to use the back of the instrument as a second soundboard by transferring bridge pressure from the top.
Nashville studio engineer Glen Snoddy discovered the Fuzz-Tone sound when recording Marty Robbin’s 1960 hit “Don’t Worry About Me.” Allegedly an overloaded transformer blew in a Langevin tube module, transforming Grady Martin’s bass guitar into a distorted, heavy fuzz. Some put the event down to another case of amplifier malfunction. Either way, Martin continued to use the tone throughout 1961 while Snoddy transistorized the malfunctioning circuit through trial and error, and sold it onto Gibson in 1962.
The roots of effects pedal usage can be traced back to early into the history of the electric guitar, but two people immediately come to mind who really pushed its usage out there:  Roger Mayer and Jimi Hendrix.  We’ve come a long way since those early days and it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the insane amount of options out there.  From good old standbys to newer boutique options, it can be a chore to know what effects pedals could be right for you.
Most of Peter, Paul and Mary’s work had splendid fingerstyle guitar work. My favorite is “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”. Paul Stookey also had some fine acoustic work going solo with stuff like “Sebastian” and “The Wedding Song”. “The Wedding Song” was supposedly “must learn” stuff for aspiring acoustic players in the 70’s (so they could play at their friends’ weddings).
Many experiments at electrically amplifying the vibrations of a string instrument were made dating back to the early part of the 20th century. Patents from the 1910s show telephone transmitters were adapted and placed inside violins and banjos to amplify the sound. Hobbyists in the 1920s used carbon button microphones attached to the bridge; however, these detected vibration from the bridge on top of the instrument, resulting in a weak signal.[2] With numerous people experimenting with electrical instruments in the 1920s and early 1930s, there are many claimants to have been the first to invent an electric guitar.
ASSEMBLE Now you can put it all together! By this time you'll be so excited you'll forget about the electronics and start to string in up before you get the electronics in but it's ok, we'll get there. Start with bolting on the neck in the same fasion that you did when you test fitted everything. Then follow that with the tuners, bridge and pickups. Don't forget to run the wiring for the pickups when you put them in.
Okay, getting down to brass tax - how do the effects and amp models sound? In a word, great! It’s not secret that Boss makes some fantastic pedals, many that have reached legendary status over the years. It’s nice knowing that you’re getting a multi-effects pedal from a brand that has really dominated the guitar and bass effects field. Boss uses some technology terms like COSM modeling and MDP (Multi-Dimensional Processing) which sound fancy but might not mean much to many guitarists. Truth is, given that this is a digital unit, some things sound really great, and some sound not so great. The overdrives are hit and miss. This user review hits the nail on the head:
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I took it into a local shop to have it looked at, turns out the neck was warped, leading to problem #2 above. I ended up returning it and ordering the same model from a different retailer; although the new guitar didn’t have the same neck problems I ended up having to replace the bridge with a Mastery Bridge (see issue #1, above, the Mastery Bridge cost me another $200 or so, including labor for installation).
A looper allows you to record a musical passage or phrase then play that passage back repeatedly. You can then record more loops and layer them, one on top of the other. Most recording and playback functions are foot controlled, and once you’ve created suitable backing tracks, you can can then play over the repeated passages in real time, creating exciting one-man-band sounds never possible before. Many of the more advanced models include built-in rhythms, custom effects, inputs for vocal mics and other instruments, plus MIDI and USB capabilities so that you can use the looper as part of your digital song-creation and recording processes.
Having got the technicalities out of the way, it's time to look at recording methods. The traditional method, and still the most satisfactory in many cases, is to mic up a really good amplifier, but where this isn't appropriate, we have a choice of physical modelling guitar preamplifiers, complete guitar/pickup/amp modelling systems using Roland's VG series of products, or the slightly lower-tech approach of using analogue guitar recording preamps (solid state or valve). The latest option is to plug the guitar directly into the computer and use a software plug-in to handle the amp and speaker modelling, but I'll start at the beginning with the miking options.

Playing power chords right up at the ‘dusty' end (past the 8th fret) gets difficult, because the frets are so close together. In the next stage we'll learn how to play power chords with a fifth-string root too, which solves that problem. However, it's important not to rush ahead, so make sure you put your effort just into the sixth-string root chords for now.
A now affordable alternative to the Tri-Axis and other Mesa Boogie Amps, the Studio Preamp contained all of the versatility one would expect from a Boogie. This 2-space machine is based on the classic Mesa Boogie Mark IIC+ amplifier, but in the popular rack-mountable form of the late 1980s. It features 5 preamp tubes and a blackface circuit, so it’s perfect for those chasing after a Fender-esque clean or 90’s mid-gain lead tone. And like most Mesa’s, you’ll get a convenient EQ for those final tweaks.

This body and headstock shape are identical to my Nivico Balladeer, and both guitars are real keepers.  This truss rod cover would become the standard curved plastic type seen on many Matsumoku-made guitars for the next 10 years.  Of course the Palmer badge is missing, but the Palmer name (as it pertains to Japanese imports) was being used as early as 1964.  I’ve seen Kawai S80s badged with the Palmer name.  If you do a search for vintage Palmer guitars, you’ll come up with all sorts of hits but you probably won’t see too many guitars like this one.  These were probably made for one or two years, and I’d bet the pickups were sourced from local Matsumoto.
According to Michael Wright of Vintage Guitar magazine, Univox itself has a rather convoluted history. Though it was a part of the “lawsuit era” of the ‘70s, Univox wasn’t just another copy manufacturer out of Japan. It’s a bit more complicated than that. The firm was created from a joining of multiple companies that had a few other name brand guitars – Hagstrom, for one – under their corporate umbrellas.
The Martin DSR2 also comes equipped with built-in Fishman Sonitone electronics, which features discrete soundhole mounted controls, allowing for stage-ready performance without having to drill excessive holes on the side of the body. With its continuesly high rating and incredible value for money, the Martin DSR2 should be at the top of your list when you're looking for an acoustic-electric guitar in this price range.
Just in...We are proud to offer this fine rare example of a Washburn vintage instrument .... This is super guitar! .. Wow talk about some beautiful exotic woods have a look at the Koa sides & back ,its a Solid Sitka Spruce top, Super high AAA grade 3 piece flamed Ribbon Mahogany & walnut neck with the Martin style Diamond Volute on back.... bone nut & saddle this is first class sound & playability & craftsmanship for a song.... Just look at that workmanship.... Great Tone woods with some ager to her now she a real Singer all right... rare to see one of these with such exotic woods makes it specially beautiful. I would compare the feel & tone and volume to that of the Old FG180 Yamaha's very similar ...Just in and its SUPER CLEAN collectors example so get her before she is gone... any questions .... ask please Thanks for your interest and looking....
This is one of several Squier models available that offer a pretty good product for a reasonably low price. The pickups and hardware are sometimes suspect, and the workmanship varies from instrument to instrument, but for the price, these are a very good beginner guitar choice. Squier Fat Strats are similar in appearance to the much more expensive Fender Stratocasters, so the look of the instrument is appealing. 
Prior to being acquired by Gibson back in 1957, Epiphone once competed with the most popular guitar brands in the market - including Gibson. These days, Epiphone is known for being the affordable sub-brand of Gibson, producing cost-effective alternatives to many of their premium guitars. Many experienced players today credit this brand for manufacturing their first ever instrument, and their popularity in the entry level market continue to soar high.
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You have a 2 band EQ as well as independent gain and master controls as well as a headphone/line out jack for either silent practice or recording directly to your audio interface. There’s 10 watts of solid state power flying out of the 6.5" speaker so you’re covered for smaller gigs and practice sessions whilst the classic VOX grille cloth and chicken head knobs provide that unmistakeable VOX look. A fantastic amplifier that will provide you with lush tone and typical VOX reliability – you can’t argue with that for under £70.
Besides insulting Taylor Swift in a way even Katy Perry would bristle at (“Nobody would confuse the pop star’s chops with Bonnie Raitt’s. But she does play a guitar.”), Edgers manages to make it through an entire history of the electric-guitar industry as it stands without quoting more than one female guitar player — the Runaways’s guitarist Lita Ford. Any person who has actually interrogated the music landscape deeper than, say, an Eric Clapton record would recognize that the electric guitar isn’t dying. The throngs of women who play electric guitar just don’t get exalted or celebrated in the same way as aging men. But there are legions of women playing guitar — maybe Edgers just hasn’t been paying attention.
Equalizer or EQ pedals have traditionally been used to boost audio signals for solos. If you want to boost the middle frequencies, the EQ will do the trick and provide a tight tone. Some musicians don’t find boosters and EQ pedals to be necessary in a chain, so make sure you do some research to figure out if this type will really benefit your sound
Even with a H-H configuration, you could utilize coil splitting to achieve single coil-ish sounds. While arguably this does not give a "true" single coil sound, if humbucker sounds are mainly used, this can be enough. My impression is that most people aren't using the middle position that much, I think the way forward is to try different pickup configurations to find out what you need.
A: If it looks like a ??? it almost certainly is a ??? Because the factory used to change the hardware at a whim there will be slight variations. This has, in most cases, nothing to do with a particular year but more to do with what happened to be to hand at the time. Some exceptions are pickups, pickguards, logos and headstocks. All I know is here on the website if you look hard enough. Also bear in mind that your guitar may have been modified at some stage in its life.
Fun !...Top 5...Such a good game I love it I would defiantly reccomend this game to all console users the graphic las the entertainment is just great you can play either online or offline so that's good so many different missions to play all at different difficulty so they ain't too easy but they also ain't too hard I ate this 5 stars for everything of people like shooting games car games then go get this game coz it is all of those things it is just excellent....The graphics are amazing though but I'm going to trade it in for something I enjoy more if this is your type of game I would recommend it but I mostly play games like Diablo and wolfenstein thought I might like it but don't and I don't have anything negative to say about it because it looks and plays great just not my cup of tea
SOLD OUT : in AMAZING Top vintage condition, Plays with ease with nice low action. Solid Sitka Spruce Top amazing Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood back - sides -Fingerboard - bridge & headstock overlay, bindings are figured and flamed maple wow what a classic beauty. if you have been thinking of getting the late model Glen Fry F360 for $1700+ think again...OWN Vintage , matured aged exotic woods is what make the greatest sounding guitars this baby has it at a great price.. buy the new Tak and 2 years later its worth %%% less, not these exotic tone woods vintage guitars they are going up...mark my words you will do well with this baby... in top all round condition really well cared for and maintained. This guitar is in the upper percentile quality & workmanship just about as good as it gets and dare I say it ...this will give a Martin a real good run for its money folks... Get this RARE beauty before she's gone.. you will not be disappointed. Email Joe at JVGuitars@gmail.com .

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GNUitar is a basic free guitar effects software that allows you to turn your PC into a guitar effects processor without having to spend a single dime. Nothing much needs to be said aside from it is working as intended. Although you don't have too many options, it has all the essential effect types including distortion, reverb, echo, delay, chorus, flanger, equalizer, wah, phaser, tremolo, vibrato and noise reduction. The package comes with 2 different types of distortion and has various flavors of echo, reverb and delay. This free software works for both Windows and Linux.
An additional note on the methods used; although we gathered rating and review data from guitarists around the world, we only considered brands that can be found at major online music gear retailers located in the United States. This means that fine brands like Maton from Australia (played by Tommy Emmanuel) weren't included - the same goes for some respected European brands. Also, only full sized guitars, or ones very close to it, were included in the data set - had we included smaller parlor guitars then this may have boosted Martin and also Gretsch might have made the list.

The Fretted Synth website has mysteriously disappeared (the likes of Native Instruments not happy that they’re giving away so much goodness for free??), so we’re linking to the Rekkerd page that still seems to host the plugins. FreeAmp3 really shouldn’t be free: it features masses of sound-shaping potential and the user interface looks great. If you just want one (free) VST guitar plugin, get this.
As a rule, acoustic guitars with laminated spruce tops do not have the same resonance as those made from unlaminated tonewoods, but the Fender FA-100’s fuller dreadnought design provides a richer tone than some customers may expect. If price is a consideration, the Fender has been described as a “cheaply made guitar with a fantastic sound.” What’s more, When you buy a Fender product, you're investing in quality. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has been manufacturing instruments and equipment since the 1940s.
I have a Les Paul Gold Top copy I bought new in the mid 70's. It has no brand name anywhere on it. I have done all the research I can and have found no conclusive results.I'm at a loss. It plays great! I do have pics. if that will help. Thanks for any help' It was bought in Montgomery Al. Clarence Carter's guitar player bought one while I was in the store so I figured ...must be a okay guitar. So I bought it. On the little square plate on the back it is hand engraved #0059. Thanks
Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back
So, if you’d like to emulate some of the guitar greats like Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin) or Slash, this Epiphone package again with all the extras you’ll need—but with an Epiphone guitar—is a great way to start. Also, it’s worth mentioning that Gibson/Epiphone Les Paul designs usually have a slightly rounded, more narrow fret board and, in my opinion, are a little easier to play compared to the flatter, wider Fender fret boards. But I strongly recommend you don’t take my word for that. Get into a music shop and try the two types of guitar for yourself.

I started out doing pretty much what I do now on an acoustic and transferred it to electric when I was able to get a paper route and buy a crappy red electric guitar. I knew the value of working stripped down and I still do, although in this day and age I've made a lot of records with different sounds. I must say I really love what technology can afford you.
Learning the notes on your guitar fretboard is one of the most important things you can do to advance your guitar playing skills. Knowing this information opens up an enormous amount of possibilities and can greatly help ease the learning curve for future guitar exercises. From scales, to soloing, to chord positions / progressions, knowing where each guitar note without having to think about it will put you well ahead of other guitarists who have not mastered this yet. This guide will give you some background information regarding how the notes on your guitar fretboard are laid out and of
An amplifier stack consists of an amplifier head atop a speaker cabinet—a head on top of one cabinet is commonly called a half stack, a head atop two cabinets a full stack. The cabinet that the head sits on often has an angled top in front, while the lower cabinet of a full stack has a straight front. The first version of the Marshall stack was an amp head on an 8×12 cabinet, meaning a single speaker cabinet containing eight 12" guitar speakers. After six of these cabinets were made, the cabinet arrangement was changed to an amp head on two 4×12 (four 12" speakers) cabinets to make the cabinets more transportable. Some touring metal and rock bands have used a large array of guitar speaker cabinets for their impressive appearance. Some of these arrangements include only the fronts of speaker cabinets mounted on a large frame.[25]
Fun !...so fun...I like the game it was worth waiting a couple years for it and I like the fact that even though I preordered it when I first got my xbox one to Best Buy they still gave me all the points for my xbox and the game so I recommend it to a friend and I'm glad that I finally got the Xbox one and the game came out to play it...IF YOU ARE A DIE HARD FAN OF HALO YOU WILL GIVE IT A 5, IF YOU ARE REALISTIC YOU WILL GO WITH A 4, NOT TOO MUCH HAS CHANGED A FEW NEW SUITS AND COLORS FOR YOUR SOLDIER, STORY IS GREAT LIKE ALWAYS, AND LIKE ALWAYS ALOT OF GRINDING ON EVERY LEVEL, IT DOES NOT BRING ANYTHING NEW ON THE 1 PLAYER SIDE,MULTIPLAYER HAS PLENTY NEW FEATURES,AS A FAN OF HALO, I MUST HAVE IT IN MY COLLECTION AND YOU MUST TOO!
Being a true pro-level instrument, the Yamaha LL16 comes with a jumbo body shape and built-in S.R.T Zero impact electronics. Playability remains beginner friendly, with a low action setup that new players will easily master. And since it comes with an all-solid wood body, this guitar will only sound better and better as it ages. If you are looking for a more long term instrument at the sub $1000 level, check out the Yamaha LS16.
We are here today to help you break free.  It's time to understand the difference between the types of guitar strings.  We can have higher value from our brand of choice or any other by understanding which product serves our personal preferences and instruments the best.  Let’s dive in and learn about the many variables that makes certain strings better or worse for each individual player.
When you have a setup that you like, you can easily save it as a track preset — or, better still, create multiple track presets for different types of sounds. Cubase can even make a fine host for live performance, should you decide to trade your rack of effects for a svelte laptop that patches directly into the PA system, as you can switch instantly between racks. (I'll cover how to do this at the end of the article.)
We would recommend that you, for your first guitar, spend between $500-$1000. This price range is good, because you know that you will be getting a guitar that is made for some serious music making (which the cheapest ones out there just aren’t). Of course you don’t want to spend this much money on something you’re not even sure you will be using a year from now, so if you aren’t that serious about learning to play the guitar it might be a good idea to go for an even cheaper option.
Another great thing about this guitar is the Min-ETune system that offers 16 tuning presets. This not only makes it super quick to tune your guitar for everyday use, it’s also great if you need to tune your guitar up or down. It saves you a lot of work and time! It’s also a feature that makes these electric guitars for beginners who don’t know how to tune their guitar, and even if they of course can use a tuner this is still a faster option.
I have a beautiful 2003 Ltd and my friend who has played for many years has the Taylor and he ended up borrowing my tak for five months he didn't want to give it back you know the guy has played with some well known folk's so I trust his judgment played with Keith Green and America and I have played over thirty years so I haven't let to many go by without some trial and ownership this tak is as good or better than the best Martin can offer. Ovation can't touch it and of course Gibson is too soft for me I own a fender and a Yamaha 6 and 12 for the money you can't beat a yam and I have played hummingbird to dove guild gretch Washburn breedlove which is a favorite not many I haven't played so with all this my top ten is Takemine Martin Gibson Breedlove Hagstrom Taylor Guild Gretch Washburn and Yamaha. If you can find a Hag it will blow your bag I have a 1971 Hagstrom acoustic I believe it was a demo for Golden Earing it was a gift from an old friend from Deutschland any way I will say ...more
I sold my fender squier stratacaster for this guitar.when I opened the box it was so beautiful nothing like what pictured showed. Easy to tune and the amp is wanderful. This guitar comes with great surprises as well. Gibson has done it again. This guitar is great for a beginner. The only flaw is that it doesn't have a pick guard but those are cheap to buy. Would buy again.
The Wildwood staff feels that they are some of the best instruments to see the light of day since the mid-60’s. We have worked closely with the Gibson Memphis factory to create unique special run guitars that take these iconic instruments to new levels while honoring the Gibson’s storied history. By producing everything from classic reissues to signature artist models, the Memphis factory is taking their game to a whole new level. We are proud to present our Gibson Memphis inventory, and we invite you to look around and fall in love with one of these superlative instruments.
Here we have a matching quad of late sixties Goodman speakers with green labels 25 Watts each @ 12 ohms Very rare in that EACH driver is fully functional, the cones are nice and stiff, no cone rub or any tears, just a killer set of vintage speakers. These came out of a wem cab and were also stock in laney cabinets(think sabbath tone, wem, Burman and Selmer gear Wem used odd impedances, these read 10.01 ohms on my multimeter so is treat them as 8ohms if they are wired up in a cab series parallel. Postage in the U.K. is £32 and they will be sent out in two separate parcels, you will have to arrange your own courier if your not U.K. based you can also collect in person! Any questions just ask
Vacuum tubes were the dominant active electronic components in bass amplifiers manufactured from the 1950s until the early 1970s, and tubes continue to be used in the 2010s for expensive bass combo amplifiers, amp heads, and preamplifiers (as well, tube amps continue to be used by audiophiles for some expensive home hifi stereo systems). Tube amplifiers for bass almost always use class AB1 topology for efficiency reasons.
My very strong opinion is that you should find an experienced guitar player, who plays in the style that you aspire to.  Tell them very clearly that you want help finding a beginner guitar that is in good condition and is easy to play.  Don't worry about resale value, looks, brand prestige, etc..  Get that person to help you find something that you can afford.  This is especially true for acoustic guitars (easy to play electrics are easier to find).  This might very well be a used guitar.  Try hard not  to buy a guitar because a salesperson told you it was a great beginner guitar and that it would be easy to play -- unless you really, really trust that salesperson.  It is true that the more money you are willing to spend then the easier it will be to find a guitar you can easily learn on but there are cheap guitars out there that will fit the bill.
Gibson has produced three Jimmy Page signature models. The first was issued in the mid-1990s. It was based on a stock Les Paul Standard of the time (rather than the more prestigious and historically correct 1958/1959 re-issues issued by the Gibson Custom Shop). The modifications were based on Jimmy Page‘s “#2” 1959 Les Paul, which had been modified with push-pull potentiometers on all four control knobs, as well as mini push-pull switches under the pickguard. This first version of the Jimmy Page Signature did not have the mini-switches under the pickguard, nor did it replicate the custom-shaved neck profile of Jimmy Page’s guitar, but it did include the four push-pull pots. With all four pots pushed down, the guitar operated as normal. Pulling up the volume pot for the Bridge or Neck pickup turned the respective pickup into a single coil, rather than humbucking pickup. Pulling up the tone pot for the Neck pickup changed Bridge & Neck pickups wiring from series (stock) to parallel. Pulling up the tone pot for the Bridge pickup put Bridge & Neck pickups out of phase with each other. The first iteration of the Jimmy Page Signature utilized Gibson’s then-current high-output humbuckers: a 496R in the neck position and a 498T at the bridge.

On entering a studio, some guitarists ask if they should leave off the effects they normally use and add them in later. Of course, this can be done; however, if the effects are integral to the desired sound and you are ‘playing’ the effect as much as you are the instrument – fuzzboxes, heavy spring reverb, long delays and so on – it might be difficult to create the right feel during the take without them. If there is uncertainty as to whether the effects are spot-on, split the signal to retain the option of reworking the sound during the mixing process.


Cap in series with a resistor (shouldn’t matter which comes first). Kinman recommends this for single coils but it works rather well for humbuckers too. I installed 1nF cap in series with a 130K resistor and it works awesome. Resistor is there to limit the effect of the cap and having it in series with the cap means it shouldn’t affect pot taper as much. Larger cap means wider frequency range, so treble jump isn’t as sudden. So far, this is my favorite treble bleed circuit.
Today’s beginner guitars are far superior to the hunk of wood with strings I started with, and now there is a huge array of instruments to choose from. In fact, I’d go so far as to say if you only intend to play guitar for fun you’ll never need to spend another dime on gear beyond your starter setup, if you don’t want to. (Except for things like strings and picks, of course.) That definitely wasn’t true thirty years ago.
I still keep in touch with Mark and occasionally pose questions to him about various maintenance concerns. He's pretty busy and it may take a few days before he get's back to me. He has always been willing to help and actually encourages me to take on a lot more of the responsibility of maintaining my basses. Yeah, I spent a little on the front end but I really feel that it's going to payoff for me long term.
For a guitar that sits comfortably in the mid-range segment of the market, Yamaha RevStar RS420 packs a decent punch. Body shape is more reminiscent of a PRS than anything else, but Yamaha definitely infused it with their unique details. The sound is tight, very flexible, and I had no issues dialing in the type of tone I was looking for. A well rounded model, that’s for sure.

This article was extremely helpful for me to understand the 5 way (ok, 3 way) switch. I’ve only previously wired a guitar with one double humbucker, and now I’m going to replace the bridge and neck pickups in an Ibanez that has HSH. The 8 contacts were confusing me since my last wiring job didn’t even involve a switch, but after reading this I know exactly what to do.
Martin makes classic guitars that have been featured in countless hit tunes. While they are best known for their top-of-the-line $2,000+ models, Martin also makes great guitars for any budget. Martin guitars always honor their tradition while continuing to strive for a better instrument. Give Martin’s new 17 Series a try if you want to see that theory in action.

Some of Jackson’s most famous models – such as the Soloist, the Kelly and the Rhoads – are a common sight on the biggest stages around the world as the biggest names in metal use them, including Randy Rhoads, Adrian Smith, Marty Friedman and David Ellefson. Thankfully it’s not just premium guitars on offer, meaning guitarists on a budget can easily pick up a quality Jackson (the Dinky Series in particular) for just a few hundred bucks.
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.
By the fall of 1956, Daniel started making the Silvertone and Danelectro lines using the standard Dano materials: a Poplar wood frame (that comprised the sides, neck and bridge block of the guitar), stapled together and covered with 3/8" thick masonite. The top and back was painted, but the sides were covered in a vinyl material to hide the unpainted poplar wood frame. Also the now infamous "Lipstick tube" pickups were used. These pickups had an alnico bar magnet and coil measuring 4.75k ohms wrapped in brown vinyl tape. The pickup guts were placed inside surplus, chrome plated, lipstick tubes. These pickups were actually the same as previously used and hidden beneath the pickguard. Just now they were adorned in lipstick tubes and mounted in cutouts in the masonite body. Construction methods stayed this way for most models throughout Danelectro's history.
Well... I'm researching this to since I have a Norma Accoustic. From what I have found they were only made between 1965-1970something. Most were made in japan including mine although some were made in Italy. They were made in the same factory as the Sear silvertone's. Most are considered vintage guitars especially the electrics from the 60's. From what I have seen electrics in good condition are worth a good bit of money. I'm still trying to find more info on mine though. Like what woods is it made of. and what was the exact year of manufacture. It says FG-10 on it. It plays great. Has great sound and plays prety easily except mine doesn't seem to like you using the first fret. lol... just trying to add some info here

The Mustang bass debuted in 1966 as (along with the Coronado) Fender's first shortscale bass, however the Competition finishes were not seen until 1969. It was effectively the same instrument, with sports stripes, and initially a matching coloured headstock. The competition colours were Red, Orange and Blue (although blue was officially called Burgundy). Have a closer look at this 1969 Fender and check out the soundclips through various vintage amplifiers.


The principal difference among the Strats was in finish options. All had 21-fret maple necks, three single-coil pickups, volume and two tone controls, and five-way select. The SWG came in yer basic red or black, with maple ‘board and chrome hardware. These had traditional non-locking vibratos. The SGV was offered in red with white graphics. The SSX was the dusey, with purple burst (white outside, purple in center), tiara turquoise, blue pearl, metallic white, black and candy apple red finish options, with… with matching colored maple fingerboard and (that’s and) matching chrome hardware.
These pedals essentially do the same thing with overdrive being regarded as a milder effect, similar to turning a tube amp all the way up and distortion a more extreme version of the same effect. Although these are designed for electric guitar, I’ve seen acoustic players use them to great effect through an amp or PA. If done well it provides a dramatic lift to a song. The most important thing is to be familiar with the sound and volume your pedal will create before you try it live.

While tube technology is still considered state-of-the-art in countries where a potato is regarded as a square meal, these days solid-state and digital amps offer excellent tone for a lot fewer bucks, and with fewer maintenance headaches. However, tube tone is still considered the standard by many top players. Take a blind listening test, and let your ears be the judge.
You can always rely on Epiphone to provide an acoustic guitar with eye-catching looks and a quality sound at an excellent price, and the EJ-200CE is certainly a testament to this. Based on one of the world’s most famous guitars, the J-200 (introduced in 1937), this revamped model offers an excellent mix of vintage style and modern components, perfect for any level of skill.

The President was produced by Hofner in Bubenreuth, Germany, specifically for Selmer, who distributed the brand in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and other commonwealth nations. The President was a hollow body electric acoustic, available as a full body or thinline, and with blonde or brunette finish. It was a great playing guitar that sold fairly well in the second half of the 1950s, throughout the 1960s, and into the very early 1970s. The example shown here is a full-body depth guitar in blonde - and as a 1965 guitar, one of the last to feature the rounded Venetian cutaway. From late 1965 until 1972, the President sported a sharp Florentine cut. Naturally, such an electric acoustic suggests jazz and blues, but many of the original British Hofner President players were part of the rock 'n roll, skiffle and beat scenes of the late 50s and early 60s.
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At the top of the fingerboard, just below the headstock, is a slotted piece of material called the nut. The strings are routed through the slots in the nut and terminate at the bridge, located on the far end of the body. When the strings are plucked or strummed, they vibrate between the nut and the bridge. This vibration is where the sound of a guitar begins. How that vibration translates into sound depends on whether the guitar is acoustic or electric, as we’ll see in a moment.

In 2003, The Blues, a PBS-TV series produced by famed director Martin Scorsese, traced the roots of the blues from Africa to modern day society, showing how it inspired other generations of musicians. While in production, Marshall Chess got an e-mail from Chuck D saying that he heard he was doing a film that connected the blues to hip hop and that he wanted to be part of it. Chess was happy to hear Chuck D say "Electric Mud was one of his favorite, most influential albums and that all the early hip hop guys were inspired by it," affirming a connection he thought had happened. In the episode titled Godfathers and Sons, the focus is on the Chicago blues, Chess records and the effect of Electric Mud on Public Enemy, with Chuck D coming to Chicago, led on a historic blues tour by Chess. There, Chuck D's feverant appreciation of EM got him to reassemble the musicians from the sessions to perform material from it for the upcoming 20th Anniversary Chicago Blues Festival. In keeping with the experimental vein of the record, Chuck D added a turntablist (Juice) and a rapper (Kyle Jason) to the band, re-naming the group the Electric Mudcats. Having the material played at a blues festival showed how the album had finally come full circle, from being hated to being respected and enjoyed.
Since treble frequencies pass through a capacitor, what would happen if you routed the positive lead THROUGH the capacitor rather than having it ground out frequencies?  The answer: just the opposite - the signal from you pickups would pass through the capacitor and only treble frequencies would get through.  Aha!  A new type of tone control.  The illustration below shows this type of wiring in a bit of an advanced concept.
The first type of distortion pedals were fuzz boxes. They produced a distorted tone that allowed guitar players to play singing leads. Like the name says, the tone was more "fuzz" than tube distortion, sounding like a damaged speaker cone. Still, fuzz pedals can be heard on countless recordings from the 60's (think of the opening guitar riff in the Rolling Stone's I Can't Get No Satisfaction or just about any of Jimi Hendrix's riffs.) Fuzz pedals remain popular today. 
GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is based on the powerful GUITAR RIG 5 PRO, providing you a straightforward and easy user interface with professional components. The advanced tag-based preset browser makes it easy to find and organize your effect settings. Drag and drop components to the rack to create custom effect chains, and adjust all settings to your needs in no time.
I have a shecter omen extreme 7 and found that the factor strings they put on were nice for my small fingers. I had to replace because the factor set in general needed some tweaking and they changed all the strings. Now i don't really like the strings they put on. Too small. All they had listed for the strings were 24X jumbo strings. What string set should i buy since i play Ambient, soft, but also djent metal.
I also didn’t mention a tuner, but that’s because a tuner really isn’t an effect. If you use one, the ideal location is in the very front of the signal chain right after the guitar as you don’t want the signal going into the tuner processed by any effects that might affect the tuner’s accuracy. Even better, get a loop switcher with a separate tuner output that keeps the tuner entirely out of the signal chain until you need to use it and that will mute the signal so the audience doesn’t need to suffer while you make adjustments.
Before it gets shipped to you, each Monoprice guitar undergoes a setup, tuning, and inspection process by Master Luthier Roger Gresco here in Southern California. The setup ensures that the neck is straight, the action is right, and that it will stay in tune. Additionally, it comes with everything you need to get started, including strings (installed), a heavy-duty zippered black gig bag with shoulder strap, and a truss-rod wrench.

By far the best bang for the buck. These guitars are beautifully made with good attention to details such as fret ends, bridge fit and neck joints. They also have wonderful finishing and are made from quality materials. The 'snob' factor is the only thing against them, they are not Gibsons. Martin's or Fender's, BUT they do play just as well and quite frankly, only those with a good ear and perfect pitch could tell the difference in a rock environment. I have Fender, Gibson, Taylor, Columbus, Washburn, Squire and Maccaferri Guitars, as well as Richwood. Sadly like the great majority of guitarists, the guitars themselves are more capable than I am, and I am happy to admit it. Having an exceptional guitar will not make you an exceptional guitarist, just as a more professional camera won't make you a professional photographer. The Richwood Artist / Master series of guitars are good, believe me! For the average guitarist, pro or am, you can buy more expensise guitars but not better as far ...more
Reverb is the persistence of sound in a particular space after the original sound is removed. When sound is produced in a space, a large number of echoes build up and then slowly decay as the sound is absorbed by the walls and air, creating reverberation, or reverb. A plate reverb system uses an electromechanical transducer (actuator), similar to the driver in a loudspeaker, to create vibration in a plate of sheet metal. A pickup captures the vibrations as they bounce across the plate, and the result is output as an audio signal. A spring reverb system uses a transducer at one end of a spring and a pickup at the other, similar to those used in plate reverbs, to create and capture vibrations within a metal spring. Guitar amplifiers frequently incorporate spring reverbs due to their compact construction. Spring reverberators were once widely used in semi-professional recording due to their modest cost and small size. Due to quality problems and improved digital reverb units, spring reverberators are declining rapidly in use. Digital reverb units use various signal processing algorithms in order to create the reverb effect. Since reverberation is essentially caused by a very large number of echoes, simple DSPs use multiple feedback delay circuits to create a large, decaying series of echoes that die out over time.

Our flagship guitar. Customers have been asking Denny to build this instrument for such a long time that he finally gave in and designed what many are calling the best acoustic on the market today.  We’ve had players put this guitar up against the best from Taylor, Martin, Gibson, Fender, Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, and we never get them back, even with our 100% money back guarantee. If you’re looking for your last guitar you can pass onto your children this is our #1 guitar. We’re sold out and back ordered on them most of the year so when you see one grab it as Denny builds only a few annually.
The first time you plug this Les Paul into an amp, the sound that comes out will put a smile on your face. It’s that vintage growl of a legit PAF that you can’t really recreate completely with anything else. We pushed a Plexi into overdrive and rolled off the volume a bit for that true rock tone. We weren’t disappointed. Gibson Les Paul Standard Heritage Cherry Sunburst brings that same epic tone which the whole series is known for.
The implementation of musical chords on guitars depends on the tuning. Since standard tuning is most commonly used, expositions of guitar chords emphasize the implementation of musical chords on guitars with standard tuning. The implementation of chords using particular tunings is a defining part of the literature on guitar chords, which is omitted in the abstract musical-theory of chords for all instruments.

In this era, as well, Gibson began experimenting with new models such as the Les Paul Recording. This model is generally unpopular with guitarists due to its complex electronics. The Recording featured low-impedance pickups, many switches and buttons, and a highly specialized cable for impedance-matching to the amplifier. Less noticeable changes included, but were not limited to, maple fingerboards (1976), pickup cavity shielding, and the crossover of the ABR1 Tune-o-matic bridge into the modern day Nashville Tune-o-matic bridge. During the 1970s, the Les Paul body shape was incorporated into other Gibson models, including the S-1, the Sonex, the L6-S, and other models that did not follow the classic Les Paul layout.


I’d like to think that I am a little more forgiving of slight finish errors than most, so most of the horror stories surrounding Gibson QC do not bother me too much. After all, one area of the body where the sunburst color doesn't fade at EXACTLY the same point all the way around? That sounds more like middle aged guys trying to save face around their buddies after their wives saw the credit card bill the next month and made them take it back.

If you’re looking for an acoustic-electric guitar that sounds great but comes at an affordable price, then you can’t go wrong with the Oscar Schmidt OD312CE. This guitar features 12 strings for a depth and richness you couldn’t achieve with a 6-string guitar. The sound of the strings is further amplified by the select spruce top for a ‘woody’ warm tone.

The construction allows the soundwaves to resonate freely within the body’s hollow airspace as well as around the violin-style F-holes and throughout the solid glue joints. Everything – from the body wood and construction to the neck wood and pitch – contributes to the tone of the 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured guitar. This model boasts impressive depth and sustain in addition to an exceptional resonance that you can feel through the guitar’s body.


While there are some obvious quality gaps, they do appear to be closing as time passes on. The hardware used on Epiphone is getting better, and the presence of the new ProBucker Pickups helps to elevate the brand to new heights. The fact of the matter is, while Epiphone is viewed as just being a cost friendly alternative to Gibson, guitar players gravitate to the brand anyways for its own special sound. While it may use the same Specs as a Gibson, they are far from equal guitars, including in the sound department (4).
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Okay so the pictures of the guy in white sneakers are super dumb- but the book IS very helpful for a beginner; It comes with small stickers to place underneath the strings to practice fingering per different color stickers numbered 1-5 indicating 1st, second, third... fingering- you get the idea; I wrote on the stickers the letter of each note so I wouldn't have to remember which colors indicated which notes; and the stickers come off clean with no residue; this is just an added bonus- b/c I initially bought this book over others- b/c it shows pictures of a players' hand with fingers on the correct frets along with the actual chart; Personally, it is much easier for me to look at a picture of someone playing the note rather than a chart with dots.And as I said the stickers make it a breeze- I don't have to look down every time I want to play a note to see if my fingers are in the right place. Also the book comes with a pic and a full length poster labeled "notes and scales" to refer to for all of the notes.I haven't really read through the book- I'm a scimmer anyway- and the first chapter is all about positioning and tuning- which I already know; But if you are a visual learner- and have had trouble in the past- get this book to start with; It's definitely learn at your own pace- and doesn't remind me of a boring text book- other authors should be as innovative;
Coupling an SM57 with a small-diaphragm KM84 condenser finds favour with Bill Price and John Fry, while Mike Hedges chooses his favourite Sennheiser MKH40. Bill Price also mentions the importance of finding a very close phase match between the two microphones. "What one had to do was balance those mics equally, grab a pair of headphones out in the studio that were turned up nice and loud, and fractionally position one of the mics so that they were perfectly in phase at high frequencies, because if you had one mic five inches away and the other six inches away you'd obviously get really bad phase shift that would take the top off the guitar sound."

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Examples of these first Supros can be seen in two catalogs from 1936, by Canadian distributor Peate and the Bronson Music & Sales Corporation, the latter probably originating slightly later than the Peate book. Both show laps identical to the Supro frying pan. Peate offered the Spanish guitar and mandolin. In the Bronson catalog, the Supro frying pan is known as the Bronson Singing Electric “For The Artist.” Bronson also sold electric Spanish and tenor guitars and an electric mandolin, other early Supro electrics.

I’m getting a bad hum that almost goes away when I turn the volume up completely….gets loud as I turn it down. Someone rewired the guitar with 2 pair wire…..they attached a ground to the vol and tone pots everywhere the wires went….and also the body of the switch. I think it’s a bad ground loop problem….I’m going to change everything to single strand wire. I’m guessing there’s a voltage difference somewhere and it gets close to normal when I turn it all the way up on the volume pot.


Yeah. He may have to sit down when he plays, but he’ll have you on your feet when he does. BB’s creamy yet piercing tone, his unique vibrato and his absolute flawless ability to express his emotions through the guitar earn him a spot in the top ten. King’s years of fame haven’t gone to his head. He is still as humble as ever giving front row seat tickets to fans waiting in a cold parking lot just to have a glimpse of him. BB King can’t play chords. Nor does he sing and play at the same time. But he has worldwide recognition of his accomplishments as an artist. That’s a mark of a truly great guitarist.
Another chord you come across every day, the E major chord is fairly straightforward to play. Make sure your first finger (holding down the first fret on the third string) is properly curled or the open second string won't ring properly. Strum all six strings. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the E major chord. 

But the question remains, was that environment good for the artists or for the equipment? Think of it this way: experienced chefs know very well the value of a seasoned pan or grill. Flip on any show from the Food Network and you’ll see cooks bragging about their 30-year-old griddle and how it imparts an amazing flavor to their corned beef hash. Preparing food leaves behind actual physical substances, unlike immaterial sound waves, so that comparison doesn’t work exactly. But the dirt and dust and grime could certainly effect the equipment. In a similar way, we have to ask ourselves, was that dirty studio, then, a source of inspiration or were the dirty, beer-smelling microphones actually improving the music? Regardless, the studio imbued the recording with an undeniable quality. Many guitar nuts can identify a particular instrument while listening to a song. Recording experts can do the same thing with studios.
The strongest thing I did for Joni as a producer on Song to a Seagull, from 1968, was keep everybody else off of that record. She was a folkie who had learned to play what they call an indicated arrangement, where you are like a band in the way you approach a chord and string the melody along. She was so new and fresh with how she approached it. It's the reason I fell in love with her music. She was a fantastic rhythm player and growing so fast. She had mastered the idea that she could tune the guitar any way she wanted, to get other inversions of the chords. I was doing that too, but she went further. I understood her joy in using bigger tools later – jazz bands, orchestra. But the stuff she did that was basically her, like 1971's Blue, was her strongest stuff. Match her and Bob Dylan up as poets, and they are in the same ballpark. But she was a much more sophisticated musician.  By David Crosby
When we talk about instruments, sometimes the guitar gets all the credit. Of course guitars are great, but an electric guitar on its own—even a hollow-body—is only so loud. For giving one of the world's favorite instruments its voice, guitar amplifiers deserve a little love too. These amps and speakers are the powerhouses of your audio setup, turning your guitar's output from a simple electric current into those familiar sounds.
But there are two things in which latency matter. Latency is time. Every digital thing ever adds latency. If you’re a well trained musician or studio rat, you can hear about a millisecond of latency if you’re listening closely. You won’t likely be bothered by 1ms latency, but 10ms might be a bit of an issue, and 100ms makes some things completely unworkable.
I bought this guitar about 1 month ago. I am a small girl 5'2". I just strap this thing on and walk around the house playing. The pickup sounds freaking great hooked up to my Marshall amp. I have several other guitars including a Taylor 210ce which I also love. But this guitar is great for traveling, camp fires, and just plain old jammin. I chose this over the baby Taylor because the Martin had a full heel on the neck where's the taylor baby did not. It also sounded better when I play both the Taylor and the lx1e side by side. I thought that the Martin had a better "feel" to is as well when holding it. It is a travel guitar so it doesn't balance as well when you are standing with the guitar strap but I don't mind that at all. I love this little guy

For those students who want a simple path to good sound and don’t want to confront a wide range of tone and effects options, we recommend the Orange Crush 12. It’s a fairly traditional amp with controls for Bass, Midrange, Treble, Volume, Gain, and Overdrive (distortion). There’s nothing on the Crush 12 that can’t be sorted out with a few twists of a knob and strums of the strings.
Sound engineers prevent unwanted, unintended distortion and clipping using a number of methods. They may reduce the gain on microphone preamplifiers on the audio console; use attenuation "pads" (a button on audio console channel strips, DI unit and some bass amplifiers; and use electronic audio compressor effects and limiters to prevent sudden volume peaks from vocal mics from causing unwanted distortion.

This is sort of a corollary to the DI+Amp suggestion. While effects on bass aren’t as common as with guitar parts, some bassists will come in with these big rigs of effect boxes, and want to record “their sound”, which often is clearly overprocessed for the song. Rather than argue the point, let the player hear the sound he’s used to during tracking, but be sure to also grab a nice clean signal, prior to all the effects, usually straight off the bass via a DI. That way, if your concerns prove all too true come mixdown, you can turn to the dry track, and recreate those favored effects to a more appropriate degree, with studio tools. Even if the effected bass sounds good to you, many pedals and MI effect boxes are noisy, and you might have to recreate the sound anyway, to avoid problematic buzz or hiss from the player’s cool-but-dirty toys.
‘Power' Chords are used in most styles of music but are particularly useful for rock guitar; they even sound cool on acoustic (check out Nirvana's Unplugged album for an awesome example). The basic idea is that you only have to learn one chord shape, and that one shape can move around the fingerboard to make other chords. It uses no open strings, and muting the unused open strings is a very important part of the technique.
Phasers work in a way similar to flangers, but this time the copy of the signal is filtered to bring it slightly out of phase. This creates a sweeping, futuristic sound at cranked-up settings, but dialed down will get a chewy, textured tone that’s even suitable for rhythm playing. Eddie Van Halen is one guitarist well-known for his application of the phaser. Today he employs his own signature effects pedal, but his classic MXR Phase 90 is legendary among guitar tone nerds.
Even with such a lightweight configuration, the Fishman F1 system is still more than capable of rendering the tone of the DCPA4R with a great deal of accuracy due to the superior tight focus on the preamp. This guitar is our pick for the top acoustic electric guitar if price is no object. There are many other awesome models out there and we urge you to check them out as well, but you'll likely find that your search could have ended right here.
Shouldn't even be questioned. Ever hear of 'Voodoo Child'? Yeah, that was recorded in one take. & almost entirely improvised. & it's the greatest recording of an electric guitar being played EVER. & this isn't from some idiot who just listens to a lot of music, I play the guitar and have done a lot of reading and I know a few of your favorite guitarists would agree with me.
A comparable alternative at a fraction of the price to the Axe-Fx (which also made the list), the Line 6 Pod HD Pro offers a ton of amp models and effects within it’s 2U rack interface. With over 100+ premium effects, 16 different cabinet models, and even eight microphone models, the Pod HD Pro gives you complete control over every aspect of your tone. All of this is complimented by an intricate display that lets you know exactly what your virtual signal path is. Add the ability to use a mic, bass, or your Line 6 Variax guitar for recording or live scenarios, and you’ve got the best of every realm of music-making at your fingertips. Oh, and to answer the most important question: Does it djent? Yes.
The use of "full range, flat response" (FRFR) amplification systems by electric guitarists has received an extra impetus from modeling amplifiers. Before widespread availability of modeling, guitarists did not commonly plug electric guitars straight into PA systems or powered speakers, because most genres relied on the tonal coloration of a regular guitar amplifier setup—from the preamplifier, equalization filters, power amp, guitar speakers, and cabinet design. The FRFR approach assumes the tone is shaped by sound processors in the signal chain before the amplifier and speaker stage, so it strives to not add further coloration[20] or dedicated combo-style amplifiers with a broad frequency range.[21] Such processors can be traditional guitar effects, a modeling amplifier (without power amplifier), or a computer running tone-shaping software.[20] Using a modeling amp or a multi effects pedal used with line level output, a guitarist can plug in the guitar into a flat response mic input or into a keyboard amplifier.
For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.
 South Korea has been one of the largest OEM guitar factories in the world since 1980's. Nonetheless, the words "Made in Korea" still invoke visions of low cost alternatives to high-end manufacturers. At Swing, our mission is to lay these stereotypes to rest, and show the world that we can produce true professional grade instruments, made by professionals, for professionals. (Of course, company is not a patriotic organization. This is a matter of manufacturer's pride and self-satisfaction that can be called "Professionalism".)
Youngman is also known for creating some of the best Frankenstein guitars in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. One of his favorites to build is his custom built Indian Esqu-wire Custom, a monstrous guitar with an SG body, a Telecaster neck and Fender pickups. "It's taking shit and making something playable," he says. And his touch must be golden because guitarslingers like Smokin' Joe Kubek, Bnois King and Rocky Athas each own one of his Frankenstein babies.
Although I left it up to our panelists to decide what they think is most important in a beginner’s amp, we all agreed on a few parameters. First, the amp should have no glaring technical flaws—it shouldn’t produce excessive amounts of noise or hum, and it shouldn’t exhibit audible signs of distress, such as buzzes or rattles. Second, it should produce enough volume that the guitarist can jam with instruments such as piano, saxophone, and a small drum kit.
@Carl – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble. I am not clear on why this would be happening from the info you have provided. Can you please shoot us an email with details on the input and output connections and how each pedal is being powered when you experience this problem? Also, please also include a video that clearly shows this behavior, your connections, and how each pedal is being powered so that we have a better understanding of what you are experiencing. support@strymon.net
Martin & Co is without a doubt one of the most reputable acoustic guitar makers in the world, so if you or someone you know is planning to spend a lot of dough on an acoustic guitar - it best be a Martin. One of the more recent releases from Martin that deserve special mention here is the 00-42SC John Mayer, a signature guitar inspired by the classic Stage Coach(SC) design, which were prevalent in an era where small bodied parlor guitars were highly favored.
This was my first attempt on building pedal. Now I'm hooked. It was such a joy putting it all together and quite a learning experience. I cannot emphasize on reading/studying the instructions thoroughly. I would rate the included instructions a 10, a 5 STAR. Very clear and easy for a novice pedal builder to understand and walk through. Very well illustrated as well. Take your time as you can easily overlook soldering connections. The main problem I encountered was a shorting problem. The two soldering terminals along each side of the tube socket were located very close to the tube base socket and volume/gain pots. Follow the instructions by running a wire between the volume and gain pots, as well as the tube socket. Once, I've addressed this problem, it was clear sailing from there.
if you wish to use your computer as an "effects pedal", I recommend IK Multimedia's Amplitube 3 - it has an extensive array of effects and amplifiers with all kinds of crazy and fun tones to mess around with. Theres a ton of effects, so I recommend you check it out. It is a bit pricey though ($199 for the standard edition). If I were you, I would download the Amplitube CustomShop, which is basically a free demo version of the full software.
Like many engineers, I learned the basics of recording guitars by doing live sound and occasional session work. But my "higher education" began when I was hired by a blues/R&B-oriented mail-order record company, and I "had" to listen all day long to recordings from the '40s, '50s, and '60s. No matter how primitive or poor the recording quality on those old discs, I was constantly amazed by the array of exciting sounds produced by electric guitar. Later, when I started recording blues sessions in my own studio, I learned firsthand about the key elements that contributed to the great tones that I'd heard on those classic recordings.
Original plate reverbs were mechanical in nature. There was a literal plate inside the amplifier, which would transform input signal into vibration. Then you would have a pickup located somewhere near the plate, that recorded those vibrations. Today, such a contraption comes across as relatively crude, but many still love the unique mechanical sound it produces. Spring reverb uses a pretty much exact same principle, only this time you have a spring in there instead of a plate. The biggest improvement a spring reverb offers is reduction in both weight and size of the device.
Most seven-string guitars add a low B string below the low E. Both electric and classical guitars exist designed for this tuning. A high A string above the high E instead of the low B string is sometimes used. Another less common seven-string arrangement is a second G string situated beside the standard G string and tuned an octave higher, in the same manner as a twelve-stringed guitar (see below). Jazz guitarists using a seven-string include George Van Eps, Lenny Breau, Bucky Pizzarelli and his son John Pizzarelli.
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