The SIX6FDFM’s jaw-dropping aesthetics belie its price tag. It has an arched flame maple top on a bound mahogany body, a bound ebony fretboard, and a three-piece maple/purpleheart neck that has a colorful streak running down the middle. Only a Blue Space Burst finish is available, but, coupled with a matching headstock, it looks good enough to lick.

Most Humbuckers are wired in anti-phase, where the opposing polarity of the localised magnetic fields cancel each others out at selective points, creating a lower bandwidth region in the high frequency domain. Less bandwidth = lower noise. If done correctly, with carefully designed pickups, it will not affect the tone, but traditionally it did, because Hillbilly wannabe technicians made the things on their knees.
A lot of users described the Line 6 Helix Floor as something amazing and too good to be true. Commendations for it's incredible versatility and sound quality are common place, with many describing it as the best guitar multi-effects processor in the market today. There's simply no denying its continued success in the market, along with the high review scores that it continuous to attain. Premiere Guitar properly summed up what most people feel about the Line 6 Helix Floor: "Great sounds. Cool design. Solid construction. Extraordinary connectivity. Good price."
The book discusses both tabs and notation which makes it easier to transition if you’ve been using the former. It covers a wide range of topics including scales and arpeggios. The approach the author takes is logically and accessible with plenty of examples and exercises to make it stick. The only downside is that there are no songs included in it.
For 2017, they introduced (or re-introduced?) the Firebird Studio. The Studio has regular tuners with protruding keys, and it has regular humbuckers instead of minis. It is not a Firebird, it is a Les Paul with the body of a ‘bird. This lie of a guitar sells for a whopping $1300, and the real version of the guitar - which is identical in every last detail to the cheaper 2016 model I own - now retails for $1500!
Since real knobs occupy space, this multi-effects processor is quite bulky, a welcome compromise that makes it easier to setup and adjust on the fly. The pedal comes with 59 effects and includes 9 amp models that feature Boss' COSM technology, the standard tech that they now employ on many of their effects and amps. You can combine up to 8 of these to craft your preferred tones, which you can then save into its 36 user presets. Other features include a built-in tuner, a 38-second looper and the ability to record your guitar sound directly to a computer via USB.
But it might be the ESP LTD Series that has really vaulted this company into contention as one of the top brands, and certainly one of the best for heavy metal. These are more affordable version of USA-made ESP guitars, along with some innovative designs. The EC-1000 in particular has earned a strong reputation as more wallet-friendly alternative to the Gibson Les Paul.

Hi! In this instructable I will be showing you how to fix and/or upgrade guitar electronics. This is applicable to most electric guitars, but I will be using a Fender Stratocaster. It is easier than most people think, especially if you know how to solder. Before you start, find a wiring diagram for your guitar and purchase the parts that are needed.
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With a typical Strat single coil pickup and assuming an instrument cable capacitance of 500pF, 250K tone pot, 0.022uF cap, guitar plugged in to a 1Meg input, the range of the tone control is roughly from 6.0kHz -3dB (tone fully clockwise – with a resonant peak of +7.4dB at 3.9kHz) to 950Hz (tone fully anti-clockwise – with a resonant peak of +4.5dB at 594Hz). These figures vary from pickup to pickup and depending on the instrument cable capacitance.
James Marshall "Jimi" Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music, and one of the most celebrated musicians of the 20th century. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame describes him as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music". Born in Seattle, Washington, Hendrix began playing guitar at the age of 15. In 1961, he enlisted in the US Army; he was granted an honorable discharge the following year. Soon afterward, he moved to Clarksville, Tennessee, and began playing gigs on the chitlin' circuit, ...more on Wikipedia
Epiphone's Les Paul series were originally designed to allow the budget crowd to experience this awesome guitar without investing thousands of dollars. That's something that hasn't changed to this day. The Epiphone Special II is among the most basic Les Paul designs on offer, making it perfect for beginners. We've chosen this particular guitar because of its neutral configuration which will keep up with you even after you've built plenty of skill.

Strongly influenced by Stevie Ray Vaughn, Albert King, and Johnny Winter, Garrett is also a longtime fan of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Allen Collins. Following the path that led Collins to his biting, cutting tone, Bo plays the same type of guitar as the Skynyrd legend, and gets tremendous versatility from his Gibson Firebirds. Incidentally, Winters and King are also notorious Firebird pickers. Bo says that his Firebirds (one of which is a rare collectible) allow him to go from nasty drive flavors to cleaner, Strat-like tones when he needs them.
In 2005, Gibson issued three Pete Townshend signature edition Les Paul Deluxe guitars, based on Townshend’s heavily customised “#1” Wine Red 1976 Les Paul Deluxe, “#3” Gold top 1976, and “#9” Cherry Sunburst 1976. These guitars were modified by Alan Rogan and used extensively on stage and in the studio with The Who. In addition to the two mini-humbuckers the guitar carried, Rogan modified Townshend’s originals with a DiMarzio humbucker in the middle. Toggle switches located behind the guitar’s tailpiece turned the pickup on and off and added volume boost. The control knobs were wired for volume, one for each pickup and a master volume. The reissues differed from Townshend’s originals in that the reissues had an inlay at the first fret while the originals did not.
Of this list I think it's such a shame to see some names there and others missed but it's only a list to grab attention, not a definitive, set in stone, tablet for future generations to adhere by. But seriously where is Brian May? The man that made me want to play in the beginning. Every time I hear him hit those strings it sounds like the first time. And no Danny Gatton either. But hey that opinions for you.
Due to distortion's critical function in modern guitar styles, by far the lion's share of stompboxes are distortion units of one kind or another. Most of these feature intensity and tone controls, but often vary wildly in terms of the sounds they create. You'll be amazed at the different types of distortions that can be produced, from rich, creamy, smooth, and melodic sustain to harsh, jagged, and piercing breakup tones. Many distortion units produce a broad range of textures.
The brilliance of Guitar Rig is the ability to create so many different tones. This is in large part due to the variety of amps that are modeled in the software. You have a choice between Citrus, Ultrasonic, High White, Tweed Delight, Plexi, and Lead 800, among others. I’m sure you can guess what Native Instruments’ clever amp names translate to in the real world.
From the 1920s to the 1940s, upright bass players who wanted to strengthen the acoustic sound of their instrument had to use small portable PA systems or guitar amp combos designed for acoustic guitar or archtop guitars. Since these systems were not specifically designed to amplify bass instruments, it is unlikely they provided good low-frequency sound reproduction (particularly guitar amps, which are not designed to go down as low in pitch as the low E (41 Hz) and A (55 Hz) strings). In the early 1920s, it was very hard for an upright bass player (indeed for any musician) to find any amplifier and speaker system to make their instrument louder. The only speakers that could be bought during the early 1920s were "radio horns of limited frequency range and low acoustic output", and the cone speaker (which is widely used in modern-era amp cabinets), was not offered for sale until 1925. The first amplifiers and speakers were PA speaker setups; while an upright bassist could potentially have used one of these early PA systems, they could only be powered with large batteries, which made them heavy and hard to carry around. When engineers developed the first AC mains-powered amplifiers, they were soon used to make musical instruments louder.
While modified four-stage phasers like the Uni-Vibe and other effects before it had sought to evoke a choral-like sound, the chorus pedal as we know it didn’t arrive until affordable short-delay chips became widely available in the late 1970s. This in itself implies that chorus is a type of delay, and indeed it is, but the sonic results of the ways in which these short delays are transformed lands the effect firmly in the modulation camp, so it’s easiest to consider it as such (the function of these delay chips will be explained in more detail in the Echo & Delay section down the road). IC-based chorus effects work in a manner very similar to flangers, detailed above. The main difference, put simply, is that the short delays used to create harmonically spaced notches and peaks in the frequency spectrum are manipulated to modulate more tightly above and below specific frequency ranges, rather than shifted to swoosh broadly up and down the entire spectrum. The result, and intention, is a sound like a group of singers or similar instruments, where some voices/strings inevitably waver slightly from those beside them, producing a quivering clash of harmonics that evokes space and dimension when used subtly. The effect is possibly best heard—as pure effect, at least—in stereo, and the nature of the beast lends itself readily to stereo outputs. The broad soundstage and Doppler-like movement a good stereo chorus can spread out before you between a pair of spaced amps or L-R headphones make it one of the most spacious, three-dimensional effects available, short of long delays or cavernous reverb settings.
By 1966 Daniel sold Danelectro to MCA, but remained with the company. In 1967 the Coral line of guitars is introduced. At the time, Danelectro sold about 85% of it's products to Sears. So MCA started the Coral line to sell to other distributors. The difference was the Coral hollow bodies (only) were manufactured in Japan. All other Coral parts were made in the New Jersey Danelectro plant. Also all Silvertones and Danelectro instruments were made entirely in the U.S.
The MESA Bigblock 750 has a built-in overdrive channel. The Mesa M2000 has a high gain switch which can be engaged with a footswitch. The Marshall MB450 head and combo bass amplifiers have a tube pre-amp on the "Classic" channel which can be overdriven. The Ashdown ABM 500 EVO III 575W Bass amp head has a built-in overdrive effect. Overdrive is also available on many Crate bass amplifiers. The Yamaha BBT500H has three types of built-in drive effects: overdrive, distortion and fuzz. The Ampeg B5R Bass Amplifier has two channels: clean and overdrive, with the ability to combine the two. Verellen, a boutique amp company, produces a bass amplifier with a built in overdrive channel.
Unabashedly brute class, with typical German overbuilding, the Schallers shown here are the Incredible Hulk of the bunch (Fig. 17). At a hefty 272 grams, they have the might to get noticed when you fasten them to your axe. If you have a guitar with a tiny headstock, you’ll hear and feel a difference with the Schallers. Whether or not you like the change is subjective, and it depends on the makeup of the rest of your guitar.
During the Advanced Electronics class students will build a simple low impedance booster by hand, from paper to breadboard, to a point-to-point wired circuit board.  The Booster can be put into a guitar or other type of enclosure.  In addition, Scott will familiarize students with his ‘harness wiring’ tool, that is available online by visiting Guitar Modder.

A partial PA is harder to define, but it's essentially any PA system that doesn't have the capacity to mic your whole band. More often than not, in these situations, mics end up on the kick drum and snare drum for the reasons outlined above. In this case, it does help to have a little extra juice in your amplifier, but try to keep it tamed, nonetheless.
With 24 amp models including a digital chromatic tuner, 9 stomps boxes, 4 amps, 5 cabs, 3 mics, and 2 rack effects; AmpliTube Custom Shop is a great way to get your hands on IK Multimedia's great guitar simulation software. As the name suggests, in addition to the free units you can purchase more effects units from right inside the plugin to build your own custom guitar shop.
Having lived in an apartment when learning guitar, it was painful. Using headphones works, but most days you just want to hear it from an amp like it was meant to be. Your only real solution is to try out some of those tiny lunchbox amps and see if they can fill that void. Another option is to start saving for a house, or find a friend who has one to jam out in.
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This gives you a wonderful bass line, and will dramatically improve your sound, as well as helping you to develop a good rhythmic strumming style right from the first. Singing the song is a matter of timing. Listen to the song a few times and you’ll get it. It’s easier than trying to explain time signatures, and timing. You’ll know when you get it right. Just keep listening.
The common design of a standalone stompbox is simple and, thus, hasn’t changed much: The guitar lead plugs into an input while a second lead carries the output to the amplifier. In between, a multitude of knobs, switches, and pedals modify the signal. To connect two or more boxes requires “jumper” leads, which chain the boxes together to complete a circuit of circuits, each one powered by a 9V battery. Typically, stompboxes are activated by “stomping” on an on/off bypass switch. This simple design enables tinkering: The exterior casing can be easily removed, exposing the interior for modification. To do so requires only a basic grasp of electronics, solder tools (or a solder-less breadboard circuit), and patience. Lots of patience.
The movie is very hauntingly beautiful, and it's especially highlighted by an awesomely haunting score, and some breathtaking visuals. The story is interesting, but it's definitely slow-paced, and the climax is much more of an intellectual payoff than a spectacular action scene (which many viewers might be hoping for). So I can definitely see why some people would hate this film, but I loved it. It's one I definitely won't forget anytime soon too, and it's great to see Natalie Portman (my old favorite actress) back in top form! watch movies online pro
For his work on Supernatural, Glenn Kolotkin turned to elaborate multi-miking as a way of managing Carlos Santana's complicated setup. "I used multiple microphones on Carlos' guitars: Electrovoice RE20s close, Neumann U47s further away, an SM56, U87s. He was playing through an assortment of amplifiers at the same time, and by using multiple microphones I was able to get just the right blend."
Post on February 14, 2013 in the RRF Forum:[12] “When John Hall so graciously let me have the license to build Rickenbacker Acoustics back in ’06, I brought a truck to RIC headquarters and loaded it up with all of the remaining wood for Rickenbacker acoustics, in order to free up some shop and storage space in Santa Ana. There was enough undamaged wood for about 40 guitars, and I’ve reached the end of the line with my RIC acoustic builds. I’ve decided to let my license to build Rickenbacker acoustics expire, effective February 1, 2013. All current orders will be built as agreed.
Hello, Our rhythm guitarist had a 12- string Mark X11 guitar by Vox back in 1967. It had a protective back pad ( 8 sided) on the back that snapped on. It was only made from 1964 - 1967. In mint shape, the Italian made one is worth at least $1,000.00 and the Engish made one is worth at least $1,500.00. Remember that is for a Mint shape guitar.(Info from Blue Book of Electric guitars -7th Edition 1999) You can see our guitarists sunburst Vox Mark X11 at Myfirstband.com ,click on Indiana -(SOS) Society of Sound page. There is a group shot and a close up in color of him with it. Peace........Rockin Rory in Indiana
While some Supros were more or less re-branded Nationals, many represented totally unique designs in the Valco line. When the Supro equivalent to the National Grand Console was introduced in 1958, it featured a radically different body design. In place of the National’s conventional all-wood construction, the Supro 1475B Console Sixteen featured two wooden necks connected by three chromed metal rods that ran all the way through each neck. It’s not obvious why this design was chosen; it doesn’t have any advantages other than its unique aesthetics, and I don’t believe it could have made construction any cheaper. The Supro was cheaper than the National – $175 vs $235 – but the difference was likely due entirely to the more “exclusive” name on the National.
On a Les Paul, adjusting the saddle position can be a little tricky while the string is tuned to pitch. Sometimes you can get a screwdriver in there and turn it, but often you need to slacken the string and move it to the side. Also note that sometimes the adjustment screws are at the back of the bridge rather than the front. I prefer adjusting the saddle while the string is slack anyway as there is a lot of stress on both the string and the saddle otherwise.
List of bass guitar brands that include the most popular and reliable models available. There is a lot to consider when looking for the perfect bass guitar for you. The body style, neck, scale length, tuning machines, intonation, fingerboard, number of frets, pickups and type of wood all make a difference in how your bass guitar sounds and feels in your hand. The most popular bass guitars include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Fender, Yamaha, Warwick and more. Use this comparison of bass guitar brands as a guide when researching the best bass makers.
With the advent of belly bridges in 1931, Martin started to compensate their saddle placement. What this does is make for better string intonation. However early pyramid bridge have straight saddles, mounted 1/8" back from the front edge of the bridge. (with the center of the pin holes 3/8" from the back of the saddle.) The 1931 to 1933 belly bridges have a compensated saddle placed 1/8" from the front of the bridge on the treble side, and 3/16" from the bass side. Then on belly bridges in the mid 1930s Martin moved the bass end of the saddle back to 1/4" from the front of the bridge.

Kadence is an Indian manufacturer of musical instruments. They provide high-quality guitars at affordable prices. The wide range of guitars offered by Kadence starts from low-budget Frontier series of Acoustic guitars. The Slowhand series of premium Acoustic guitars having superior sound high quality finish. Kadence has become a favourite and one of the best guitar brands in the Indian market with its good quality products. The great look and feel and available at affordable prices make these guitars invaluable.
Note: When it comes to acoustics, I recommend you do NOT go super cheap (unless you know what you’re doing). I’m not joking about this. The results can be painful both physically and emotionally when you’re not able to learn anything. I made this mistake starting out and I regret it 100% (I’ll tell you about this later on). Save yourself the trouble. Get a decent, playable guitar to learn on and you’ll be one step ahead of most beginners who try to go cheap, then end up quitting because it’s too hard to learn (cheap guitars are hard to learn on!).
Effects can inspire you with new creative ideas, or just help you sound like your musical inspirations, go for it. I would urge you to consider a multi-effects unit like a Digitech RP series, or Line6 PodHD series. They can provide you with many options to try before you figure out exactly what you want. Many units can be had pretty cheap used, and as a bonus, most will act as a usb interface, and let you record your playing (for better or worse) to computer. – Michael Cook Apr 29 '13 at 21:39

Ask anyone at all if they've heard of Ibanez, and you'll most likely get a 'yes'—even if it's not a guitarist or even a musician that you're asking. It takes a lot for an instrument maker to become as well-known outside the music community as it is inside, and Ibanez is one of the elite luthiers that has managed to do just that. How have they done it? Simple: by making instruments so sought-after that they can be found nearly everywhere. Originally founded in 1957, Ibanez is one of the "original" manufacturers from the formative decades of the electric guitar as we know it today. Ibanez was one of the first Japanese companies to break through to the international music industry as well as, even more impressively, the very first brand to mass-produce seven and eight-string guitars. That makes extended-range guitars an important part of the Ibanez legacy alongside their many classic 6-string models. Some of the most renowned Ibanez instruments include hollow body guitars like Pat Metheny's signature model, and distinctive solid body axes such as the Iceman and Fireman series. You'll also find a wide assortment of basses, including 5 and 6-string models that join the 7 and 8-string guitars in the extended-range Ibanez family. There are plenty of acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars and basses to choose from as well, not to mention mandolins, banjos and ukuleles. Ibanez has a prolific catalog that spans the whole guitar family, offering something for anybody who loves to work the strings. In addition to stringed instruments, Ibanez is also renowned for a broad range of effects pedals, amplifiers and accessories. The TS808 Tube Screamer, for example, is an effects pedal that's beyond legendary. The unmatched warmth and tone of its overdrive makes the TS808 a must-have item for countless guitarists. Connect it to an amplifier like the TSA30 Tube Screamer 1x12 Combo Amp, and you're rocking an amazing recipe for serious vintage sounds. Ibanez was an early player in the electric guitar game, and their instruments, pedals and amps are certain to be on stages the world over for decades to come. Make yourself one of the artists that takes Ibanez onstage at every gig and this gear will pay off in spades with the incredible sounds that made them an industry giant in the first place.


I've been playing music my whole life, guitar since 16 (>30 years!!!). I'm used to distortion, delay, and some sort of phase for my unique sound. With this little devil, I make my guitar scream and whine like I'm playng straight from hell! Makes me sound almost as evil as I am in real life. For this DIYer, I have some good noise until I can build all my own pedals. Many presets, I only needed to modify two of the for my sound. Now i can sound like the true 80's hardcore punk and thrash metal songs and sounds that I grue up with.
Want to know more about how to distinguish all these guitars? Until a few years ago there wasn’t a good (or any!) English language reference book for Japanese guitars of the 1960s. But my co-author on this piece, the esteemed Frank Meyers of Drowning In Guitars, has written an excellent primer on this subject which can help demystify the confusion around a lot of these guitars. You can pick up your own copy here.
Yngwie Malmsteen released his Concerto Suite for Electric Guitar and Orchestra in 1998, and Steve Vai released a double-live CD entitled Sound Theories, of his work with the Netherlands Metropole Orchestra in June 2007. The American composers Rhys Chatham and Glenn Branca have written "symphonic" works for large ensembles of electric guitars, in some cases numbering up to 100 players, and the instrument is a core member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars (played by Mark Stewart). Still, like many electric and electronic instruments, the electric guitar remains primarily associated with rock and jazz music, rather than with classical compositions and performances.[37] R. Prasanna plays a style of Indian classical music (Carnatic music) on the electric guitar.
your right brian i been a acdc freak since u all been out in the early n mid 70s the greast band of all time. and i seen acdc 37 times through out the united states. i love my memories with the band and still watch and listen to the cds and dvds of the band. brian johnson is the best thing that happen to acdc since bond scott death. keep rockin guys i love u with a passion. mark
The power handling capabilities of a speaker cabinet or individual speaker are always given in relation to a specific impedance (a measure of electrical resistance); the most common impedance ratings in bass speaker systems are 8 ohms and 4 ohms, although some equipment is rated down to 2 ohms or even more rarely to 1 ohm. For example, the Aguilar DB751 puts out 975 watts if plugged into a 2 ohms speaker cab, 750 watts at 4 ohms, or 400 watts at 8 ohms. The way to interpret ohms ratings is "backwards" to the way wattage ratings are assessed. That is, with wattage, bassists make sure that their amplifier does not put out too high a number of watts for a speaker cabinet, but with impedance, bassists ensure that the amplifier does not put out too low an impedance for a speaker system. For example, if an amplifier head is rated at 4 ohms, a 4 ohm speaker, an 8 ohm speaker (or any ohm rating higher than 4 ohms, including 16 ohms or 32 ohms) could be connected (albeit with the amplifier producing less watts as the number of ohms, the resistance, increases). However, bassists do not connect a 2 ohm speaker cabinet to a 4 ohm amplifier, because this will be too much of a load (too low an impedance) on the amplifier, and it could damage or destroy the power amplifier.
RARE Epiphone Vintage FT-150 Bard Lefty Conversion with bone saddle. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides. Medium to low action. Beautiful sounding and playing guitar. Superb projection. Rivals guitars costing thousands.In excellent cosmetic condition with normal fretwear for a guitar it's age, and tiny dings here and there but nothing that stands out and looks gorgeous. Includes original right-handed, adjustable bridge. Includes hard shell case and original right-hand adjustable bridge if you wanna convert it back to a righty!
If you've NEVER heard of EZMix for effects, Impact Soundworks Shreddage 2 IBZ or Prominy V-Metal for guitar, or Alchemist Studios Texas Grind for bass, or Impact Soundworks Shreddage Drums for drums, then I would say you're right, (Amplitube 4 is out right now, by the way). You need Kontakt 5.5 for all of this to work though, so if you have this already you need to upgrade.
Through the 19th century, guitars were part of a musical ensemble. As performance spaces increased in size, stringed instruments like guitars were hard to hear over other instruments, especially horns. As a result, the traditional Spanish-style acoustic guitar—wooden with a flat top, a symmetrical hollow body, a sound hole in the center, and gut strings—began to change in size, shape, and construction. For example, in the late 1890s, Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company, designed a guitar with an arched (or curved) top that was stronger and louder than the earlier flat-top design.
Silk strings and Steel strings are described as a mixture of classical and steel strings, and are also called “compound strings.”  They have a mellow sound and lower tension that provide the feeling of a classical guitar, while still providing the brightness of the metal of a steel stringed acoustic.  The term silk is referring to the nylon used to make classical guitar strings, which we will learn about next.
Now, imagine having that same signal but with your guitar’s volume on its half way setting. That same degraded signal comes out even worse as it only had half of the voltage to work with from the get-go. In order to minimize the amount of signal loss, it is always suggested that the guitar’s volume is kept at its max setting and either manually adjust the output level from the amp or better yet, from a dedicated volume pedal, as is the choice for most professional musicians. A volume pedal in an effects chain will control the output volume of everything that is placed before it, so it’s pretty much almost always a good idea to place it at the end of the chain if it’s going to be your main form of overall volume control.
This is a subsidiary guitar brand owned by Gibson. Epiphone makes the same models as Gibson - SGs, Les Pauls and what have you. The only real difference is the electrics, the circuitry, the wood and the finish, which to the normal eye/intermediate guitar player won't be able to tell apart from a Gibson. In fact, most of the musicians started out with an Epiphone because Gibsons are too expensive. John Lennon famously continued using Epiphone even after being able to buy Gibsons because he loved the imperfection of his Epiphone Casino.
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First the lower line models were built for steel strings first. Like the style 17 in 1922, and the style 18 in 1924. Pretty much all models were built for steel by 1927-1929. But unfortunately there was no definative serial number or time line for any 1920s Martin style. This makes it difficult to determine if any particular 1920s Martin guitar is really built for steel strings. Martin didn't just implement steel string design at any one definative point. It was a transition, and apparently a very slow transition. And special orders for gut or steel complicated things.
The Lotus Vantage copy (Washburn Eagle, Aria Pro II Cardinal series, or Ibanez Artist) double cutaway (batwing) guitar with a solid body, 3 per side tuners on headstock, rosewood fingerboard with brass inlays, brass nut and neck-through construction (though there may have been a bolt-on model). This was usually finished in emerald green, polished mahogany or stained blue/white breadboard style and occasionally gloss white with 2 exposed humbucker pickups.
Something else to understand is that different styles of guitars offer specific pickup and switching designs that define the guitar’s sound. Depending on what type of music you want to learn, some guitars will be good and suit you better than others. That frequent adjustment of the guitar’s electronics during a song will become a big part of your playing style and it’s worth learning from the outset. Read on, and you’ll see what I mean. Oh—and a word of warning. Some “beginners” guitar bundles are for kids. Make sure you’re buying a full-sized instrument.
The truth is that you can play any genre of music with just about any type of electric guitar. Many blues players run Gibson Les Pauls with beefy humbuckers, while Iron Maiden completely broke the stereotype that you can't play metal with a Stratocaster.  Guitar effects pedals really changed the game too. However, some guitars do actually deal better with certain music genres.
The fact that the output is electrical has made possible a dizzying array of sounds produced by electrically and electronically modifying this electrical output. Besides the volume and tone controls on the guitar and on the amplifier, a variety of outboard devices are used to obtain custom sounds and effects. As an attempt to organize these effects, consider the following classifications:
Optocoupling Compressor using a LED and a LDR. Similar to Colorsound Supa Sustain or DOD 280. As others have mentioned, instructions are a single photocopied sheet showing component layout. There's no mention that you'll need a piece of heat shrink to fab up your optocoupler. If you have some experience you can figure it out. Wire was not supplied.
That is, if the tone caps in parallel filtered from within th 1k-2k and 3k-5k frequency band with the pot determining how much of those ranges are filtered off, then moving the 2nd cap parallel to the pot should shift the 2k window of the bigger cap so it would be filtering less of the 3-5k at one end of it’s sweep, and more of the 1k-3k filtered at the other end of it’s sweep. (my frequency selection and math here are conceptual only, and not to be taken as accurate measurements).
A hard-tail guitar bridge anchors the strings at or directly behind the bridge and is fastened securely to the top of the instrument.[20] These are common on carved-top guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul and the Paul Reed Smith models, and on slab-body guitars, such as the Music Man Albert Lee and Fender guitars that are not equipped with a vibrato arm.

Another good reason to go with this type of acoustic guitar is the fact that there aren't really any significant reasons not to. These days, an acoustic electric model won't be that more expensive, and having the electric option available is priceless. You can get them really cheap, but just like with anything else, quality of the system will depend on the price. It's the little things that I appreciate, like the built-in tuners, besides the main feature. These tiny details bring so much convenience that traditional acoustic guitars lack that can save the day, like when you forget to pack your nice guitar tuner in your gig bag.
I own some 13 or so, high end American, Canadian and/or Japanese 6 strings 7 basses and a full studip of gear and if my opinion means FA then I can't help but not mention my Washburn Custom Shop WV548! It has Parker guitars (famous for the FLY) patented composite glass carbon fiber fretboard, EMG active PU's (81, 85) and a real Floyd with the Buzz Feiten system and it is bar none, the fastest, smoothest, and by far the nicest playing (and sounding for that matter) guitar I own or have played in my some 30 odd years plus, playing electrics.
Position 2 (outside coils, parallel connection): this one is more exciting because all poles do something. Pole 1 connects bridge pickup coil tap to ground, effectively splitting the bridge pickup. Pole 2 connects bridge pickup hot lead to the output. Pole 3 connects neck pickup coil tap to pole 4 which connects it to the output. What we end up with is a coil from bridge pickup coil tap to hot lead and a coil from neck pickup ground to the coil tap. Because of the way poles 2 and 4 are connected, these two coils will be paralleled.
Yes and he lost the finger tips on his left hand and attached makeshift fingers out of thimbles but managed to play some of the greatest evil licks ever. I love Eddie but he screwed up Van Halen terribly by getting rid of Dave and turning it into a girl band. Duane was awesome and highly skilled and a sought after studio musician. Clapton is the master.
The Les Paul guitar line was originally conceived to include two models: the regular model (nicknamed the Goldtop), and the Custom model, which offered upgraded hardware and a more formal black finish. However, advancements in pickup, body, and hardware designs allowed the Les Paul to become a long-term series of electric solid-body guitars that targeted every price-point and market level except for the complete novice guitarist. This beginner guitar market was filled by the Melody Maker model, and although the inexpensive Melody Maker did not bear the Les Paul name, its body consistently followed the design of true Les Pauls throughout each era.

The Les Paul guitar line was originally conceived to include two models: the regular model (nicknamed the Goldtop), and the Custom model, which offered upgraded hardware and a more formal black finish. However, advancements in pickup, body, and hardware designs allowed the Les Paul to become a long-term series of electric solid-body guitars that targeted every price-point and market level except for the complete novice guitarist. This beginner guitar market was filled by the Melody Maker model, and although the inexpensive Melody Maker did not bear the Les Paul name, its body consistently followed the design of true Les Pauls throughout each era.
While there are cheaper Strats under the Squier sub brand, the Standard Stratocaster is the way to go if you want a budget friendly one with with the Fender logo. This guitar is fondly called an MIM (Made in Mexico) Strat to differentiate it from the American made version. While some elitists will tell you that the difference is noticeable, many others attest that it's hard to spot the difference in an actual blind test - making this a true to form Standard Stratocaster, only this one is not made in the USA.
Here we have a great mid - late 1970’s Alvarez 5047 model its kind of rare and seldom seen and she is a wonderful example of Japan’s answer to the Martin 00028 with the Herringbone rosette and rosewood body and in this case they used a wonderfully high grade beautifully grained rosewood for its body back and sides and fingerboard and bridge at that it looks to be a rich looking Jacaranda Brazilian rosewood type you can be the judge of that just have a good look at our pictures, at any rate its workmanship is excellent as is its fit and finish work is all of a high grade. Well balanced sound board with good volume and a sweet tone with its gorgeously straight grained solid spruce top is beautiful and easy on the eyes as well and up close you can tell its genuine vintage with its thin skin finish its grain highs and lows are visible the Japanese truly were masters - experts at thin poly finish and this one has it. This is the famous S.L.M. model it was imported by Saint Lewis Music back in the Lawsuit era days the 1970's these were made especially nice for SLM as seen here. Bindings all round are excellent overall condition is JVGuitars rated at very good its not new of course its over 40 years old it has only minimal insignificant scratches or doinks true vintage in its own right yet - excellent used vintage and is considered above average for a played 40+ year old instrument. No cracks no buldges or warpage anywhere this guitar is straight no repairs and all original and was excellent when we took this in on trade.We simply cleaned - oiled and polished the entire guitar and it has a good set of Martin 80/20 phosphorous bronze strings set of 12’s… this guitar plays very well now with excellent string action, its neck is a really great one RARE for the Japanese with its more meaty V profile much like the old Martin. Condition, condition, condition, Easy on the eyes and that vintage tone and fun to play are 6 darn good reasons to own this ALVAREZ 5047 Japanese Vintage 0029 with that gorgeous rosewood… Any questions ask Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.

As a rule, you don't add much, if any, reverb to low-frequency sounds, such as bass guitar or kick drums. Where you need to add reverb to these sources, short ambient space emulations usually work better than big washy reverbs, which tend to make things sound muddy. Taking this a step further, you can also make a mix sound less congested by EQ'ing some low end out of your reverbs.
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All this is to say that you don't need to worry about getting your hands on a large amp. Small amps perform better for the overall sound of your band in most venues, and any venue big enough for you to need more volume is going to mic your amp anyway, giving you all the juice you'd need. So, as you look at the amps on our list, you can evaluate them based on their EQ options, their effects, and, frankly, their look.
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! Hello, The Vox "plank" guitar I had was EXACTLY like yours! I don't have it now (January,2005). I sold it on eBay this last Spring on Ebay to a collector that works at Warner Bros. studio. He bought it for $460.00 !! There were a few bidders, so I would hang on to that 1950 skiffle guitar if I were you. They are very RARE! Peace! Rory
as an old school country picker i prefer the fender tele for the crisp twangy sound and also the feel of the fingerboard. I find a strat to be poorly designed with the volume control badly in the way to say nothing about the clumsy tremelo arm. I have modified some strats and made them playable for my slyle.A humbucker in the neck position on a tele is rite sharp for the blues.As for gibson they make a fine instrument,just not my style.

I must confess -- I am horrible at soldering. So after messing up another wiring harness with my soldering skills, I came across ObsidianWire and purchased out of desperation. Now I wish this would have been my first choice. The wiring sounds awesome, it was a breeze to install and the included switch and input jack completed the upgrade. I would HIGHLY recommend ObsidianWire harnesses." - Ross G Vintage 50s Wiring for Les Paul


We specialize in the repair and restoration of stringed instruments and Guitar repair in Nashville, and the surrounding area. Our services provide for stringed instrument repair and maintenance  of all makes and models.  We also sell stringed instrument related accessories. Contact us for all of your repair and restoration needs. We love rescuing injured instruments, and helping them make music again.

An instant classic, and an easy guitar song that offers a simple, repeated section of just a handful of dyads, or two-note chords. It is one of the most recognizable guitar riffs of all time and it’s great for beginners to learn. The entire section is played with just two notes per chord, and it’s a progression that keeps your fretting hand in just a single section of the neck. Once you learn this riff, it’ll be tough to stop, since it sounds so good, and it’s easy to play. 
Remember, when you choose to buy an electric guitar by itself (not as part of a ‘starter pack’), you’ll also need to buy an amp, guitar cable, and a tuner. These are extra costs that you should budget for on top of the cost of your new guitar. I recommend that beginners keep their first amp purchase conservative–both in price and size. Here’s what I’d recommend:
One of the all-time classic gigging and recording amps, in this new incarnation the Deluxe Reverb is arguably more practical than ever, thanks to the extra versatility offered by being able to utilise the tremolo and reverb on both channels.  Where original Deluxe Reverbs of the period would have had a Normal channel, sans tremolo or reverb, the new '68s have a Custom channel with access to those global effects and a new voicing, courtesy of a "modified Bassman tone stack" that's billed as being more pedal-friendly. Where you would have found a Vibrato channel, there's now a 'Vintage' channel with a more traditional voicing. There's a magic sweet spot between 4.5 and 6 on the volume control (depending on your choice of guitar), where the amp delivers a wonderful, dynamic dirty-clean rhythm sound at stage level that works as a brilliant core guitar sound for all manner of rock 'n' roll, Americana, blues and classic pop applications. Just add picking-hand dynamics and your guitar's volume control; there's so much range here. The onboard reverb and tremolo are wonderful, classic-sounding musical tools that push and inspire you to play in a certain way. Far more than a means of merely amplifying your guitar sound, this is a musical instrument in itself.
I'm trying to determine the worth of a korean made fender telecaster. Solid ash,butterscotch blonde,maple neck,abalone inlays,seymour duncan pick-up(the other 1 is silver?)classic bridge.It's probably about 5 or 6 years old,it seems nicer than any mexican I've seen. Serial # 04041144 I paid $500 and I want to sell but don't want to be unfair to self or buyer.Help please-QUICK.
The 10.5mm string spacing allows for easy picking across strings, such as string skipping and hybrid picking. The snap and hold tremolo arm socket can makes it easy to load a tremolo arm, and the arm torque adjuster enables fine torque adjustment without any tools. The stud lock screws lock the stud bolts in place, for better tuning stability and resonance. The 2-point floating tremolo system allows for super smooth tremolo motion when either raising or lowering the pitch.
The technique is often executed by the little finger of the guitarist which is wrapped around the volume pot of the guitar. When the note is struck the volume is increased from zero by a rolling motion of the little finger. Alternatively, the effect is achieved with a volume pedal. It is sometimes called "violining", because the sound is similar to a bowed violin. Allan Holdsworth pioneered the technique of the pedal swelling along with a delay unit to create a thicker sound that is more associated with the cello. - winner333

Yamaha-C5-Salamander-JNv5.1- Arguably the best free piano on the internet and better than many of the expensive ones as well. Modified for sf2 with five brightness levels with optional resonance and this set includes the new Dark, Mellow and Dynamic Grands.  All in a set at 592mb in size.  This version has the detailed 15 velocity layers for seamless expression.
There was a lot of tinkering with the Spanish-style electric guitar in the 1930s and 1940s since the electronics in a hollow-body instrument caused distortion, overtone, and feedback—especially problematic for recording sessions. Historians and guitar enthusiasts enjoy debating over who really developed the first solid-body Spanish-style guitar to resolve these sound issues. The National Museum of American History owns a rare Slingerland Songster made in or before 1939. This model is possibly the earliest commercially marketed solid-body Spanish-style electric guitar.
He embodies the stylish sideman identity forged by guitar greats like George Harrison and Keith Richards: a neatly trimmed pudding-basin haircut, and a stage presence that never upstages the frontman. Yet, he is intriguing in his own right. Marr’s post-Smiths career has been stellar. He’s worked with everyone from New Order’s Bernard Sumner (in Electronic) to Oasis to John Frusciante, and has been quite active recently with both Modest Mouse and the Cribs. He has an uncanny knack for being around whenever cool music is happening.
Other notable effects include the tube-driven Leslie speaker series, which originally modified the sound of electric organs (such as the Hammond B3) until guitarists like George Harrison (and the Beatles more generally) began to use it for spacey chorus, tremolo, and phaser tones. The classic 60s model, the Leslie 122, was housed in a huge 41-inch wooden laminate casing and comprised of two motors (essentially two electromechanical horns) that had been rotated to create a Doppler-effect-based vibrato. These horns were, in turn, picked up by the dual speaker units. The Leslie 122 wasn’t even built to connect to a guitar, but bull-headed technicians fudged the electronics and made it work anyway. The laminate wood wasn’t just for aesthetics, either: It functioned as a partial enclosure, ensuring mellower tones, and different woods created different vibratos.

Learning just a song won't get you far, there will be a point where you just won't be able to learn a song because of its difficulty. First of all you need to learn some chords, scales and study a bit of music theory. Here's one example: Lets compare a song to a poem. You can learn a poem and keep saying it, but if someone asks you the meaning of the poem, you won't be able to say anything. If you just learn how to play a song without knowing any chords, it won't be any good for you. (Btw sorry for bad English) Also if you know the essentials, learning a song will get easier and easier.
Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
At the current time, the questions who really invented the electric guitar and why can’t be answered straightforwardly, as there is no clear answer to them. On the one hand, some people argue that the electric guitar was invented in 1931 by George Beauchamp with the help of Paul Barth and Harry Watson. At the time of the invention, Beauchamp was the general manager of the famous National Guitar Corporation.
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There are many options in this price range that will suit the beginning player. Musician’s Friend offers an extensive selection of Electric Guitar Value Packages that include an electric guitar, amplifier, and many of the accessories mentioned above. The components in these packages have been carefully chosen to work well together and can eliminate guesswork when choosing the right gear. Many also include instructional books, DVDs, and online beginner’s lessons, plus other resources to keep the new player motivated to keep learning.
Whether you are a beginner or the pro guitarist, choosing the right guitar brand is always essential. We are sure you will find your desired electric guitar from the range of best electric guitar brands we review above. If you want something different or best acoustic guitar brands, do share with us your thoughts in the comments below. Maybe we missed out something that you would remind us.

Continuing with the rock and metal theme we’ve got going, we come to the Schecter Omen 6. At the time of this writing, the Omen 6’s price on Amazon is about $50 cheaper than you’ll find anywhere else. I hope that continues long after I publish this, because the Omen 6 is an amazing guitar and finding it under $300 is a steal (and may not last long).
Effects can be connected via insert points, or the effect send and return loop that is included in most consoles and DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations). When effects are used in the send/return loop, their Mix control should be set to 100 percent wet, so you add back only effected sound to the dry sound, which comes directly through the mixer channel.
Controls available are extensive, but pretty straight forward and the quality of the entire package defies logic when you consider the price. In terms of budget reverbs, this one is among the best you can find at the moment. Behringer keeps pushing the line further and further by delivering quality and versatility to those who are limited financially.
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Neck Construction – The neck part of the guitar includes the fretboard and headstock. The tuners are mounted on this part of the guitar. The width and profile of the neck affects the playability of the guitar. Most necks are either “C” or “U” shaped. In most cases, the fretboard is made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, but some guitars have maple necks. Fretboard have position dots and other inlaid markers that assist the player. There are generally 3 types of necks – bolt on, set neck and neck through.
It’s easy to remove your pickup or pickguard and slide some foam rubber behind the unit. Start with soft foam first, and then increase the density to find the difference you like. Conveniently, the gray foam used in aftermarket pickup packaging makes great damping material: It’s soft enough that you can double it up (see Fig. 1 and 2) to create more pressure on the pickup’s back plate, too. This is a relatively no-frills mod that requires minimal materials and tools.
The 1964 TRG-1 was a slightly more asymmetrical variant of the WG body style, with offset double cutaways and offset waists. It had the squared-off Bizarro Strat head introduced in ’63 and rectangular-edge fingerboard inlays. The tail was a primitive top-mounted trapeze. Most of the face of the guitar was covered with a large metal pickguard, which had one two-tone neck pickup. The volume and tone knobs were above the strings, as was a small sliding on/off switch for the amp. In the off position, the guitar played out as a normal electric guitar. Horizontal grill slots were cut into the pickguard, behind which sat a 3-inch speaker. The amp operated on two 9-volt batteries installed in back. The TRG-1 shown in the subsequent ’64-65 catalog had a new, hooked headstock, but all the examples I’ve seen have the squared-off Bizarro Strat head. Also, the model I have has a TRE100 designation on the back sticker, so at least some were called this.

The key difference between an electric guitar and an acoustic is how they make a sound. Electrics use pickups and acoustics rely on a ‘soundboard’ a hollowed out body, and a sound hole to amplify the vibration of the strings. The most important difference though is what you want to sound like and what you prefer. A guitar that you want to pick up and play will always be one that makes you practice more – which is the only way to get better at guitar!
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body: Mahogany - Body Size: Dreadnought - Top Wood: Engelmann Spruce - Back: Bubinga (African Rosewood) - Figured - Sides: Bubinga (African Rosewood) - Figured - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Ivory - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Soundhole: Round (Traditional) - Rosette: Mother Of Pearl - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, Grover Tuners - String Instrument Finish: Natural
Those aspiring to kill the next-door neighbour’s lawn by the malevolent force of their playing alone would do well to speak to their local dealer about Schecter’s Demon-6. Updated with fresh set of Schecter active humbuckers and a super-smooth wenge fretboard for 2018, the Demon-6 is a mean- looking S-style that’s built for shredding  - and it’s also available as a seven-string for a little extra. It’s one of the most powerful and playable instruments on the market at this price. Its thin-C profile neck, cut from maple with a satin finish, is super-quick. Shredders will love that a light touch is rewarded on the fretboard - that wenge feels slick ’n’ slinky. The bridge’s construction fits the two most important tenets in bridge design: it’s no-fuss and industrial-strength. The Demon-6 feels indestructible. It might make you feel likewise; at least, its active pickups (powered by a nine-volt battery that’s easily accessed via a clip on the rear of the instrument) will ward off most predators if you crank the gain high enough. Tonally, that’s the Demon-6’s wheelhouse. The bridge ’bucker has plenty of grunt but an abundance of top-end that metal soloists will love. Overall, the Demon-6 is a metal guitar, designed to summon something much more sinister, and it delivers in spades.
If you are an insurance agent, pawn store, a manufacturer or appraiser searching for used guitar prices and other musical equipment values, Used Price is for you. Our extensive database contains the value of thousands of pieces of used musical equipment. Whether you are looking for a Fender guitar value, a Gibson guitar value or a certain bass value or drum value, we have them for you all in one convenient location.
1946 to present: Sitka spruce (darker than Adirondack). The change to Sitka happened on the larger "D" models first (in very early 1946). It took Martin a little while to use up all the smaller pieces of older Adirondack red spruce, hence the change to Sitka happend slower on the smaller body models. This is also the reason multiple piece Adi red spruce tops are sometimes seen on 0,00,000 bodies in 1946.
Ash is a common body material in solid body guitars. It is harder than mahogany and very resonant. This gives the guitar ringing sustain and bright tone with a well-defined mid-range. A light colored wood with attractive grain figuring, it is often given a transparent finish. Swamp ash is a particularly appealing, detailed wood used on higher-end guitars.
Welcome to the world of premium! While there are several tiers of boutique amplifier priced higher than $1000, this category is when you really start to hit the high end. Some of the most iconic guitar amps sit in this section, although all models are capable of performing on big stages and professional recording studios with pro-grade features, exceptional tones and massive power, extending into 100 watts and above. One amp you will find in this market is the legendary Peavey 6505 Plus head, which has helped shape the sound of metal over the past few decades.
In the Spring of 1960 the Kent Musical Instrument Company (20 East 15th Street, New York City) was founded as a subsidiary of prominent New York distributors Buegeleisen and Jacobson. It’s first products were microphones, cables and aftermarket guitar accessories like pickguard/pickup assemblies for archtop guitars and soundhole pickups for flattop acoustics. In 1960 the Marco Polo Company (1055 E. First Street, Santa Ana, CA) began importing Japanese guitars (many by Suzuki), including electrics, which it began to advertise in 1961. Kent began promoting Japanese solidbody electric guitars (mainly Guyatones) in April of 1962, although by the Fall of ’62 the Kent Standard series consisted of Teisco models.
This guide is as marvelously written as it is exceedingly informative. It takes a long look at each of the major and minor American guitar companies — Gibson chief among them — and recounts the story of every guitar to come off their workbenches. Buoyed by scads of historical photos and thoroughly researched copy, this book earns its place at the top of this list.
While you don’t have to mortgage your home to buy a good guitar, price will still be a key factor in deciding which guitar to purchase. When buying for a beginner—especially younger players—you may be hesitant to spend too much without knowing if the recipient will stick with the guitar. That’s perfectly reasonable. There are guitars to fit just about every budget. Just keep in mind that the better the guitar the new player starts with, the more likely they will be to continue learning and playing. An instrument that’s hard to play or won’t stay in tune will deter even the most enthusiastic beginner.
Nut slots too deep: Take a course file and file the top of the nut 1/2 the distance you want to raise the slots. Catch the filings on a piece of paper. Tape both sides of the nut with masking tape and then fill the slots with the filings. Soak the filings with thin superglue. Press into place with a toothpick. When dry, refile the slots. The slots should be made so the string sits in about 1/2 to 3/4 thier diameter. Slots should be wider, and taper downwards on tuner side. Square slots are acceptable.


There’s an old proverb that goes, “If you can’t afford a Fender Strat, get a Fender Standard Strat.” We can’t agree more. This is the guitar company that changed the world of electric guitar, so you can’t go wrong with any Fender. But, if you have the money, go with the Standard over the Squire as that’s truly a beginner guitar. The Standard has features such as three single-coil pickups, synchronized tremolo with high-mass bridge block, and a ‘70s-style headstock logo. While some sites are selling this guitar close to $400, it’s more commonly found just under $500. 

I own a v100 gold top modified to fit regular humbuckers and boy it is great. I have played it with gibson lps and it holds it own. Not as nice really but damn it sounds great. I have an SG too but have never played an SG before this guitar. I am weirded out by the light body. Are they all like that? I know they are all neck heavy but this seems out of order. I do like the sg though more every time I pick it up.
In more recent years, a diverse cross-section of artists have started to favour Rickenbacker guitars. In 1979, Tom Petty and Mike Campbell of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers would adopt the Rickenbacker 12-string “toaster” jangle into their records and still use the vintage 1960s models. The post-1960s “Hi-gain” pickup-equipped guitars are associated with The Jam and REM. The “Hi-gain” pickups are well suited to harder spiky pop/rock sounds as well as the classic clean chime.
Needing a more compact logo suitable for the guitars’ headstock, the founders decided to change the name to “Taylor” as it sounded more American than “Listug” and because as Kurt Listug put it, “Bob was the real guitar-maker.”[3]Listug became the businessman of the partnership while Taylor was responsible on design and production. In 1976, the company decided to begin selling their guitars through retailers. In 1981, facing financial difficulties, Taylor Guitars took out a bank loan to purchase equipment.[4][5]
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This is an American Gibson Les Paul electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This soundfont has the same presets as the Fender Jaguar above (except it does not include the slaps and slides preset) and is also recorded with the volume on the edge of break up on the amp (read the Fender Jaguar above for description of amplifier setting). This guitar is suited to jazz and blues but can easily be used for rock if used with more distortion. It has a very full rounded sound with good sustain and when played harder has a bite to the attack. This guitar is a classic that has been used in alot of types of music.

The single keys at the beginning of the keyboard (C2-C3 white notes only) contain a variety of percussion instruments (2 wood blocks, an Irish bongo, a mini rain stick, a mini swinging drum, a tambourine, a mini hollow wood log and a mini wooden scraper). Then the black keys further up are groups of instruments that cut each other off. For instance the first group of black notes (F#3,G#3,A#3) are all samples from the big conga but with different hit types. The next 2 black notes are a dear skin bongo. The next 3 black notes are the little conga. The next 2 black notes are a little metal bongo. The next 3 black notes are the medium conga and the next 2 black notes are a home made plastic shaker. This makes it easy to know the grouped instruments. It is also easy to whack a way at the congas (like real congas) as they are all the black keys in groups of 3 and each conga cuts its own keys off if another is played. I mainly recorded this for the 3 congas and then added the other bits as I had them laying around (some are even from my childrens musical instruments bag, i.e. wood blocks from the early learning centre and a home made plastic shaker). The congas are boomy when played hard but with a lot more delicate hand sound when played softly. It is possible to get a variety of sounds and styles with these conga samples.


And finally, it is always a good idea to have your amp set on with clean settings in order to get a clear image of the sound of your effects chain. Hitting the distortion on the amp, for example, will distort EVERYTHING in your chain, so it’s best to leave the distorting to your pedal where it can be better contained. But in the end, experiment! While these are merely a few suggestions of the general way a signal chain works, you are only limited by your creative implementation.
One special effect I used quite a lot in analogue studios, but which is surprisingly tricky to implement in a lot of software sequencers, is where you feed the left and right outputs of an auto-pan effect to two different effects processors. With this setup, the outputs of the two effects can then be mixed together to create a variety of different modulation-style treatments. This patch always worked well in a send-return loop with a pair of phasers, especially if you also EQ'd the two returns wildly differently. The same setup used as an insert could do great things with distortion and ring-modulation processors, and if you were feeling really adventurous, you could fiddle with the panning rate in real time while mixing down. Mike Senior
There are an awful lot of boutique guitar effects manufacturers out there who make pedals designed to create all kinds of twisted and bizarre sounds. Sadly, their products are often very expensive, often prohibitively so — so what about the more budget-conscious would-be sonic terrorist? Well, one option is to 'circuit bend' more conventional (read 'cheaper') guitar effects. The basic idea behind circuit bending is that you experiment with short-circuiting the pedal until it makes a noise that you like, and then solder in a connection, with a switch or potentiometer in place if you think you may want to turn the noise off again at some point.
An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitar player strums, plucks, fingerpicks, or taps the strings. The pickup used to sense the vibration generally uses electromagnetic induction to do so, though other technologies exist. In any case, the signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is fed to a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker(s), which converts it into audible sound.
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