The guitar is built of full, all-solid maple that gives a nice clean tone and helps to avert some of the feedback prone to other fully hollow guitars. There’s a mahogany set neck to both help with longer sustain and to give you the premium fit and finish usually reserved for more expensive hollow-body instruments. The two ACH-ST humbuckers aren’t ultra-heavy metal pickups, so you won’t get a ton of snarling distortion out of the AF55, but you can push an overdrive sound to the next level if you want to. It all adds up to a sound that’s perfect for a player who’s looking to go for the jazz/blues vibe, or someone who’s looking to go for a singer/songwriter roots project. The trapezoid tailpiece also gives you a nice nod to vintage axes, too.
The Effect: Even though acoustic electric guitars are generally not associated with various guitar effects, using some can be very beneficial to your tone. Naturally, the types of effects you are going to use will differ from those used with electric guitars quite a bit. The most common accessory in an average acoustic electric signal chain is a preamp pedal. Something like LR Baggs Venue DI is a perfect example. This preamp allows you to boost the signal being fed into the amp or PA, but more importantly, shape it in a way that enhances your tone. Aside from preamps, many guitar players like to use various modulation effects, delays, reverbs and similar. General consensus is that overdrives and distortions are not something you would want to hook up to your signal chain. If you are frequently performing on stage, having even a simple effects chain can be a real game changer.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Dean - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Metallic Cherry, Metallic Black, Transparent Red

The honest truth lies with the listener’s ear and capability to identify a sound with an individual player.  B.B. King was known for his tone and only later revealed his secret mentioned above.  It wasn’t even really a secret; it was more of a physical shortcut that allowed him to express himself.  You should choose what feels and sounds best for your own musical expression.
Now you see why these Spectrum 5s are so desirable! It is not clear, by the way, how many (if any) were ever made with ebony necks. The few I’ve personally seen had maple necks. Certainly the expense of the ebony would have been enormous and hard to justify on the Teisco brand name. Also, with the density of ebony, the guitars probably would have been hard to balance. In any case, these are the Holy Grails of Teisco!
Speaking of session guys, we have Joe Messina, but where are his partners Robert White and Eddie Willis? Or Dennis Coffey? There’s a whole slew of great musicians whose names get forgotten but whose playing we all instantly recognise – alongside the Funk Brothers, there are the likes of Buddy Emmons and Grady Martin from the A Team, and then there’s the Wrecking Crew and the whole LA scene. Someone has already remembered Glen Campbell but how about Howard Roberts and Ted Greene? Whoa! How can you guys have neglected Barney Kessel, truly a top ten contender?
If you are buying a guitar for a kid, it might be good to know that there are smaller electric guitars especially for children. If it’s a small child, it might be really difficult to reach on a full-size guitar. The best way of determining what size you need is to try different sizes in a music shop or ask the guitar teacher what he or she recommends. If your kid grows quickly and you can’t be bothered or can’t afford to get a new guitar every year there is always the option of renting a guitar until your kid is big enough to play on a full-size guitar.
MusicPCB.com – offers PCB projects to build guitar and bass effects, and synth modules. All PCBs are professionally manufactured, and include soldermask, a silkscreened component legend, and plated through holes and pads. They are designed to be easy to build, provide simple and clean wiring, to work well with your other pedals, modules, and instruments, and most of all to sound great and provide sounds and features not available in commercial designs. Each PCB comes with a PDF document with wiring diagram, schematic, build notes, and large modding sections with details on how to perform a variety of mods to tailor the design to your needs/taste.
In the first part of this two-part article, we look at the original five-way switch and find it lacking for some uses. The 2-pole super-switch steps in to help, and we look at how we would go about wiring a Strat in the standard way using that switch. Once we’ve understood that, we go on to create an interesting alternate wiring scheme for a Strat that wouldn’t be possible with the standard 5-way.

You aren’t likely to really know what works best until you get the song a little further along in the mix, when you can hear how the guitar sound sits with the vocals and other instrument tracks. Sometimes, what sounds like the best guitar tone in the room isn’t always the most effective guitar tone in the track, but as ever, at this point you can only take a stab at what you think will work. Through experience, you’ll build a tool kit of go-to mic positions that achieve what you are seeking.
Second, you might be wondering if it’s just better to get a cinematic VST or one that takes from a range of instruments. Fractured does have cymbals and bass kicks but, of course, the guitar creates these and this gives them a lot of offbeat character. You could easily get a more rich and deep bass kick with a drum VST, but then you lose that quirkiness that propels and highlights Fractured.  
Super nice !.... Beautiful Patina exceptional Booming sound much like the old Martin 000 or old Gibson for that matter for a fraction $ and this ONE is a really good one folks. These are a well kept secret sort of ... known for their GREAT rich mature sound. This example is in fine all-round Original condition without any of the over 60 group problematic issues- none found anywhere upon close examination, no NONE nada -- neck issues -frets ARE good - tuners ARE good - bridge IS good - Solid Top is without a crack it s wood is FREE of cracks, Back is OK no buckle rash , no buldge to its Spruce top, The bridge is tight and NEW MARTIN STRINGS and just JVGuitars Set up this baby plays and sounds amazing at this price point unbelievable! Made in Japan quality with a beautifully grained high grade Mahogany medium soft V NECK feels like an old Martin too ....looks at the neck grain they used a beautiful Honduran mahogany not African or other this one is cool See the Pics of that ...its original Tortious pickguard is nice too..... nearly 40 years old its amazing but she's not new or mint of course she has a few minor doinks and plenty of that natural vintage patina and such but overall she's JVG condition rated at vintage excellent used condition rated. She Plays with easily and will bring a warm smile to your face when playing GREAT TONE fingerpicking rich and punchy its a very fun guitar to play... she's over 45 years old and in this kind of condition..... you better snap this gem up before she's gone or I change my mine and keep her for myself...haha this is my business I need to sell but you get my point its a good one folks. This is one amongst several of the FG150's Red Label Nippon Gakki's we have and I call it ( # 3 ) Contact Joe by email to BUY it: JVGuitars@gmail.com.

Then there's the issue of valves. Serious guitar players invariably prefer the sound of valve amplifiers to any form of solid-state circuitry, but the technical reasons are not as obvious as you might imagine. We all know that valves distort nicely when driven hard, but the use of output transformers also affects the sound. Then there's the choice of Class-A or Class-B (sometimes referred to as AB) power stages — Class-A stages clip asymmetrically whereas Class-B power stages tend to clip symmetrically. Even the make of valve has an effect, as do technical issues such as the choice of triode or pentode output valves, or even the types of capacitor used in the circuit. Because there are so many variables, not including the most important one (playing technique), the electric guitar is capable of a vast tonal range.

And it's not just about looking different because it does follow conventional acoustic guitar builds with its solid spruce top, scalloped X-bracing and laminated mahogany back and sides. For plugging in, it comes with the Fishman Sonicore under-saddle pickup and Isys+ preamp system, which comes standard with many acoustic-electric guitars in the market.
Another Martin creation, the 000 shape guitar is almost the perfect halfway house between a dreadnought and a parlour. Its classic hourglass figure meant it sat comfortably on the knee, endearing it to players of folk and other fingerpicking-heavy styles of music. The shape ensured it had the perfect balance between playing and comfort, and was often seen on the lap of no less a player than Eric Clapton. However it wasn’t averse to a bit of heavy strumming when the occasion called, and it’s large bottom end ensured it could keep pace when playing with others.

Hi Teo, both amps are great for beginners. I have both personally, so I know that the Vox is great for classic British tones and some heavy Rock n Roll distortion, however, if you want a more heavy metal sound the Orange would suit that better as the overdrive is very powerful. It comes down to personal preference really so I suggest you try both out! -Lee
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While production and distribution of guitars under the Ibanez brand began much earlier, the company gained notoriety outside its native Japan when it started importing Ibanez guitars to the United States in the mid-1960s. These first efforts were funky-looking creations which sold at the low end of the guitar market, primarily in department stores. But the company's products continued to move up the quality ladder until the company was perceived as a legitimate market force, selling what were essentially copies of other companies' designs in the mid-1970s. A patent lawsuit from Gibson ended the sales of those copies, but Ibanez had by then gained a foothold in the guitar market globally. (more...)
Schecter is one of the more recent brands to start building serious trust and authority on the guitar market. They started out as a parts company, only to cross into making their own guitars later on. It is no secret that Schecter guitars are first and foremost built with heavier genres in mind. Almost every model they offer packs so much range, though, that you can easily play anything you want without compromise.
The guitar features hand-rubbed solid Sitka Spruce top supported by Martin's incredibly reliable mahogany HPL (high pressure laminate) back and sides, essentially similar to the configuration found on many of Martin's mid-priced acoustics. If you're looking for an affordable starting instrument that has big-brand backing, or you are looking to get into the parlor-style guitar trend, check out the LX1E Little Martin.
Harmony was the largest US guitar manufacturer between the 1930s and late 1960s. At the height of the guitar boom in the mid-1960s, Harmony was building more than 1000 instruments per day. Not only were they producing Harmony-branded guitars, there was a time when the Chicago-based factory was making guitars for 57 different brand names and trademarks. At one point, Harmony was selling 40 percent of their guitars through Sears & Roebuck under the Silvertone brand.
Beginning about 1975, Hoshino began introducing original guitar and bass models to the market. At first, their original designs were subtle variations on the copy models. For example, the "Custom Agent" (model 2405) was basically a Les Paul with a fancy scroll headstock, a fancy pick guard, and, yes, fancy inlays on the neck and body. The Professional model 2671 was a Les Paul with a "vined" neck and a fancy headstock. But soon, the overall shapes of the guitars changed, and models known as the "Weir" (after Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead), "Artist" and "Musician" were introduced. By 1978, Hoshino had ceased production of all of its copy models and was truly producing 100% original designs. These guitars are not just beautiful, but are some of the best crafted guitars of all time, by any manufacturer, and represent the pinacle of guitar-making skill and quality.
If you love effects like we do, we hope you'll find this top-50 list a useful guide to discovering the classic effect boxes that have shaped the guitar sounds of rock, metal, blues, punk and many other styles. And if you're like us, it will undoubtedly compel you to plunk down a chunk of cash for a collectible pedal or two on eBay. Don't say you weren't warned.
In 1951, this initial rejection became a design collaboration between the Gibson Guitar Corporation and Les Paul. It was agreed that the new Les Paul guitar was to be an expensive, well-made instrument in Gibson’s tradition.[10] Although recollections differ regarding who contributed what to the Les Paul design, it was far from a market replica of Fender models. Founded in 1902, Gibson began offering electric hollow-body guitars in the 1930s, such as the ES-150; at minimum, these hollow-body electric models provided a set of basic design cues for the new Gibson solid-body, including a more traditionally curved body shape than offered by competitor Fender, and a glued-in (“set-in“) neck, in contrast to Fender’s bolt-on neck

Looks like a good guitar. I honestly think that for 90% of the hobbyist players out there, after buying better pickups, the difference between the sound of a Squier and a real Fender is negligible. I could be wrong I guess, but my ear doesn't really pick up enough of a difference to justify the money for a more expensive guitar. The quality of the guitar plays a big part for me. For instance, when I first got my guitar, the frets weren't smooth. Bends sucked because the note had lost it's sound by the time it was bent all the way up. Finally through playing and polishing, they flattened. Now they play really nice. I'm sure that on a new Gibson, that wouldnt happen. Oh well. About the Tele headstock that you didn't like, what don't you like about it? Do you like the gibson style 3 tuners to a side configuration?(like an acoustic?)


Many of the Cordobas, such as the C7, come with a gig bag or case, which makes it easier to keep your guitar in great condition, especially if you purchase a humidifier block. If you head over to the Amazon listing for this guitar, you might see that the reviews are the same for this guitar as they are for another Cordoba instrument, so there really isn’t much extra information, unfortunately.​
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturer which was founded in the year 1957. Ibanez was the first Japanese company to gain a foothold in exporting guitars to United States and Europe. They were the pioneer to produce the seven- strings guitars. Ibanez has produced several guitar models including the Electric Guitar Models, the Signature Models, Bass Guitar Models, and Acoustic Guitar Models etc. The Ibanez guitars are one of the best in the world.
The first “real” guitar I ever bought for myself as a teenager was an Ibanez RG much like this one, and I played that guitar for almost 10 years before buying yet another Ibanez RG. Note that this model does not have a tremolo, which means great tuning stability and fewer headaches when it comes to changing strings, tuning, and setup. However, you won’t be able to perform any crazy whammy tricks, so be sure you’re okay with that. Mahogany body, two hot humbuckers, jumbo frets, and an ultra-stable 3-piece maple neck. Hard to beat at this price point. Love it.
For many people, Yamaha isn’t a brand that immediately comes to mind when they hear “electric guitar.” Yamaha’s artist roster isn’t filled with many high profile endorsers nor is the Pacifica carried by the big online retailers. This is a shame and why (in my opinion) the Pacifica is one of the most underrated electric guitars available today. It’s a guitar I wish more people knew about: the PAC112V is very well made, sounds and feels great, and is suitable for a number of styles thanks to its H-S-S pickup configuration and 5-way pickup selector.
I’m not sure if you’re right about Joe being wrong. My memory of exactly how tone controls are usually wired is kind of failing me, but I think I remember that what you’re saying would be true if the output was taken from the node connected to the capacitor, but it’s not–the output node is the node on the opposite end of the tone pot from the capacitor, unless I’m remembering wrong. I think that filter-characteristics of guitar tone circuits are easier to visualize if you imagine them as reacting to a current source. Meaning “a big resistor in series with a capacitor” reacts the same way that “a big resistor” does. Basically, current above the cutoff frequency is shunted to ground through the tone pot–so if the tone pot is high, very little percentage (compared to if it was just a capacitor) of this current gets shunted, whereas if the tone pot is low, a high percentage gets shunted.
This cutoff is based on the average used price on Reverb over the past year, and while the $1000 cutoff is relatively arbitrary, it is as good a point as any to divide between entry-level gear and more heavy artillery. Here again, we are not combining wattage and cabinet size variations on the same models, which inherently decreases the ranking of any amp series with a multitude of different configurations.
Gilmour was made famous by his haunting guitar scores in Pink Floyd. This “replacement” guitarist surpassed expectations and helped shape Pink Floyd’s unique sound. You can always expect hairs at the back of your neck to stand whenever you hear one of his solos – be it for the first or hundredth time you’re listening to it. All the emotion that Gilmour’s poured into his guitar work lives on in the music and is channeled through anyone who’s ever wanted to cover a Pink Floyd song. I know several guitar players (myself included) who whenever playing the Comfortably Numb solo – whether they are alone in their bedrooms or on stage – have always been unwillingly brought to tears, near the point of crying. How could you not expect things to get esoteric and mystical when it comes to music?
This article was tremendously helpful! My daughter is entering college for music therapy, and she is already an accomplished pianist but needed a more portable instrument to see patients. We have been scouting out guitars for some time and are looking to get a quality instrument without breaking the bank. Thank you so much for this well-researched article.
But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.
The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.

I’m also going to go out on a limb and suggest the earliest Univoxes also included the ‘Lectra, a version of the one-pickup Aria 1930 violin bass (made by Aria). These were basically violin-bodied basses originally inspired by the Gibson EB-0, and popularized among imports by Paul McCartney’s use of the Höfner violin bass, copied by EKO. This was a hollowbody with no f-holes, Cremona brown finish, single neck pickup, bolt-on neck with position dots along the top of the 22-fret bound rosewood fingerboard. Strings anchored to a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly.
2.  Cracked peg head.  Customer “fixed” with mystery glue and a wood screw.  Result:  Peg head and neck shaft not aligned. Fix: If the peg head can be re-broken you may be able to re-align the neck and re-glue (if it was glued with aliphatic glue you won’t be able to as the glue will not stick to itself).  The joint may have to be resurfaced and new wood may have to be inserted, possibly a spline as well.
Gate – A dynamic effect that cuts off or lowers the volume of the output when the input is below a certain volume threshold. Once the input reaches the threshold the gate opens and allows the entire signal through. This is handy when placed in an amplifier’s effects loop for helping to eliminate hiss caused by high gain distortion when the guitarist is not playing.
Jimi Hendrix: Right-Handed vintage white body flipped upsidedown for left-handed use with an oval profile maple-cap neck. The controls and electrics are vintage-modern to ensure stability. The guitar is strung upside down with the strap button on the lower horn, the backwards 68 thick black CBS headstock decal is so that—in front of a mirror—the player sees the guitar as it would appear if Jimi Hendrix played it. As well as this upside-down lefty Strat for right-handed players, Fender also made four exact copies of the Vintage white Stratocaster Hendrix used in many performances, the most famous being Woodstock (1969).
The models in the California Series come in three Fender-exclusive body styles: Newporter, Malibu and Redondo. All of the models have a painted solid Sitka spruce top, solid mahogany back and sides as well as unique bracing patterns to deliver an articulate, highly responsive and balanced tone. The mahogany neck and pau ferro fingerboard and bridge give the guitar a rich and warm overall sound.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple & Wenge - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 54mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Gibraltar Standard II-8 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 808 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Cobalt Blue Metallic, Galaxy Black - Made In: Japan
It's impossible to ignore the British brand, which has been linked to the most famous names in rock history for several decades. Who hasn't seen "Marshall walls" stacked on the stage behind their favorite bands? Unlike Fender, their typical sound is not clean but rather "crunchy" and a bit sandy, like you can hear on some albums by The Who and AC/DC. Their first prototypes were Fender Bassman replicas that slowly found their own personality. For instance, Marshall decided to split the amp from the speaker cabinet (4 x 12" Celestion) to create the famous "stack". The use of tubes to provide more gain is also noteworthy, and it translates into more overdrive than the Bassman can offer. And so the JTM 45 was born, followed by many legendary models like the JCM 800 and 900, as well as the Plexis series.
The Supro line continued to grow in 1938, as can be seen in the CMI catalog. Still around was the Supro Spanish Guitar, now called the Supro Avalon Spanish Guitar, other than the name change (which is not featured on the guitar, as far I can ascertain), it is identical. Gone are the wood-bodied, frumpy-pear Supro Hawaiian Model and the Model D amplifier, although a Supro Special amplifier is mentioned (and not described) as being available for $40, the same price as the Model D. One and the same?
The best way to have a great experience building your first guitar is to do it as a member of as class under the direction of a master Luthier. I built my first Tele-style guitar at Tulsa Wood Arts taught by Seth Lee Jones. You can learn a lot of the tricks and avoid some of the frustrations of doing it on your own. Plus, you make new friends and come away with a beautiful, quality guitar your first time out!
One of the best defining features of Schecter guitars is their build quality. It seems that they always go an extra mile. Schecter’s bodies are solid, made of great tonewood depending on the application, and the array of finishes they offer are just impressive. In simple terms, build quality is not something you need to worry about with this brand.
 You will not grow here or learn anything that will be useful in any other company unless they employ 1950's management techniques. Maybe a screenwriter for "Madmen" would find some material here but as someone trying to grow their career you won't learn anything useful. The pay will be no better than your last job minus your previous bonus and 401k match which to my knowledge they do not contribute. So next question, your not making any more money and probably less, not learning anything useful and will need to explain why you left after 6 months, how are you going to position this to beat the competition going after your next job?
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar company that started out making outstanding copies of classic guitars, and has gone on to be one of the most revered guitar builders in the world. This is one of the top brands of heavy rock, and Ibanez instruments are known for the thin, fast necks and outstanding build quality. They’ve also led the way when it comes to 7-string guitars.
Another option would be to instead buy a mobile guitar interface and download one of the many guitar apps available, but I typically don’t recommend this for beginners. These apps are very robust, and can be a little overwhelming for someone just starting out. First learn how the controls on a real amp affect your tone. Once you’ve grasped these basics (and acquired some basic guitar skills), you can think about buying some fancy apps and effects.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Carved - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Richlite (Paper/Phenolic Resin Composite) - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Resomax - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Godin Tuner, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Cherryburst, Creme Brulee, Black, Burgundy
• Wrap around: On wrap around tailpieces, what’s wrapping around is the string. Strings are slid into the tailpiece from the front and then pass over the back and top of the bridge before making their journey up the neck. This system creates less string tension. Some players report tuning and intonation issues with these tailpieces. Others swear by them.
Judging by many of my last few years guitar purchases (on Ebay and elsewhere), I’m the kind of a person who seems to think he’s the kind of a person who likes guitars with a lot of knobs and switches. I’ve bought several multi-pickup guitars. Old ones, new ones, new ones made to look like old ones (not those stupid “relic-ed” ones, though…I’m an idiot, but I’m not stupid). Yet, as I look at the keepers in my collection, I’ve only kept one guitar with more than four knobs, and none with more than two pickups. Odd.
Clipping is a non-linear process that produces frequencies not originally present in the audio signal. These frequencies can be harmonic overtones, meaning they are whole number multiples of one of the signal's original frequencies, or "inharmonic", resulting from general intermodulation distortion.[34][35][36] The same nonlinear device will produce both types of distortion, depending on the input signal. Intermodulation occurs whenever the input frequencies are not already harmonically related. For instance, playing a power chord through distortion results in intermodulation that produces new subharmonics.
When I first tried multisourcing, on a solo project by Club Foot Orchestra guitarist Steve Kirk, I used an air mic, a direct source (Manley tube DI box or speaker emulator output from Kirk's Marshall JMP-1 tube preamp), a close mic on a clean-sounding Fender Princeton amp, and close and distant mics on a cranked-up Marshall cabinet (see Fig. 2). And that was just for the first rhythm track! As you may imagine, mixing was a lot of fun, and after that day there's been no going back to the old SM57 shoved up against the grille cloth. If you dare, you can take it from there. The only limitations are your time, the guitarist's patience, and available tracks. Oh yes-and lots and lots of mics.

The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.


Lou Reed has been blowing traditional guitar styles to bits since his Velvet Underground days. A fan of Ike Turner's R&B and Ornette Coleman's free jazz, he created epic bad-trip psychedelia on songs like "Sister Ray." "He was rightfully quite proud of his own soloing," wrote fellow New York guitar luminary Robert Quine, "but resigned to the fact that most people weren't ready for it." As a solo artist, Reed kept on ripping up the rulebook: See 1975's Metal Machine Music, a noise opus that took feedback further than Hendrix could have imagined.
Vox entered the "lunchbox" amp market in 2009 when it introduced the Night Train (NT15H) head. This compact, all valve amp is a 15W head with two 12AX7 preamp tubes, a pair of push-pull EL-84 valves in its power section, and a solid state rectifier. It uses a cathodyne splitter, and its power section is cathode biased. The amp is solidly constructed on a black steel chassis with a bright mirror chrome finish, diamond-perforated steel tube cage, giving it a physical appearance reminiscent of a lunchbox (some comparisons to a toaster have been made as well). The NT15H also set the cosmetic and operational template for two additional releases, also all valve heads, that book-ended its output power: the 2W Lil Night Train (NT2H) in 2010, which uses two 12AX7 preamp tubes and a 12AU7 dual triode as its power section, and the 50W Night Train 50 (NT50H) in 2011, a two channel head with four 12AX7 preamp tubes and a pair of EL-34 valves in its power section. All models feature the ability to choose between the familiar "chimey" Vox voice and a high gain voice that bypasses the EQ section, via the Bright/Thick switch. Note though that each Night Train model's feature set also provides some unique capability apart from its siblings. For example, the NT15H output power can be switched between 15W pentode and 7.5W triode modes. The NT2H provides a headphone/line out jack with on-board speaker emulation (for practice or direct recording use). Lastly, the NT50H offers two channels by adding a second,optionally foot-switchable, higher gain "Girth" channel, a "Tone Cut" control and a "Tight" switch in its master section, plus a bypassable, JFET-driven effects loop. All models were designed for use with most any 8 ohm or 16 ohm cabinet, although Vox also offers a matching cabinet (NT15H/V112NT, NT2H/V110NT, NT50H/V212NT) for each model.

Referring to this setup, Leckie also explains more about what makes double-miking so powerful: "If you brighten up the U67, it's totally different to brightening up the SM58, so sometimes I'll add a little brightness to the 67 and a little compression. But between that combination, I find I can get pretty much everything I need. They're rarely used at equal level; sometimes I'll favour the SM58 with the U67 at 10-15dB down. Even 20-30dB down, just bringing it in, it's amazing the different colour you get — how much the tone of the guitar changes."
The 2nd basic beginner guitar chord you should learn is C, or C major. You don’t have to say “major” in the name of the chord. If you just say C chord it’s assumed that it’s a major chord. You only want to strum the top 5 strings (that means the highest sounding 5 strings, not their relationship to the floor) The X in the guitar chord chart means not to play that string, or to mute it.
The tone knob is similar. Like the volume knob, the more you turn down the knob, the more of the sound you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier. But there is an additional trick involved. See, the current generated from each string is quite complex, like the sound characteristics it produces. Think of it like a continuum. On one end, the current is turned into low frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'warm') and on the other end of the continuum, the current generates high frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'bright').
I then surveyed Amazon, Sweetwater, Musician’s Friend, and other online musical instrument vendors to see what was available. Having found several promising models priced below $200, I decided to set this as our price ceiling. By setting a $200 ceiling, we’re not saying that more-expensive models aren’t worth paying extra for—only that the models we recommend here are more than adequate to get a beginner off to a great start.

This guitar follows after the tried and tested formula of old Stratocaster design, from the double cutaway alder body to the bolt-on maple neck, down to its triple single coil pickup configuration. The scale length follows after traditional builds at 25.5", while the neck profile (modern C) and narrower nut width of 1.65" makes this guitar viable for modern players. While it doesn't have vintage voiced pickups, the default pickups are not so bad either, and will give you the distinctive Strat tone that almost everybody loves.
John Scofield (b 1951) is an American jazz guitarist and composer, who has played and collaborated with Miles Davis, Joe Henderson, Charles Mingus, Joey DeFrancesco, Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny, Bill Frisell, Pat Martino, Mavis Staples, Phil Lesh, Billy Cobham, Medeski Martin & Wood, George Duke, Jaco Pastorius, John Mayer, and many other artists. Scofield had played a 1981 Ibanez AS-200 as his main guitar for over 20 years.[26]
UPDATE 10/21: The good news first - I'm still absolutely loving the game and steadily improving. I'm only able to play about one to two hours a day, but even though that's all the time I'm able to put in, I'm already to the point of being able to play along with a song. But (here comes the downside), with my improvement audio lag has become a real issue. Before I was so horrible that I couldn't hit the right notes at all, let alone on time, so it didn't make much difference. But now that I've improved, it's a problem. To be fair, they warn you about this in the form of a pamphlet inside the game box, so it wasn't out of nowhere. I was just hoping that since I wasn't using HDMI, the lag wouldn't be too horrible. Wrong.

If the book had been proofread better, I'd give it 5 stars. For example, there are places where the text has both a fret number and standard musical notation, and the fret number is wrong. The book refers you to play along with the instructional CD backing tracks, but it doesn't tell you which track number to play. It's easy enough to figure out what was meant, but a little more care would have been better.
Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.
WOW! This thing is incredible. One of the nicest instruments we have ever played and we've had, played and sold a few hundred over the past 20 years! Can't say enough about this bass. It's a pre-owned Zon Legacy Elite series 5-string model featuring a beautiful book-matched solid Bubinga wood top over a solid Mahogany wood body. A solid graphite neck / fingerboard utilizing a sculpted body neck joint finishes off the basic construction of the instrument. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active Bartolini pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. This bass has had the electronics modified by Zon to move the midrange control from the access hole in the back cover to a matching pot located in the control section on the front of the bass. While at Zon to get the custom electronics installed,  the original owner had new frets and a new finish coat added. Figured as long as it was there "what the heck". Tuning is accomplished via the 5 German made Schaller tuning machines in the same gold plate finish as the solid cast bridge. The solid graphite neck features a full 2 octave neck with 24 frets and a 34" long scale. This bass is a dream to play! Just about as good as it gets. There's not a mark on it anywhere. It looks brand new! Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up perfectly! Includes original Zon Soft exterior hard shell case on black Cordura.
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If you do find yourself at a concert and there’s not a Fender onstage, there’s an exponential chance that there will be a Gibson – if not both. Getting their start as a small mandolin manufacturer in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1902, the brand eventually went on to start building guitars, inventing the archtop style of guitar by using the same building techniques as violin manufacturers. In the 1930s, Gibson had made their first electric guitar, but it wouldn’t be until 1952 that the brand would unveil what is still their most popular and iconic guitar ever built: the Les Paul. Now based out of Nashville, Tennessee, Gibson’s storied history is littered with the presence of some of the greatest guitarists of all time, including B.B. King, Chuck Berry, Slash, Jimmy Page, Pete Townshend of the Who, and Angus Young of AC/DC.


: I own a Decca guitar, it is what I learned to play on many years ago. From what little I have gathered about them they were an order by mail brand, and you could only get them from a catolog such as Sears & Roebuck. I havent been able to find a price for them or any ifo on what catalogs they were from. Mine has a Ernie Ball Musicman-like peghead (4 one side 2 on the other) and has a metal pick guard with 2 giant switches which seem to have no effect on tone. It has a brown & yellow sunburst paint job (ewwww).I thought I possibly had the only one in existence, lol, guess not.
Learning guitar with no source material to work with will require many different resources, overlapped to fill the blindspots of each. Most people take lessons, but you’ll be at the mercy and pace of your teacher, with little room for your own interpretation. These days, there are apps and online lessons which have their advantages, certainly. They also come with monthly fees, though these will likely be cheaper than a live local instructor.
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Firmly intended to compete with Gibson's ES-335, the Starfire IV, V and VI retain plenty of Guild style, not least the more spacious cutaways and the wooden foot tune-o-matic-style bridge. Placed side-by-side with an equally new Bigsby-equipped Gibson ES-335, the Starfire V somehow looks more 'retro', more 60s. The body here is made from mahogany laminates with a distinct striped figure under the Cherry Red finish, which was introduced with the first Starfire. Then, as now, it all creates a different aesthetic to the Gibson ES-335. A major difference is the control set-up, which here augments the Gibson layout with a smaller knobbed master volume control on the treble horn, just behind the three-way toggle pickup selector. The pickups here replicate the early-60s introduced 'Anti Hum Pickups' and are period correct, along with the black plastic, chrome-tipped control knobs. It's a fairly weighty guitar for a semi, thanks to the full-length maple centre-block, and has a classic strapped-on feel. It is, of course, thinline depth and feels every bit an ES-335. It has a 'clean' sound, with low-end definition, slightly bright on the treble pickup with decent sustain and, importantly, a very respectable feedback threshold. It likes volume, and while similarly evocative of virtually all those classic styles, it's the stage version and effortlessly takes you on to early The Who, The Jam or Britpop voices, while seemingly equally at home with rootsy, strummier Americana.
Because of the high quality, Gibsons are among the more expensive models of guitars. However, Epiphone, of whom they are the parent organization, produces high quality guitars at much more affordable prices. These guitars are usually slightly inferior to their Gibson counterparts, but the playability and style are similar, and they are still a definitely among the good guitar brands.

In 2013 Vox released updated "G2" versions of the 15 watt and 50 watt heads, and added a combo version of the NT15H-G2 called the NT15C1. Compared to the original NT15H, the NT15H-G2 adds a foot-switchable Girth channel (which first appeared on the original NT50H) with an additional 12AX7 in the preamp section, a "Dark" switch, a digital reverb, and an effects loop. However, Vox did not retain the pentode/triode output section modes from the "G1" version that allowed for full or half power operation as well as a broader tonal palette. The NT50H-G2 differs from the original NT50H with the additions of an XLR D.I. out and a digital reverb, and the deletions of one 12AX7 preamp tube and the "Tight" switch. It also appears the FX loop is no longer bypassable. Gone is the bright chrome look of the "G1" models as both heads received new cosmetics in the form of a black mirror finish on the tube cage and a new suitcase-type handle. Vox also released "G2" versions of their matching cabs: the V112NT-G2 (one Celestion G12M Greenback speaker), and the V212NT-G2 (two Celestion G12H 70th anniversary model speakers), each also sporting the suitcase-type handle. The new NT15C1 combo combines an NT15H-G2 chassis with a single 16Ω 12” Celestion G12M Greenback speaker in a black tolex cabinet with a suitcase-type handle.


Jump up ^ The little finger whose use is not completely standardized in classical guitar technique can also be found designated by e or x. There are several words in Spanish for the little finger: dedo meñique, dedo auricular, dedo pequeño, but their initials conflict with the initials of the other fingers; c is said to be the initial of the dedo chiquito which is not the most common name for the little finger; e and x are not initials but letters that were picked, either with its own rationale, by people who didn't know what else to pick
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Popular condensers: when it comes to condenser mics for guitar-cab miking, the AKG C414 (in its various flavours — the C414 B-ULS is pictured above left) and the Neumann U87 (centre) are both popular choices. Some producers also frequently look to the U87's predecessors, the U47 valve (pictured) and FET models, and the U67.The characteristics that producers most often seem to be looking for in these mics are their extended frequency response, especially at the low end, and the slightly softer, more diffuse sound imparted by the large diaphragm. These mics also tend to boost the 5-15kHz region, but this boost is rapidly lost as you move off-axis (it is inherently difficult to design a large-diaphragm capsule with an even off-axis frequency response).

A humbucker pickup is electrically equivalent to two single-coil pickups wired together in series. Coil splitting involves shorting one of the coils to ground, essentially turning the humbucker into a single-coil pickup (not a perfect replica, though, as the magnetic circuits of the two pickup types are different). This is usually done with a DPDT switch, but can also be done with a push-pull pot. Some manufacturers have used a pot to vary the amount of signal shorted to ground from one coil, thus producing a range of tones between a humbucker and a single-coil. Coil splitting results in a sound that's brighter and has less output than a full humbucker. It also eliminates the humbucker's noise-cancelling properties. This modification requires the start and end of both coils to be exposed, which is more commonly available on aftermarket than stock pickups.[17][18]
Let’s start off with a real classic for a classic player! This Fenders vintage modified style Strat hss has captured the happy way of the 50’s, available in Surf Green, Daphne Blue and Fiesta Red and it’s a guitar that just makes your life a litter bit more worth living. The design is very much like the 1950’s electric guitars, from the soft V-shaped neck, maple fretboard and 8-hole pickguard down to the smaller things, like the knobs and the switch tip- everything just brings us back!
“You can also think of it as what the signal path in a studio situation would be if you were to plug your guitar directly into the input of your amplifier, and process that sound through outboard effects. You’re not going to have your echo first before going into your distortion boxes—unless you’re looking for a specific sound—because you want the echoes to die out naturally, and not with your distorted sound.”

Glen Campbell; DJ Ashba, Melissa Etheridge, Nikki Sixx, Mick Thomson; Kaki King, Steve Lukather; Marcel Dadi, Ray Davies,[30] Roy Harper,[31] James Hetfield, Josh Homme, Cyndi Lauper, John Lennon, Country Joe McDonald,John McLaughlin, Yngwie Malmsteen, Bob Marley, Ziggy Marley, Stephen Marley, Roman Miroshnichenko, Maury Muehleisen, Dave Mustaine, Vince Neil, Jimmy Page, Richard Daniel Roman, Shania Twain, Boz Scaggs, Luis Alberto Spinetta, Statler Brothers, Cat Stevens, and Aaron Tippin;[30]
It was also in January of ’64 that the Westheimer Sales Company, 1414 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, began advertising its New Kingston, the “S” line of quality guitars. These double-cutaway guitars included the #S-1 single pickup, #S-2 double pickup, #S-3 three pickup, the #S-2T double with tremolo, and #S-3T with tremolo. These were most likely versions of the little MJ and WG guitars.
EQ or equalization effects work by boosting or cutting specified frequency bands within the sound signal. From treble or high-end sounds such as the sizzling sounds of a riveted cymbal to low-end sources such as the thump of a bass drum or bass guitar, EQ effects don't change the pitch but rather alter the timbre or quality of the sound. Depending on the application, EQ control can be quite precise or very simple.
The modern full size classical guitar has a scale length[46] of around 650 mm (26 in), with an overall instrument length of 965–1,016 mm (38.0–40.0 in). The scale length has remained quite consistent since it was chosen by the originator of the instrument, Antonio de Torres. This length may have been chosen because it's twice the length of a violin string. As the guitar is tuned to one octave below that of the violin, the same size gut could be used for the first strings of both instruments.
Nut slots too deep: Take a course file and file the top of the nut 1/2 the distance you want to raise the slots. Catch the filings on a piece of paper. Tape both sides of the nut with masking tape and then fill the slots with the filings. Soak the filings with thin superglue. Press into place with a toothpick. When dry, refile the slots. The slots should be made so the string sits in about 1/2 to 3/4 thier diameter. Slots should be wider, and taper downwards on tuner side. Square slots are acceptable.
“Take a humbucker wound with 42-gauge wire as a benchmark. With an Alnico II magnet, it would have a warm, soft bass response, a very sweet high end and a slightly pronounced mid- range. Alnico III, funnily enough, is not quite as strong as Alnico II. So, the highs tend to be more muted and rounded. Probably the best way to imagine the sound of Alnico III is to think of the early 1950s when this form of magnet was very common. Think of the sounds of the jazz and clean guitar tones from that time – that plummy roundness.
12. Once your wiring loom is complete, install it in the guitar, and reattach the pickup and ground wires. Test the guitar through your amp and make sure everything is working. If it is, congratulate yourself on a job well done. If it’s not, check that you’ve wired everything together properly. Also, check your solder joints and redo any that aren’t shiny or look a little iffy.
Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.
The Yamaha's top is constructed of Sitka spruce, a “strong yet elastic” wood that helps the player articulate tone and dynamics. The neck is made of Nato wood, and the back and fretboard are both made of rosewood. One of the best things about the Yamaha's neck and body is the way the two are joined together: via a hand-fitted, dovetail neck joint that uses no metal hardware. This neck-to-body cohesion is ideal for tone as well as the overall stability and durability of the physical instrument.

FeaturesThe Gibson LogoAngled HeadstockAdjustable Truss RodNew Asymmetrical Neck Profile22-Fret Rosewood FingerboardAlloy Fret WireTrapezoid Inlays Set-Neck ConstructionPlus Maple TopChambered Mahogany BodyPickups: Gibson Burstbucker ProsTonePros Locking Tune-o-matic Bridge and Locking Stopbar TailpieceNitrocellulose FinishBody BindingCustom-Made PotentiometersLocking Neutrik JackLocking Grover TunersRevolutionary Plek Set UpNew Enlarged Neck Tenon
In the Guitar Setup & Maintenance course, Greg Voros devotes an entire DVD to electric guitars. Rather than talk in the abstract about setting up all electric guitars, he’s picked two very popular ones to use for demonstration purposes. He’ll teach you how to adjust the action, the bridge, and the pickup heights, as well as how to adjust the neck for precise relief, in order to get the best action possible on your electric guitar.
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I am an SG player through and through. I own a bunch of them- mostly from the initial run of SG Special Faded with the moon inlays, because that particular run felt right to me. I am looking to have a custom SG style guitar made, but I don't know of any builders who make SGs. Can anyone tell me a boutique or custom shop builder who does SGs? Thanks!

it is my opinion that most classical and jazz guitar instructors at local colleges and music stores are better than tom morello and jack white. I like both of them and they are definitly innovators and very popular but my college classical/flamenco instructors were doing things incredibly more complex and emotional than anything ive ever heard tom or jack do. ask tom morello to play a segovia piece and see what happens. this list seems like it was made by a 17 year old kid who thinks he’s smart because he knows who robert johnson is, like putting him at #1 instead of hendrix is his “ace in the hole” of guitar knowledge. there is no real answer to the question “whos the best” but we guitarists will never tire of discussing it.


The Tone knobs on electric guitars are really just potentiometers. It’s important to know that they do not ADD treble or bass to your sound, they only remove higher frequencies as you turn them down and restore those frequencies to the sound as you turn them up. When they are set at 10, you are getting all the frequencies that your guitar and pickups can produce. In some cases, this may sound too shrill or harsh so if you turn the tone knob down, you are removing some of the higher frequencies or “rolling off “ the treble. Turning the knob back up towards 10 restores those frequencies, but isn’t actively “adding” treble frequencies to what your pickups are capable of producing.

The size of the acoustic guitar body also influences its voice. Larger instruments, with dreadnought or jumbo bodies, generally produce more volume. They also tend to have warmer, rounder tones that accentuate bass notes. Smaller guitars, such as parlor, concert and “000” models, usually have a brighter sound that accentuates their middle and treble ranges.

Further simplifications occur for the regular tunings that are repetitive, that is, which repeat their strings. For example, the E-G♯-c-e-g♯-c' M3 tuning repeats its octave after every two strings. Such repetition further simplifies the learning of chords and improvisation;[71] This repetition results in two copies of the three open-strings' notes, each in a different octave. Similarly, the B-F-B-F-B-F augmented-fourths tuning repeats itself after one string.[73]
Epiphone features all-metal rock solid hardware on all of its instruments. The Les Paul Special VE comes standard with the legendary Locktone Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece for easy set up. Tuning is fast and reliable with Epiphone Premium Covered tuners with a 14:1 ratio.The higher the ratio, the more accurate your tuning. The tuners are mounted on an Epiphone Clipped Ear headstock with Les Paul Model in gold and the Epiphone log in silver. In addition, a "2016" Edition logo is on the back of the headstock. 
Whether it costs $100 or $1000, the build quality should feel worthy of the money. Naturally with budget models you will find more laminated woods compared the solid woods and exotic materials used in expensive guitars. However, a good model will have laminates that are put together securely and cleanly, with no excess glue or rough spots. Even a good budget guitar will look and feel great.
While many players revere the original analog effects boxes and their modern reissues, the majority of effects on the market today have digital circuitry. Don't let that be a deterrent, digital effects are so advanced now that many of them can only be distinguished from analog effects by certified tone geeks. Professionals at all levels use digital effects. There are advantages to both analog and digital stomps, and either can be the right option depending on the player and the music.
Washburn is an EXCELLENT brand. I have owned an N4, 2 N2's, and their latest, cheapest Nuno model for my daughter. My daughter's guitar is amazing for the price I wish I had such quality for my starter guitar. I would put my N4 up against ANY guitar- period. Plus, whenever I have contacted the company, they have top notch customer service. I know this isn't about amps, but I wrote them about an issue I had with my Randall amp ( a division of Washburn). Without me asking, they mailed me an amp part with an apology. Top notch.
The short-lived Elite Telecaster of 1983 incorporated two specially designed humbucking pickups powered by an active circuitry that featured a “TBX” guitar expander and an MDX midrange booster with 12 dB of gain. Other features included a “Freeflyte” hardtail bridge and die-cast tuning machines with pearloid buttons. This guitar was among the latest CBS-era Fenders to feature a BiFlex truss-rod system, low-friction EasyGlider string trees and active electronics. After CBS sold Fender to a group of employees led by Bill C. Schultz in 1985, production ceased on the Elite Telecaster and other Elite models. Fender Japan made its own version of the Elite Telecaster in late 1984, which featured a 22-fret neck with medium-jumbo fretwire and a modern 9.5 inch fingerboard radius. Notable Elite Telecaster players include Johnny Hallyday and Dave Davies of The Kinks. Michael Houser w/ Widespread Panic and Andy Summers of The Police.
In 1967 Lipsky introduced a line proto-copies carrying the Domino brand name. Most were inspired by European models such as the EKO Violin guitar. Among the offerings were two models sporting a California cache, the #502 Californian, an asymmetrical copy of a Vox Phantom, and the #CE82 Californian Rebel (wouldn’t California Rebel have made more sense?) shown here.

Boogex is a guitar amplifier plug-in with a variety of sound shaping features.  With Boogex it is possible to get heavy distorted sound as well as slight distortion sound.  Boogex is also able to apply any speaker cabinet impulse response (selection of built-in impulses is available).  Processing latency is very modest - 96 samples (2.1 ms at 44.1kHz).  Boogex comes with several example factory presets.
Let's discard the keyboard idea. And the human hand idea. Let's isolate the guitar player from the instrument. The player can manipulate only three parameters - the tone, velocity and duration of sounds to be generated. We have that in MIDI. (Okay, the guitar player can dance and wear a costume, but for our purposes, that's not part of the equation.)

It will take time to write and update all of the content at once. Come back regularly and I promise that there will be always something new for you to read, the list with essential guitar effects will be constantly updated. If you are just starting out, we recommend going through some online guitar training before you dive in the guitar pedals world.
The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.

The playing of conventional chords is simplified by open tunings, which are especially popular in folk, blues guitar and non-Spanish classical guitar (such as English and Russian guitar). For example, the typical twelve-bar blues uses only three chords, each of which can be played (in every open tuning) by fretting six-strings with one finger. Open tunings are used especially for steel guitar and slide guitar. Open tunings allow one-finger chords to be played with greater consonance than do other tunings, which use equal temperament, at the cost of increasing the dissonance in other chords.


The Ibanez Artwood AW54 is easily the best bang-per-buck all-mahogany-body dreadnought in the market, for the price you are getting an acoustic with solid mahogany top, back and sides. I am definitely envious of students who have this as their first guitar, with its impressive specs and genuine vintage appeal. And it's not just for newbies, because experienced players appreciate the articulation and warm tones of this all-solid mahogany body guitar.
"I'm the famous guitar player," the late Duane Allman said, "but Dickey is the good one." The two spent less than three years together in the Allman Brothers Band, but they established an epic rapport – jamming at length, trading solos and playing their famous twin-guitar leads. After Allman's death in 1971, the group continued with Betts, scoring with "Ramblin' Man" and "Jessica." For all his blues and slide chops, his roots are in jazz, and you can hear the influence of his clean-toned modal soloing in every Southern rock group that's followed.

The #1 cause of fret wear is the fretting hand pressure exerted by the player.  I have some clients that grip very tightly and wear frets quickly (Rob Fahey), and some that grip very lightly and take forever to exhibit significant wear (Jasan Stepp, Dog Fashion Disco/PolkaDot Cadaver).  Fret material hardness, string hardness and frequency of use all contribute to wear as well, but hand pressure is still the leading cause since frets do not wear themselves out.  Technique is different for every player, unique and personal and habits can be hard to change.  Just like brakes in a car, how hard and how much something is driven directly impacts wear and longevity.  Please see the refrets page for further thoughts on this topic.
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If you really want your guitar strings to stand out as well as your playing does, then these colourful options from DR are a novel eye-catcher. For even more fun, stick them under a UV light and they’ll glow, too! They might also serve a practical purpose for beginners, too, as new guitarists can quickly identify specific strings based on their colour.
Some solid-bodied guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul Supreme, the PRS Singlecut or the Fender Telecaster Thinline, among others, are built with hollows in the body. These hollows are designed specifically not to interfere with the critical bridge and string anchor point on the solid body. The motivation for this can be to reduce weight, to achieve a semi-hollow tone, or both.
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