Of course, there’s one other reason you might want to grab a mini amp for yourself, and that, perhaps surprisingly, is the sound. Many of the mini amps on the market today are designed and manufactured by the most iconic brands in the industry. That means you can get your hands on some pretty serious tone that may not fill an auditorium, but could be an interesting addition to a recorded guitar track.
What Fender might lack in heavy, modernized features, it makes up for in affordability, novelty and being some of the best all-around guitars in existence. They would also have to be considered some of the most stylistically versatile guitars, covering all kinds of musical genres and songs. We’ll focus primarily on the Standard (non-American) models, since they’re priced below our $700 cut off. If you want to go with something nicer, target the American series Strats and Teles.
When used with the human voice, it is important that the pitch correction doesn't happen too quickly, otherwise all the natural slurs and vibrato will be stripped out leaving you with a very unnatural and robotic vocal sound. If only a few notes need fixing, consider automating the pitch-corrector's correction speed parameter so that it is normally too slow to have any significant effect, then increase the speed just for the problem sections. This prevents perfectly good audio from being processed unnecessarily.
Two other totally new guitars debuted in November of ’88, the ST-3 ($225) and ST-4 ($235). These were both Strats, with maple necks, rosewood fingerboards, volume and two tones, five-way select, chrome hardware, SAT non-locking vibrato, in black, white or red with graphics. The ST-3 had three single-coils, whereas the ST-4 had a ‘bucker and two singles. Cases or gig bags were extra.
Martin’s first era of flirtation with electrics ended with its GTs, and, in terms of American production, wouldn’t resume until a decade later. However, in 1970 Martin joined the growing list of American manufacturers to begin importing guitars made in Japan, introducing its Sigma series. In around 1973, Martin, like competitors Guild and Gibson, began importing a line of Sigma solidbody electrics made in Japan by Tokai.
Here we have a great mid - late 1970’s Alvarez 5047 model its kind of rare and seldom seen and she is a wonderful example of Japan’s answer to the Martin 00028 with the Herringbone rosette and rosewood body and in this case they used a wonderfully high grade beautifully grained rosewood for its body back and sides and fingerboard and bridge at that it looks to be a rich looking Jacaranda Brazilian rosewood type you can be the judge of that just have a good look at our pictures, at any rate its workmanship is excellent as is its fit and finish work is all of a high grade. Well balanced sound board with good volume and a sweet tone with its gorgeously straight grained solid spruce top is beautiful and easy on the eyes as well and up close you can tell its genuine vintage with its thin skin finish its grain highs and lows are visible the Japanese truly were masters - experts at thin poly finish and this one has it. This is the famous S.L.M. model it was imported by Saint Lewis Music back in the Lawsuit era days the 1970's these were made especially nice for SLM as seen here. Bindings all round are excellent overall condition is JVGuitars rated at very good its not new of course its over 40 years old it has only minimal insignificant scratches or doinks true vintage in its own right yet - excellent used vintage and is considered above average for a played 40+ year old instrument. No cracks no buldges or warpage anywhere this guitar is straight no repairs and all original and was excellent when we took this in on trade.We simply cleaned - oiled and polished the entire guitar and it has a good set of Martin 80/20 phosphorous bronze strings set of 12’s… this guitar plays very well now with excellent string action, its neck is a really great one RARE for the Japanese with its more meaty V profile much like the old Martin. Condition, condition, condition, Easy on the eyes and that vintage tone and fun to play are 6 darn good reasons to own this ALVAREZ 5047 Japanese Vintage 0029 with that gorgeous rosewood… Any questions ask Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
Look at the action. Action is the distance between the fingerboard and the string at any given time. Make sure you hear no buzzing from the guitar when playing a note at a normal weight. Try it at the 5, 10, 12, fret, etc. and listen for the 'buzz' of strings banging on the frets below it. If any guitar is like this, ask the music store (any good one will do this for you) to adjust the neck if you can try it out in playable condition. If they can adjust it for you, then there is no problem, it just needed adjustment.
The National STEM Guitar Project, in partnership with NSF Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Centers with funding provided through a grant from The National Science Foundation (#1700531, #1304405, & #0903336), hosts innovative Guitar Building Institutes throughout the US. Five-day institutes, combined with additional instructional activities comprising 80 hours, provide middle, high school, and postsecondary faculty training on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) applications as they relate to the guitar. The institutes present and teach participants hands-on, applied learning techniques to help engage students and spark excitement for learning STEM subject matter.

The amp has the usual basic controls: Volume, Bass, and Treble, plus a Gain knob that adjusts the amount of distortion. Once you start turning some of the Champion 20’s other knobs, all sorts of additional tonal possibilities arise. The Voice knob accesses simulations of different amps: Tweed (1950s-era Fender amps heard on early R&B records such as “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” and “In the Midnight Hour”), Blackface (mid-1960s Fenders, often used by Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan), British (reminiscent of the classic Vox amps used by the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and U2), and Metal (somewhat like the sound of the Marshall amplifiers favored by rock and metal players from Jimi Hendrix to Slash). Each of these four simulations has three different variations that alter the tone a bit.
    Kahler Tremolo bridges feature 6-way adjustable string saddles, which really allow you to dial in your string action and intonation. They have a fairly wide range-of-motion, but less than the Floyd Rose. The Kahler’s have a smoother feel compared to the Floyd Rose, and also have a convenient locking mechanism to convert the bridge into a fixed bridge.
Excellent explanation! One thing that no one has touched on, yet is the physics of the high frequency components (mentioned above). When you clamp a string at both ends and pluck it it will have a fundamental frequency of waving back and forth based on a) it's length b) it's thickness and c) how tightly it's stretched. All wavering strings, though will have additional waverings. These are referred to as overtones. The first overtone will be a doubling of the frequency and the next a trippleing and so forth. Each of these overtone frequencies contribute to the rich, complex sound of the instrument. Here's a good explanation with pictures. Note the location of the frequency nodes in relation to the placement of the pickups.
However, it does give you a good flavour of the Martin and is a very playable plug-in, one of the best ways to see proper guitar emulation in action without paying for it. There are tab and effects options and a keyboard for playing it (we’ll assume if you can play a guitar, you’ll opt for the real thing, anyway). While it is free, we think you’ll be sorely tempted to upgrade, which will set you back $169.
Side Note: The above is a visual example of how the wrong pedal order screws up your tone. When you compress before using delay, you get a perfectly shaped note ringing out and decaying uniformly over time. If you delay before compressing and even normalize with your make-up gain, you still lose volume and power due to the attack sneaking through first. Then your delayed notes are all also compressed, ruining your fine-tuned echo decay so that all echoes are relatively too loud and don't decay equally over time.
The Hi Flyer was a thin-bodied reverse Strat-type with a German carve around the top, almost always seen in sunburst. This was identical to the Aria 1702T. The bolt-on neck had a three-and-three castle head, plastic logo, string retainer bar, zero fret, 22-fret rosewood with large dot inlays. A white-black-white pickguard carried volume, tone and three-way. Two black-covered single-coil pickups were top-mounted, the neck slanted back like on a Mosrite, with six flat non-adjustable exposed poles in the center. An adjustable finetune bridge with round saddles sat in front of a Jazzmaster-style vibrato. The plastic logo was still in use in 1971, though gone was the string retainer, replaced by a pair of little string trees. Dots had gotten smaller by ’71, and the Hi Flyer was available in three finishes – orange sunburst (U1800), black (U1801) and white (U1802). The Hi Flyer listed for $82.50 (plus $12 for case) in ’71.
The power handling capabilities of a speaker cabinet or individual speaker are always given in relation to a specific impedance (a measure of electrical resistance); the most common impedance ratings in bass speaker systems are 8 ohms and 4 ohms, although some equipment is rated down to 2 ohms or even more rarely to 1 ohm. For example, the Aguilar DB751 puts out 975 watts if plugged into a 2 ohms speaker cab, 750 watts at 4 ohms, or 400 watts at 8 ohms. The way to interpret ohms ratings is "backwards" to the way wattage ratings are assessed. That is, with wattage, bassists make sure that their amplifier does not put out too high a number of watts for a speaker cabinet, but with impedance, bassists ensure that the amplifier does not put out too low an impedance for a speaker system. For example, if an amplifier head is rated at 4 ohms, a 4 ohm speaker, an 8 ohm speaker (or any ohm rating higher than 4 ohms, including 16 ohms or 32 ohms) could be connected (albeit with the amplifier producing less watts as the number of ohms, the resistance, increases). However, bassists do not connect a 2 ohm speaker cabinet to a 4 ohm amplifier, because this will be too much of a load (too low an impedance) on the amplifier, and it could damage or destroy the power amplifier.
Of course, as guitar players we still want to remain open to a number of tonal aspects that happen after the front end of the initial attack. These elements aren’t necessarily in the front part of the very beginning of a guitar tone, nor are they delegated to the trail of lingering sustain. “The reason why people sound a certain way is because of little nuances, those little pull offs, those hammer ons, those plucking [dynamics]— the sequence of those things. Think of it as a sonic palette. That sequence is what makes the artist sound like himself.”
This is a guitar that feels alot like a pre-CBS Fender strat. It has all the tones. If you didn't already know, G&L stands for George and Leo. As in LEO FENDER. The headstock is a little different, but the pickups are great, not Noiseless but definitely not NOISY either. Mine is a physically heavy guitar. It sounds heavy too - in a good way. Still, I can get all the tones I need from all the pickups. I believe that the neck pickup is superior to the Mexican Made Fender Strat. The pearloid pickguard is pretty. These Indonesian made strats sound great. They're made in the same factory as the Squiers but definitely sound different.
If this doesn’t work, or you’re just a little paranoid about hooking the guitar directly into the PC, you can get one of these. This is the Line 6 Pod Studio GX, and it’s a great value and pretty much a one-stop shopping starter kit. The box you see there is a guitar USB interface, with an input designed for guitar. It’s also got a headphone output, so you can listen through the interface. I had an older version of this ages ago, which I used for basic guitar input until I got some more advanced recording gear that worked well with guitars.
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Pristine and hi-fidelity are two words that many use to describe the Fractal Audio FX8's sound. Even experts are amazed, like how Guitar Interactive Magazine praised the unit by saying: "it’s easy to say that the FX8 is the most fully featured and best sounding multi effects unit on the market right now". The quality of its reverb and delay got a lot of thumbs up, while other users found its drive and modulation effects to be inspiring.
But Lou’s edgy lyrical stance and image spawned something even more fundamental to deviant aesthetics: punk rock. It is with considerable justice that he graced the first cover of Punk magazine in 1976 and was subsequently dubbed the Godfather of Punk. Lou embodied a new kind of rebel hero, an amalgam of two distinctly different but equally vilified social pariahs: the disaffected intellectual and the scumbag street hustler. In recent years, he’s added a third persona: the grumpy old man.
Another factor that may need to be considered is the length of the speaker cable. Very long speaker cable runs may affect the performance of the system, either by causing line loss of power or by affecting the impedance. For best performance and highest wattage output with bass stacks or combos with extension speakers, bassists typically use the shortest possible speaker cable.
When Rolling Stone founder Jann S. Wenner asked John Lennon how he rated himself as a guitarist, Lennon replied, "I'm not technically good, but I can make it fucking howl and move. I was rhythm guitarist. It's an important job. I can make a band drive." It is, and he did: Lennon was the Beatles' spark plug and bloodletter, often adding rawness to pristine pop songs. Listen to the airborne strums that power "Help!," the circular riffage of "Day Tripper" or the deceptively sloppy "The Ballad of John and Yoko" – where, with George Harrison away on holiday, Lennon turned rudimentary lead and rhythm lines into sharptoothed magic. He was also capable of generating a truly ferocious tone: In the live promo clip for "Revolution," Lennon makes his hollow-body Epiphone Casino screech like a very angry lawn mower. Still, he didn't get his due as a guitarist in the Beatles' heyday. "They call George the invisible singer," Lennon said. "I am the invisible guitar player."
This is such a trite discussion. There are many more choices than Fender and Gibson, and to boil it down to those two players is detrimental to the industry and by extension musicians of all skill levels. Those companies made great innovations and came out with classic models, and the industry owes them a whole lot. But to me, you get more points for continued innovation, not making a few great models then resting on laurels for the next 100 years.
Another well established brand FMIC i.e. fender musical instrument company is widely recognized for manufacturing eminent guitars of superlative quality and texture. In India, the customers are satisfied form its products and won over millions of heart by providing brilliant guitar brands like FA – 100.So why waiting more? Quick make your purchase and enjoy the lovely music tone.
Electric guitar pickups provide a great way to customize your sound. They offer you the option of creating more sustain and enjoying stronger harmonics, and depending on the music genre or venue, pickups can make your tone warm or bright and allow you to add more or less distortion. Where you place you electric guitar pickup has an impact on the desired sound you want to achieve. If you're looking to create a bright or trebly timbre, place the pickup at the bridge. Neck pickups provide a warmer sound with a little more bass while multiple pickups together in one area help to produce additional vibrations. There are a variety of electric guitar pickups to choose from that can help you amplify your rockin' riffs or scorching solos.

These guitars appear to have lasted through 1989 or so. In 1990 the Stinger line shrank dramatically. Three guitars and two basses were listed in the Guitar World 1990-91 Guitar Buyer’s Guide. The three guitars in ’90 were the SSX, SPX and SSL. These were basically Strats (gone were the arched tops). The SSX now had three single-coils and fixed bridge/tailpiece. The SPX offered two humbuckers with a coil tap switch. The SSL had one humbucker and one single-coil, with a tap on the ‘bucker, and a traditional vibrato.


If you have an envelope follower, envelope filter, auto-wah or other dynamic touch-sensitive effect, this should go at the very front in most cases, as these effects are almost exclusively dependent upon the dynamics of your playing. Placing most other types of effects in front of them will compress the signal, thereby reducing dynamics and minimizing their performance.

Since 1946, the P-90 has been pleasing guitarists with its vintage-soaked tone, that shares qualities of both single-coil pickups and humbuckers. P-90s are primarily single-coil in their construction (although larger and flatter), and come in a range of different housings. Although they feature a relatively low output, they provide a meatier tone than a single-coil, but with a bit more sparkle than a humbucker, and are therefore very versatile. They have been put to great use in rock, blues and jazz music, with Pete Townshend, Tony Iommi, and Carlos Santana all taking advantage of the sweet P-90 tone. On our chart above, the Seymour Duncan Antiquity is a great example, but check out more P-90 highlights on the dedicated page.
No, could it be!? Finally we see a brand that does not come from England nor the US, but from Germany. ENGL specializes in tube amps for high-gain and heavy-metal. Its most famous users are Ritchie Blackmore and Steve Morse (Deep Purple), Alexi Laiho (Children of Bodom) and Chris Broderick (Megadeth). Both past and present Deep Purple members even have their own signature model. And there's also the standard Powerball, Fireball, Classic, and Invader series.
Hum: other than singlecoil hum, it is almost certainly caused by a ground issue, either a faulty string ground or ground connection, or a ground loop. I highly recommend going to Star Grounding. Shielding is also recommended. See the guitar nuts site for more information on these topics. Single coils are very succeptable to rf frequencies such as emitted by flourescent lights, tv's, computers, motors etc. Also note that high load or other appliances running on the same electrical circuit can cause noises through your amp.
I purchased my Dove in 1989 in a mom and pop kind of music store in North GA , actually Cumming GA. I have played it ever since and I have owned many other guitars in my 52 Years in the music business but it has always been my come back acoustic for the sound and playability of the neck slim D stile ,but the sound quality is very much as good as any lots more expensive guitars,the way it holds the overtone of the note long after you play the note in the body is just unbelievable ,my hat's off to which either company wants to claim they built it I am just glad they did!! Damn fine Guitar.Thanks,Victor
Quality replacement pot from Bourns.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.
Unlike the Gio model of Ibanez included in their guitar package that only has two humbuckers for pick-ups. The GRX70QA has the three pick-ups configuration made popular by Ibanez consisting of neck humbucker, middle single-coil, and humbucker for the bridge. This pick-up combination goes well with the 5-way switching controls, volume and tone, to harness the sound esteemed for the kind of play.
Silvertones were guitars sold by Sears but manufactured by five main companies: Danelectro, Harmony, National-Dobro (Supro/Valco), Kay, and Teisco. These companies were called "jobbers" because they were contracted (jobbed out) to make guitars for Sears. They also produced guitars under their own brand names. In almost all cases the guitars manufactured for Sears were identical to models sold directly by the manufacturers with only a logo or color change.
This is where you want to go. I brought Steve an old Telecaster with a faulty input jack. He not only had the parts needed to fix it, but came up with a better, more stable solution that would avoid the same problem later, all in a few minutes while I waited, and for the walking-around money I had in my pocket. He is professional, expert, friendly, and reasonable. I couldn't ask for more.
I see a bunch of people all over social network sites and youtube videos responding with things like "who needs it, just give me a guitar and a tube amp" whenever news about a pedal of some kind comes up. What's so wrong with pedals? For some reason there's a stigma against them that "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" when most people use them to get sounds out of their guitar that you normally can't without them. I don't understand why so many people opt for the "guitar right into an amp" sound when there's so much more available.

The Ultimate Beginners Series gets aspiring musicians started immediately with classic rock and blues riffs, chord patterns and more. Now, for the first time ever, Basics, Blues, and Rock are combined in one complete book and DVD set. Follow along with 4 hours of DVD instruction and 3 hours of audio tracks, with the help of on-screen graphics and printed diagrams. The Ultimate Beginners Series: Electric Guitar Complete takes you from picking to soloing and power chords. If you're serious about mastering the blues and rock styles, this book and DVD set is a must-have.
@NeilMeyer I used to believe that as well until I started noticing songs that used the flatted 7th degree chord instead. It's generally easier to play those major chords for a beginner than diminished chords. Since the answer is provided for beginning students, I presented the easier approach. Notice the chart also leaves out some major keys which feature more difficult to play chords. Keeping it simple for newbies. Tim referenced this (music.stackexchange.com/q/29817/16897) – Rockin Cowboy Jan 18 '16 at 17:26
To answer this question, all you need to do is close your eyes and focus on what is currently going on around you. Just about every sound you hear, whether you are at home or on a busy street, is packed with some dose of reverb. In nature, sound reflects off of multiple objects and surfaces across various distances. Both our ears and our brains are used to reverb by default. That is one of the reasons why even an artificial reverb effect tends to make a track more enjoyable.
That's actually a good question. There were several people working on the electric guitar at the same time... so it depends on what you're looking for, and what constitutes a real electric guitar. And to compound the issue, tape recording was also in an experimental stage, back in the 1930s when the electric guitar arose. So live recordings of early performances pretty much don't exist.
PRS is an American guitar company founded by luthier Paul Reed Smith in 1985. It makes some of the finest high-end electric guitars and custom shop instruments. It was extremely popular in the '90s and eventually spread to Asia, where they started the SE lineup that was more affordable and budget-friendly. However, they are not meant for beginners even though they cost less. They are used by musicians and players of all kinds of genres. The high-end models are classy and can be somewhat expensive.
In 1950, Leo Fender introduced the single-pickup Esquire, and a few months later released a dual-pickup version called the Broadcaster that, due to trademark issues, was later renamed the Telecaster. The Tele® would go on to become the world's first successfully mass-produced solidbody electric guitar. Simple yet elegant, it has been a show-stopper and session magnet since its debut. It’s the go-to guitar for twangy chicken pickin’ solos, which is why the iconic axe has appeared on the majority of country records over the past six-plus decades.
There’s been a steady evolution in effects signal processing since the 1940s. Guitarist-innovator Les Paul was among the first and most avid effects developers, experimenting with echo and multi-track recording to add sonic excitement to his music. The first foot-switched effect showed up in the late ‘40s with Harry DeArmond’s Trem Tol tremolo processor that was later used by Bo Diddley. In the 1950s and early 1960s other effects were developed, but they tended to be expensive and some had operational issues. Meanwhile amplifier makers such as Fender and Gibson were building reverb and tremolo effects into their amps. These tube amps also produced tasty distortion and overdrive effects when gain and volume were cranked up to maximum settings. Today, many effects are designed to reproduce those sounds.
Jim Root: Featuring mahogany body, maple Modern C shaped neck, ebony fretboard in Flat Black finish, maple in Flat White, 22 Jumbo frets, EMG pickups, EMG 81 in bridge position, EMG 60 in neck position, strings-through-body hardtail bridge, locking tuners, 3-way switch, single volume knob and large headstock.[18] Along with his Jim Root Telecaster, it is the only Fender guitar equipped with EMG pickups as standard.
He has a way about him that makes you stop and listen, but he isn’t in your face. His sound is very melodic, which is why his tone was so perfectly matched to answering the needs of the vocals, yet he still holds his own in every tune. Bright, confident and edgy, he is a serious guitar-player and he has no intentions of holding back! People often say that he carries humour in his music, which is quite a clever characteristic to portray with this piece of equipment.
An additional note on the methods used; although we gathered rating and review data from guitarists around the world, we only considered brands that can be found at major online music gear retailers located in the United States. This means that fine brands like Maton from Australia (played by Tommy Emmanuel) weren't included - the same goes for some respected European brands. Also, only full sized guitars, or ones very close to it, were included in the data set - had we included smaller parlor guitars then this may have boosted Martin and also Gretsch might have made the list.
BAJAAO bring to you the best and extensive range Electro Acoustic Guitars also known as the Acoustic Electric Guitar or Semi Electric guitar in layman terms from all over the world. Versatile in design, the electro acoustic guitar is known for its smooth sound and powerful projection. At its core, an acoustic-electric guitar is acoustic in style fitted with a pickup device allowing it to be plugged into an amplifier, a number of effect pedals or played on its own for a more intimate sound. Heard in basically every genre of music, these guitars are indispensable in almost any modern band setting. In acoustic-electric nylon string guitars, piezoelectric pickups and microphones are used because magnetic pickups are not capable of picking up vibrations of non-magnetic materials. The design is distinct from a semi-acoustic guitar, which is an electric guitar but with the addition of sound chambers within the guitar body. Buy the best Electro Acoustic Guitars online with BAJAAO.com with the best and affordable price in India. Make your shopping experience a wonderful one with us.
I nearly returned this guitar when it first arrived. I'm very glad I changed my mind. When I first unboxed it I was not a fan of the sound at all, and I didn't think it could improve significantly, but I was wrong. I put my trusty Tone Rite on it and left it there for several days. It opened the sound up and made it project much better. The finish is great, and I love the dark sound of sapele. It just takes some time and playing to get it to open up. When I first picked it up, I much preferred the sound of my Seagull, but now the Martin is really speaking to me and the Seagull has been relegated to backup status. I've even picked up a couple of bluegrass tunes, just because I'm playing a Martin now. I've only plugged it in a couple of
Then there's the obvious fact that wood has no magnetic properties, so it's simply impossible that any acoustic vibrations from the body will have any effect on the amplified sound. It's also not true that any acoustic qualities of the body wood are somehow imparted back to the vibrating string; the vibrations go out into the air and, well, that's it. They're a by-product, nothing more.
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Effects on the Spider Classic 15 are a little easier to handle than those on the Champion 20. One knob accesses the chorus, flanger, phaser, and tremolo effects, while a separate knob accesses the reverb and echo effects. This arrangement makes it easy to blend different types of effects and makes the Spider Classic 15 a little more versatile than the Champion 20 if you are interested in coloring your sound more.

Chords in a song are arranged according to chord progressions, which are chord intervals that work pretty much the same as single notes in a scale. It’s very important for you to learn chord progressions for the various keys, because then, as long as you know what key the song is in, you can figure out the chords in it very easily. There may be times when you want to change the key of a song to one you can sing or play in better, and for this, knowledge of chord professions is critical.

If you are inexperienced, it is only recommended that you attempt to setup a guitar that is of little value to you, both financially and sentimentally. If you don’t have one that fits these requirements, then it is best to pay the cost of a guitar setup as performed by a professional. The primary risk while setting up the instrument is over adjustment. Working any part of the bridge too much will cause wear and tear, and irreparable damage to the neck is often the result of improperly adjusting the truss rod. It is always hard to justify ruining a perfectly good instrument in order to avoid guitar setup cost.
“He played an SG, a Les Paul, a Flying V, as well as a Stratocaster, but he always sounded like Hendrix,” Clive Brown states. “He didn’t suddenly sound like Jimmy Page because he played a Les Paul. That’s where everybody’s perception seems to go wrong. It’s the playing, and not necessarily the guitar.” In spite of an entire multi-million dollar industry revolving around selling musicians the latest gear, and in spite of thousands of axeslingers, aspiring and acclaimed alike, who readily gobble up that gear, it all seems to boil down to two implements— and we’re born with those.
One question I get asked incredibly often, specially from beginner guitarists is: “What are the best guitar brands.” It’s a pretty valid question given that in just about every industry there are brands that are known to be the most desirable and most reliable (not always at the same time) and therefore, the best. However, it works a little bit differently in the guitar industry. Sound quality often goes on par with price. Reliability is measured a little differently than say, cars, as most guitar companies easily make very reliable instruments. Finally, desirability is usually based on price, looks, artist endorsement and more importantly again, sound-quality.
While the general purpose is to emulate classic "warm-tube" sounds, distortion pedals such as the ones in this list can be distinguished from overdrive pedals in that the intent is to provide players with instant access to the sound of a high-gain Marshall amplifier such as the JCM800 pushed past the point of tonal breakup and into the range of tonal distortion known to electric guitarists as "saturated gain." Although most distortion devices use solid-state circuitry, some "tube distortion" pedals are designed with preamplifier vacuum tubes. In some cases, tube distortion pedals use power tubes or a preamp tube used as a power tube driving a built-in "dummy load." Distortion pedals designed specifically for bass guitar are also available. Some distortion pedals include:
Lists like these come down to personal taste, but since you like Ryan Adams you should give Uncle Tupelo’s album March 16–20, 1992 a listen. After Uncle Tupelo pretty much defined the modern alt-country genre with the electric guitar driven albums “No Depression” and “Still Feel Gone” they released one of the best acoustic albums you will ever hear.
I think it's unreasonable at best, and more likely impossible, to say with any confidence "Model X guitar will be eaisest for everyone", because everyone's hands are different sizes, everyone's fingers are different lengths and thicknesses, some people prefer smaller or larger frets, everyone has different preferences with regard to neck profile shape, neck width, neck length, body shape, body weight, bridge design (floating vs fixed, TOM vs hardtail, etc.), not to mention pickup types (single coil vs humbucker vs P90, active vs passive) and control layouts (multiple volume/tone controls vs single master volume/tone controls, blade vs toggle pickup selectors).
Who among us doesn’t relate to Nigel Tufnel in This Is Spinal Tap when he tried to explain to “Meathead” that having an 11 on his amp made it louder than – and hence superior to – one having a mere 10? That’s just how I felt back in the day when, after nearly two decades of owning one – that’s only one – guitar, a classical, I decided I ought to get an electric guitar again. Who could have known how slippery that slope would turn out to be?!

Why We Liked It - The price on amazon is undoubtedly pretty high, which means that this Gibson is going to be for serious players and professionals only. You'll need to make sure you have gig bags or a guitar case in hand for protection! However, if you’re looking for the absolute best that the electric acoustic market has to offer right now, then there probably aren’t many contenders to the J-200’s crown.
If you just want to send that current through to the amplifier unchanged, that would mean keeping all volume- and tone knobs turned all the way up. But the knobs can be useful. Underneath the volume knobs, the electrical signal is hooked up to two places; one line goes out towards the amplifier, and the other is effectively contained without being sent to the amplifier. The more you turn down the volume knob, the more of the signal you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier.

Mentioned below are some of the tabs for guitar, that a beginner could practice. Take the guitar and let us first learn the 4 x 4 rhythm. Strum the guitar with a plectrum in downward and upward direction in the form of - four beats in each measure and the quarter note gets one beat. That is, strum the guitar strings (chord) 'Up-Down' 4 times a then just end it coming up after the 4th downward strum. Yes! You got it right. 'Up-Down' is 1 note (that needs to be played 4 times) and 'Up' is the half note (that needs to be played once). Practice this rhythm till you get your hands on it and then practice it, changing the guitar chords.


Only two or three frets are needed for the guitar chords—major, minor, and dominant sevenths—which are emphasized in introductions to guitar-playing and to the fundamentals of music.[87][88] Each major and minor chord can be played on exactly two successive frets on exactly three successive strings, and therefore each needs only two fingers. Other chords—seconds, fourths, sevenths, and ninths—are played on only three successive frets.[89]
In the Guitar Setup & Maintenance course, Greg Voros devotes an entire DVD to electric guitars. Rather than talk in the abstract about setting up all electric guitars, he’s picked two very popular ones to use for demonstration purposes. He’ll teach you how to adjust the action, the bridge, and the pickup heights, as well as how to adjust the neck for precise relief, in order to get the best action possible on your electric guitar.
The EB-18 was the first electric bass the Martin company produced in 1979. The single-pickup EB-18 was a partner to Martin’s E-series electric guitars. Its scroll-shaped headstock was reminiscent of the Stauffer-style pegheads of early Martins. The EB-28 was added to the line a year later. It had a mahogany body and PJ pickups. Both models were discontinued in 1983.
Fender has a long history of building amplifiers, so much so that many of the amps we see today still mimic the look and aesthetics of the amps that they built many decades ago. You could also say that many of the amps we have today can trace their roots to the classic Fender amp design. Also impressive is the long list of Fender amplifier users which include Eric Clapton, Jerry Garcia, Brian Setzer, Neil Young, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Eddie Van Halen and many more. For a company with a long legacy and a massive line up of amplifiers, maintaining high rating across the board is quite the feat, but then again, this is to be expected from the company that helped shape the electric guitar sound that we know today. These days, Fender is well represented in the entire amplifier market, from entry level models with amp modeling, to premium modern reproductions of their iconic tube amps.

I have many Behringer pedals.Used them gigging.Have had many people ( lots of musicians ) asking me what I am using to get my tone and effects .They are all surprised when I tell them Behringer pedals.And almost all say the same thing."aren't they made of plastic"? Yes they are made of plastic.But being someone who has worked in the plastics industr.for 25 + years I know Plastic can be very strong .I have done hundreds of gigs with these pedals and never had a problem.You would really have to jump ontop of these hard to damage them.And if you did that with the non plastic pedals I am sure you would also have a problem .That said.I have 5 fx600 pedals because I found a site selling them for $14.A super bargin for so much effect.As far as battery power nowadays batteries cost more than pedals so anyone ... full review
Support your local music shops! The Guitar Store is a great spot in a convenient location. Helpful and friendly staff all around. A good assortment of electric and acoustic guitars, amps, and more pedals than you could possibly imagine. No cases full of BOSS Metal Zones either - we're talking real pedals for the pedal enthusiast. They also are great for lessons/workshops and instrument repair. We had been bugging the guitarist in my band for having a noisy output jack for weeks. He took his guitar in, came in during a slow time, and they replaced the jack for him on the spot! Amazing! So while Guitar Center might be your only option to buy that fancy pack of tapered-B 5-String bass strings, The Guitar Store should be your first choice for literally anything else. Check it out! SUPPORT LOCAL MUSIC SHOPS! But they make you leave your backpack at the counter?!? ZERO STARS!!!!! ;-)
I spoke with Matt “M@” Picone, of Fractal Audio, about the increasing use of modelers for today’s biggest acts. Their flagship modeler, the Axe-FX II XL+, is used by bands as diverse as U2, King Crimson, and Taylor Swift. Increasing numbers of top-level guitarists are discovering Fractal’s dozens of effects/amps/cab/microphone models and the obsessive tweakability inherent in their designs. In the credits of Fractal’s products, Matt Picone is listed alongside Cliff Chase, the company’s founder, president and DSP/Hardware engineer, as contributing to “everything else.” He says that title suits him because it spans a range of duties including support, artist relations, brand development, sales, marketing, PR, sound design, docs & manuals, e-commerce, business development, infrastructure and much more. Their products are not just for ultra rock stars, as Matt explains:
wonderful feel of a small town, with caring people and the owner is amazing. He'll of a player too! Just got a gorgeous ESPN strat copy from him, he graciously showed me just how well of a strat it is... by playing it through a fender tweed tube amp. He even sang a little for me as he made my strat sing right along with him. Price was excellent, as are all his prices. See More
The Jasmine S35 acoustic guitar has its share of criticisms, most notably its heavier strings and bargain basement appearance, but what keeps it popular with customers is the starter kit. Other entry-level acoustic guitars rarely include the accessories that the Jasmine S35 offers. It is also valued as a good back-up guitar for advanced players who want a dependable spare on hand during performances.

Confusion sometimes revolves around the distinctions between overdrives, distortions and fuzzes, but in theory each should do approximately what it says on the box—even if some also do a little of the other breeds’ jobs along the way. In the case of overdrive pedals, the intention is often twofold: either to provide a gain boost to “overdrive” a tube amp into distortion, or to approximate the mildly distorted sound of a slightly overdriven tube amp. In practice, most do a little of both. Crank the average overdrive toward the max and it usually coughs up an element of self-generated distortion, which can easily be heard when DI’d into a mixing desk set to well below overload levels; generate enough distortion, and things can also sound a little fuzzy. Despite the gray areas, however, there are definitely distinctions between the types. It all makes some sense if you think in terms of the degree of clipping achieved by the pedal, with overdrives generally being soft-clipping devices and distortions being hard-clipping devices.


Been in my attic for 20 years...kinda dirty...Rare Vintage Electric Guitar that i have never found an exact pic of on the web...seems like a Teisco Del Rey,but looks earlier than the 60's models ive seen...obviously needs cleaning an repair...but man this thing is cool...a great restoration project...the only marking is the patent number 31-4127 on the truss rod cover...or a Norma or Guyatone version...or just hang it on your wall as a great conversation piece

Vintage Gibson Les Paul Special model, introduced in 1955 This 1957 model is killer.Utilizing the Junior’s solid Mahogany body with single cutaway shape but  finished in what Gibson called Limed Mahogany which appeared white on black and white television sets which gives it the nickname of "TV Special"A neck pickup with accompanying volume and tone circuitry was also added making the Special an affordable but still professionally playable instrument. The Special was sold in this configuration until 1958 . Gibson’s surviving shipping records indicate approx. 1,452 Les Paul Specials were shipped in 1957. MORE HERE.

Thanks for popping in! Yeah, that g-string issue's a real pain. I also get it on acoustics for the same reason. I've found that, aside from sloping the slot DOWN on the peghead side, if you also try to provide a gentle (side) edge where it starts to head towards the g tuner, that helps too. What I'm trying to say is that you should try to give as clear a path as possible to the tuner to reduce interference/friction. I've tried to illustrate what I mean here: https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-_9c955WEOiM/UI8xvC_nvFI/AAAAAAAADAA/RQmXf_beWUc/s754/nut-slots.jpg but let me know if it's not clear. More on making a nut here, by the way: http://diystrat.blogspot.tw/2010/10/making-bone-nut-from-scratch.html
Next, you will need to adjust the intonation. In this case, the technique is pretty much the same. You will need a small Phillips screwdriver. On the tailpiece side of the bridge in the first case, or the rear of the bridge in the second, there are screws holding the string saddles in place. Check each note by striking the string at the twelfth fret fretted and then unfretted. The unfretted note is the proper one; turn the screws either clockwise or counter-clockwise until the notes match.
Guitars come in two basic flavors: acoustic and electric. From a hardware standpoint, electric guitars have more components and doohickeys than do acoustic guitars. Guitar makers generally agree, however, that making an acoustic guitar is harder than making an electric guitar. That’s why, pound for pound, acoustic guitars cost just as much or more than their electric counterparts. Both types follow the same basic approach to such principles as neck construction and string tension, and so they have very similar constructions, despite a sometimes radical difference in tone production.
I personally use Vegas, Sonar, and REAPER. I would not recommend Vegas or Sonar for live playing, if for no other reason than both have crashed on me during recording sessions, and I do not easily forgive that. REAPER (Audio Production Without Limits) never, ever crashes. It’s not as full featured as some DAWs, but what it does, it does well. I use it for all my recording.
Electronic instruments are well known for their great versatility and all of the amazing sounds that they can produce. In many cases, those effects all come down to skillful use of the right pedals by a talented musician. When you're equipping your pedalboard, some of the first units you should look at are delay and reverb effects pedals. Delay pedals enable you to put a note on a timer and have it come back a few measures later. They're perfect for holding off a chord, then having it kick back in with a new sound layered in on top of it for cool combination effects. For example, you might mix a long, sustained note together with a more complex riff to briefly become your own rhythm guitarist. You can play a chord against itself to double up into a deeper, richer tone, or even simulate an echo for atmospheric effect.

Fender once again has proved itself to be a great name in the guitar industry by introducing this super acoustic model. It’s a full-size guitar and is IDEAL FOR BEGINNERS to start their musical journey as guitarists with it. It’s designed for learners so you must not expect too much from it, but yet, it is capable of producing great sounds in the hands of an advanced player that’s why claimed to be best suited for all styles of music.


Just bought a Martin D-18GE beautiful sunburst from Franklin Guitar today and was absolutely blown away by the hospitality, friendly atmosphere and knowledge I was met with. I've never written a revie...w before but this place is so good it deserves praise and recognition! I would recommend anyone who wants to buy any level of guitar with all ranges of experience to go check out Franklin Guitar! From beginners to professionals, this little place has what your looking for and will no doubt be a joyful experience. Thanks Pat! See More
I’ve never played a gig without an amp, but I am prepared to… Instead of spending a ton of money on AXE FX (which a good amp can be a small fraction of the cost of AXE FX, especially if you still need to buy monitors, power amp, etc…), I keep a Line6 Sonic Port in my bag I can use with my iPod, iPad, or iPhone. Cheaper than AXE-FX. I do use the Line6 Sonic Port into my iPad for recording tracks for different projects. A lot less than AXE-FX and easier to use. Another option.
For easy, go-anywhere amplification, start out with a combo guitar amp. These all-in-one units combine the preamp, power amp and speakers into one piece, which makes them ideal for places where you want to set up and tear down in a hurry. Rehearsals and busking are easier with a combo amplifier, and they're great for small venues that don't need the power of a larger amp. The combo is your basic, high-versatility amp, and no guitarist should be without one.
by pedalhaven  @airbag3333  has a seriously stacked board! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
Taylor's rise to fame has been relatively quick, thanks to their combination of impressive build quality and tone. Their diverse list of celebrity endorsers also helped, which include artists from different musical styles like Tony Iommi, Jason Mraz and Taylor Swift. Founded in 1974, the company has grown to be a major competitor in the acoustic guitar market, challenging older and well established brands in many price points. The Taylor 110ce is one of their more popular models, a mid-priced acoustic with solid spruce top that makes for a great entry point for intermediate players who want a "branded" workhorse acoustic.
Fulltone’s popular Full-Drive pedal has the bonus of a switchable booster channel, while its overdrive channel goes to a fairly high gain and, unusually, uses asymmetrical clipping for a more textured sound that is quite different from the Tube Screamer’s. Asymmetrical clipping is also at the center of Boss’ SD-1 Super Overdrive (as used by Eddie Van Halen), generated by a circuit that uses two silicon diodes in series in one direction, and only one in the other, to clip each side of the waveform differently. Some players credit asymmetrical clipping with more richness, body and character; others say it sounds clanky and harsh, like an amp with mismatched output tubes. Then again, some guitarists—those in the former camp, probably—say they prefer the sound of mismatched output tubes for these same reasons. As ever, what works is up to you.

Praises and recommendations continue to flood the reviews of the Fender Super-Champ X2 HD, pointing to its great value for money as its main selling point. Even users who are not happy with some of the extra features agree that the amp gives you more than what you pay for. As expected from a Fender tube amp, clean tone is well received, while others are equally happy with the other voicings. Another plus for the Super-Champ X2 HD is that it gets good feedback from guitarists of different playing styles and instruments, be it single-coil equipped or even those with active humbucker pickups.


An overdrive is almost always at its best played through a tube amp set at medium to upper-medium volume, since the amp itself is doing a major part of the job, the pedal just being the boot that kicks its butt into juicy break-up a little quicker. Conversely, demo one DI’d into a mixing desk or portastudio as described earlier, and in most cases the breed sounds absolutely awful: harsh, raspy, cold, and artificial. It can be a shocking look at the evil side of that $350 vintage Tube Screamer you just bagged from eBay. Now stop crying, and plug it back into your AC30.
A small number of bass amps designed for the upright bass have both a 1/4" input for a piezoelectric pickup and an XLR input for a condenser microphone mounted on the bass, with a simple mixer for combining the two signals, as described below. Some Acoustic Image amps have a dual input design. A rare feature on expensive amplifiers (e.g., the EBS TD660) is the provision of phantom power to supply electrical power over the patch cable to bass pickups, effects, a condenser mic (for an upright bass player) or other uses. A small number of 2010-era amps that have digital modelling features may have an input for a computer (e.g., USB), so that new digital effects and presets can be loaded onto the amp.
Kings style fused the call and response element of gospel with a blues form and a hint of Jazz throw in for good measure.  He’d sing a line, then answer it by playing a phrase on the guitar. T-Bone’s influence was apparent in his playing too – the expressive style and long single note sustain played a big part in his sound. B.B King also went on to influence the other two ‘Kings’ of blues – Albert King and Freddie King.
Due to the acoustic, aesthetic and processing properties (workability, finishing, joints) the wood and the ligno-cellulose composites are the most valued materials for the musical instruments' construction. The guitar is made up of a complex structure, formed by a vertical wall in a curve shape (technologically named "sides") and two faces made up of ligno-cellulose plates, so that it should... [Show full abstract]
Seagull Guitars is a sub-brand of Godin that utilizes their modern design and production capabilities in building classic looking instruments. The S6 Original exemplifies what the company can do, combining Godin's build quality and attention to details with old school aesthetics and playability, and it does all of this while retaining a very reasonable price tag.
I’ve played Martin D35 and O18 for decades and fooled around with Maton and Cole Clarke’s for a bit, but switched to James Goodall’s ( 6 and 12) which are simply stunning instruments. Why they’re not mentioned here is a mystery to me – especially if it’s quality of woods and craft and tone you’re chasing. I love the Martin’s but Goodall stole my soul.
Both guitarists have been a large part of the Montgomery Gentry sound since the beginning. Garrett had been working the bars in Lexington, Kentucky and ended up becoming the first-call guitarist for singer Troy Gentry. When he and Eddie Montgomery teamed up to conquer the Nashville music scene, Bo was the natural pick for lead guitar. When the time came to expand their sound by adding a second guitarist to embrace their Southern Rock roots, bassist Andy Bowers recommended his brother Frank. Being the consummate professional that he is, Frank did his homework and nailed the material his first day out, earning him his spot on stage with the group for more than eleven years now.
The intervals between the notes of a chromatic scale are listed in a table, in which only the emboldened intervals are discussed in this article's section on fundamental chords; those intervals and other seventh-intervals are discussed in the section on intermediate chords. The unison and octave intervals have perfect consonance. Octave intervals were popularized by the jazz playing of Wes Montgomery. The perfect-fifth interval is highly consonant, which means that the successive playing of the two notes from the perfect fifth sounds harmonious.
"The library has a huge amount of great samples covering every nook & cranny of the electric guitar, and it really is of the highest quality... I could tell that they must have put in a gigantic effort into the scripting, sampling, and design... It’s easy to use, has extensive options for articulations, sounds even better with its effects, and yet it can have a pristine, clean sound as well. I highly recommend it... When they say 'Absolute Electric Guitar' on their website, those words are a lot to live up to [and] they achieved this with a brilliant product and awesome sound." Rob Mitchell (SoundBytes Magazine)
Achieved with springs or plates, as in the early days, reverb is a distinct sound all its own. The effect has been lured in to the delay camp more in modern times because the same bucket brigade analog technology or digital delay technology that is used to create long echoes can be manipulated to produce a reverb sound, too. Tap the multistage analog delay chip at a very short delay, and layer these with other such short delays, and a reverb effect is produced. It has something in common with the spring reverb in guitar amps—or old studio plate reverb units—in that both approximate the reverberant sound of a guitar played in an empty, reflective room. While many players make good use of reverb pedals, including anything from Danelectro’s newer, far-eastern-built units to old and new Electro-Harmonix and Boss models, most consider the amp-based, tube-driven spring reverb to be the pinnacle of the breed. But there are many great guitar amps out there with no reverb onboard, so for anything from your tweed Fender Bassman to your Marshall JTM45 to your Matchless DC30, an add-on unit is the only option.

Fall 1954: both models have 2 volume and tone knobs, $39.95 and $59.95 respectively. The single cutaway bodies were made of solid Poplar wood, and are known as the "peanut" body shape at 11.25" wide. Then used a solid aluminum bar running from the peghead to the bridge for strength. "Coke bottle" pegheads are used that are 5/8" wider across the two "E" tuners than the later "Coke bottle" peghead shape. This model was also available under the Silvertone brand name with the "lightening bolt" peghead.
YP - The Real Yellow PagesSM - helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business's suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.
Taylor has swiftly made several electric guitars that made their way to the hands of professional guitarists onstage. Moreover, a few of their models are directed towards working players too. In fact, Taylor seems to be caring about the beginners and intermediate level players as well, since they produce several guitar models aimed at these customer groups. If you are ready to scour out your wallet to get your desired guitar, Taylor will be the perfect choice for you.
Now I know the image above will give some people fits. Just the idea of doing a gig without your favorite amp roaring behind you is enough to send people to their sheds, grabbing pitchforks and lighting torches. This article is about why some guitarists choose to go direct at gigs. Going direct doesn’t replace the traditional guitar/pedals/amp formula that has powered popular music for over 60 years. Bass players and acoustic guitarists have gone direct for years, and technology is catching up to the ears of electric guitarists. Of course, no one is trying to tell every guitarist to do this, but it does seem to have merit in certain situations. Those situations are exactly what we will be talking about here. 
For many people, Yamaha isn’t a brand that immediately comes to mind when they hear “electric guitar.” Yamaha’s artist roster isn’t filled with many high profile endorsers nor is the Pacifica carried by the big online retailers. This is a shame and why (in my opinion) the Pacifica is one of the most underrated electric guitars available today. It’s a guitar I wish more people knew about: the PAC112V is very well made, sounds and feels great, and is suitable for a number of styles thanks to its H-S-S pickup configuration and 5-way pickup selector.
Gruhn Guitars: If you're looking for a convenient appraisal that can be done online--something along the lines of what May Music Studio used to do--Gruhn Guitars offers an appraisal service. You must first send information and pictures of your guitar according to their guidelines. You must also include a payment for the appraisal fee, which varies depending on the instrument.
Yes and he lost the finger tips on his left hand and attached makeshift fingers out of thimbles but managed to play some of the greatest evil licks ever. I love Eddie but he screwed up Van Halen terribly by getting rid of Dave and turning it into a girl band. Duane was awesome and highly skilled and a sought after studio musician. Clapton is the master.

Reviews of the Boss Katana Head are generally positive, with many users pointing to its versatility as its main selling point. One user described it as a Swiss Army amplifier, which encapsulates what even experts are saying. Art Thompson of Guitar Player had this to say: "I found the quality of the amp and effects sounds to be quite satisfying. There’s good touch responsiveness on the higher gain tones, and these 100-watters are definitely capable of holding their own in a band." The inclusion of a built-in speaker got a lot of thumbs up from users who are happy that they don't have to use a different amp for practice.
The size and power rating of the amp, as well as the size and type of the speakers within the cabinet, will have a significant impact on the recorded sound. Obviously, huge stacks will produce a very different sound from small combos. That said, many recording engineers have found that a small, low-powered amp cranked right up can sound more exciting than a big powerhouse. Even cheap transistor amps with tiny speakers can sound great in the right context. Don’t be precious and don’t rule anything out; it’s all about the end result!
Fender "Squire / Bullet" Strat. Great, low priced project guitar. Black, laminated body, maple neck with Indian Rosewood fingerboard. 4-bolt neck plate. Original, "covered" tuning machines and nut installed. Frets in NEW condition. Neck adjusted well with slight "back-bow" under no tension and does have adjustable truss rod. Body and neck finish in excellent shape. Headstock finish has wear to the word "Bullet" see photos. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Ready for your custom hardware parts. Would make a great project / player or second "don't care if it gets stolen off the stage" guitar.

For example, Al Schmitt starts with the traditional SM57 close mic, on axis but a little off the centre of the cone. "Then I'll put a really good mic up — maybe a Neumann U67 or an M50 — for the room... It could be anywhere from 15 to 20 feet away." It's worth noting that the M50 is an omni microphone and, although the omni polar pattern is only very occasionally mentioned for close-miking, it makes a much more sensible choice for capturing natural room ambience.
If you just want one or two instruments from a large SoundFont then follow this procedure.  Open the large multi-instrument SoundFont in Polyphone, then select File, New, Name the new SoundFont.  Go to the Presets of the original SoundFont, Left-Click the Preset you want and then holding down the Left mouse button then drag it to the Presets of the new SoundFont and let go of the button (the preset is now inside your new SoundFont).  Right-Click on the main heading of the original SoundFont and choose Close File.  Now simply choose File, Save (or Save As), Close.

As you will see, our list embraces outsiders, trailblazers, outliers, and Eugene Chadbourne playing a rake. We don’t worship “guitar gods,” but prefer our axe-wielders to be resourceful, egalitarian, flawed, and human. We’re not drawn to Olympic feats of fleet-fingered athletics, unless they’re used for unique and exploratory ends. We see the mewling histrionics of Jeff Beck as tyranny instead of catharsis. The name Derek Trucks is practically alien to us.

A combo amp contains the amplifier and one or more speakers in a single cabinet. In a "head and speaker cabinet" configuration, the amplifier and speaker each have their own cabinet. The amplifier (head) may drive one or more speaker cabinets. In the 1920s, guitarists played through public address amplifiers, but by the 1940s, this was uncommon. A rare exception in the 1990s was grunge guitarist Kurt Cobain, who used four 800 watt PA amplifiers in his early guitar set-up.


GNUitar is a basic free guitar effects software that allows you to turn your PC into a guitar effects processor without having to spend a single dime. Nothing much needs to be said aside from it is working as intended. Although you don't have too many options, it has all the essential effect types including distortion, reverb, echo, delay, chorus, flanger, equalizer, wah, phaser, tremolo, vibrato and noise reduction. The package comes with 2 different types of distortion and has various flavors of echo, reverb and delay. This free software works for both Windows and Linux.
When connecting more than one pickup, it’s important to follow the manufacturer’s color codes and wiring diagrams so that the phase relationship is correct. The phase relationship of a pickup is determined by the winding direction of the coil and the polarity of the magnets. The two coils of the traditional humbucker are connected in series with the phase relationship shown in Fig. 1. Most modern Stratocaster® style guitars with three single-coil pickups are supplied with a reverse wound/reverse polarity middle pickup for a parallel hum canceling effect when the guitar is switched to a two pickup position (e.g. neck & middle pickup together) as shown in Fig. 2.
You have all the control you need over your effects and you can use all three at the same time, too – ideal for those who like to create big walls of sound. The delay features a tap tempo control, whilst the FX loop connectivity allows you to hook up any other effects pedals you might have before the delay, which ensures the tonal qualities of those pedals are intact.
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In the early Sixties, Blackmore did sessions with legendary British producer Joe Meek and apprenticed with U.K. session ace (and Jimmy Page mentor) Big Jim Sullivan. Blackmore founded Deep Purple in the late Sixties and led the group through various incarnations. He also spearheaded metal icons Rainbow with the late Ronnie James Dio and has more recently played a role in Blackmore’s Night with his wife Candice Night.
Through the late 1960s, Westheimer offered a wide range of Kingston instruments including electric basses and hollowbodies (and even amplifiers). By the mid-1970s, it was becoming increasingly expensive to build guitars in Japan, so Westheimer shifted production to Korea by building a factory there, which became Cort. Kingston guitars existed in one form or another through the 1970s and even in the early 1980s, but Westheimer was finding great success building budget and entry-level guitars in his Cort factory for big U.S. guitar companies such as Kramer, B.C. Rich, and Epiphone.
The fretboard wood is used for the part where the frets are installed (front of the neck, where you press on the strings). All our fretboards are built from quality tone woods. If you're just starting out, we recommend you choose the wood that appeals to you most based on its appearance, and don't worry too much about how the type of wood affects the sound or performance of the instrument.
I always respond to these enquiries as I have played some in UK shops and like them a lot .Well designed and made though I am sure the odd duffer gets through like most imports .Trev Wilkinson did the designing ,though it should really read ,modifying ,as most are other makers basic designs,.The Les Paul lemon drop is superb judging by reviews and I loved their S types ..Worth the money it seems .I would prefer a Vintage Strat , 335 or Les Paul to the other cloned alternatives .I did buy an Epiphone Dot but after playing a Vintage 335 ,wish I had bought it instead .The ones I played were Chinese
The best way of working out which contact is which is to use a multimeter and see for yourself which contacts are connected to each other in the 5 switch positions. On the Fender-type and some import-type switches you’re given a good clue because you can actually see the mechanism or see through the switch casing. Watch this as you move the switch through the 5 positions – you can see which contact is always in circuit (the wiper) and which ones are in circuit in each position (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5). This method of visualising the switch also helps when it comes to fitting the switch to your pickguard and getting it the right way around! Now, where does the wire from the bridge pickup go again…
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If you are a beginner, you may have heard of electro-acoustic models. In the future you may want to consider one of these, as they will allow you to plug into an amplifier and project your sound across a room, concert hall or stadium (well, you have to dream big!). However, for now it’s wise to stick with a solely acoustic model, which will be cheaper and less complicated to use.
Continuing with the rock and metal theme we’ve got going, we come to the Schecter Omen 6. At the time of this writing, the Omen 6’s price on Amazon is about $50 cheaper than you’ll find anywhere else. I hope that continues long after I publish this, because the Omen 6 is an amazing guitar and finding it under $300 is a steal (and may not last long).
A few years ago I wanted a mini/parlor guitar. I tried a few, did not like what I heard in the Taylor line and I did not want another Larrivee. The irony of it is, I did buy a Taylor and now realize it was because it sounded like a Larrivee, bright and even. This is an anomaly Taylor, I know that now. I bought a Larrivee Parlor which is okay but I also have learned that I am not a parlor, mini fan. They, for the most part, do not deliver an even enough sound for me. I have played Lowden, Martin, Gibson, Guild, Olsen, Huss and Dalton. I recently played an Irvin guitar. Wow, what a beautiful line of guitars. I want one. It is my next guitar with its sustain, consistency, brilliance and ease of ...more

You might be wondering: “Why the glossy finish?” Having a gloss finish can mean the difference between your guitar cracking—or not--in extreme temperature changes.Of course, like all Cordobas, there is a truss rod with which you can change the string relief, so you’re not having to press the strings down so hard, making it easier for beginners to learn.
A hard-tail guitar bridge anchors the strings at or directly behind the bridge and is fastened securely to the top of the instrument.[20] These are common on carved-top guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul and the Paul Reed Smith models, and on slab-body guitars, such as the Music Man Albert Lee and Fender guitars that are not equipped with a vibrato arm.
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