Effects on the Spider Classic 15 are a little easier to handle than those on the Champion 20. One knob accesses the chorus, flanger, phaser, and tremolo effects, while a separate knob accesses the reverb and echo effects. This arrangement makes it easy to blend different types of effects and makes the Spider Classic 15 a little more versatile than the Champion 20 if you are interested in coloring your sound more.

Two full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by bands such as A Day to Remember (on Mr Highway's Thinking About The End, Welcome To The Family, Violence (Enough is Enough), Life Lessons Learned the Hard Way and Sticks and Bricks), In Flames, Hostility, Issues, Static-X, Bring Me the Horizon (since Suicide Season), Hellyeah, Amaranthe, Breaking Benjamin (since Phobia), Parkway Drive, Otep, Spineshank, RED, Bury Your Dead, Eye Empire, Dirge Within, Remembering Never, and occasionally Chevelle, Darkest Hour, Evanescence, 9oz. of Nothing, and For the Fallen Dreams.
Coming in as the fourth-most recommended multi-effects unit is the Boss ME-80, which is the upgrade to the older Boss ME-70. This is probably most comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X in terms of having an all-in-one, full-featured multi-effects and amp-modeling unit. But the great thing about the Boss ME-80 is that it costs nearly half what the Line 6 does! Furthermore, the Boss is a very different animal in how you interact with it, which you can pretty much tell just by looking at the two pedals side by side.

Despite their small stature, some of the smaller amps on the market still boast features you’d expect to see on much larger models. For example, many include some degree of tone shaping and equalization. This can take the form of a single knob dedicated to presence or even a three-band EQ capable of managing bass, mid, and treble. If you know you want to route your little amp through a larger speaker, or your sound restrictions are so great that your sessions are limited to headphones, you’ll want an amp that boasts a headphone output. These are sometimes standard 3.5mm headphone jacks, though some larger models boast ¼-inch outs.

This model comes in Takamine’s NEX cutaway guitar body, and features a slimline mahogany neck with 12”-radius rosewood fretboard. The result is an acoustic that plays really quickly, and is more than comfortable right up in the high frets. Ideal for virtuoso players. Takamine also use their own preamp system here, which includes three-band EQ and gain controls, mid contour switch, notch filter and EQ bypass. It all sounds great.


Chrome ES-335 diamond trapeze tailpiece. This is a short version of the standard ES-335 style tailpiece which was also used on many arched top instruments. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 3 1/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 9/32 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.

{"id": "L20582", "skuOrProductId": "L20582000001000", "categoryId":"site1AAG", "name":"Slash Firebird Limited-Edition Electric Guitar", "pageUrl":"/guitars/epiphone-slash-firebird-limited-edition-electric-guitar", "thumbnailUrl":"https://media.musiciansfriend.com/is/image/MMGS7/Slash-Firebird-Limited-Edition-Electric-Guitar-Trans-Black/L20582000001000-00-120x120.jpg", "addToCartUrl":"/guitars/epiphone-slash-firebird-limited-edition-electric-guitar", "hasFeatures":"0", "isAccessory":"0", "message":"Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.", "value":"899.00", "priceMin":"899.00", "priceMax":"899.00", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"40", "inventory":"0", "brand":"Epiphone", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"0.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"0", "reviewHowManyReviews":"0", "usedOrNew":"new", "discontinued":"0", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"1", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "Best Seller", "checksum":"565047124900", "priceVisibility": "1"}
Orville Gibson patented a single-piece mandolin design in 1898 that was more durable than other mandolins and could be manufactured in volume.[10] Orville Gibson began to sell his instruments in 1894 out of a one-room workshop in Kalamazoo, Michigan. In 1902, the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co. Ltd. was incorporated to market the instruments. Initially, the company produced only Orville Gibson's original designs.[11] Orville died in 1918 of endocarditis (inflammation of the inside lining of the heart chambers and valves).[10]

Yamaha is famous Japanese Company known for producing an extensive range of musical instruments. It has caught the attention of the beginners and intermediate guitar players due to its budget-friendly product prices. Thus, it is the excellent choice for those who are going to have a first experience of buying any guitar. They can indeed get a good deal without costing a fortune. It is also suitable for Acoustic players. Yamaha continuously produces high-quality instruments that are unconquerable when it comes to the material or even sound quality.
Gold models had single coil pickups with clear silver plastic covers and phillips head bolt adjustable pole pieces. The Upbeat model came with an optional transparent black plastic cover. These pickups appeared on Kay instruments through the late 1960s and are sometimes called “Kessel” or “Kleenex Box” pickups.[citation needed] The Jazz Special Bass has a single blade pickup as used on the K-161 and K-162 (tilted slightly towards the neck at the treble side), as well as a distinctive, oversized headstock.
Back in the good ol’ days, guitarists had to crank their amplifiers to eleven in order to obtain a nice and creamy distortion. Today, this is no longer the case. Thanks to overdrive pedals, you can basically drive every clean amp into overdrive – at any volume – and choose the amount of gain and shape the tone precisely as desired. The overdriven or crunch sounds are commonly used for rock, to slightly get that “breakup” clean tone or to play blues licks and solos. During the last two decades, guitarists found out that overdrive pedals are also perfect for boosting the crunch channel of their amps into total distortion – a technique often used during guitar solos, to give the sound that extra weight and girth – or, as with the famous Tubescreamer, to tighten up the bass response of the amplifier gain channel. The Boss SD-1 is a very popular choice for overdrive pedals, capable of great sounds. The legendary TS9 by Ibanez is also worth a mention – even considering that it’s available in Mini and Deluxe formats. And while we’re at it, why not give the Harley Benton Ultimate Drive a try? This little screamer can boost your amp into full overdrive at a very competitive price.
The one-string guitar is also known as the Unitar. Although rare, the one-string guitar is sometimes heard, particularly in Delta blues, where improvised folk instruments were popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Eddie "One String" Jones had some regional success.[citation needed] Mississippi blues musician Lonnie Pitchford played a similar, homemade instrument. In a more contemporary style, Little Willie Joe, the inventor of the Unitar, had a rhythm and blues instrumental hit in the 1950s with "Twitchy", recorded with the Rene Hall Orchestra.

Further down the Seagull line, looking at models outside of the Artist Series, the components and woods aren’t the same but we still see an impressive attention to detail. The Seagull S6 Original is a bare-bones acoustic, perfect for beginners and intermediate players. This is a guitar worth checking out if you need a solid acoustic and don’t want to break the bank.


It's always hard to rate amps when mixing high gain with vintage, boutique amps and the mass produced monsters, but including S.S. and digital technology seems to be a unrealistic stretch. That being said, this manufacturer is making some of the best sounding vintage type tube amps I've heard to date. their lineup of vintage Fender style amps are all excellent, and considerably more affordable and reliable. If you are a fan of the tweed, black and silver faced gems, you have to give Victoria a try. If you prefer something with a unique spin they make their own unique creations as well and they are all serious tone machines. In so far as tube amps go, these guys are definitely in my top five. Speaking of boutique, where is Carr?
One notable exception is a pitch shifter or harmonizer, particularly if you plan on using a pitch shift and envelope follower together as the pitch shifter may have greater difficulty accurately tracking an envelope follower-processed signal. Similarly, a standard wah pedal generally sounds best in the very front of the signal chain, but once again I recommend placing pitch shifter/harmonizer effects in front of a wah if you plan on using both together. Also, many players prefer the sound of a wah with a distortion pedal placed in front of it as this configuration can produce a more dramatic or more refined sweep depending on the distortion pedal’s tonal character (See Example 1, below).
1) Mic your guitar cabinet, running the mic signal into a simple mixer with your effect units patched in on effects sends and returns. Run the mixer into a power amp and full-range speakers, or powered full range monitor speakers (the “wet” cabinets), placed on either side of your dry cabinet. Set the effects units 100 percent wet and blend in the amount of effect you want into the wet cabs. Use a MIDI foot controller to change presets on the effects units, and add an expression pedal to control things like the output volume of the effect signal, or the feedback of a delay. For live applications, the soundman can mic your dry cabinet separately and take a stereo line-out signal from your mixer for the effects, panning the effected signal hard left and right in the PA. Guitarists such as Eric Johnson and Larry Carlton have used this approach.
Oh and you play really great sounding exercises in blues, rock and country that encourage you to noodle around and find your own riffs and leads to play over the tracks which is something that I had never really been inspired to do before with any other book. The author doesn't just throw a bunch of tired, boring, public domain yankee doodles and scarborough fairs because he is too cheap to pay royalties or some crappy tunes that a kindergardener could write but actual original pro sounding tunes and riffs. Yes, I HAVE been around my fair share of crappy guitar lesson books, thanks for asking!
Includes 9+ hours of in-depth training on all aspects of guitar. There are many variables that can impact the tone and quality of a guitar recording — from setup, string gauge, amps and pickups, to processing, effects and miking. Mark breaks it all down so you can confidently create awesome guitar tone and take your mixes, productions, performances and recordings to the next level.
Fender California Series Classic This acoustic guitar series will make you swoon with its original Fender body shapes, fully painted tops of solid Sitka spruce and matching Stratocaster-style headstocks. But the California Series Classic models don’t only have the looks; they also have the sound and tonal quality to match. We don’t expect anything less from Fender, and this lineup surely delivers.
A more successful early electric was the Ro-Pat-In "Frying Pan" guitar. This was played lap-steel style, and was the earliest I know of that uses something close to the magnetic pickups as they exist in modern guitars. This was conceptualized by George Beauchamp in 1931... he played Hawaiian style, thus the lap steel design. He met Adolph Rickenbacker and together the two worked out the details of the pickup system, and put this into production in 1932... the company name was eventually changed to "Rickenbacher".
Most guitars will have at least one TONE knob - a way to adjust the frequency spread of the signal going to the amplification system. Similar to a TONE adjustment on radios, stereos, other things; it usually is a means to adjust how much of the higher frequencies are sent to the output. Rolling the knob “back” will reduce the higher frequencies and can help make the guitar sound less “shrill” if it exhibits that tendency.
In this range, you will find many premium options. Many guitars in this range will offer some of the best features available. Again, you will find many upgrades from less-expensive models. Often, these are considered the standard models. Of course, you certainly don’t have to spend $1000 to get a great guitar. However, most guitars of this caliber will satisfy even the most discerning player. Musician’s Friend’s Private Reserve collection includes instruments that cater to the most demanding professional guitarists’ requirements.
As you will see, our list embraces outsiders, trailblazers, outliers, and Eugene Chadbourne playing a rake. We don’t worship “guitar gods,” but prefer our axe-wielders to be resourceful, egalitarian, flawed, and human. We’re not drawn to Olympic feats of fleet-fingered athletics, unless they’re used for unique and exploratory ends. We see the mewling histrionics of Jeff Beck as tyranny instead of catharsis. The name Derek Trucks is practically alien to us.
The Top Guitars specialized only in Custom Made Electric Guitars and Basses - "We will create an instrument that will delight you with exceptional tone and great playability, optimized to your personal preferences and all with the utmost quality, beauty, and rigorous attention to detail. We are experienced builders of custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks. We craft our exquisite custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks using a variety of time tested, great sounding woods, offering options that you can not buy off the shelf. We can also build for anyone that has a custom design that they would like built to their specifications. We do our best to meet your dreams continually striving for unattainable perfection.Only the best, one-of-a-kind, and built just for you! "
it is four solders on a guitar on say a les paul needs electricty so two wires pass the electricity through the other two wires are for your pickups the pickups electricity goes through the wires of them , into a potentiometer which is the technical name for the thing under the knob (or two depending on the guitars wiring) .... than into the 3 way and than finally passes out of the guitar and into an amp , pedal or tuner

The majority of favoured mic pairs seem to include the trusty SM57, but its most popular partner appears to be the larger-diaphragm MD421 — users include Bob Rock, Bruce Fairbairn, Alan Winstanley, Joe Barresi, Simon Dawson, Stephen Street and The Matrix. Also high on the list is the pairing of the SM57 with a large-diaphragm condenser of some type, and Steve Churchyard, Toni Visconti, Jim Scott, Stephen Street, and John Leckie all name-check the U87 in this role.
Updated! Now has complete information on how to set up a guitar with a tremolo bar including the Floyd Rose Tremolo System. A complete step-by-step guide to maintenance and setup of your electric guitar. This guide, packed with images, will show every aspect of essential electric guitar care such as changing the strings, adjusting the neck, and setting the action to match your playing style. It will also show you how to fix common electric guitar problems such as buzzing strings, scratchy pots and much more. Electric Guitar Repair and Maintenance is a great resource for any guitar owner. Now at a lower price!
Some solid-bodied guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul Supreme, the PRS Singlecut, and the Fender Telecaster Thinline, among others, are built with hollows in the body. These hollows are designed specifically not to interfere with the critical bridge and string anchor point on the solid body. In the case of Gibson and PRS, these are called chambered bodies. The motivation for this may be to reduce weight, to achieve a semi-acoustic tone (see below) or both.[34][35][36]

they're both excellent guitars, and for jazz-only, and a little more money, the eastman was a little better. it had a bit more acoustic volume and sounded really killer plugged in. but, the godin is the one i ended up keeping. really, really versatile guitar. the tone knob has a wide range of usable tones. really a very articulate sounding guitar plugged in, especially with the tone a little more open. i play a lot of straight ahead jazz on it, and am very happy with the sound. i have always played it with 12 gague strings on it. again, it's not terribly loud unplugged, but the sound is great, and this is designed primarily to be used plugged in.
As a beginner, you are prone to make mistakes while purchasing your guitar due to lack of experience. Many end up buying very cheap guitars that with time start developing technical issues. Being in this business for a good amount of time, we have noted some of the common challenges faced by all beginners. When you want to buy a guitar as a beginner, there are a number of qualities that should be looked into before deciding which one to buy. These factors include:

We're not suggesting you become your own handyman 24/7. If your house roof tiles are falling to bits, you'd call a pro, right? But basic setup can be done, and if you eventually need help from a guitar pro, it's good to be able to explain what your bugbear is. Guitar players and guitars are all different, and it's simply good practice to think about what you do and don't like about your treasured instrument.

The Yamaha FG830 uses a well-engineered combination of woods to create a solid body and neck suitable for pro-level performance. You simply cannot go wrong with this guitar; the workmanship of this guitar is a cut above other acoustics in its class. Owners love the gorgeous dreadnought sound, describing it as rich, resonant, and well-rounded. One satisfied customer boasted that in a room full of acoustics, his Yamaha would “float to the top” of the din.

The FR6UC's matt black flat finish and lack of bling lends the instrument a mean, no-nonsense aesthetic that would be a perfect fit for the modern metalcore player. There's an ebony fingerboard and its neck is a five-piece affair, with two thin strips of 0.5mm walnut between three sections of maple. The FR6UC's suitably rock-looking distressed pickup covers house a pair of Bare Knuckle Aftermath humbuckers with "accelerated bass response for exceptionally fast tracking of high-speed staccato riffing with crushing midrange and precise high-end articulation". The 14.7k-ohm bridge unit comprises a trio of ceramic magnets, while the neck is Alnico V with a DC resistance of 11.5k ohms. This instrument is built cleanly with excellent fretwork, as you would expect from a Japanese guitar at this price point, although it has to be noted that - considering its relatively compact proportions - it's a little on the weighty side, weighing in at 3.8kg (8.4lbs). The FR6UC's Bare Knuckle Aftermaths in full humbucking mode are perfect for a gamut of king-size-yet- articulate heavy rock tones, from Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age right through to Deftones and Slipknot. That said, the Aftermaths are by no means all about metallic high gain; back off the volume and switch to position two or four to get one of the inner coils in isolation and you'll enjoy pleasantly springy Strat-style tones. It may be none-more-black in appearance, but there's a broad range of hues on the FR6UC's sonic palette.
What people may not know is that they have a very affordable line of entry-level guitars.  This line continues the legacy of craftsmanship and prestige that comes with owning a Taylor. Whether you look into their line of Baby Taylors – 3/4 sized guitars that play better than many full-sized budget guitars, or you look into their entry full-sized acoustics, Taylor will not disappoint you.
New York City native Joe Charupakorn is a guitarist, author, and editor. He has interviewed the world’s biggest guitar icons including Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Yngwie Malmsteen, Carlos Santana, Neal Schon, and Dave Davies, among many others, for Premier Guitar. Additionally, he has written over 20 instructional books for Hal Leonard Corporation. His books are available worldwide and have been translated into many languages. Visit him on the web at joecharupakorn.com.
The two common guitar amplifier configurations are: a combination ("combo") amplifier that includes an amplifier and one or more speakers in a single cabinet, and a standalone amplifier (often called a "head" or "amp head"), which passes the amplified signal via a speaker cable to one or more external speaker cabinets. A wide range of speaker configurations are available in guitar cabinets—from cabinets with a single speaker (e.g., 1×10" or 1×12") or multiple speakers (e.g., 2×10", 4×10" or 8x10").
YP - The Real Yellow PagesSM - helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business's suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.

For my tastes, position 1 on a clean tone can be a bit too boomy. Even if one backs the volume a bit to take the edge off, it doesn't quite suit acoustic-style strumming. Position 2 is perfect for these sorts of things, though. I'd always use it for the small high chords you often find in funk and reggae. Position 2 is also a nice way thinning a distorted tone without it cleaning up too much, like Position 1 with the volume dialled down does. If you have your rig set so Position 1 screams, Position 2 will sing.
The E-28 guitar now sported a two-octave fingerboard and a Schaller adjustable bridge/tailpiece assembly, in chrome. Pickups were twin active humbuckers specially designed for Martin by Seymour Duncan. The straplocking system was also by Schaller, as were the tuners. Controls included two volumes for each pickup plus a master volume and master tone (all with black knobs sort of like those found on Rickenbackers), a three-way select, a phase switch and an active circuit bypass switch. The headstock had an ebony veneer. The cover on the control cavity was made of black Boltaron.
Martin actually got into the electric guitar business in the late ’50s when it started slapping DeArmond pickups onto some of its acoustic guitars yielding the D-18E, D-28E and OO-18E. These pickups were the DeArmond humbuckers with chrome sides and a black center in a trapezoidal hole, large pole pieces along one side and smaller poles along the other. Prototypes of the D-18E began in 1958 and in 1959 production began on it plus the D-28E and OO-18E.
Sometimes people forget that the greatest musician is not the one who can plays faster. I play guitar and I admire who plays fast, but i admire more the ones who can make beatiful music, even if it's simple. Frusciante is one of the few guys who can do so (beside Hendrix). And Frusciante could play all of Jimi's songs when he was 12 years old, and I guess he still can. So for those who compare them to Steve Vai, you should listen to music and not watch to the speed of their fingers.
The latest in a grand lineage of guitar-based Kings, Marcus [pictured, top] has - without exaggeration - the chops to bear that weighty association. Mentored by ‘Uncle’ Warren Haynes, he was personally tipped to us by Kenny Wayne Shepherd and leads a band of formidable players that seem able to turn on a dime from Miles Davis jazz jam to blues and searing Southern rock. 

Every time I guitar shop I come back to Gibson. Pricey, but the look, feel and tone are to my tastes. A lot of classic songs have been recorded over the years on these guitars. Are they superior to Martins or Taylors? It's a matter of preference. I own a hummingbird custom and the aesthetics, tone and feel are unsurpassed, but it doesn't "cut" like a Martin. For chording though, it's a better balance. I also own a J-45 which is the ultimate acoustic blues guitar.


One day I went over to hang out with a friend on Long Island’s prestigious, luxurious north shore. He was also an amateur, aspiring, guitarist, and perhaps slightly more advanced than me – after all, he wrote a solo, even if it didn’t belong to a song yet. But he was very excited when I arrived and wanted to show me something cool in the family room. When I stepped inside, what did I see strewn about the floor but a whole bunch of effects pedals surrounding his electric guitar like a battalion about to march on and conquer a fierce enemy.
A steel-string guitar tuned to concert pitch endures a tension of about 180 pounds (800 N) on the top of the guitar from the strings[citation needed]. The X-bracing system has been shown to be an efficient technique for preventing the top of the guitar from warping under this force. The braces are generally carved, scalloped and tuned to improve resonance and integrity of the guitar top, such capability being performed by skilled artisans and not readily reproducible by machine[citation needed]. This work is an important factor in determining the timbre of the guitar and a major determinant in the observation that rarely do two guitars ever sound alike, even though they are ostensibly identical in construction.
{ "thumbImageID": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Midnight-Blue/J20317000004000", "defaultDisplayName": "Rickenbacker 4003S Electric Bass Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Midnight Blue", "sku": "sku:site51423495785840", "price": "1,949.00", "regularPrice": "1,949.00", "msrpPrice": "1,949.00", "priceVisibility": "4", "skuUrl": "/Rickenbacker/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Midnight-Blue-1423495785840.gc", "skuImageId": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Midnight-Blue/J20317000004000", "brandName": "Rickenbacker", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Midnight-Blue/J20317000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Mapleglo", "sku": "sku:site51423495785745", "price": "1,949.00", "regularPrice": "1,949.00", "msrpPrice": "1,949.00", "priceVisibility": "4", "skuUrl": "/Rickenbacker/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Mapleglo-1423495785745.gc", "skuImageId": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Mapleglo/J20317000003000", "brandName": "Rickenbacker", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Mapleglo/J20317000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Fireglo", "sku": "sku:site51423495785820", "price": "1,949.00", "regularPrice": "1,949.00", "msrpPrice": "1,949.00", "priceVisibility": "4", "skuUrl": "/Rickenbacker/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Fireglo-1423495785820.gc", "skuImageId": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Fireglo/J20317000005000", "brandName": "Rickenbacker", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Fireglo/J20317000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Jetglo", "sku": "sku:site51423495785710", "price": "1,949.00", "regularPrice": "1,949.00", "msrpPrice": "1,949.00", "priceVisibility": "4", "skuUrl": "/Rickenbacker/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Jetglo-1423495785710.gc", "skuImageId": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Jetglo/J20317000002000", "brandName": "Rickenbacker", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Jetglo/J20317000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
I have a very unique Lyle guitar. It is apparently a 1972 but on the headstock it has the pearl from Gibson and it says Gibson on it as well on the headstock. It has the tail trapeze and the adjustable saddle. I recently had it set up and there is absolutely no fret buzz, it looks like it just came off the wall, stellar condition. My tech was stunned at the body condition and even the frets were like a new guitar? This is the only guitar I have seen that is definately a Lyle but it has Gibson, correctly done on the front of the headstock? I went in to the acoustic section and played a Gibson new hummingbird next to mine and it sounded cheap! I was stunned. I have no idea what this is worth but is like the perfect guitar. No dents, nicks, scratches, just and old guitar that has been babied, no warping anywhere, I think this will play another 30 years easy. If anyone knows about a Lyle with a Gibson logo and Gibson written on the headstock, please let me know
Again, if a Martin guitar needs a neck set, don't try and solve the problem of high string action any other way! Take the guitar to a *good* repair person, pay the money, and have a proper neck set done. A good neck set will make the guitar play and sound the best it can. With the correct neck set and bridge and saddle height, the guitar strings will drive the top of the guitar best, giving the best sound possible, and at the ideal playing action. And after all, isn't that what it's all about?
Very disappointed! This was a gift from Santa this morning and the amp failed miserably. Would not work at all. Not with a battery or an adapter(which by the way is not included). Amp started to smell like it was burning/melting even though it showed no power at all. Son is very disappointed to say the least and so is mommy. Only thing he wanted was an electric guitar and he couldn't even enjoy it this morning. How do I explain returning it to Santa...

Most players dream of having comfortable, smooth action on a guitar. With the PLEK, the most optimal string action possible for any instrument can be realized. This gives the individual musician an instrument that plays exactly the way he has dreamed of. Optimal playability on a guitar makes it sounds better with notes that ring true and clean. There is no fret buzz under normal playing conditions and the intonation problems that occur because of high string action, are eliminated. You can hear and feel the difference.


We can visualize the operation of a potentiometer from the drawing above. Imagine a resistive track connected from terminal 1 to 3 of the pot. Terminal 2 is connected to a wiper that sweeps along the resistive track when the potentiometer shaft is rotated from 0° to 300°. This changes the resistance from terminals 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 simultaneously, while the resistance from terminal 1 to 3 remains the same. As the resistance from terminal 1 to 2 increases, the resistance from terminal 2 to 3 decreases, and vice-versa.
A common mistake that most beginners do is buying a guitar without checking the wood quality. Many sellers deceive buyers with shiny and very attractive guitars that are of very poor quality and come in cheap prices. We can help you out of this trap so that you aren’t fooled into buying a poor quality guitar. You can visit our website before you make your purchase, and read through the specifications of any guitar. By doing this you will know the kind and quality of wood that has been used to make a guitar before you decide to buy it. So ensure you check the wood quality of a guitar before you consider buying it.
If you love the sound of both acoustic and electric guitars, but you want to play both at the same time without draping one of each over your shoulder, then an Acoustic simulator pedal is ideal. These pedals take your guitar signal – regardless of what electric guitar you’re playing and make it sound like it’s an acoustic. These are often used by guitarists on stage who want to switch between an acoustic and electric guitar sound during a set or even the same song. The Boss AC-3 Acoustic Simulator is a great option.
This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar recorded on the both pickups setting direct in and also through a valve driven Fender reverb unit. This can be used with software amplifiers such as the free fender and marshall vst plugins on this forum (there are lots of software guitar amplifier and pedal related things worth downloading on the Guitar Amp Modelling forum) or amplifier impulse response files with your convolution reverbs like Jconv on Linux or Freeverb on Windows. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them.
Never buy a guitar for its looks alone. You must buy a guitar only once you have started learning and know your fingerstyle and the genre of songs you will be playing. Most of the guitars last for more than a decade. This is the reason, you must keep all these tips in mind before buying a guitar. Look for the style of your playing before you buy a guitar. A few guitars have a thicker neck which may or may not be comfortable to you. In each brand of guitars, different layouts and designs are available. Look for the series and the design that provide you comfort while playing the guitar.

On regular occasion I have stuff come through to me after the instrument owner has already taken it to another shop that, for whatever reason, could not fix or solve the problem. This time, a supposedly professional and legitimate shop... and after the customer PAID FOR WORK THAT DID NOT YEILD THE DESIRED RESULTS. That just boggles my mind a bit. I would never charge a customer unless they are happy and satisfied with my work.
The neck, which extends from the guitar body, includes the fretboard and headstock on which the tuners are mounted. It contains a metal truss rod that prevents neck bowing and twisting, and can be adjusted to help the guitar maintain consistent pitch. The fretboard is usually made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, although some models, usually with maple necks, have a fretboard made of the same wood as the neck. Most fretboards have position dots or other markers inlaid in the fretboard. Some models have markers on the upper edge of the fretboard offering the player easy visibility.
Just SOLD #2 another fine example of the vintage 1960s era J200 copy by the great luthiers at Alvarez in the mid 1970s - the 80's WoW very well done impressive... Alvarez from over 40 years ago. This example is JVG rated at very good + 8.6/10 vintage condition with beautiful patina and character mojo as well so cool Gotta love this Beauty! This instrument has received our JVGuitars "set up" and several upgrades as well we have installed a new set of Martin 80/20 bronze Marquis strings for a crisp tone with great bass and volume as well as a Martin solid natural bone nut & a compensated saddle set custom fit into its original fully functional adjustable bridge with plenty of room for up or down adjustments to your personal taste further upgrades do include throwing out the old plastic tone robbing bridge pins for the superior resonation of solid ebony wood with brass ring and beautiful abalone inlay bridge pins and this was for tonal reasons and it looks much more high end as well, then we removed the old economy tuners of the era ( a weak point ) and installed a set of Grover tuners old holes were touched up in the process looks good and works excellent now to keep this guitar in tune and as a side benefit the added girth at headstock increases sustain as well. The medium slim profile C shaped neck is 1-11/16ths at the nut and also is pretty much the same as the 60's Gibby profile the frets are the originals as well and still playing well without buzz as per JVG set up. Truss rod is working fine and the headstock is looking cool with its Old School script Alvarez mother of pearl logo and crown design with its patina and cool old Alvarez Truss rod cove this guitar is striking as well. Great sounding like a Piano wow and she's playing with ease with excellent string action now. She retains her excellent vintage Sunburst and finish still shines nicely of course she is not new or mint it has some natural finish checking several that only adds to its Mojo along with several doinks here and there on the body and top a few that caught edge near binding on front and back not so big rather small and small paint had chipped off and so I addressed them with a fine tip matching color lacquer tip pen to touch up and to help preserve original finish integrity and looks much better as well. We also installed a replacement pickguard and it fits perfectly and looks great too. The 1960's VIBE and this instruments playability makes this an excellent choice for that SWEET Jumbo tone well crafted over 40 years ago Vintage Script Logo on headstock inlayed in mother of pearl on correct law suit era open book Gibby style headstock. Made in Japan well taken care of all these years and ready for you to enjoy another 40. Overall she is SWEET! Contact Joe to buy: jvguitars@gmail.com.

The Gibson L5, an acoustic archtop guitar which was first produced in 1923, was an early “jazz”-style guitar which was used by early jazz guitarists such as Eddie Lang. By the 1930s, the guitar began to displace the banjo as the primary chordal rhythm instrument in jazz music, because the guitar could be used to voice chords of greater harmonic complexity, and it had a somewhat more muted tone that blended well with the upright bass, which, by this time, had almost completely replaced the tuba as the dominant bass instrument in jazz music.
As stated previously, the closer 2 coils are to one another, the greater the cancelations will be when they go "out of phase". So, wiring a humbucker out of phase with itself is going to produce a lot of cancelations, a huge reduction in volume and a very thin sound. If that's not enough, the pickup will not be humbucking either. Still there are some people that like this kind of sound. The best way to put a humbucker out of phase with itself is to wire the coils out of phase in series. (see below)
T5 (2005) – Abbreviation stands for Thinline 5-way. “5-way” refers to the five position pickup selector switch mounted on the top of the guitar which activates different combinations of components in the T5’s pickup system. When hooked up to an amplification system, it’s capable of producing a variety of acoustic and electric tones in a single guitar.

I have a Les Paul Gold Top copy I bought new in the mid 70's. It has no brand name anywhere on it. I have done all the research I can and have found no conclusive results.I'm at a loss. It plays great! I do have pics. if that will help. Thanks for any help' It was bought in Montgomery Al. Clarence Carter's guitar player bought one while I was in the store so I figured ...must be a okay guitar. So I bought it. On the little square plate on the back it is hand engraved #0059. Thanks
Firebird is one of those less known, but legendary Gibson models. The 2016 version brings the core of what this bodyshape is all about, with more modern components. Even though my experience with Gibson Firebird is very limited, it’s one mighty guitar. It comes with mini humbuckers, and the sound is pretty unique. You can play anything from rock to metal on this bad boy, without being limited in any way.
Oh but this guitar is beautiful. The PRS SE A50E Angelus is something you would really want to play in front of an audience because of its stunningly good looks and the quality sound it produces. This guitar has a solid Sitka spruce top, figured maple back and sides, mahogany neck, bone nut and saddle as well as ebony fretboard and bridge. It has a distinct and highly playable Angelus Cutaway body shape. The PRS abalone bird inlays on the fretboard are a really nice touch. Yes, it’s a gorgeous, well-built guitar, but that’s not all.
A Twitter follower once asked me what electric guitar I’d recommend for a beginner with a max budget of around $200 total (for guitar, amp, tuner, etc.). So, I wrote a blog post for her where I recommended two all-in-one “starter packs” that are a great value for someone with such a low budget. The guitars in those starter packs are worth around $150, give or take.
In late 2012 I decided that I had all the modern guitars I needed. I’m not gigging much, just writing and recording. There were a couple of vintage guitars I was interested in. A Vox teardrop, especially the Mark IX, and the Fender Coronado. The Voxs turned out to be too expensive for me, especially the Mark IX, which was a 9-string beast meant to sound similar to a 12-string. Those are very rare and priced out of my range. The Coronado, I might be able to afford one day, but I’m not as interested as I was. The new reissues sell for about $700, but they’re different from the originals in several important ways.
Not many classical guitar concertos were written through the guitar history. Nevertheless, some guitar concertos are nowadays wide known and popular, especially Joaquín Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez (with the famous theme from 2nd movement) and Fantasía para un gentilhombre. Composers, who also wrote famous guitar concertos are: Antonio Vivaldi (originally for mandolin or lute), Mauro Giuliani, Heitor Villa-Lobos, Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Manuel Ponce, Leo Brouwer, Lennox Berkeley... Nowadays, more and more contemporary composers decide to write a guitar concerto.
By 1961, at least, the makeover was complete. The old mini Les Paul, the J-1, was changed to become a sunburst double-cutaway solidbody. These had widely flaring equal cutaways, a single rectangular neck pickup, a large pickguard which covered most of the treble side, a wooden adjustable bridge, covered tailpiece, volume and tone. The bolt-on neck now had a more Gibson-style open-book head shape (with round logo sticker). The fingerboard had the old large dots with two small octave markers. The J-1, in a number of forms, would survive at least through 1966, if not longer. It is presumed that the J-2 was still around and that it had also become a double-cutaway; it most certainly was still in the catalog, as a double-cut, in ’62.

Other notable effects include the tube-driven Leslie speaker series, which originally modified the sound of electric organs (such as the Hammond B3) until guitarists like George Harrison (and the Beatles more generally) began to use it for spacey chorus, tremolo, and phaser tones. The classic 60s model, the Leslie 122, was housed in a huge 41-inch wooden laminate casing and comprised of two motors (essentially two electromechanical horns) that had been rotated to create a Doppler-effect-based vibrato. These horns were, in turn, picked up by the dual speaker units. The Leslie 122 wasn’t even built to connect to a guitar, but bull-headed technicians fudged the electronics and made it work anyway. The laminate wood wasn’t just for aesthetics, either: It functioned as a partial enclosure, ensuring mellower tones, and different woods created different vibratos.
If you mean the Guitar Hero III guitar then there are two switches on the back. The one just below the neck of the guitar (It looks like a quarter of a circle.) detaches the neck so you can store the guitar AND the neck in a smaller space, and the switch towards the side of the guitar detaches the faceplate so you can put a different faceplate on, or play without a faceplate.
The following year, the company hired designer Lloyd Loar to create newer instruments.[11] Loar designed the flagship L-5 archtop guitar and the Gibson F-5 mandolin that was introduced in 1922, before leaving the company in 1924.[12] In 1936, Gibson introduced their first "Electric Spanish" model, the ES-150, followed by other electric instruments like steel guitars, banjos and mandolins.
Note that much of information and pictures are courtesy of Paul Bechtoldt and D. Tulloch's book, Guitars From Neptune", 1995. Much of this book is catalog reprints, but from it and American Guitars by T. Wheeler, I was able to construct this information. Personally I've never really actively looked for these guitars, so my knowledge base is somewhat limited. But a lot of people buy these at garage sales, flea markets, etc, and ask me about them. There doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there. This is probably because Danelectros and Silvertones are considered "low end" vintage guitars at best, and don't sell for a lot of money. So I hope this page will be of some help in their identification.
A guitar amplifier (or amp) is an electronic device or system that strengthens the weak electrical signal from a pickup on an electric guitar, bass guitar, or acoustic guitar so that it can produce sound through one or more loudspeakers, which are typically housed in a wooden cabinet. A guitar amplifier may be a standalone wood or metal cabinet that contains only the power amplifier (and preamplifier) circuits, requiring the use of a separate speaker cabinet–or it may be a "combo" amplifier, which contains both the amplifier and one or more speakers in a wooden cabinet. There is a wide range of sizes and power ratings for guitar amplifiers, from small, lightweight "practice amplifiers" with a single 6" speaker and a 10 watt amp to heavy combo amps with four 10” or four 12" speakers and a powerful 100 watt amplifier, which are loud enough to use in a nightclub or bar performance.
Of this list I think it's such a shame to see some names there and others missed but it's only a list to grab attention, not a definitive, set in stone, tablet for future generations to adhere by. But seriously where is Brian May? The man that made me want to play in the beginning. Every time I hear him hit those strings it sounds like the first time. And no Danny Gatton either. But hey that opinions for you.
But is the Fender Deluxe really as good as the name suggests? We certainly think it is! Even though it would be easy to just write it off as an electric guitar for country music, it’s actually really versatile and can be used for any other genre as far as we’re concerned. This is thanks to two vintage noiseless pickup configurations, one on the neck and one on the bridge, and a strat pickup in the middle.
The amps are interesting and also pretty much impossible to I.D. These were, of course, tube amps. Their basic cosmetics consist of two-tone tolex or vinyl covering � contrasting dark and light � arranged vertically with a wide band in the middle, just slightly narrower than the grillcloth. Cabinets had rounded edges, and, in fact, sort of look like ’50s TVs. One was a small practice amp, with two medium sized amps about 15″ or so high, and one humongous amp, complete with six 8″ speakers (which looks like the later HG-8).
{ "thumbImageID": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/L21559000004000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender Player Precision Bass Maple Fingerboard", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Polar White", "sku": "sku:site51500000219917", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Polar-White-1500000219917.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Polar-White/L21559000005000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Polar-White/L21559000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000219923", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black-1500000219923.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/L21559000004000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/L21559000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Buttercream", "sku": "sku:site51500000219915", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Buttercream-1500000219915.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Buttercream/L21559000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Buttercream/L21559000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Tidepool", "sku": "sku:site51500000219921", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Tidepool-1500000219921.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Tidepool/L21559000001000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Tidepool/L21559000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "3-Color Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000219916", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-3-Color-Sunburst-1500000219916.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-3-Color-Sunburst/L21559000003000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-3-Color-Sunburst/L21559000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
The C-series archtops were long scale until mid-1934, same as the 000 models. Sometimes a C model is converted from an archtop to a 000 style flat top. A conversion of a short scale C-2 (mid-1934 and later) won't exactly be a 000 either. The neck must be shortened to get the shallower angle required for a flat top. This amounts to about 1/3 of a fret, so the guitar ends up having a 13 2/3 fret neck. This puts the bridge position a little lower on the top, closer to the OM bridge position (but not exactly the same). The other feature on the C models that is different from a 000 is the back arch and the back braces. The archtops have more arch in the back and taller #3 and #4 back braces. Note the 1939 and later C-2 models have no abalone, the neck inlays are pearloid.
Similarly to the previous model, this guitar has a mahogany body as well as a fine looking maple top. What is more, this unit has an elegant metallic gold finish that you might like. Among the features that make it stand out, we feel like it is important that we mention its practical Alnico Classic humbuckers and the fact that it has a Rosewood fretboard. Additionally, it comes supplied with trapezoid inlays.
Re-amping a DI'd keyboard or bass can really liven up a sound, but if you don't have access to a nice amp or amp modeller, you can simulate the effect by sending the audio to a bus with a delay plug-in set to a short delay time and with the wet signal set to 100 percent and dry to 0 percent. Then send the bus's output to another bus with a distortion (or better still, a guitar amplifier emulator) plug-in inserted. This simulates the delay you get from miking up a speaker, and if you blend this in with the DI'd sound, it can give the recording a live feel — especially if you use a convolution reverb to add some 'room' ambience. You may also want to roll off the very low and high frequencies to help get rid of that DI'd vibe. Nicholas Rowland

The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.
Fortunately I did some research, performed some trial and error experimentation on my own semi-hollow (a very nice Epiphone Dot) and found what I consider to be the best way to wire up a hollow body guitar. You won’t need any uncommon tools or equipment – just a wrench set (or an adjustable wrench), plenty of wire, a pair of needle-nose pliers, a soldering iron, and a bit of patience. I’ve included plenty of pics to help illustrate each step.
The far mic will give you a bigger, more heavy-metal type of sound with a more pronounced bottom end on it. The reason for that is low end sound waves take much more distance to fully develop than high end waves. Someone once told me that a low E note on a bass guitar takes thirty-three feet to fully develop. Whether or not that is true will only be known by people who have enough time on their hands to calculate such things. I do know that if you take a tuning fork that's vibrating with a high note and stick it in the imaginary puddle of water, it will generate waves that are small in comparison, and closer together than what a low note will make. Simple physics.
This kit contains everything you need to build your guitar.  Just add your finish materials to the body and neck.  These kits aren’t just a collection of random parts- each neck has been custom fitted to the body to ensure a good, snug fit.  Includes a finished, predrilled body, fretted neck, all electronics and hardware. Wood is raw and unfinished, may require sanding and patching or other preparation prior to applying a finish.
That said, unless the beginner had a specific focus, I never have a problem recommending Line6 spider amps. Lots of options built right in (so you save a fortune on effects you may want to experiment with), and they don’t sound bad at all. I played one a few years back in a rock band and got compliments on my sound all the time, and I put nothing else in the signal path, I played straight in using one of their floor controllers at a gig. I think the whole setup (and this was the 120 watt one) cost me something like $350 bucks.
In 1974 Martin Sigma electrics included two SGs, a Tele and a Fender bass. The SBG2-6 was pretty much a straightforward SG copy with a bolt-on neck, center-peaked three-and-three head, block inlays, large pickguard, twin humbuckers, finetune bridge, and stop tailpiece, in cherry. The SBG2-9 was pretty cool, with a natural-finished plywood body, white pickguard, rosewood fingerboard with white block inlays, gold hardware and Bigsby. The SBF2-6 was a Tele with rosewood fingerboard, three-and-three head, block inlays, neck humbucker and bridge single-coil. The SBB2-8 was the bass, with natural finished body, three-and-three head, rosewood ‘board, block inlays, white ‘guard, and two humbucking pickups.
Another point to remember about ’65 Teisco Del Rey guitars. While, in reality, Japanese Teiscos were never too particular about consistency in headstock design, they at least tended to show consistency in the catalogs. The American Teisco Del Reys were even more varied, and the ’65 Teisco Del Rey catalog shows a mix of the Bizarro square Strat head (the most predominant), the new ’64 hooked design, and the older elongated Strat design. This is probably explained by the vicissitudes of stockpiles and shipping to the new American market. In any case, it makes it a bit harder to date these instruments.
The fact that his guitar playing is as relevant today and is still loved by generations (even those who weren’t even born at the height of his success!) is proof that Eric Clapton is a guitar hero in many people’s eyes. Who can forget him singing, with just his string guitar, about his late son in ‘If I Saw You In Heaven’. The overwhelming emotion is enough to send shivers down your spine.

Making their second appearance on our list, Mesa Boogie delivers with the Dual Rectifier Rackmount (appropriately nicknamed the “Racktifier”). This 3-U behemoth is simply a Dual Rectifier Head, and is one of the very few rackmounts to contain a pre-amp and power-amp all-in-one.  The Racktifier is made for those who simply want the dual rectifier sound, but have the “rack-gear bug”.
This is a rare bird. Its a early ibanez maxitone 994. It has a huge neck but plays pretty great! It has that classic MIJ tone. I can include a new Gator case for $50 extra! The neck and frets are good! The electronics are a little dirty. Ill clean them the best i can, but i thoughtit worth mentioning. It is functioning as it should be just a little dirty!

Pedals allow instant variables, with built in effects you have to dial it in every song, I can turn on a chorus on the verse add fuzz on the hook and manage combinations in real time, much more flexible. Also boutique pedals like earthquaker devices and Devi Evers create much more complex sounds within each pedal, it really helps when u are trying to cultivate your own sound.
{ "name": "Vintage Sunburst", "skuUrl":"/bass/epiphone-thunderbird-classic-iv-pro-electric-bass-guitar/h82691000002000", "status": "instock", "statusText": "In stock", "pimStatus": "R1", "inventoryText": "In Stock & Ready To Ship", "inventoryKey": "in_stock", "price": 549.00, "formatedIntegerValue": "549", "decimalValue": "00", "isOnSale": false, "easyPayOptions":"36,16,7500006,36 Months Promotional Financing,10/28/2018,0% Interest for 36 months*. 36 equal monthly payments required. Valid through,549.0,false,/pages/Gear-Card-Rewards.gc", "msrp": 832.00, "salePrice": 549.00, "listPrice": 549.00, "isPriceDrop": false, "priceDropPrice": "", "savingPercent": "0.00", "promos":["freeShipping","topRated","flexibleFinancing","guarantee","international"], "warranty": true, "freeWarrantyAvail": true, "sku": "site1skuH82691000002000", "displaySku": "H82691 000002000", "serialized": false, "stickerDisplayText":"Top Rated", "shipsFree":true, "condition": "New", "priceVisibility": "1", "scene7SetID": "MMGS7/H82691000002000_MEDIA_SET", "invMsgVendorDropShip":"false", "invMsgOverSized":"false", "invMsgBackOrdered":"false", "invMsgPreOrder":"false", "invMsgPromiseDate":"", "invMsgAvailability":"", "invMsgDetail":"", "invMsgAddOnText":"", "currencySymbol": "$", "styleImgUrl": "https://media.musiciansfriend.com/is/image/MMGS7/Thunderbird-Classic-IV-PRO-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst/H82691000002000-00-140x140.jpg", "styleImgAlt": "Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO Electric Bass Guitar Vintage Sunburst", "freeGiftWarning":false, "freeGiftWarningTips":"", "isShipsInternational": true, "pdpLoyaltyPoints":"4,392", "pdpLoyaltyPointsMultiplier":"1.0", "checksum":"345399726200", "restrictionType":"", "restrictionError":"" }
While Ujam has only been in business since 2010, their members aren’t new to VSTs or even guitar VSTs for that matter. In 2002, Steinberg released Virtual Guitarist, developed by Wizoo, and this was one of the first VSTs that brought credibility to guitar VIs. It just so happens that the man that founded Wizoo, Peter Gorgers, founded Ujam and brought along many of the members, ensuring the same level of detail.
To repair your guitar’s body, glue in any broken wings. Also, repair strap buttons that have come out and bridge holes that have been stripped by putting glue on a toothpick and applying it to the holes. When the glue is dry, you can re-insert the strap buttons or re-thread the bridge holes. You can use the same technique to repair bolt-on holes if the screw holes are stripped or are larger than the threads. If the holes are too large, just leave enough toothpicks glued into the hole to take up the extra space before you re-thread the screw.
One possible way of dealing with the g string tuning issue (my experience has involved the low e more than anything) is to wind the string on the peg so that the winding goes up from the bottom of the peg, not v.v as it is done at factory. This reduces the angle at which the string sits relative to the nut and neck, potentially reducing the problem caused by the friction this angle creates when it contacts the nut. It will likely have a significant impact on the string staying in tune over time and you don't have to worry about filing the nut. A little nut lube might help too.

© Frank Meyers and Drowning in Guitars, 2012-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Frank Meyers and Drowning in Guitars with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Amp Modeling: A multi-effects pedal does not necessarily guarantee that it also includes amp modeling. Amp modeling basically means that, in addition to effects like reverb, delay, chorus, fuzz, distortion, compression, et al. it also has the ability to sound like - or model - various tube and solid-state guitar or bass amplifiers. Amps have a tremendous impact on tone, which is why brands like Marshall, Vox, Fender, Matchless, Mesa Boogie, and many others have cult followings. Copying the true character of an amp in the digital world is admittedly a tall order, and one that multi-effects pedals are not great at; even the best ones struggle. Still, they do a decent-enough job, and you should decide if you want your multi-effects pedal to include amp modeling.

Intonation is difficult since the bridge is a bar of metal with grooves cut into the top. The whammy bar works and provides a nice warble in a limited range. Action is a bit high at the moment, and adjustment is limited to bridge height unless I shim the neck (no truss-rod adjustment is obvious). Still, the short scale and light strings make it easy to play anyway.
Fretwire can vary from some makers as it is shaped by extrusion thru a series of roller dies and the dies wear.  I have observed actual Dunlop 6105 in my shop varying from .088” to .090” wide and from .052” to .055” tall.  Due to the inconsistent size and tang formation, I generally do not use Dunlop fretwire these days, instead preferring the more accurate German made Jescar or the Japanese made Stewart McDonald fretwires.  Both Jescar and SM have very well formed tangs and barbs and are very consistent. I will refer to the Dunlop numbers below but only for very general description – always verify actual sizes!
Capacitors are typically used as filters to control tone. In most cases, they are used to filter out very high frequencies before being sent to ground (the output jack) which controls the warmth of your guitar’s tone. Capacitors vary greatly and come in a range of materials from ceramic, film, paper and electrolytic (mainly used with active pickups).
To preserve the clarity of the tone, it is most common to put compression, wah and overdrive pedals at the start of the chain, modulation (chorus, flanger, phase shifter) in the middle, and time-based units (delay, echo, reverb) at the end. When using many effects, unwanted noise and hum can be introduced into the guitar’s sound. Some performers use a noise gate or noise suppression pedal at the beginning or end of a chain to reduce unwanted noise and hum.

The EB-18 was supplied with a quality hard flight case. The EB-18 body fits into the shaped recess and the case takes account of the oddly shaped ‘lizard-looking head and large tuning lugs. There is a pair of compartments inside forcables and other items. The inside is lined with a soft, burnt orange color, fur-like material. The case is closed with four toggle latches and has a centrally placed carrying handle.


The Quebec-based Robert Godin decided to create his own music instrument company in 1972. Today, the manufacturer sells its products under different brand names: Norman (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), Art & Lutherie (entry-level guitars), Simon and Patrick (mid-range and high-end guitars), La Patrie (classical guitars), Seagull (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), and Godin for electric guitars. Some models are equipped with a piezo and/or "synth" pickups. The body shape is pretty classic, somewhere between a Les Paul and a Telecaster. Among the most famous Godin players we have John McLaughlin and Leonard Cohen. The brand catalog is sorted in different series: Performance Series, Signature Series, Multiac (acoustic/electric hybrid), Passion Series (high-end instruments), 5th Avenue Series, plus some very original single models like the Glissentar, an acoustic/electric 11-string nylon-string fretless guitar!
The Effect: The octave effect does exactly what its name says. It takes the raw signal from your guitar and adds one or more of its copies which are pitch shifted for an octave up, or down. Some models come with both upper and lower octave available, while others allow you to use as many as three octaves. One of the best examples of this type of pedal is the Electro-Harmonix Pitch Fork.

Much like any other job or hobby, building guitar pedals requires specific tools in order to get the job done. Furthermore, before you start putting together your first build, it is vital that you have a significant understanding of how to solder circuit board electronics – otherwise you may find yourself at a loss due to faulty soldering (believe me, this is not a fun issue to troubleshoot).  If you need to practice soldering, here is a helpful video.


A hillock appeared again, but at 350Hz. This is really into the human voice range now. The curve is no longer a curve, but a flat line, and the -10dB point shifted at 800Hz. the guitar will sound dark, moody, the kind of muted tone they use in clean guitar stereotypical rhytmic jazz chords. On the oscilloscope, we will barely see the small fringes of the higher order magnitude signals, and a more sine-like wave.

1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-44? Electric Guitar. 4 single coil Pickups. Great, original Black / Green burst finish. '57 Chevy style aluminum pick guard. "Shark-Fin" headstock. Rosewood fingerboard. Original 4+2 tuners with cast cover. 4-bolt neck joint with an adjustable truss rod. Bridge adjustable for height, intonation and string spacing. 4-Square pole pickups, 4 pots, 4 pickup selectors and a 3 position rotary wafer switch. Some of the pots do things and some don't either by modification or design. The rotary switch simply acts as an On / Off switch. Guitar works great the way it is, or could be configured other ways as well. We have not modified it since we acquired it 8 years ago. It's spent most of it's time in the box, until I decided to get around to listing it. Missing whammy bar as are most every Teisco we have ever owned. The bridge pickup has had one of it's mounting screws changed. The finish is in exceptional shape for a 40 year old guitar (while the photos make the guitar look black the finish is actually a dark green to black burst). Plays and sounds great. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in near new shape with virtually no wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, oiling the fingerboard, nut checked for correct height, neck angle checked, pickup heights checked and adjusted, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .008 when fretted at the first and the body (super low)) adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!) and cleaning and polishing entire instrument. This is our old shops standard $75 tune-up. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .009 strings. No case included.
Hybrid bass amplifier heads typically pair a tube preamplifier with a solid-state power amplifier. This provides the player with the best elements of both amplifier technology. The tube preamp gives the player the ability to obtain tube amplifier tone, which tube enthusiasts state is "warmer" than a solid state (transistor) preamp. As well, tube users state that tube preamps have a more pleasing-sounding, natural tone when the preamp's volume is pushed up so high that the bass signal becomes overdriven; in contrast, a solid state preamp that is pushed to the point of signal "clipping" can be harsh-sounding. Some hybrid amp heads have a bypass switch, so that the tube preamp can be bypassed, if the tube breaks or develops a technical problem. The tube preamplified signal in a hybrid amplifier head is then sent to a solid state power amplifier. Compared with tube power amps, solid state power amplifiers are more reliable, require less maintenance, less fragile and lighter in weight. A hybrid tube preamp/solid state power amp thus provides a bass player with the benefits of both technologies' strengths: tube preamp tone and solid state reliability for the power amp.

Again, as with the bridge saddle, too low of a bridge will decrease the "drive" of the strings. Thus the sound and tone will suffer. Also a low bridge is structurally not a good idea, as the bridge can more easily crack (and damage the top of the guitar). Most original Martin guitar bridges are about 3/8" tall (from bottom to the highest part of the bridge).
{ "thumbImageID": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Natural/J46217000007000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender American Professional Stratocaster Maple Fingerboard Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Natural", "sku": "sku:site51500000138952", "price": "1,499.99", "regularPrice": "1,499.99", "msrpPrice": "1,500.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Natural-1500000138952.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Natural/J46217000007000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Natural/J46217000007000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "3-Color Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000030467", "price": "1,399.99", "regularPrice": "1,399.99", "msrpPrice": "1,400.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-3-Color-Sunburst-1500000030467.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-3-Color-Sunburst/J46217000001000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-3-Color-Sunburst/J46217000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Sonic Gray", "sku": "sku:site51500000030468", "price": "1,399.99", "regularPrice": "1,399.99", "msrpPrice": "1,400.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sonic-Gray-1500000030468.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sonic-Gray/J46217000005000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sonic-Gray/J46217000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Sienna Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000030466", "price": "1,499.99", "regularPrice": "1,499.99", "msrpPrice": "1,500.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sienna-Sunburst-1500000030466.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sienna-Sunburst/J46217000004000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sienna-Sunburst/J46217000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Antique Olive", "sku": "sku:site51500000030469", "price": "1,399.99", "regularPrice": "1,399.99", "msrpPrice": "1,400.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Antique-Olive-1500000030469.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Antique-Olive/J46217000006000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Antique-Olive/J46217000006000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Olympic White", "sku": "sku:site51500000030470", "price": "1,399.99", "regularPrice": "1,399.99", "msrpPrice": "1,400.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Olympic-White-1500000030470.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Olympic-White/J46217000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Olympic-White/J46217000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000030471", "price": "1,399.99", "regularPrice": "1,399.99", "msrpPrice": "1,400.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Black-1500000030471.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Black/J46217000003000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Black/J46217000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
×