Paul Landers, of Neue Deutsche Härte band Rammstein has a signature guitar based on his custom-built guitar. It features a mahogany body with a maple cap finished in satin black with silver binding only around the front of the body. The neck is also made of mahogany and features an Obeche fingerboard with no inlays or binding. Hardware includes a hardtail tune-o-matic bridge and Grover locking keystone tuners. The guitar also feature chrome-covered EMG pickups; an 81 in the bridge, and a 60 in the neck. It also only has a single volume control and a 3-way pickup toggle switch.

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Berklee College of Music professor Thaddeus Hogarth thinks the hands and the human element accounts for almost all of what we consider guitar tone. “Providing the instrumentation and the amplifiers are above a certain quality and in the general ballpark, I think it’s safe to say that we’re talking 90 perecent,” Hogarth says. In his classes and on his blog, The Quest for Good Guitar Tone, Hogarth argues that much of a guitar player’s tone is based upon the attack more so than the sustain. “If you take away the first second of the attack of a note played on any instrument, it is often very difficult to determine what that instrument is and certainly impossible to identify who played it,” he writes on the blog.
How a guitar feels is highly subjective – after all, even guitarists come in all shapes and sizes. While the acoustics in our list are all made in such a way that most guitarists will find them comfortable and easy to play, there’s still no beating being able to try several models out so you can choose which one feels like it’s a part of your body.

Watching the short documentary posted above about Joe’s youthful experiences with MXR pedals was a real treat for me and sent me nostalgically back to those childhood days discovering pedals with my friends. I don’t know a whole ton about Joe’s use of particular pedals and such, but I’d definitely love to learn more. I do, however, appreciate how indispensable they are to an electric guitarist, especially a supremely talented one like Joe. Watching Joe’s fingers as he plays is magic, but I definitely need to start paying attention to how he’s playing guitar with his feet.
Hello everyone. Today we’re going to do a setup on a Les-Paul-style guitar. For this post, I’ll be setting up a “Burny Super Grade” guitar, but the set up is the same for most Les-Paul-style guitars. I already have a general electric guitar setup post over here: http://diystrat.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-to-set-up-electric-guitar.html, but there are a few Les Paul specific areas I’d like to go into here.
Learning guitar chords is often one of the first things beginner guitarists do. You only need to know a few popular chords in order to be able to play a huge amount of songs. This beginner’s guitar chords article will provide you with the necessary chords you’ll want to learn for both beginner and intermediate players. Before jumping into learning the chords provided in the guitar chords chart below, I wanted to first explain what a guitar chord actually is. What Is a Guitar Chord? As wikipedia defines it, “a guitar chord is a set of notes played on a guitar”. Although a
“Music is ineffable,” says Scott Waara, product manager at Line 6. His company has built a business around providing the widest range of tones possible to guitar players. But even for a firm dedicated to dissecting tone, it’s not easy to reduce things to a simple recipe. “Everybody hears differently,” Waara says, “and the frequency response of everyone’s brain is different, so some things that are cool to some guys are not going to be cool to other guys. You can put it on a scope and see what’s happening on a frequency graph and you’ll see some tendencies and trends and so on.” The trends seen by the Line 6 staff seem to indicate that warmer, fuller tones are more generally accepted and considered “good.”

Chord CG-10Classically styled guitar combo in a vinyl covered cabinet with metal corner protectors and basket-weave style grille cloth. Front control panel is recessed with retro "chicken-head" control knobs and additional features for Gain, EQ and outputs. Custom solid-state circuitry is voiced to produce authentic vintage-style clean and driven tones.•Headphone output for practice•Switchable clean and drive channels•Classic styling•Power supply; 230Vac, 50Hz (IEC)•Model: CG-10•Output: 10Wrms•Speaker; 165mm (6.5")•Controls: Gain, drive switch, volume, treble, middle, bass•Connections: Guitar input, headphones out (6.3mm jack)•Dimensions; 290 x 280 x 150mm•Weight: 4.0kg
In 2010, Gibson USA released the Slash “Appetite” Les Paul Standard as a tribute to Guns N’ Roses‘ debut album, Appetite for Destruction. It resembles the original Les Paul Standards of the late 1950s, including the 1959 Les Paul replica Slash used for the recording of the album. It has a maple top with a nitrocellulose Sunburst finish, rosewood fingerboard with acrylic inlay, and a Slash headstock graphic. It also features Slash’s signature Seymour Duncan pickups.[40] The Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash “Appetite” Les Paul Standard. Production was limited to 400, with 100 guitars hand-aged and signed by Slash himself, and another 300 finished with the Custom Shop’s VOS process.[41] Epiphone issued a more affordable version of the “Appetite” Les Paul, production of which was limited to 3,000.[42][43]
This is such a trite discussion. There are many more choices than Fender and Gibson, and to boil it down to those two players is detrimental to the industry and by extension musicians of all skill levels. Those companies made great innovations and came out with classic models, and the industry owes them a whole lot. But to me, you get more points for continued innovation, not making a few great models then resting on laurels for the next 100 years.



We’re bookending this article with two Epiphone guitars. Why? Because Les Paul was the man. And G-400 Pro was actually a successor Les Paul model from ’61 to ’68, making this guitar a true icon of rock, power, and endless sustain. With a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, this guitar has the looks and, with Alnico Classic Pro humbucking pickups, the tonal quality is excellent. 



In 1954, Fender introduced the Fender Stratocaster, or "Strat". It was positioned as a deluxe model and offered various product improvements and innovations over the Telecaster. These innovations included an ash or alder double-cutaway body design for badge assembly with an integrated vibrato mechanism (called a synchronized tremolo by Fender, thus beginning a confusion of the terms that still continues), three single-coil pickups, and body comfort contours. Leo Fender is also credited with developing the first commercially successful electric bass called the Fender Precision Bass, introduced in 1951.

Lyle guitars were some of the best COPY CAT guitars made during the LAWSUIT years - years where Lyle (made in Japan) attempted to COPY higher end American made Gibson and Fender guitars - hence 'lawsuit' guitars. There are some other companies that attempted to 'copy' American instruments but many of those were made in Korea or other countries and were not of the quality that the Japanese 'Lyle' copies of American instruments. They would have done well to make their own branded guitars - they're very well made. Another 'copy' company from that era is Ibanez - they made excellent instruments, too, and they paid quality guitarists to help them market their marque - George Benson, for example. Enjoy your guitar.
Just in...We are proud to offer this fine rare example of a Washburn vintage instrument .... This is super guitar! .. Wow talk about some beautiful exotic woods have a look at the Koa sides & back ,its a Solid Sitka Spruce top, Super high AAA grade 3 piece flamed Ribbon Mahogany & walnut neck with the Martin style Diamond Volute on back.... bone nut & saddle this is first class sound & playability & craftsmanship for a song.... Just look at that workmanship.... Great Tone woods with some ager to her now she a real Singer all right... rare to see one of these with such exotic woods makes it specially beautiful. I would compare the feel & tone and volume to that of the Old FG180 Yamaha's very similar ...Just in and its SUPER CLEAN collectors example so get her before she is gone... any questions .... ask please Thanks for your interest and looking....
While musicians intentionally create or add distortion to electric instrument signals or vocals to create a musical effect, there are some musical styles and musical applications where as little distortion as possible is sought. When DJs are playing recorded music in a nightclub, they typically seek to reproduce the recordings with little or no distortion. In many musical styles, including pop music, country music and even genres where the electric guitars are almost always distorted, such as metal and hard rock, sound engineers usually take a number of steps to ensure that the vocals sounding through the sound reinforcement system are undistorted (the exception is the rare cases where distortion is purposely added to vocals in a song as a special effect).

With Apple including their Guitar Amp Pro plug‑in in Logic, Sonar coming bundled with Native Instruments' Guitar Rig, and Ableton adding their new Overdrive plug‑in to Live, guitar‑slinging Cubase 5 users might initially feel a bit left out. But you don't have to, because you can assemble some pretty amazing 'guitar racks' in Cubase: it's just that Cubase takes a more à la carte approach, where you need to draw on the existing effects as if they were stomp-boxes. A VST audio channel in Cubase offers inserts for up to eight series effects, including an amp simulator, so you actually have more options than with many pedalboard setups. Furthermore, you can add some quality 'studio effects', like the new Reverence reverb, as send effects. So think of Cubase as 'virtualising' a pedalboard, then bringing it into the studio so that its output can go to studio rack processors.

The Gibson L5, an acoustic archtop guitar which was first produced in 1923, was an early “jazz”-style guitar which was used by early jazz guitarists such as Eddie Lang. By the 1930s, the guitar began to displace the banjo as the primary chordal rhythm instrument in jazz music, because the guitar could be used to voice chords of greater harmonic complexity, and it had a somewhat more muted tone that blended well with the upright bass, which, by this time, had almost completely replaced the tuba as the dominant bass instrument in jazz music.


Pitch shift effects, which includes harmony and octave pedals, are a lot of fun, and add depth and flavor to a guitar player’s sound. The effect works by taking the fundamental note being played on the guitar, and adding another note either above or below the original. Simply adding more notes will often produce odd, off-key notes if you’re not careful. Most modern pitch-shifting effects use advanced technology to make sure the added notes work harmoniously with the original.

Ibanez is considered to be one of the best-selling electric guitars and bass guitar brands. But, they also produce a quality acoustic guitar for acoustic guitar players. The V series is really popular for newbies, making it one of the best acoustic guitar brands for beginners. Their guitar uses mahogany wood on the neck, and back and sides of the guitar. It also includes a rosewood bridge and rosewood guitar fretboard.
In this era, as well, Gibson began experimenting with new models such as the Les Paul Recording. This model is generally unpopular with guitarists due to its complex electronics. The Recording featured low-impedance pickups, many switches and buttons, and a highly specialized cable for impedance-matching to the amplifier. Less noticeable changes included, but were not limited to, maple fingerboards (1976), pickup cavity shielding, and the crossover of the ABR1 Tune-o-matic bridge into the modern day Nashville Tune-o-matic bridge. During the 1970s, the Les Paul body shape was incorporated into other Gibson models, including the S-1, the Sonex, the L6-S, and other models that did not follow the classic Les Paul layout.

The Ring Resonator Deluxe is like having two all analog pedals in one. It contains the octave-up fuzz effect of the original Ring Resonator with added LED, push-push output pot and mini-toggle switch. With the push-push output pot down, the octave-up effect is removed and fuzz-only is achieved. In the fuzz-only mode of operation the toggle switch allows you to switch between dark fuzz and bright fuzz tones.


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The case raised concerns for musicians who lack documentation of vintage instruments made of traditional, non-sustainable materials.[50][51] However, officials from the Justice Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have stated that musicians who unknowingly possess instruments made from illegal wood would not be treated as criminals.[52]
Jazz – Does no-one listen to Eddie Lang’s recordings? Or that master of comping, Freddie Green? To Charlie Christian? MarleyIII gets special credit as the only one naming the marvellous Jim Hall, who really should be up there in one of those ten spots. Like Marley, I really like the work of John Abercrombie, although I can’t put hand on heart and suggest him for the top ten. If you like John A, let me put in a plug for the work of London session-man John Parricelli. (Which reminds me that the very different “Johnny A” is no slouch either!)
By the mid 1990s Korean instruments were rising in price as Korean labor rates and other costs went up. Many Korean and Japanese companies set up factories in Indonesia to take advantage of reduced costs there and Fender set up their Mexican factory to take advantage of reduced labor rates in a setting very close to their USA factory. With modern CNC equipment and Korean and Japanese ownership and management, it was possible for Indonesian factories to very quickly turn out good student- and intermediate-grade instruments. In my experience, however, none of the Indonesian products rival the quality of the better Japanese or Korean guitars. The new Mexican Fender guitars give excellent "bang for the buck" and in many cases play and sound better than the later CBS-made American Fenders.
Fujigen Gakki began operation in 1960 as a classical guitar manufacturer, moving into the lucurative electric guitar markets in 1962. The company was the largest producer of Japanese guitars during the 1960-1980 period. They were known for producing high quality products, especially for the badged guitar market, which is why the company was selected by so many major American brands. It wasn't until 1970 that the company began making products for the venerable Ibanez brand, which was an unqualified success. Fujigen Gakki was the main manufacturer of choice for Greco badged guitars in the 1970 to 1980 period. They also produced guitars for major manufacturer Yamaha. Badged guitars made by Fujigen include Antoria, Epiphone, Jason and Mann. Badged guitars that may have been made by Fujigen Gakki were Marlin and St. Moritz.
The kind and quality of woods and other materials, as well as features such as onboard electronics, also figure in the price of a guitar. With a well-built guitar that is made using quality materials, you can be sure to have a sturdy instrument that will last for years, as opposed to a low-end product that you may need to replace because the neck snapped.
Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]
Basic Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet All about how to play guitar chords and guitar chord charts. Once you finished the free online guitar lessons you know all there is to know about guitar. Music guitar tabs archive with over guitar chords for guitar, keyboard, banjo and viola, tabs for guitar, bass, drums, guitar note
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Players discovered that, if you put the switch in the right position, you could get the neck-and-middle and bridge-and-middle sounds. Jimi Hendrix is a popularizer of this technique, and it became popular enough that the Strat got wired stock with five-position switches. Eventually the middle pickup was made reverse wound and reversed polarity, so that neck-middle and bridge middle would effectively be noiseless, humbucking positions.
An excerpt: “Scorned, laughed at, jeered, chided, and derided. The concept of the solidbody electric guitar was subject to such utter disdain in some corners that it’s almost hard to believe it ever came to be at all. The ridicule and mockery would have been enough to send a less self-confident inventor running for the hills. Given our more than 55 years of perspective, though, we know it just had to be; a world without the solidbody guitar? Moreover, without the Gibson Les Paul? Unthinkable ...”
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