Tempo Delay: Most plug-in and hardware delays now allow you to automatically sync delay times to MIDI clock and then specify the interval of the repeats in terms of note values rather than milliseconds. A trick here is to use two simultaneous tempo-based delays with, say, a triplet delay setting, panned hard left, and a straight-note delay panned hard right. Things can get more interesting still if you apply this technique using ping-pong delays, so that alternate repeats bounce from one side of the stereo spectrum to the other. To create a true 3D effect, play around with the amount of original signal left in the middle. Depending on the intervals between your repeats, you can turn simple guitar and synth lines into complex, arpeggiator-like patterns or totally spaced out ambient pieces. Stephen Bennett
What if you could get a wide variety of sounds from your acoustic guitar, including complex effects and virtual (MIDI) instruments, without having to use an external amp? That would certainly be a game-changer, as it could essentially turn your guitar into an all new instrument, and by adding to your available 'soundscapes' without needing to be tethered to a plug, it could also convert acoustic performances into rockin' ones.
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I've been to a PRS factory and seen the precision and skill with which they are made. Their quality control is incredible: they test each one individually and make adjusments until it is perfect. They won't let a bad one get through so if you buy a PRS guitar, you are guaranteed a high quality guitar. I mean, with the high price you pay, how could they not be wonderful? Plus, they sound, feel, and look amazing. (I also got to see Paul himself; it was pretty cool. What a nice, humble guy.)
And it's not just about looking different because it does follow conventional acoustic guitar builds with its solid spruce top, scalloped X-bracing and laminated mahogany back and sides. For plugging in, it comes with the Fishman Sonicore under-saddle pickup and Isys+ preamp system, which comes standard with many acoustic-electric guitars in the market.
ESP is notable for using active pickups — as opposed to the nearly universal use of passive pickups. Active pickups make use of internal amplification inside the guitar, so that the pickups produce a hotter, louder, and richer sound. The concept is very effective, however it requires the incorporation of a 9V power supply inside the guitar. This can be a great inconvenience if the battery dies and the guitar is not playable.
Artist Studies are available that explain the specific playing style of a guitar hero or band like Van Halen, Albert King, AC/DC, B.B. King, Chet Atkins, Iron Maiden, David Gilmour, Eric Johnson, Freddie King, George Lynch, Jack Johnson, Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Joe Pass, John Prine, Keith Richards, Metallica, Megadeth, Randy Rhoads, Ritchie Blackmore, The Edge, Tony Rice, Wes Montgomery
I’m not a very good guitarist. In fact, some people would probably say I’m really awful. And that’s ok. But I’ve owned guitars. I can play a G chord. I can fumble my way through some 3-chord punk, alternative rock songs and a Beatles tune here and there. At the very least, I know a tiny bit about guitars and things. For example, I wouldn’t confuse a drum kit with a guitar, so score points for me there.
On September 6, 2018, the company announced that a global settlement has been reached with respect to the company’s reorganization plan upon emergence from Chapter 11. Under the plan, the company will be focused on its core musical instruments business with "essentially no debt." Current Chairman and CEO Henry Juszkiewicz will step down as CEO and assume the role of consultant. With immediate effect, Brian J. Fox, the company’s CRO, will oversee daily operations until a new CEO is appointed.[59]
The EG-6N had a similar profile but tuners were mounted on a square-topped head with the buttons facing up. This had a dark square-ended fingerboard with dots and a single chrome-covered pickup with black center insert and exposed poles (same as on the SD-2L/4L), volume and tone control. The EG-8N was similar except for having a light fingerboard with black dots, and two of the chrome/black insert pickups, volume, tone and threeway select. A folding stand to hold the steels was available (this was a standard Teisco product from the mid-’50s on).

Some of the smaller amplifiers that I like to talk so much about are not really that small. I mean, the Marshall MS4 Mini Micro Full Stack Battery Amplifier is anything but small, in terms of sound at least. It has a powerful volume output that is hard to ignore for anyone, be it in some bar or in the street or at some gig. The tall tower like shape of the guitar is exceptional in design and yes, while the stack is a little on the big side, the affordable price of it and the quality of tone and volume is definitely worth the little bit of a size problem. Definitely worth your consideration!
I recommend you buy your pickup new, and from a place that you trust. I am getting more and more unsatisfied with Musician's Friend(everything I order is backordered...) so after being informed that my pickup was going to be in stock three weeks from when I wanted it, I canceled the order, bought the same pickup at Guitar Center(online) and it came in by the end of the week.
Leo Fender’s simple and modular design was geared to mass production, and made servicing broken guitars easier. Guitars were not constructed individually, as in traditional luthiery. Rather, components were produced quickly and inexpensively in quantity and assembled into a guitar on an assembly line. The bodies were bandsawn and routed from slabs, rather than hand-carved individually, as with other guitars made at the time, such as Gibsons. Fender did not use the traditional glued-in neck, but rather a bolt-on. This not only made production easier, but allowed the neck to be quickly removed and serviced, or replaced entirely. In addition, the classic Telecaster neck was fashioned from a single piece of maple without a separate fingerboard, and the frets were slid directly into the side of the maple surface—a highly unorthodox approach in its day (guitars traditionally featured rosewood or ebonyfingerboards glued onto mahogany necks). The electronics were easily accessed for repair or replacement through a removable control plate, a great advantage over typical construction, in which the electronics could only be accessed through the soundholes in the case of hollow-body instruments, or by taking off the pickguard after removing the strings (in a design popularized by Fender’s own later guitar model, the Stratocaster).
The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.
When connecting more than one pickup, it’s important to follow the manufacturer’s color codes and wiring diagrams so that the phase relationship is correct. The phase relationship of a pickup is determined by the winding direction of the coil and the polarity of the magnets. The two coils of the traditional humbucker are connected in series with the phase relationship shown in Fig. 1. Most modern Stratocaster® style guitars with three single-coil pickups are supplied with a reverse wound/reverse polarity middle pickup for a parallel hum canceling effect when the guitar is switched to a two pickup position (e.g. neck & middle pickup together) as shown in Fig. 2.
Distortion effects are really like an overdrive pedal taken to another level. Many distortion pedals are simply overdrive pedals with the ability to dial in a higher gain setting (“Gain” can be thought of as the volume going into the overdrive components of the pedal). Some pedals will also have a built in equalizer to shape the tone of the distortion.
Hartley Peavey built his first amp in 1957 and decided to establish his own company in 1965. Ever since, he has been the head of one of the biggest audio gear companies in the world. Eddie Van Halen collaborated in the design of the famous 5150 amp, a legendary amp that is still heralded by today's enthusiasts. However, the collaboration stopped in 2004 and the brand had to rename its amp to 6505. Born in the 1970's under the name Vintage, and with a completely different style, the Classic series is still very popular among blues, jazz and rock guitar players. The brand has also developed solid-state amps (the Bandit series) and, more recently, some modeling amps (the Vypyr series).
Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, 5-ply top binding with pearloid outer layer, elevated tortoise pickguard with b/w binding, backstripe of two horizontal lines surrounded by two rows of diag lines (like a Style 45), bound ebony fingferboard, style 45 fingerboard snowflake inlays, trapeze tail piece, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, bound peghead, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
And how does adding a pedal, basically one more optional pre-amplification stage that you can turn on or off at your leisure, make somebody less “real”? Imagine some old-school guy is just using guitar to a (insert amp brand)? Great! I love them too. Which one? Ah, nice amp! Did they know that amp has one more gain stage than that amp over there? If I plug into that one while they play theirs, did I make them less real or genuine, or did I become SUPER-real? Are they going to start fading like Marty McFly when the outcome is in doubt at the end of Back To The Future? Will they spring back to life and start playing “Earth Angel” properly once I unplug?

Beside learning the basics, avoiding modeling amps and multi-effect pedals in the beginning will allow you to focus on the few basic effects every guitarist needs along the way – Reverb, Chorus, Delay and Compressor. Reverb is a must, and most amps have onboard reverb effects. Once you begin to get the hang of playing guitar and wrap your head around those basic effects you can branch out to other effects and modeling amps.
I'm also retarded. And my father used to beat me with my decca.... Im also the ex-ceo for decca inc. Your guitars are worth mere pennies.... litterally, Deccas were originated in the late 60s for young children to pretend to be their idols.. Deccas were packaged in cereal boxes as ready-to-go kits.. you assembled them yourself... they are made from old left over popsicle sticks.. So Im glad to put your high hopes and sleepless nights of wondering whos going to come up to you and tell you your old guitar is rare and worth thousands... Because frankly it will just never happen..
My dad has an old Norma classical 6 string from the 70s.I've been told it was a cheap brand and not especially remarkable,but his is still holding up and still sounds good.It had to have a neck repair many years ago,but still plays well.I'm not sure what the tone woods are.The neck,back and sides are dark,like mahogany,the top is very orange and kind of ugly.
This is the main component that separates acoustic guitars from electric guitars. A pickup senses the vibration from a string, transfers it to the guitar amplifier which then transfers it to the loudspeaker. There are many pickups but we’ll cover the four basic ones. The single coil pickup has a single coil of wire with two horseshoe-shaped magnets. They produce a bright, cutting sound and are quite noisy. The P90 pickup is a single coil pickup with one wide coil that increases the surface area of the strings, producing a bigger yet less bright sound. Humbucker pickups were designed with twin coils. They produce richer, warmer, more powerful sounds but roll back some higher frequency sound. Active-passive pickups use a battery-powered circuit to produce a powerful yet balanced tone across a range of frequencies. It outputs a balanced, clean tone.
But if you never play with a tone as dark as the fully-rolled off sound, you might consider a lower-value cap. The next example is an .033μ (also know as 33n and 333), another popular choice, followed by the smaller .022μ (also know as 22n and 223), and the even smaller .01μ (also know as 10n and 103). As the cap gets smaller, the minimum tone knob settings gets less dark. As the overall range of the tone pot decreases, it may be easier to locate any desired “nooks and crannies” between the highest and lowest settings.

I wish I knew what goes on in there. I'm told it is a simple cut of the laminated neck and then the tone block is glued to the back. I hope it is that simple as I am about to perform some major surgery on my 9 ply neck to acomidate this construction technique . If any body out there can lend some advise on this , please do so I don't turn my bass into a clock!
This guitar is the J Mascis signature, specifically spec’d out by the man at an affordable pricepoint. Jazzmasters will never not be cool, in part because their versatility tends to exceed expectations. Like the Modern Player Tele above, Fender leveraged much-improved Chinese production to bring this in under $500. They also opted for lesser P90 pickups compared to the expected (and usually truly excellent) proper Jazzmasters, but many players won’t notice this.
Let’s kick things off in style. This guitar is one of Epiphone’s mid range semi-hollow models. As such, it has to meet much more refined standards. Many wondered if Epiphone was capable of delivering such a guitar, but the answer is a strong yes. With its three Dogear Alnico pups, this thing is a beast. If you know how to handle a semi-hollow, you will find that Epiphone Riviera Custom P93 brings a lot of range. At least that’s the type of impression it left on me.
I agree with Squank, and I appreciate the compliment! We live in a golden age of guitar gear and I’m in the lucky position of getting to play through quite a bit of it. It’s rare that I come across an amp, pedal, or other piece of guitar hardware I truly dislike, and I can usually get a decent, useable tone out of most modern equipment. This month, I’ll share some of my thoughts on dialing in great tone on amps, pedals, and guitars.
If you really want ultimate tone and control, it’s hard to beat a w/d/w type rig. You have ultimate power and control over your tone in a rig like this. Of course, a rig like this probably isn’t going to fit in the trunk of your car! But the massive tones and ultimate control will have you running out to buy a bigger vehicle (or hiring roadies). Don’t say I didn’t warn you....

The first guitar developed was the K1 Series. Launched in 2000, this instrument had a dreadnought cutaway design and used inexpensive materials such as laminated spruce for tops, and sapele for back and sides. Kona Guitars then launched the K2 series after which it diversified, at present offering over 30 models of guitars, ukuleles, violins, and other instruments.


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But the question remains, was that environment good for the artists or for the equipment? Think of it this way: experienced chefs know very well the value of a seasoned pan or grill. Flip on any show from the Food Network and you’ll see cooks bragging about their 30-year-old griddle and how it imparts an amazing flavor to their corned beef hash. Preparing food leaves behind actual physical substances, unlike immaterial sound waves, so that comparison doesn’t work exactly. But the dirt and dust and grime could certainly effect the equipment. In a similar way, we have to ask ourselves, was that dirty studio, then, a source of inspiration or were the dirty, beer-smelling microphones actually improving the music? Regardless, the studio imbued the recording with an undeniable quality. Many guitar nuts can identify a particular instrument while listening to a song. Recording experts can do the same thing with studios.
The first step in deciphering the serial number is determining the country or facility in which the guitar was produced. In most cases the country of origin is provided in the same location as the serial number. In cases where you have a serial numbe r but not a country of origin, the origin can sometimes be deduced from the serial number, although in this case it's very helpful if you have at least a rough idea of the date of manufacture.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Earvana - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - String Instrument Finish: Brown Sunburst
Silvertone starter pack is incredibly hard to beat. The candy blue finish gives the guitar a gorgeous aesthetic that looks fully professional. The pickup selector has 5 positions, and there are two tone knobs to give even more control over the sound. Stratocaster fans will love this guitar! Also included in the set is a gig bag, small Silvertone amp, strap, 5 picks, Allan wrenches, strings, a clip-on tuner, and a tremolo bar.
Also called tuners or machine heads, these geared mechanisms, usually mounted on the guitar's headstock, hold the strings in place and allow tuning the instrument by adjusting string tension. Most modern tuners have enclosed, permanently lubricated mechanisms. Strings are held in place on posts that are attached to knobs, which are turned to adjust string tension allowing the guitar to be tuned. Some tuners are designed to lock in place. This provides more tuning stability, and helps prevent strings from slipping loose from the tuner. It also makes changing your strings a little easier.
Across the United States, there are increasing concerns from businesses about the supply of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics trained workers. Although science and math test scores in the US are among the lowest around the world, the US educational system is in the process of revitalizing the “hands on” learning techniques as a way to enhance the participation and success of students. Our project meets the needs of applied learning with the flexibility of being modular in the classroom.
Since 1946, the P-90 has been pleasing guitarists with its vintage-soaked tone, that shares qualities of both single-coil pickups and humbuckers. P-90s are primarily single-coil in their construction (although larger and flatter), and come in a range of different housings. Although they feature a relatively low output, they provide a meatier tone than a single-coil, but with a bit more sparkle than a humbucker, and are therefore very versatile. They have been put to great use in rock, blues and jazz music, with Pete Townshend, Tony Iommi, and Carlos Santana all taking advantage of the sweet P-90 tone. On our chart above, the Seymour Duncan Antiquity is a great example, but check out more P-90 highlights on the dedicated page.
Chorus: Chorus pedals mimic the effect choirs and string orchestras produce naturally, by having slight variations in timbre and pitch, by mixing sounds with slight differences in timbre and pitch. A chorus effect splits the instrument-to-amplifier audio signal, and adds a slight delay and frequency variations or "vibrato" to part of the signal while leaving the rest unaltered.[71][72] A well-known usage of chorus is the lead guitar in "Come As You Are" by Nirvana.[61]
Australian singer Frank Ifield also owned and used a Maton guitar, which he later had fitted with a custom-made scratch plate, made in the shape of a map of Australia. Frank gave this instrument to his guitarist Ray Brett when he returned to Australia, and it has been featured on an episode of the BBC programmeAntiques Roadshow. Although these guitars are now normally worth around UK£2,000, expert Bunny Campione valued Ifield’s guitar at between UK£10,000 and UK£15,000, because Ifield had used it in songs featured in a compilation album alongside The Beatles‘ first two singles.[2]

Primarily, people also use Mahogany wood to construct the guitar neck. Since it’s able to prevent the neck from warping, you’ll never have to worry about any impact that can deteriorate the quality of sound. Furthermore, the body ends up with a spruce top. In comparison with cedar, spruce is much brighter and provides better echoes through the instrument.
You don’t have to be a pro player to strut your stuff on an acoustic electric git. Beginners will enjoy the medium-low action the hybrid offers, the on-board tuner (on some guitars), and the convenience of not having to remain static on stage due to the limitations of a mic. With all that said, it’s time for you to narrow down your options with the customized lists you’ll find below!

Forget Risky Business (remember the famous scene of Tom Cruise rockin' out in his boxers?); this technique, which I consider real air guitar, is serious business. It entails capturing the airy, percussive sound of the plectrum strumming or picking the electric guitar's strings-either in acoustic isolation or combined with the ambient sound from the amp-and then mixing this sound with the recorded amplifier sound. The addition of just a little percussive plucking can enhance the presence wonderfully for any style of guitar playing. In my opinion, it's the greatest studio-recording innovation since John Bonham's distinctive drum sound.


This is basically the same as having an entire studio’s worth of gear under your feet. You have 72 amp models to play with, painstakingly recreated from reference amps such as Vox Ac30 amps, Hiwatt Custom 100, Fender amps and more. There’s 194 effects to choose from ranging from distortion to modulation to delay, compression, wah – basically any effect you can think of! There’s also 37 cabinets that you can choose from which gives each amp model and effect a unique sound as well as 16 microphones which provide unique tonal qualities to your overall sound– we challenge you to get bored of this!
It helps if you shop frequently but at my Guitar Center the tech is frequently going through guitars on the wall and setting them up so it's ready to be sold without the need for a setup. They have motivation to keep their guitars setup. I mean, have you ever went to a shop, picked up a guitar you wanted, and it had stupid high action? You're not gonna buy it until it's setup right? If they're setup, they'll play better and it'll be a lot easier to sell.
The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.
This article was tremendously helpful! My daughter is entering college for music therapy, and she is already an accomplished pianist but needed a more portable instrument to see patients. We have been scouting out guitars for some time and are looking to get a quality instrument without breaking the bank. Thank you so much for this well-researched article.
For instance, the guitars that have a solid body are the most numerous out there. These models are as sturdy as they come, but they do not offer one plenty of resonance and sustainability. If you are interested in a design that mimics the figure of acoustic units, then you should pay attention to those guitars that have a hollow body. These products are able to deliver plenty of resonance, but they might not be of great help when it comes to feedback.
Kramer served a prison sentence on drug-related charges after the MC5 split up. When he got out, he teamed up with Johnny Thunders to form Gang War and later re-emerged as a solo artist on L.A. punk label Epitaph. Smith went on to lead the punishingly loud Sonic Rendezvous Band and married New York punk rock poet, artist, singer and originator Patti Smith. He passed away in 1994. But from the Clash to Fugazi, Crass and Green Day, the politicized wing of punk rock continues to fly the banner first raised by the Motor City 5.

If you plan to use your delay in conjunction with other stompboxes, it’s important to consider where to place these effects in the chain—especially if you’re using an overdrive, distortion, or fuzz pedal. The most common setup is to place dirt before delay. This is important because it means you’ll be delaying the distorted signal as opposed to distorting a delayed signal, which will sound mushy and indistinct. Because a distortion pedal has the strongest impact on your fundamental tone, it’s typically placed early in the chain, whereas delay is usually placed toward the end of the chain so it can produce repeats of all of the effects added to your guitar sound. Of course, you should experiment for yourself to see what you prefer.
I wanna weigh in, I’m just an average player but having one of the best luthiers around and talking to them really gives you an idea of what quality your getting from a guitar. I play a martin DC 16gte, my singer plays a Chinese knock off Taylor. No one can tell the difference when he switched to the real genuine 314 CE Taylor (basically made the same way as the Chinese one), and we get no complaints about either guitar. Save your money, (buy quality) or buy the Chinese knock off and find it’s made the same and it will make you the same money playing and feel just as good in your hand as the 1000 dollar plus Taylor. Conclusions for Taylor or martin fans is don’t go name brand cause they (known or unknown) swear by them, is all personal preference, try everything in every price range find what’s right for you. My $750 DC 16gte Martin was right for me. My singer the 914ce Taylor Chinese knock off (327 bucks new) suits him better than his 1200 dollar original Taylor 314ce.
But having hot tubes is only half the recipe for getting great tone. Room sound is the other ingredient necessary for obtaining a full-bodied guitar track. It didn't take me long to figure out that the guitarists on my formative blues sessions were slyly contributing to my "education" by nudging the mics away from their amps as soon as I left the room. Thanks to their clandestine efforts, my ears opened up to an entire new world of electric-guitar sounds.
As the ’60s dawned, electric guitars began to increase in popularity again, and many distributors turned to Europe for suppliers. The Italian makers were the most successful, with EKO, imported by LoDuca Brothers, in Milwaukee, leading the pack. German makers were paced by Framus, which was imported by Philadelphia Music Company, located in suburban Limerick, Pennsylvania. The Scandinavian contingent was represented by Levin, Landola and Hagstrom, the latter picked up by Merson.
Awesome for the money! I have had my guitar for about a month now. The guitar itself is worth the money. I play on a 100w amp at church and it sounds good. Definitely not the highest quality but still a good full body sound. (After restringing it. The strings it comes with are garbage) The amp that this comes with is nice ... I actually was using it as a practice amp with my bass and it did fine. Nothing that I could play with any other instruments but definitely can hear what I'm doing. My son also uses it as a practice amp on an electric guitar and it does fine, it doesn't have any functions just meant to be an accustic amp. Definitely worth the money.
It has a wide dynamic range and a 20dB attenuator, which alongside a bass-cut filter should clear out any noise that’s not supposed to get over your guitar track. Add to this an integrated suspension to reduce any vibrations when playing on stage and you get a highly functional condenser microphone that won’t capture anything else than what’s supposed to.

Though Dennis Hartnett took good care of his ViVi-Tone instruments (mandola NMM 10809, mandocello NMM 10810, and this guitar), all three show signs of extensive use. Indentations on the bar-armature and wear to the screw-ends of the posts on the guitar pickup indicate that Hartnett also used the instrument for electric-only amplification, in addition to the electric/acoustic set up in which he left it. Hartnett's guitar is preserved with an amplifier (NMM 10812) by Webster Electric Company of Racine, Wisconsin, and an accompanying foot pedal.
Tremolo – Not to be confused with a tremolo bar (which is closer to the Whammy pedal), this effect works on volume. You can think of tremolo pedals as being like strumming a note, and then wiggling the volume knob on the amp while it’s ringing. Usually, the pedal will have controls for speed (equivalent to how fast the volume is “wiggled”) and depth (equivalent to how far the knob would be turned).

The RP360 XP lets you combine different effects to craft your preferred sound by choosing from its wide variety of options including 74 effects, 32 amp models and 18 cabinet models. Each setup can be saved into one of its 99 user presets, that allow for incredible flexibility. The interface has a bit of a learning curve, but allows for deep editing.
Overdrive can be subtle and produce warm slightly overdriven tones, think SRV. Distortion is easy to see as simply more overdrive, these tones are more saturated and compressed. The spectrum of overdriven tones is huge, from BB King’s slightly overdriven tube amp tones to Eddie Van Halen’s cranked Marshall, to Metallica’s thick distortion, to Smashing Pumpkins’ fuzz tones. It is all actually the same idea is a general sense, these tones may be gotten with amps, pedals, or a combination of both but it is all the same idea, overdrive. What was considered a heavy distorted tone in the 70’s is tame to the metal sounds of today.
when I started playing, if you wanted distortion, you "cranked up" the volume on the guitar and the amp. my old Gibson amp had reverb and tremolo. I used to play without reverb or tremolo. nowadays, in my old age, I use a little reverb for flavoring. I have pedals, but it's too much hassle to set everything up. so, I just plug into the amp with a little reverb. I'm happy and that's all that really counts. isn't it ?

There are also companies like Eastwood Guitars that are releasing their own versions of the Hi-Flier. Available for a pretty low sum, you can get Eastwood’s recreation of a Phase 4 Hi-Flier in both right-handed and lefty configurations. If you don’t find the world of vintage guitars too appealing, but you dig the look and feel of the Hi-Flier, this might be a prime option for you.
Pedals allow instant variables, with built in effects you have to dial it in every song, I can turn on a chorus on the verse add fuzz on the hook and manage combinations in real time, much more flexible. Also boutique pedals like earthquaker devices and Devi Evers create much more complex sounds within each pedal, it really helps when u are trying to cultivate your own sound.
Telecaster is considered to be the oldest solid body electric guitar in the world. Capturing that type of pedigree is not easy, but Squier managed to pull it off. Handling the Squier by Fender Vintage Modified Telecaster brought back some of the best memories of my youth, when Telecaster was the go to axe. This is definitely one guitar worth trying out.
A. Musical instruments, especially acoustic and electric guitars, are routinely pawned for short-term loans. Buyers prepared to pay cash can sometimes find high-quality acoustic guitars at pawn shops, but there are no guarantees on condition. Furthermore, the seller may or may not be able to provide any technical information or additional accessories.
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