A rivalry sprang up between Fender and Gibson, creating some of the solid-body electrics most coveted by musicians and collectors, including the 1952 Gibson “Les Paul” model with a curved top and a combination bridge-tailpiece (the guitar was designed primarily by McCarty, with input by the famous guitarist who endorsed it), the 1954 Fender Stratocaster, and a 1958 version of the Gibson Les Paul with a new “humbucking” pickup that transmitted less background interference from electrical equipment.

The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.


Developed by Martin in 1916, the dreadnought shape changed the landscape of acoustic guitars. Thanks to its punchy sound, loud volume and improved bottom end, dreadnoughts quickly rose to popularity and has since been copied by virtually every acoustic guitar manufacturer. Today, if you're thinking acoustic guitar, the most probable image in your mind would be of a Martin Dreadnought or one of its many clones.
Electric guitars vary greatly in sound, look and playability. Different designs, quality of craftsmanship, electronics and choice of woods make them sound, look and feel different from one another. It's the luthiers' goal to combine the best of these elements to create the next masterpiece. Our task is seeking and offering the finest tonewoods available to make that goal a reality.

That is true, but without the many fine guitarists of today, who will inspire the gifted musicians of tomorrow. Musicians are artists and it would be quite dull if they all copied each other and sounded the same wouldn’t it? Whether we like it or not the world keeps on spinning regardless of what we want, think or do. Enjoy the gifts that are shared today, because we’re not guaranteed a minute more.

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Description: Body: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Nut Width: 47.6mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Piranha Tooth - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 26.5" (67cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line - Bridge: Floyd Rose Special Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Jackson Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan Nazgul/Sentient - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Bright Blue - Made In: America

I agree with Squank, and I appreciate the compliment! We live in a golden age of guitar gear and I’m in the lucky position of getting to play through quite a bit of it. It’s rare that I come across an amp, pedal, or other piece of guitar hardware I truly dislike, and I can usually get a decent, useable tone out of most modern equipment. This month, I’ll share some of my thoughts on dialing in great tone on amps, pedals, and guitars.
It has been stated repeatedly that the CEO is a challenge, toxic whatever and yes, all of it is true. Many if not most people who take a management position here don't last a year. This is especially true at Corporate where at any given time half of the positions are open because employee turnover is off the charts and they are horrible at recruiting talent to get replacements hired. That's a really bad combination to have in a company. So the first question you have to ask yourself is: do you want to show a job that only lasted six to twelve months on your resume with a company that has a positive, almost cult like global brand image? Or another way, how will you explain your short tenure to the next company you interview with and make them believe you weren't the problem? When I was outside Nashville and told people I worked for Gibson 100% of them said "that's a great company" even though they had no clue. It's highly likely your next potential employer will think that way as well.
Back in the mid-60s, a desire for independence in business led to John Skewes forming a small musical instrument agency and wholesale business based at his home near Leeds, England. Over time, his new business steadily began to take off, and soon included throughput of some self-branded lines of musical merchandise. That effective early decision to carry self-branded merchandise continues to this day, with their signature Vintage® acoustic and electric guitars and basses which were first produced and sold in 1985. Today, Skewes is the largest family-owned independent musical merchandise distributor in the U.K. and the Vintage ‘family’ includes Fret King® electric guitars, Pilgrim® Banjo’s and Mandolins, Laka® Ukuleles, Encore® electric and acoustic guitars, and Kinsman® cases.
The original guitar recording preamp was almost certainly the Scholtz Rockman, but within a few years we had several sophisticated competitors (from Sansamp, Groove Tubes and Mesa Boogie) using both solid-state analogue and tube circuitry. These all include speaker emulation of some kind, though usually offer few or no effects. On the whole they are easy to use and some produce excellent results, though they have less tonal flexibility than digital systems designed to model the characteristics of a range of specific commercial amplifier and speaker combinations.
An equalizer (more often called EQ) is the device that allows you to adjust certain frequencies within your tone. The 3-band part implies that the EQ offers three points of control: bass, middle and treble. While 3-band is the standard, you can also have 2-Band EQ (which tend to offer just bass and treble), as well as 4-band EQ, 5-band EQ (low-bass, mid-bass, midrange, upper-midrange, treble) and upwards! Of course, the higher the band, the more versatility the amp offers. But 3-band tends to be the easiest to get to grips with.
One of the most versatile electric guitars we encountered when putting together our list is ESP’s LTD EC-1000 KOA. Koa is a Hawaiian wood that this guitars top is made from, and it has very special sound qualities. It makes the tone very bright, crisp and clear, but at the same time it’s full of life and depth. We immediately though that the sound reminded us of an ukulele or some other happy little stringed instrument, and the sound can easily bring us back to summer evenings around a camp fire.
Many music purists prefer analog effects. Since they don’t use digital conversion, the signal (purists argue) is less prone to loss, and is more pure as a result. It’s true that digital conversion can cause some natural artifacts of the original sound to become lost, and can sound more “processed.” However, as digital technology has evolved, this has become less of a consideration. Digital effects have the advantage of versatility and precision. Today’s multi-effects processors only exist because of digital processing; many effects can be achieved in a single unit through sheer processing power. Digital signals can also be used to control a wider range of parameters.
The overall design of the JS11 Dinky is a streamlined and straightforward, it is basically a less contoured version of the Dinky with cost-effective parts, assembled and built overseas. But don't count it out yet because many found it to exceed their expectations in terms of looks and tone. The 25.5" scale maple neck, flat 12" radius fingerboard and 1.6875" wide nut also makes it a pleasure to play, and have made life easier for both students and experienced players alike. The high output Jackson designed humbuckers are also good enough for high gain playing, although most got great results by switching them out.
The K-4L (Teisco Del Rey ET-460 Super Deluxe) had four of the large, chunky, single-coil pickups with chrome sides and black center insert revealing six square poles. These were controlled by four sliding on/off switches, plus a 3-position switch for solo, rhythm and super bass sounds, as well as volume and tone. The roller bridge had a spring-loaded muffler/mute.
To repair your guitar’s body, glue in any broken wings. Also, repair strap buttons that have come out and bridge holes that have been stripped by putting glue on a toothpick and applying it to the holes. When the glue is dry, you can re-insert the strap buttons or re-thread the bridge holes. You can use the same technique to repair bolt-on holes if the screw holes are stripped or are larger than the threads. If the holes are too large, just leave enough toothpicks glued into the hole to take up the extra space before you re-thread the screw.
This guitar has an interesting makeup of tone wood. First, the body is Mahogany just like the Iron Label model. The top of the guitar is Poplar Burl, where a burl is actually a type of growth on a tree in which the grain has become somewhat deformed. It sounds bizarre but, Burl is highly prized for its rarity and beauty and is often sought after by wood sculptors and luthiers alike.
However, amplifiers can also be quite loud. Maybe you’ve got a fancy one, big enough to make everyone in a bar cover their ears. Or maybe you don’t have one at all, and have been playing on acoustic guitar. Either way, you may not have known that you can simulate the trademark sounds of famous amplifiers using something you probably already have: a computer. Using your computer as an amp isn’t too complicated, and it opens up a world of possibilities that the analog audio world can’t deliver on a budget. Some newer practice amplifiers have headphone jacks so you can play without making a racket, but those are only starting to become widespread and the majority of hobbyist electric guitar players would rather spend big money on a good stage-ready amplifier than a mediocre one to accompany their practice amp. If you’re an electric guitar player looking for a way to practice quietly or with headphones, this is the tutorial for you. You will need: An electric guitar A computer running Windows XP or better (Windows 7 or newer preferred) An instrument cable (both sides quarter-inch and mono, same cable used to plug guitars into amps) A ¼-inch to ⅛-inch mono adapter

Also offered by Sears in ’42 was the Supro Baton Guitar Outfit, with lap and amp, except for a carved Silvertone logo on the head, identical to the Supro outfit. One other Silvertone amplifier was clearly the Supro Supreme. Another five-tube amp with a 12″ speaker was also offered, which appeared to be a Valco product, but which model is unknown. This had a cabinet covered in a “grey checked material,” and featured a round grill cut by two horizontal bars, typical of Valco designs.

All tube class A single end design Factory modded with premium components selected for optimum tone. This is Vox taking on the boutique guys and beating them at their own game. Lush rich 3D tone and with a classic Vox chime. Paired with an Alnico 2x12 and a reverb pedal you’ve got beautiful shimmering natural tone to die for. Boxed in excellent condition.
peavey marshall bass tc electronic ampeg svt bass guitar laney ashdown mag ashdown cab carlsbro ashdown abm bass amp head marshall fender bass amp behringer peaveybassamp ashdown bass 4x10 bass cab sale sales roland bass amp speakers for bass amp combo peavey for sale guitar bass practice carlsbro amp fender ashdown head amplifier ampeg bass carlsbro bass bass guitar amplifier
Rotating speakers are specially constructed amplifier/loudspeakers used to create special audio effects using the Doppler effect by rotating the speakers or a sound-directing duct. The rotating speaker creates a chorus-type effect. Named after its inventor, Donald Leslie, it is particularly associated with the Hammond organ but is used with a variety of instruments as well as vocals. The Hammond/Leslie combination has become an element in many genres of music. The Leslie Speaker and the Hammond Organ brands are currently owned by Suzuki Musical Instrument Corporation. The stompbox that simulates this effect is the Uni-Vibe pedal.
CF Martin & Co: When CF Martin & Co first started business, America only had 24 states in its union and Andrew Jackson had begun his second term as president. CF Martin & Co has seen two world wars, and huge economic peaks and troughs. The history of this guitar company is unlike any other, it’s the world’s oldest surviving guitar company in the world and the reason for so is they indeed make excellent guitars. When you own a Martin guitar you don’t just own a guitar, you own a small part of history.
On the same topic, if you do apply some compression during recording, be careful not to overdo it. At this stage, you don’t need to hear any effect, it should just transparently control peaks. If you apply the amount of squeeze that may be needed for the mix as the part is going down, it might cramp the player’s style—better to leave that for later. Plus, if the signal is over-compressed here, it may bring out the normal squeaks and finger & fret noises so much that it becomes difficult to eliminate them later—this is especially true if the player is really a guitarist who also moonlights on bass. Guitarists who try their hand at bass parts often haven’t mastered an experienced bassist’s technique for damping the strings, and the little playing noises I referred to, as well as distracting undamped harmonics, can end up overpowering the recording if heavy limiting/compression brings them up (I recently struggled mightily to deal with a bass track that suffered from this flaw).
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I want to combine an LED circuit with the 5 way selector so that it switches LED colors based on the pickup selected. Position 1 = Red, Position 2 = Purple (1+3), Position 3 =Blue, Position 4 = Green (3+5) and Position 5 = Yellow. The questions I have are: 1. The LED circuit has a 9V battery to light the LED. Would this affect the tone of the guitar. 2. I’ve also heard that this might introduce noise in the guitar circuit. Is this even possible?

Are you running it through a cab simulator? That or proper eqing. Turn up the mids and drop a high pass filter on that sucker. If you're finding it still lacking check out the KeFir cab simulator and then just use the preamp you have now. I've had wonderful results with that. If you're not liking your preamp try out The Anvil by Ignite amps. Best clean tone I've had out of freeware.

It seems like Taylor have been around forever, but compared to most big name acoustic guitar brands, Taylor are a relative newcomer on the scene having been founded by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug in 1974. They started out as an acoustic guitar company and that is their primary focus to this day and are now renowned the world over for the tone and quality of their instruments..
The Gruhn Guitars repair shop has been world renowned for decades for its unrivaled expertise, skill, and respectful repair practices. Though our full-time staff of luthiers primarily focuses on repairing and restoring the instruments we make available for sale, beginning in 2016 we are also pleased to offer our repair services to loyal customers as an extended benefit of buying an instrument from Gruhn Guitars. Instruments purchased from Gruhn Guitars will be moved to the front of our repair queue and will be repaired at a discounted labor rate. As a sign of our appreciation for your business, Gruhn Guitars is here to help you for years to come to keep your instrument in the same prime working order as when it was listed for sale at the shop.

The x99 is as Soldano as an amp can get; its purple! The X99 (a step above the 3-channel X88) is a unique MIDI-controlled preamp, featuring Tim Caswell’s innovative system of real-time-controllable motorized knobs. Modeled after the SLO, the X99 has got the Soldano character that everyone’s grown to love. If you find one, let us know! Like most discontinued Soldano’s, the X99 is virtually impossible to track down.
Looper – A time-based effect that records a “phrase” of your playing and loops it back repetitively. These phrases can play sequentially in a song-style format or overdubbed to create dense layers, as used by one-man band style performers, vocalists to beatboxers. Larger loop pedals have more than one pedal for multiple tracks and allow you to add in-built effects to your loops. Remember: If you want to record your chain of effects pedals, make sure your loop pedal is always at the end of effects chain.
If it is muted in positions all up and down the neck, and you've already tried different strings, then I think you really need to be looking at the bridge. Is there any sort of slot cut in the saddle for that string? It could be that it is just the right width to kind of kill any sort of vibration from the string. Might be worth slackening the string, lifting the string out of the slot and setting it just a mm or two to the side and tuning it up again to see if that helps. If it does, then you'll need to do something about that saddle. You might be lucky enough to be able to swap it with another string, or maybe even turning it around might make enough of a difference. To be honest it's a hard one to troubleshoot, but if you want to contact me by email about it with some close-up photos, I'd be more than happy to try to help you figure out what the problem is. Email is stueycoolTAKE-THIS-PART-OUT@gmail.com
Great post a lot of useful information here I found this old acoustic guitar made by lotus I have never heard of this brand and have been trying to research it for about a month now and haven't gotten any closer to finding out the history of it if anyone know anything about them I'm all ears it has a tag on the inside model no. LW 65 or g5 lotus made in japan thanks in advance for any information I can get
Here's a fresh one from the JVG Vault... vintage tone much like an old classic Martin Acoustic has some wear and has the "feel" just feels great in your hands and plays & sounds wonderful. Good volume and rich sounding lows and very nice.. condition rated at a solid 8.5 / 10 or better no cracks no repairs and plays nicely with original nut & saddle still in place , optional change nut & saddle & set up add $80.00. Please SEE MORE FULL SCREEN HIGH RES PICTURES HERE: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sYamahaFG140RedLableLikeFG180?authkey=Gv1sRgCIHmw573kYa6HA#slideshow/5634523767539294722.

In pop and rock music, the electric guitar is often used in two roles: as a rhythm guitar, which plays the chord sequences or progressions, and riffs, and sets the beat (as part of a rhythm section); and as a lead guitar, which provides instrumental melody lines, melodic instrumental fill passages, and solos. In a small group, such as a power trio, one guitarist switches between both roles. In large rock and metal bands, there is often a rhythm guitarist and a lead guitarist.

Pickups are meant to capture (pick up) the strings' vibration. Now, the pickup closest to the neck captures the strings' vibrations at their highest amplitude, which results in a warm sound with lots of lows. Conversely, the pickup closest to the bridge captures the strings' vibrations at their lowest amplitude, rendering a bright and sharp sound. So, the same pickup will have a different sound depending on its position. That's why most guitars are equipped with several pickups.
I think jackson (particularly the USA models) are truly the most versatile of all the high end electric guitars. The build quality is second to none as they are made at the custom shop by very experienced luthiers, the woods used are exotic and tonally superb. The hardware is the best around Floyd rose/ Seymour Duncan's and the action/playability is fantastic. All in all you feel although expensive, you feel like you're getting your monies worth. But the great thing is that they produce an incredible array of sounds which covers all aspects of musical style from the beefed up classic grind of a Gibson, to the stringy percussive violin sounds of a start and everything in between. The USA ones are expensive but I have 2 (an sl 1 and sl 2) and given the enjoyment and reliability they have given me, they owe me nothing.
The chord below (an Am) is going to be used for demonstration. Firstly, you'll notice the name of the chord labeled up the top. Next you'll see a "grid" below it. This grid represents your guitar fretboard. The 6 lines running downwards represent the six strings on your guitar with the fattest and lowest sounding string on the left hand side. The horizontal lines represent the frets on your guitar neck. The top line is the top of the neck.
You know you’re getting great guitar from the outset, because it’s based on Gibson’s legendary Dove model, which has been sued for decades now by distinguished guitarists in numerous genres, including the likes of Elvis himself. It really does look the part, with the dove design on the fretboard and pickguard, and numerous other nice little touches.
We don’t know about other early guitars, but Univox probably augmented its offerings with other offerings from the Arai catalog, similar to what Epiphone would do with its first imports slightly later, in around 1970. Evidence this might have been so is seen in the book Guitars, Guitars, Guitars (American Music Publishers, out of print) which shows a Univox 12-string solidbody with a suitably whacky late-’60s Japanese shape, with two equal cutaway stubby/pointy horns. The head was a strange, long thing with a concave scoop on top, and the plastic logo. This is the only example of this shape I’ve encountered, but it had two of the black-and-white plastic-covered pickups used on Aria guitars of the period, and the majority of later Univox guitars were indeed manufactured by Arai and Company, makers of Aria, Aria Diamond, Diamond and Arai guitars. These pickups have white outsides with a black trapezoidal insert and are sometimes called “Art Deco” pickups. Perhaps the coolest feature of this strange guitar is a 12-string version of the square vibrato system employed on Aria guitars of this era. You can pretty much assume that if there was a strange-shaped solidbody 12-string Univox, it was not the only model! These would not have lasted long, probably for only until 1970 at the latest, and are not seen in the ’71 catalog.
Reliability is one of these. There are many different parts to an electric guitar. In addition to the body and neck being put together solidly, there are the components to consider. The pickups, controls, circuitry and output jack all need to be well made and connected securely, while the bridge and tuners should function correctly, with nothing too loose or too stiff.
• Wrap around: On wrap around tailpieces, what’s wrapping around is the string. Strings are slid into the tailpiece from the front and then pass over the back and top of the bridge before making their journey up the neck. This system creates less string tension. Some players report tuning and intonation issues with these tailpieces. Others swear by them.
This is because sound in an acoustic is dependent upon the bridge, saddle, and soundboard’s (top) ability to transfer string vibration through the sound hole of the body. The top (soundboard), back, and sides makes the body of the guitar where the sound hole is designed and cut. Knowing this, you’ll not only need wood that’s strong, but wood that can offer unique acoustic properties that emphasize its ability to project differing sounds at various frequencies. Of course, your choice of strings also lends to the harmonic ranges of a guitar.
But add some effects to the blend and the results can be even more interesting. Keyboard-like tones can be generated by rolling off the tone pots and employing digital delay, expanding the sound of your band without overstuffing the van, and the gentle application of a phase shifter or wah-wah can bring an interesting voice to warm, low tones. Jimi Hendrix’s “Pali Gap” is a classic example of the latter.
Solid state amps have many advantages: they are cheaper, lighter, and require less care than a valve amps (which eventually will need new valves, for instance!). Vox, Line 6 and Hiwatt make really good solid state amps that you can gig with without worries. They are not necessarily "worse" amps. The Rolling Stones, Status Quo and many other big acts have used solid-state amps at some point. They're also quite popular with jazz guitarists.
When B.B. King heard T-Bone Walker, he "thought Jesus Himself had returned to Earth playing electric guitar." Walker invented the guitar solo as we know it, building a new style on fluid phrasing, bluesy bends and vibrato. It was the clear tone and melodic invention of his 1942 single "Mean Old World" that blew everyone's mind, and Walker refined his approach through hits like "Call It Stormy Monday." "I came into this world a little too soon," Walker said. "I'd say that I was about 30 years before my time."
When you are in Drop D tuning, the note open string is a D. This means that at fifth fret you would play a G. To get the A note (the root of the power chord) you would move up to the seventh fret. How convenient that the fifth is right next to it, on the seventh fret of the next string! Power chords now look like the following chart. Note the difference between these chords and those in the previous chart.
No matter whether you used method A or B, you can now go about measuring the neck bow. This is done by measuring the string height (the gap between the ruler/string and the top of the fret) at about the 8th fret. There is a lot of debate over how straight a neck should be, and in fact it really is personal choice, but a height roughly the same as the thickness of a B string is a good starting point. Personally, I use a 0.012” feeler gauge to do this, but you could use a B string. Simply slide the feeler gauge/B string into the gap to see if it is too big/small.

From Clean to Modern, chose from 8 amp settings, four modulation effects and four delay/reverb effects, with tap tempo. Its Hi-Fi sound can be sculpted by a three-band EQ, giving it a lovely spacious sound distribution; and special off-stage circuit gives it excellent overdrive qualities even at low, discreet volumes. Finally, its sleek designer looks will fit into any living space, especially with its soft tube glow.
Play It Loud: An Epic History of the Style, Sound, & Revolution of the Electric Guitar is just that: a swooping, all-encompassing timeline of the instrument’s early days to its beyond-essential role in pop culture and music. Written by Brad Tolinski and Alan Di Perna, with a foreword by Carlos Santana, the book dives into the electric guitar’s place in our society, tracing its evolution in sound, style, look and purpose. Here are 10 things we learned from reading:
On paper it looks fantastic for the money, but having Google'd it I found some people were less than happy with the fit & finish. But I value the opinions of my fellow MLP'ers a bit more than those found on some other forums so I'd like to hear what you all think. Aside from the electronics, which I'd replace, how is the quality of this instrument? Is it as good as the singlecut models?
The bridge pickup is a Modern Player Humbucker, which gives this Telecaster a little more “punch” than the traditional model. And like the Stratocaster, Fender's Tele design is also know to be one of the most versatile guitar in existence, capable of anything from hard rock to country and lite jazz tones. The pickup configuration of the modern player makes this a substantially heavier Telecaster, in terms of tone and resonance.
The Effect:Distortion is one of the most popular and desired guitar pedal effects, especially among rock, hard-rock and metal players, The Kinks, Jimmy Hendrix, Metallica, to name a few. Prior to the introduction of effect pedals on the market, Distortion was mostly achieved by forcing an overwhelming amount of electricity passing through a guitar amp’s valves. Nowadays this is no longer necessary. Arguably one of the most famous and newbie friendly option and at the same time prime example for a distortion pedal is the classic Electro-Harmonix SOULFOOD.
Acoustically I own a Martin for the living room. Best sound but I won't let it leave the house. (Taylor people are so defensive, but lets face it Martin owners never have to say "Oh it sounds just like/as good as a Taylor") I own an Ovation, the thing is bullet proof, a little thin on sound but can take it anywhere. If I plug it in, it has amazing electronics and sounds 10X better. I own an Ibenez exotic wood, pretty but a stiff box that just does not resonate, hate it.

Remember when I said that there were 2 amps widely used as practice amps and tools for guitar tech’s? Well, the Orange Micro Crush Mini Guitar Amplifier Combo is the other one. Warm ups before gigs, during set ups and maintenance work, this amplifier is relied upon to provide accurate sound and incredible tone anywhere, anytime. This is one of the best cheap amps available thanks to the fact it’s made by one of the most respected amplifier manufacturers in the world, powered via 9V battery and busts out some seriously amazing clean and dirty sounds.
Similar to Jackson guitars, B.C Rich is famous for their sharp jagged edges and heavy metal sounds. The influence of their hard rock and heavy metal sound spans decades. Bands such as Motley Crue and Slayer are just a few of the bands that made B.C Rich guitars such a huge staple in the world of heavy metal. When you see the shape of B.C Rich guitars, there is no doubt as to what kind of music is going to come from them. B.C Rich offers a decent selection of guitars ranging from beginner up to pro-level instruments. They even have models that don’t have that signature “heavy metal” jagged style. Most B.C Rich guitars have a mahogany body and at least some of the components are made from rosewood. Obviously, the quality depends on the price, but even their highest priced models could still use a few upgrades to really bring up the sound quality.

New in ’64 were the TG-64 (named for the year) and a matching series of solid basses. The TG-64 was essentially a Fender Jazzmaster shape with a slightly extended bass horn, the new, hooked four-and-two headstock (usually with a metal plate on the front), and best of all, our old friend the “monkey grip” handle in the lower bass bout, handed down from the old T-60. The pickguard was two-part, with one large piece under the strings and a little extension on the lower bout for knobs and jack. These had three single-coil pickups, usually the chunky, metal-covered kind with a black insert and exposed poles, although some have smaller oval metal covers with exposed poles, all controlled by three on/off rocker switches above the strings. A small sliding switch served as a rhythm mute, or lead boost, depending on your point of view.


It is a great budget guitar but not very much useful if you want to play this at an advanced level. Actually, this is an ideal and the most popular electric guitar for intermediate players; also it's suitable for the beginners. So make sure you upgrade your guitar once you master the basics of using this guitar. Find out the latest price of this guitar using the button below which takes you to the Amazon product page of this model and tells you all the information about it.

The neck and fretboard (2.1) extend from the body. At the neck joint (2.4), the neck is either glued or bolted to the body. The body (3) is typically made of wood with a hard, polymerized finish. Strings vibrating in the magnetic field of the pickups (3.1, 3.2) produce an electric current in the pickup winding that passes through the tone and volume controls (3.8) to the output jack. Some guitars have piezo pickups, in addition to or instead of magnetic pickups.

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