I've used 3 effects applications till now: Amplitube podfarm and guitar rig 5. The best software I found so far is guitar rig the sound it gives is amazing it has some pretty good presets and it has an intuitive interface I recommend trying out demos of every software to see which better suits you. I recommend guitar rig. I would suggest using a PC instead of a laptop because they're processor intensive. Anything that's part of the is series is great (i3 i5 i7). Good luck and remember to get asio4all drivers google it and get the newest drivers

With its playful old school appeal, many consider the Gretsch G5024E as a fun instrument to practice and perform with. Build quality and aesthetics are often cited in reviews, with many reports of the guitar eliciting positive response from friends and audiences. There are also reports from users who are very happy with both its amplified and acoustic sound.

The Ibanez AFC95 extends the Japanese manufacturer’s reach well into the future whilst remaining true to its roots. The elegantly styled single-cutaway hollowbody is equipped with forward-thinking appointments that extends the tonal versatility of the hollowbody further than ever before. Sublime hardware includes a delightfully nimble ebony fingerboard, whilst the ebony bridge and AFC tailpiece optimise intonation and sustain superbly.
Looking for a super-hot, aggressive metal tone? You need a dedicated high-output humbucker that will crush any amp. Whether passive or active, it’s humbuckers that dominate the heavy rock and metal genres, offering huge power, mix-cutting melodic lead tone, and noise-cancelling abilities – just what’s need when the volume and gain increase. For gigging metal guitarists, humbuckers are pretty much essential. This genre has some great affordable options that will turn any axe into a tone monster, as well as some high-end signature pickup sets from legends such as Dimebag Darrell and Mick Thomson, while the premium James Hetfield Humbucker Set from EMG is one of the best purchases a gigging metal guitarist can buy!
your right brian i been a acdc freak since u all been out in the early n mid 70s the greast band of all time. and i seen acdc 37 times through out the united states. i love my memories with the band and still watch and listen to the cds and dvds of the band. brian johnson is the best thing that happen to acdc since bond scott death. keep rockin guys i love u with a passion. mark
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Bass Type: Electric Solid Body - Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 54mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Medium - Inlay: Abalone - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 34" (86cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Mono-Rail IV - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: Bartolini Humbucker - EQ/Preamp: 3 Band - String Instrument Finish: Amber
One thing is for sure: the advantage of a multi effects pedal is getting a lot of effects in one convenient package, which you can use to learn what guitar effects you actually use on a regular basis. Depending on the type of music you play, your style, and your skill level, chances are you don’t have a need for every effect type under the sun. Pro guitarists’ pedalboards are tailored to the tone and sound they need to achieve. Perhaps fuzz, delay, and compression are crucial, but not a flanger or chorus. Point is, if you don’t yet know this about yourself, a multi-effects pedal is the most perfect and cost effective way to start. Over time, if and when your love for effects deepens, as your budget allows you can start buying individual pedals that are better versions of what’s on your multi-fx unit. The overdrive in your Zoom G3X might be good enough to hold you over, but eventually you might want to get an actual Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer.
I played power cords and picked blues sounds 15- 18 years ago and started back playing but decided to learn actual cords I never actually learned anything about strings back then my girlfriend at the time had three awesome guitars so I was able to read tabs and just play so what's a good set of strings for someone who can pick the blues but is a beginner in ways at learning actual cords I was told the guitar I have is four years old and never been restung
Boutique pedals are designed by smaller, independent companies and are typically produced in limited quantities. Some may even be hand-made, with hand-soldered connections. These pedals are mainly distributed online or through mail-order, or sold in a few music stores.[98] They are often more expensive than mass-produced pedals[99] and offer higher-quality components, innovative designs, in-house-made knobs, and hand-painted artwork or etching. Some boutique companies focus on re-creating classic or vintage effects.[100][better source needed]

By panning the distant mics to the opposite side of the mix from the close mic, you can create interesting panning effects for solos. "If it's a rhythm part, you get this huge sound because the whole thing is spread across the stereo spectrum." When double-tracking lead or rhythm parts, a useful trick is to reverse the panning of the direct and distant mics. "If there were two guitarists in a band, I would record them like that, so you got a wall of sound that had a transparency that would allow the drums and bass to come through."
Their songs cut right to the melodic and rhythmic core of great rock and roll. Johnny contributed song ideas and slashing guitar arrangements, but he also kept the whole thing on the rails. A straight guy in a world of addicts, perverts, weirdoes and psychos, Johnny’s politics were dubious. But, like Mussolini, he made the Ramones’ rock and roll train run on time for more than two decades. John Cummings passed from this life in 2004 after a five-year fight with prostate cancer.
The way that cabinet manufacturers state the power handling capabilities of a speaker cabinet (or an individual speaker) can also be confusing. An important figure for a speaker cabinet's power handling capabilities is its rated wattage-handling capabilities as "RMS". For example, a bass speaker cabinet's back panel may state that it has a power handling capacity of 500 watts RMS. This means that the speaker can handle an average power, from a power amplifier, of 500 watts. The speaker can also handle occasional peaks or "transient" bursts of higher wattages, so long as these are brief. Where is becomes confusing is that some manufacturers also list "peak power", also called "maximum power", "max power" or "burst power". Peak power is the power-handling ability of the speaker for very short bursts of high-wattage signal. The RMS figure is much more important than the "peak power" or "max power" figure. To add to the confusion, some manufacturers state the "program power" capabilities of their speaker cabinet, which can be a vague and less defined term. Reputable, major manufacturers state the RMS output and/or power-handling capabilities of their gear.
The Epiphone Joe Pass Emperor II is the signature guitar of one of jazz music’s great guitarists. Joe Pass played on records with Ella Fitzgerald, and his influence has cemented his name among the greats of the genre. The guitar which bears his name is a fine example of a guitar geared precisely towards one genre. It won’t win any awards for versatility, but it is a fantastic instrument for jazz fans of any skill level. Featuring the classic hollow body arch top design of old but with two high quality Burstbucker pickups for a range of silky tones.
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In the 1950's company called Don Noble and Co, was founded in the 1950’s by Don Noble, a well-known accordion player and entrepreneur.  He began by importing Italian made musical instruments, mainly accordions, in an era when the "stomach Steinway" was very popular and accordions were being sold door-to-door, and accordion academies were common in most larger cities. But he also imported guitars under the Noble brand name.
REGOLAZIONE DELL'INTONAZIONE (FAT20) Per garantire l'assenza di movimento, ogni selletta è provvista di una vite di fissaggio. Per regolare l'intonazione, allentare la vite di fissaggio della selletta con una chiave a brugola da 2 mm (D). Per regolare l'intonazione, inserire una chiave a brugola da 2,5 mm nella vite della selletta sul retro del tremolo.
The models in the California Series come in three Fender-exclusive body styles: Newporter, Malibu and Redondo. All of the models have a painted solid Sitka spruce top, solid mahogany back and sides as well as unique bracing patterns to deliver an articulate, highly responsive and balanced tone. The mahogany neck and pau ferro fingerboard and bridge give the guitar a rich and warm overall sound.

PICKUP CAVITIES Same basic thing here. Be careful routing as you don't want to go outside you lines. The pickup rings tend to be thin along the outter edge, so if you go outside you lines it will look like there is a hole in the body of the guitar once you fit the rings on. Determine the depth that you will need for the pickups you are using. This is usually based on the length of the mounting screws. You will need enough room for them to fit. I use a 1/4" bit for this as well. You can use a template if you want but I do it free hand because any imperfections will be covered by the pickup rings.

No matter whether you used method A or B, you can now go about measuring the neck bow. This is done by measuring the string height (the gap between the ruler/string and the top of the fret) at about the 8th fret. There is a lot of debate over how straight a neck should be, and in fact it really is personal choice, but a height roughly the same as the thickness of a B string is a good starting point. Personally, I use a 0.012” feeler gauge to do this, but you could use a B string. Simply slide the feeler gauge/B string into the gap to see if it is too big/small.
This cutoff is based on the average used price on Reverb over the past year, and while the $1000 cutoff is relatively arbitrary, it is as good a point as any to divide between entry-level gear and more heavy artillery. Here again, we are not combining wattage and cabinet size variations on the same models, which inherently decreases the ranking of any amp series with a multitude of different configurations.

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The case raised concerns for musicians who lack documentation of vintage instruments made of traditional, non-sustainable materials.[50][51] However, officials from the Justice Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have stated that musicians who unknowingly possess instruments made from illegal wood would not be treated as criminals.[52]
Sometimes, the research we do - such as this hunt for the best multi effect pedal - opens up our world to a piece of gear we did not previously know about, and yet completely blows us out of the water. Such is the case with the Line 6 M5 Stompbox Modeler. This is the second item from Line 6 that made it into our top 5 list (the other one being the high-end POD HD500X). The Line 6 M5 is different than the other multi-effect pedals on our list, as it’s the only one that can only model one effect at a time, and also does not do amplifier modeling. With the other pedals on our list, you could replace your entire pedalboard by having multiple effects active at the same time. The M5 is far more simplistic, only letting you use one at a time. You might be asking yourself why we love it so much - well, it’s not for everyone, but there’s a lot of beauty in its simplicity. Read on to see if this is the right pedal for you.
Madbean Pedals provides schematics and circuit boards so you can create your own pedal kits. As the creator, Brian, describes it, “I love making music and I love making things, so pedal building is a happy accident for me. Mostly, it came from being too broke to buy any gear. I owned and used only two pedals for about a decade: a TS-10 and a Digitech PDS-1000 Digital Delay. I used those for both my bass and guitar gigs. Even my drum gigs, I think. Anyway, rather than spend money I didn’t have, I decided it would be more fun to take a “peek under the hood” and see what the whole effects thing was about. That was about six years ago, and the obsession grows a little more every day! “
Adjusting saddle height couldn’t be easier on a Les Paul. Since the bridge can only be adjusted at each end, there is no need to adjust each saddle individually. Firstly check and, if necessary, adjust the low (thick) E string height. Do this by adjusting the height of the bridge at the thick E string end. This is done by rotating the thumbwheel anti-clockwise (counter-clockwise) to raise the bridge or clockwise to lower it. You might be able to do this with just your fingers, but chances are you will need to use pliers. Be careful if you use a tool as it is easy to slip and damage the finish on your guitar. Alternatively you can slacken all of the strings and use your fingers, although this is a very time-consuming process. Finger method
In 1950 and 1951, electronics and instrument amplifier maker Leo Fender through his company, designed the first commercially successful solid-body electric guitar with a single magnetic pickup, which was initially named the "Esquire". The two-pickup version of the Esquire was called the "Broadcaster". The bolt-on neck was consistent with Leo Fender's belief that the instrument design should be modular to allow cost-effective and consistent manufacture and assembly, as well as simple repair or replacement. The Broadcaster name was changed to Telecaster because of a legal dispute over the name.
Through the late 1960s, Westheimer offered a wide range of Kingston instruments including electric basses and hollowbodies (and even amplifiers). By the mid-1970s, it was becoming increasingly expensive to build guitars in Japan, so Westheimer shifted production to Korea by building a factory there, which became Cort. Kingston guitars existed in one form or another through the 1970s and even in the early 1980s, but Westheimer was finding great success building budget and entry-level guitars in his Cort factory for big U.S. guitar companies such as Kramer, B.C. Rich, and Epiphone.

What can we learn from these restaurant guests? The lesson is that we are very easily tricked into liking things we pay more for, even though they might not be that good after all. We get a particular feeling from thinking that we’re treating ourselves to something luxurious. If we, on the other hand, haven’t spent very much, we usually assume that it can’t be a good product.
Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.
Through the 19th century, guitars were part of a musical ensemble. As performance spaces increased in size, stringed instruments like guitars were hard to hear over other instruments, especially horns. As a result, the traditional Spanish-style acoustic guitar—wooden with a flat top, a symmetrical hollow body, a sound hole in the center, and gut strings—began to change in size, shape, and construction. For example, in the late 1890s, Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company, designed a guitar with an arched (or curved) top that was stronger and louder than the earlier flat-top design.
Later makes of fuzzes—and later generations of those above—moved on to silicon transistors. Many players found the silicon-based models a little harsher sounding, however, and the legend of the magical germanium transistors began to grow. Even so, plenty of guitarists get along just fine with the silicon variety. Eric Johnson, often credited with ears of canine keenness, has used a silicon-transistor Dallas-Arbiter Fuzz Face to drive the dirty rhythm of his famous multi-amped, multi-routed set-up. He also holds the unit together with a rubber band because he says the bottom plate’s central mounting screw affects its tone. Make of this what you will.
Using, or not using, some piece of gear doesn’t make a player more genuine, harder, tougher, more real, more natural, or better than players who do. What does make people those things is the honest pursuit of their art, the skills and experience earned from practice and performing, their genuine expression, feeling, and the ability to play something that has an effect on the listener. All of this is MUCH more difficult and real than simply choosing not to use a piece of gear.
For die-hard metal players looking for best electric guitar brands, Dean is another famous name you wish to check. The iconic ML design has become a signature instrument for rock because of Damageplan and Darrel Abbott of Pantera (late). In the ’90s, ML was revived by Dime, and then Dean stretched out the idea while sharpening the designs of it with a modern touch.

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If you’re a beginner, you may still be in the process of exploring different playing styles or developing your own. In this case, it’s best to go for a versatile guitar that can accommodate a variety of acoustic playing styles. Fortunately, the guitars on this list are also versatile players. Some, however, may cater to a more specific style. For instance, the Taylor 214ce’s bright sound and the Seagull Maritime’s wider nut make these models great for those who do a lot of fingerstyle playing.
Before Nathan Daniel started the Danelectro company in 1947, he made amplifiers for Epiphone from 1934 to 1946. Epiphone wanted Daniel to make amps for them exclusively, but he preferred to stay independent. Instead he founded the Danelectro company in 1947 and started making amplifiers for Montgomery Ward. By 1948 Daniel expanded and became the exclusive guitar amplifier producer for Sears & Roebuck. At the same time he was also supplying other jobbers such as Targ & Dinner of Chicago.
Pedalboards are just plain fun. You can mix and match any number of little boxes and really personalize your tone. We are living in the golden age of guitar pedals right now with such a huge variety of effects out there. The majority of effects fit into one of the following categories: gain (overdrive, fuzz, distortion, compression, clean boosts), filter (wahs, auto-wahs, envelope followers), and time-based (delay, reverb, chorus, flange, phase).
When you have signature models for two of the most impressive guitar virtuosos in the world, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, there’s certainly something you’re doing right. Such is the case with Ibanez. Started as a sub-brand beneath sheet music and music-product distributing company, Hoshino Gakki, Ibanez began in the 1920s, specializing in importing the guitars of respected Spanish builder Salvador Ibáñez. In the 1930s, they adopted the maker’s name as a show of respect. In the 1960s through the 70s, the brand shifted focus to making high-quality knockoffs of Fender and Gibson models, until Gibson’s parent company filed a lawsuit for copyright infringement. After settling out of court in 1978, the brand again began making original models, including signature guitars for the likes of Kiss frontman Paul Stanley (who plays a guitar similar in shape to the Iceman pictured above) and Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead. Now they specialize in precision instruments for musicians who like their music loud, hard, and fast.
Let me shoot you some names Mr Pro Guitar player. When those you mention can play with the likes of Jack Pearson you can put them on a list. You didn’t even touch on country or bluegrass so I have to assume you know nothing about them. So let me throw this out there. There is only ONE called Mr. Guitar. Chet Atkins. His protege, Jerry Reed is another great. Let’s try Merle Travis, Jody Maphis and in recent years Redd Volkaert. I think you need to expand your listening radius. Let’s not forget the man who likely has his name on your guitar, Mr. Les Paul. Then I would ask you listen to bluegrass flatpicking. You want speed? These guys can play with Ygnwgie and do it on a Martin D28.

The Givson Guitar Corporation makes guitars which sell under various brand names and are considered as among the best guitar brands on the planet. The company is famous to have devised the arch top guitar and created a few of the most iconic instruments in guitar history. Some iconic versions are the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES 175 as well as the Firebird. The Les Paul Melody Maker is a popular model amongst many guitarists in different countries.
hey guys im just curious as i just got back from a music store that had to basses from two different brands (local luthiers) and they were virtually the same (5 string, j pickups, Aggie 3 band mahogany body, set neck) the only difference was one had a alder tone block, i personally couldn't hear a difference but the owner of said shop said tone wise it makes a huge difference, any thoughts?
For example, bass guitar frequencies are on the relatively low end of the tonal spectrum. However, plucking a bass string can create a sudden, short burst of high and mid-frequency sounds. You need your bass amp to be loud enough to make those low-frequency sounds strong and audible in the mix, but you don’t want to flatten your band mates or blow out your speakers by sudden pops of high-frequency sounds.
The Supro line continued to grow in 1938, as can be seen in the CMI catalog. Still around was the Supro Spanish Guitar, now called the Supro Avalon Spanish Guitar, other than the name change (which is not featured on the guitar, as far I can ascertain), it is identical. Gone are the wood-bodied, frumpy-pear Supro Hawaiian Model and the Model D amplifier, although a Supro Special amplifier is mentioned (and not described) as being available for $40, the same price as the Model D. One and the same?
There’s a huge range of cheap electric guitars out there that would not look out of place on the stages of the world thanks to high quality manufacturing and the brands actually caring about their products – “cheap” does not always mean poor quality and plenty of guitars out there will give you a fantastic playing experience for many years without breaking the bank.

I personally could not play any of my songs as they currently stand on Amber and that influences my review a lot.  And while I like pushing away from open chords, power chords, and standard major/minor barre chords, I think a strumming/chord focused VSTs should be able to play a Cadd9/A with a capo on the second fret. That’s not even a complex or difficult chord to play (Guitar tab = 5x055).
Mijn first guitar was a Epiphone by gibson sg, it was all right, then I got my gibson sg special(Around 550e), really good guitar, huge difference with the Epiphone. My next was, believe it or not another Epiphone, a Casino limited edition with bigsby, best price/quiality guitar ever(I paid 430e), beautiful guitar, and next week I’m getting a Fender Telecaster American vintage 58′(1755e), I’m very excited about it. I also own a Fender jazz bass classic 70s, it’s a mexican which plays like an american, very proud of this bass. First rate guitars are normally the best, you pay for the quality of the materials and the workmanship and experience, but there are exceptions with second range guitars, you can get very good ones, just good models or plainly good guitars, it’s nice to own both kind of guitars.

If you are a beginner then you probably don't know what a ‘floating tremolo' is. Have a look at Floyd Rose, who made the first models. If you are looking at a guitar that has little tuners on the bridge, then it's probably a floating tremolo. For a beginner, they are a total pain in the butt. They are very hard to tune and a real pain to change strings. The cheaper ones go out of tune a lot too. If you know why you want one, then fine, but locking tremolos on budget instruments are usually rubbish, so stay clear of those for now!
Epiphone currently produces several models of the Les Paul including the entry level “Les Paul Special II”, which is generally made of a basswood body and a veneered top, a bolt-on neck (with dot inlays instead of the usual trapezoid inlays), lacks a binding, and has simplified electronics.[25] The next model up is the “Les Paul 100”, which costs approximately $US300, has similar features but it has the standard Les Paul wiring, mahogany body and a higher-quality paint job. The Epiphone Les Paul Studio is the least expensive Les Paul model to have a carved top and a set neck (features considered central to the feel and sound of more expensive Les Paul models), and is between $350–$400 depending on features and finish. The standard models are the “Les Paul Standard Plain Top” and the “Les Paul Standard Plus Top”. They cost $US550 and $US650 respectively. They both feature a solid mahogany body with a maple veneer and carved top; the “Plus” model includes a “flamed” maple finish while the “Plain” top is unfigured.[26]
Paul has been great to work with, he's flexible, and knowledgeable on what works best for our son. Plus our lessons are in the comfort of our home! He always communicates with us on how our son is doing and if he needs to practice more, so he can show improvement on learning notes. Paul also purchased a bass guitar so he can work with our son on learning the bass as well. I also asked if he can help us shop and pick out a reasonable amp and he agreed to help out and suggested a few places to shop at. Working with Paul has made this experience easy as I was worried of finding a good fit for our son. I would recommend Paul to anyone and you can't beat his rate!
Description: Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Floyd Rose Speedloader - Bridge Construction: Maple - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: ESP Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Dimarzio Crunchlab 7/LiquiFire 7 - String Instrument Finish: See-Thru Black
Johnny Marr: I'd already played a couple of shows before that with a couple of bands. I'd been in a couple of bands before I met Andy, even though I was fourteen or fifteen at the time. We met in school, Andy and I. I'd been playing in these little kid's kinds of bands at twelve and thirteen. When I got to fourteen and fifteen, I got invited to play in a couple of bands with much older guys.

Note that the information presented in this article is for reference purposes only. Amplified Parts makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this article, and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions on the part of the author. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose, is given with respect to the contents of this article or its links to other resources.


What type of environment are you playing in? This is an important consideration when determining how many watts your amp should have. If you practice in an apartment surrounded by neighbors, a low wattage combo option is going to minimize potential conflicts. If you play live gigs in small club environments, it is possible to get by with as little as 50 watts. Larger venues require a larger amp that can move more air with its speaker. You should also take in to account how many other musicians you are playing with, and if there is a second guitarist, as you will want a tone cuts through the mix as opposed to getting buried.
Finally the ease and portability of the small amp will allow you so much more flexibility with when and where you can practice. Just weighing a couple of pounds is already a great advantage over the rest of the amps available on the market. And being able to take it on road trips, travel trips, backpacking trips (for a bit of extra buck, we all have thought of doing it) means you can practice anywhere, any time. Small storage requirement means a great storing capability where you don’t have to worry about taking up too much space in your tiny room or apartment. It is great stuff, honestly.

The guitar is hand-made by Martin's top luthiers, using exotic cocobolo wood for the back and sides, mixed with a more conventional solid sitka spruce top. As expected from a high-end instrument, this guitar features impressive visual appointments, most notable of which is its ivoroid binding, beautiful rosette and fretboard inlays. While its price tag and looks may push you to just hide this guitar in the closet, know that this instrument is built to make music in the road or in the studio. Martin employed modern bracing and construction techniques to ensure the guitar stays reliable, beautiful and great sounding for a long time. Those that are lucky enough to own this guitar have themselves a treasure that they can pass down to the next generation of players.
8dio sampled a 200-year-old Italian made mandolin to create a gorgeous sounding VST that simply rules, and will fool even the most well-trained ears into thinking it’s the real deal.  Like with the others in the series, we have our usual clean legato, artifacts, effects, tremolos, mutes — basically, you have everything you need to get the job done 99% of the time.

One step up is the combination of a treble cut and a bass cut, with a single knob to select between them, like the one in the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff (Figure 2). The knob selects a blend of highs left over from the bass cut side and lows left over from the treble cut side. If you make the cut frequencies of the treble and bass sides far apart, you get a persistent midrange scoop, as in the original Big Muff. You can also have the bass and treble sides overlap in the middle and get a midrange hump in response. The near-endless variations you can get by tinkering with the relative values of the parts and the need for only one knob make this a favorite in effects.
Before I start, I want to mention a few things about this particular guitar. It looks and (potentially) sounds great. The neck plays well too, but it has some tuning problems and buzzes a bit more than I’d like. The tuning problems are coming from two areas. Firstly the nut slots are too tight, made evident by the strings making a pinging noise when they are tuned up or down. This means that it is difficult to fine tune, as the string’s pitch tends to “jump” up or down. The second reason for the tuning issues is that the intonation is way out. By that I mean that the saddles’ forwards/backwards positions are not set up well, and so when the open strings are correctly tuned, and we then play up the neck, it suddenly seems out of tune again.

Many artists discovered that the 3-way pickup selector could be lodged in between settings (often using objects such as matchsticks or toothpicks to wedge it in position) for further tonal variety, resulting in a unique sound when two pickups are combined. Jimi Hendrix would also move the switch across the settings while sustaining a note, creating a characteristic ‘wobbly’ sound, similar to that created by the wah-wah pedal. This effect can be heard in the Woodstock recording of Star Spangled Banner. Since 1977, the Stratocaster has been fitted with a 5-way switch to make such switching more stable. This switch is the same electrically as the original 3-way, but with extra detents for the in-between settings. Other subtle changes were also made to the guitars over the years, but the basic shape and features of the Strat have remained unchanged. In the 1970s and 1980s, some guitarists began modifying their Stratocasters with humbucking pickups, especially in the bridge position, to create what became known as a Fat Strat. This was intended to provide a thicker tone preferred in the heavier styles of hard rock and heavy metal. The popularity of this modification grew and eventually Fender began manufacturing models with a bridge humbucker option (HSS), denoted and separated from the original triple single coil by the title of “Fat Strat“, as a reference to the humbucker’s distinct sound, as well as models with dual humbuckers (HH), better known as “Double Fat Strats“. Fender also started making Stratocaster pickguards specially designed for guitar bodies routed for HSH (humbucker-single-humbucker) and HHH (humbucker-humbucker-humbucker) pickup configurations.


But what about the Les Paul devotees like Jimmy Page, Zakk Wylde and Bob Marley? Is it possible that the Les Paul is as enduring and adaptable as the Strat? Um… Yes! Each guitar style has its own rich history of players and possibilities, and with a powerful imagination, anything is possible. Solid body guitars are truly the dominant species of electric guitars for their overall versatility, ability to interact with pedals and amps, and general lack of fussiness.

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