The guitarist and composer Francisco Tárrega (b. Vilareal, Spain in November 29, 1852-d. December 15, 1909) was one of the great guitar virtuosos and teachers and is considered the father of modern classical guitar playing. As professor of guitar at the conservatories of Madrid and Barcelona, he defined many elements of the modern classical technique and elevated the importance of the guitar in the classical music tradition.
In 1966, Vox introduced the problematic V251 GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, although this never happened.[citation needed] According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative.[citation needed]
For an experienced guitarist, the choice of amplifier is personal and a major part of the guitarist’s sound. But most of our panelists thought that, for a beginner, it’s most important for an amp to offer a variety of good sounds so that they can find what works for them and make adjustments as their style and taste evolve. As Ken Rosser put it, “If a kid’s starting out and they’re really into Pantera, they’ll love an amp that gives them that sound, but next year they might discover Eric Clapton and want a different sound.”
Guild began in New York in 1953 but eventually moved to Rhode Island. Fender purchased Guild in 1995. Fender seemed only interested in Guild as a brand of acoustic guitars. The classic Guild electric guitars were not being made at first. But then some of the classic electric models were re-introduced. Cordoba Music Group (makers of classical guitars) purchased Guild and sells both electric and acoustic models based on the old designs.
Gibson Les Paul Studio Electric Guitar The Gibson Les Paul Studio electric guitar has been around since 1983. For 2018 Gibson upgraded one of its most well-loved models, fitting it with cryogenically treated frets for greater fret durability, adding fingerboard binding and giving it a Slim Taper neck profile. The core Les Paul tones and quality hardware and electronics are still there, of course.
Today's use of Torres and post-Torres type guitars for repertoire of all periods is sometimes critically viewed: Torres and post-Torres style modern guitars (with their fan-bracing and design) have a thick and strong tone, very suitable for modern-era repertoire. However, they are considered to emphasize the fundamental too heavily (at the expense of overtone partials) for earlier repertoire (Classical/Romantic: Carulli, Sor, Giuliani, Mertz, ...; Baroque: de Visee, ...; etc.). "Andrés Segovia presented the Spanish guitar as a versatile model for all playing styles"[5] to the extent, that still today, "many guitarists have tunnel-vision of the world of the guitar, coming from the modern Segovia tradition".[6]

Either way, the results in the Descent Reverb are nothing short of phenomenal.  If you watch the demo video below, you'll hear some of the most unique sounds capable of being produced by a guitar pedal. Pigtronix did something similar with delay and pitch shifting in the Echolution 2 Ultra Pro, but we think the combination is even better in the Descent.
Strumming Patterns: Tremolo is a tough fit here for the same reason as delay. Timing and repeating issues both tend to cause problems.Chords: This can work if used sparingly, especially when strumming patterns are simple and chords are allowed to ring.Short Arpeggios: Particularly if played during a verse, short arpeggios are easily benefited and improved by a light tremolo effect.Quick Solos: Any unique, lead guitar part that needs something extra can be a good spot for the tremolo effect. Usually this will occur during the bridge of a song.

The separation between Briefel and Unicord must not have been entirely unamicable, probably more a matter of direction than anything else. In any case, in 1978, following the demise of the Univox brand (when the Westbury brand was debuted) three Westbury Baroque acoustics were offered, all made by Giannini. These included one “folk” dreadnought with a tapered Westbury head, the stylized “W” Westbury logo, block inlays and a very Martin-esque pickguard. The “classic” was our old friend, the CraViola, with a new head shape. The 12-string was another CraViola. These probably only lasted a year or so; in any case, the Westbury name was dead by 1981.
Yet, there’s still a lot to like about the JS140. First, the use of solid basswood for the body of the guitar is a plus, despite the fact that basswood is plentiful and affordable. While it’s typically used in economy guitars (like this one) its tone is quite good, providing a thick low end with a punchy mid range. As tonewoods go, it’s a decent compromise.
In this installment of Gibson Tone Tips we’re going to take a look at a simple factor of any guitar’s set up, but one that newer players often approached from too a narrow standpoint. When a learner first picks up the electric guitar, he or she is often most drawn to an instrument that has the strings as low to the fingerboard as is functionally possible, because this is easier on tender, unfamiliar fingers, and makes that guitar feel more comfortable in the beginner’s hand. From this point on, our “feel preference” is often set, and we take this “low action=great guitar” bias with us from guitar to guitar, throughout our playing career, imposing it forever after on guitars that we set up ourselves.
That it does, indeed. Acoustic design has been refined to reflect the best possible usage of materials and shape to get the most productive sounds and tones and, as you can see, it's pretty consistent. Wood is the predominant role player in an acoustic's construction, because it directly affects the sound. Only the best, resonant tonewoods would do and they were used to the hilt to make a good sounding instrument as the sound partially relies on it.
Although it’s a minor issue when choosing your first guitar, the tone and sustain that the guitar can produce relies on the quality of the material it’s made from. The most used tonewoods in the budget range are basswood, poplar, alder, and paulownia, while more expensive guitars can be made from pine, mahogany, and swamp ash. This is just a rough rule though – these days you will find mahogany in budget guitars and basswood in premium models. They all have different tonal qualities – for example, mahogany typically offers a warmer sound, swamp ash is brighter, while basswood and alder are well-balanced.
For a guitar that sits comfortably in the mid-range segment of the market, Yamaha RevStar RS420 packs a decent punch. Body shape is more reminiscent of a PRS than anything else, but Yamaha definitely infused it with their unique details. The sound is tight, very flexible, and I had no issues dialing in the type of tone I was looking for. A well rounded model, that’s for sure.
An EQ pedal has been designed to allow you to tune certain parameters of your sound such as the bass, middle and treble frequencies. They are predominantly used by more experienced guitarists who want to add or take away specific bands of sound. These are great for guitarists who want to really boost the treble, bring out the bass or just ensure their guitar signal sounds as flat as possible. The MXR M109S Six band EQ Pedal is one of our favourites.
• Sound Judgment: Consider the sonic characteristics of the various materials used in making electric strings. Stainless steel strings are the least glamorous, but offer plenty of bright bite and sustain. Pure nickel has a warm old-school sound, for vintage tones. And nickel-plated steel is a bit brighter than classic nickel and responds more adroitly to picking attack. Chrome guitar strings are typically the province of jazz players or blues artists who are looking for the kind of warm retro tones chiseled into history by the likes of Charlie Christian or swinging Gibson ES-250, ES-5 and ES-335 bluesman Aaron “T-Bone” Walker. And then there are coated strings – the most expensive and theoretically the longest lasting. They are, however, not really the best, sonically speaking. Coated strings tend to have less sustain. Also, their Teflon exterior surfaces are slippery, which might take some getting used to for particularly aggressive electric guitar players. And when the coatings wear off, they rust like any other string.

Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!
There sure are a lot of electric guitar options to choose from in this day and age. Thankfully, your choice doesn't have to be a difficult one to make thanks to world-leading guitar companies like Epiphone. In fact, Epiphone specializes in a wide range of electric guitar value packages, assembled specifically to help budding enthusiasts begin their musical journey on the right foot. If learning how to play the guitar is something you've always wanted to try but were never sure where to start, consider this section your launching pad.
I was buying my first acoustic guitar ever in my life, and I'm happy to say I picked this store. When you walk in you pretty much feel that you're in another world filled with music and color in contrast with the cloudy days of Seattle. I researched a little on their website before coming in to see what guitars were within my price range, what type of finish and strings. I said to the guy who greeted me at the door: "I'm looking to my buy very first acoustic guitar." And felt a little nervous not knowing anything about playing. Handed him my note card of guitars and he led me into a practice room where he brought the guitars I was interested in and played them for me (since I had zerrrrrooo experience) so I could hear the tone of the guitars. He was very professional, and also took his time making sure that I picked a guitar that I liked. Even gave me a little history about where they are made and how the company sources their wood, etc. Very nice! I forgot his name, but he had curly blonde hair. (If you read this, Hi! And thank you). In addition, an instructor, Ted, who works there also offered me a free first lesson and have been taking lessons since then. The people there are all welcoming and have a real passion for what they do. It's always fun going by their store. Check it out! Please respect their bag policy if you are asked to leave it with them while you are in the store... if you don't feel comfortable, then leave your guitar at home. Easy.
Much like booster pedals – where its placement depends on what exactly you’re looking to boost – the location of compressors and wah-wah pedals in a signal chain will vary depending on what type of sound you are trying to create. In this case, you are encouraged to experiment with their order and see what you like best. Although as mentioned above, try to keep the wah-wah after tier one effects as they generally do not sound that usable in that order. Compressors, on the other hand, can be placed before any pedal, even distortion, as it shapes the signal rather than modifies it.
In recent years, convolution reverbs have become both affordable and commonplace. These differ from synthetic reverbs insomuch as they work from impulse responses (or IRs), recorded in real spaces to faithfully recreate the ambience at the microphone's position when the IR was made. Sometimes these are referred to as sampling reverbs but there's no sampling involved as such, even though the process seems akin to sampling the sonic signature of a room, hall or other space.

The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.
Gibson did not take Fender too seriously at first; Fender were just an amplifier company that made a few guitars. They didn't regard the solid-body Broadcaster launched in 1950 as a serious musical instrument, lacking the depth of tone of a Gibson electric-acoustic. But music was changing, guitarists wanted different sounds, and music was getting louder. Fenders instruments proved to be more appropriate for the emerging musical scenes. Over the next decade Fender created a number of solid-body guitars that defined genres. Guitars like the Stratocaster, Telecaster and Precision and Jazz basses proved to be exceptionally popular and have stayed in production ever since.
We are really proud of our instruments, but what makes us most unique is our people, and your access to them. The world is full of faceless guitar companies, most are big conglomerates. We have a team of passionate guitar people and are committed to giving you unprecedented access to our team. Each member of the team is focused on supporting you. We treat each player like a Michael Kelly endorser. We value personal relationships with Michael Kelly owners and work hard to give you a level of service not readily available from other guitar brands or retailers. Let us help you get the right instrument!

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Octave effects take the input signal and produce synthesized tones that are one or more octaves above or below it. They can be blended in with the input signal to harmonize with it in real time. The effect can be synthesized by monitoring the waveform of the input and multiplying or dividing the observed frequency by, for example, 2 (to go up or down an octave) or 4 (to go up or down two octaves). This takes advantage of the fact that tones that are an octave apart have a 2:1 frequency relationship; the frequency of the tone one octave higher than a root tone is always double the frequency of the root tone.

Another tone option for a guitarist is to put a pickup out of phase with another pickup, producing a thin "inside-out" squawky kind of sound. When 2 pickups are in phase, they work together and reinforce each other. When they are out of phase the 2 pickups are working against one another and the resulting sound is the "leftovers" from these cancelations. The closer the 2 pickups are, the greater the cancelations, the thinner the sound and the lesser the volume. Therefore, the neck and bridge pickups out of phase is the best choice for this type of sound.

Most of Peter, Paul and Mary’s work had splendid fingerstyle guitar work. My favorite is “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”. Paul Stookey also had some fine acoustic work going solo with stuff like “Sebastian” and “The Wedding Song”. “The Wedding Song” was supposedly “must learn” stuff for aspiring acoustic players in the 70’s (so they could play at their friends’ weddings).
These multi-effects pedals are exactly what the name suggests: all-in-one models that pack multiple effects into a single box. There are a few benefits to this, one of which is value, since getting more than one effect at once gives you great bang for your buck. They also tend to come with presets that give you customized mixes of their various effects, which can do a lot to teach you how different effects interact and how to mix and match them yourself.
I have $100 guitars that play and sound great. I have $15,000 guitars that play and sound great. That said, a great middle of the road guitar that won't break the bank is an Epiphone Masterbilt. I find them to sound remarkable AND play great, ESPECIALLY for the money. I like buying guitars used and save about half from the retailers. A good used Masterbilt will cost about $300 on Ebay or Craigslist.
Many musical instruments are works of art, so it’s little doubt that design is very important to a lot of people. Make sure that you really like the way a guitar looks before purchase, because you might be playing it for years. This is one of the reasons the more natural wood colored guitars are always popular - they don’t go out of style or look out of place.
Materials for necks are selected for dimensional stability and rigidity, and some allege that they influence tone. Hardwoods are preferred, with maple, mahogany, and ash topping the list. The neck and fingerboard can be made from different materials; for example, a guitar may have a maple neck with a rosewood or ebony fingerboard. In the 1970s, designers began to use exotic man-made materials such as aircraft-grade aluminum, carbon fiber, and ebonol. Makers known for these unusual materials include John Veleno, Travis Bean, Geoff Gould, and Alembic.
Tribute Legacy Electric Guitar Candy Apple Red Rosewood Fretboard. The G&L Legacy blends contemporary refinements from the Leo Fender-designed S-500 and Comanche models with classic Alnico V pickups. If your holy grail is faithful Alnico single-coil tone with modern refinements and superb craftsmanship, the Legacy makes for an excellent choice. The Legacy's vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ˜50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo's private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ˜50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was - and wasn't. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon's persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World. This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo's PTB (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What's more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy is...
As successor to the Bogner Triple Giant, the Fish is a pre-amp with a legendary status, due to it’s unique character and it’s 4-channel configuration. Originally introduced in 1990, the unit was limited to 250 pieces, and is a rare find now-a-days. But thankfully, Bogner decided to reintroduce the Fish, featuring a “Country”, “Shark”, “Strato”, and “Brown” channel. Just like the original, this amp can take on just about any style you throw at it!
Therefore, if you are a beginner that is still struggling to find a product that comes shipped with other accessories, you should really pay attention to this model. Besides, although this is a full-sized guitar, previous buyers of the model have stated that the unit is not particularly heavy. Consequently, it can be used by teens without worrying about its size and weight.
But there are more questions – are you a beginner, or do you have 20 years playing experience under your belt? Are you on a tight budget, or is money no object? Do you prefer funk, or are you a full-on metalhead? Somewhere the perfect guitar is waiting for you, and – with hundreds of reviews on this site – chances are we have featured it on these pages!
Pete Cornish (Pete Cornish Ltd.): “Compressors should be first in line from the guitar. Do not use a volume pedal first, as this will defeat any compression, and leave the system with maximum noise if the volume pedal is reduced to zero. I tend to connect any distortion devices and high-gain pedals first in line, and the lower-gain pedals later. I have found that the higher-gain devices control sustain, and the lower-gain devices control the tone if they are connected in this order. Modulation devices can come next.
Other specs on the guitar are similarly metal-inclined. It has a fast Nitro Wizard neck profile and a very flat 15.75-inch-radius ebony fretboard, a Gibraltar Standard II bridge that improves string resonance, and Gotoh MG-T locking machine heads for tuning stability. And a single master “Volume” knob ensures nothing gets in the way of your shredding and riffing acrobatics.
For years, Seymour Duncan has provided guitarists with first-rate, handmade pickups and parts that are anything but stock. All of our products are designed and customized to suit the needs of specific musical styles and the musicians thereof. If you’ve got a guitar that doesn’t have a good-quality set of pickups and seems to lack that “extra something” in the tone department, investing in a set of pickups is your first stop.

Other unique features of this wonderful guitar are the 70’s styled headstock logo which effectively rounds out the look of this American instrument very nicely. Weighing just 7.2 pounds, the guitar is of pure single coil bliss! It sounds great as all Teles do and it plays like a dream. For every guitar lover, this is a true workhorse instrument to get.
Great for beginner guitar players, the electric guitar packages/electric guitar kits give you all the essential tools that’ll help you get started on your musical journey. These electric guitar packs typically include an electric guitar, a guitar amplifier, and various must-have guitar accessories including guitar picks,guitar straps, and an electric guitar gig bag.
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