While Laney brand might not sound as familiar to the “uninitiated”, this brand has been producing quality amps for very good prices. The  LG12 is a combo amp with 12-watts. While 12-watts isn’t much it seems to kick in a punch when needed (and plus, you want it for practice and more practice amps don’t have a lot of wattages). Apart from that this combo offers  LG12 12 single channel with switchable drive, CD input, headphone socket (a much for practice) as well as Bass, Middle and Treble control. The tone of this amp is pretty crisp and clean. That’s partly due to the 6.5″ custom-designed speaker. The speaker is not only functional but looks pretty nice. Looks wise this model has top mounted construction, rubber feet for sturdiness and leather handle for ease of transportation. Apart from being a great practice amp, it is also great if you travel around and want a model that can take a punch or two.
But here at Uberchord (click to download the free guitar learning app) we get that your dream is maybe about playing electric guitar. And if that’s what you want to do, then starting out with a good electric instrument makes sense. But what makes a “good” guitar? Well, if you are confused about what kind of Guitar to buy, you can check out our post on: Types of Guitar: Beginner’s Guide to Buying A Guitar.

Chorus is an effect that doubles and detunes your signal. It can add an otherworldly effect to your tone, as well as add emphasis to your playing. Chorus adds shimmer and depth to your signal. While it shines in making clean playing more lush, many players, Zakk Wylde included, use chorus to add a doubling effect to their solos, which really will bring it to the forefront of a song. When used carefully, you can even approximate the sound of a 12-string guitar.


Martin’s first truly electric guitars were the Style F thinline archtops which began in prototype stage in 1961 and entered production in 1962. The F Series consisted of three models, the F-50, F-55 and F-65, all with bodies slightly less than 2″ thick and made of maple plywood with bound tops. All three had shapes roughly reminiscent of the dreadnought that made Martin famous, though slightly exaggerated with a wider lower bout. The cutaways were fairly wide and radical, cutting out at almost a right angle from the neck. The glued in necks had unbound 20-fret rosewood fingerboards, dot inlays and the typical squarish Martin three-and-three headstock. Necks joined the body at the 14th fret. Each bore an elevated pickguard and had a distinctive moveable adjustable bridge made of clear plexiglass.
Seriously, Yamaha above ESP?! Japanese made ESP guitars are among the best in the world, no wonder so many people play them. They have great designs and an ESP standard is not to high in price compared to a USA Jackson or custom shop guitar. Ibanez prestige are very nice to (I hate the necks personally) but the build is really good. ESP blows Gibson out of the water by a VERY large margin. Gibson has lawsuits against them for selling "USA" made guitars that were discovered to be imports from cheap labor offshore factories. All ESP and Ibanez prestige guitars are made in Japan and are immaculate in terms of quality and consistency. ESP is more a metal guitar but they have much better tone than any of the others listed, the only one here that might have a sweeter tone is prs but for $8,000 and only a fractionally better tone that is subjective they can keep it. I personally like ESP and Schecter best but Jackson is really good too. Not to knock Ibanez, but their necks are way to thin ...more
Godin (pronounced Go-dan) was founded in 1972 by Robert Godin in Canada and now owns a number of highly respected acoustic guitar brands including Art & Lutherie, Simon and Patrick, La Patrie and Seagull. Their electric guitars, produced under the Godin brand, have been played by greats including Roger Waters, Elliott Sharp and John McLaughlin. Many of their high-end models come with 3 types of pickups - regular electric guitar pickups, piezo pickups for producing an acoustic-like sound, and Synth/MIDI pickups for making any kind of sound you want.

Finally, there were some twelve Hawaiian lap steels in ’55, the EG-NT, EG-K, EG-Z, EG-A, EG-S, EG-R, EG-L, EG-7L, EG-P, EG-8L, EG-M and EG-NW. Again, since I have no reference materials, there’s no point in attempting any description. However, many of these guitars continued on into the ’60s where we’ll discuss them in detail, and you can probably extrapolate backwards to these mid-’50s models, allowing for pickup changes, etc.


The stompswitches take a couple stomps to cut on. There also some tape residue around the led lights where someone covered them. But its not a huge issue for reverb considering that the way I play, I always have a little reverb on to add texture and presence to my tone. Also, if you have a pedal switch looper that you can run all your pedals through it can stay always on that way too. But I'm going set the bidding price lower just because they don't work 100% properly and the tape residue. Other than the issue with the stompswitches the effect works great. Just clarify, you have to stomp on the switch 2 or 3 times and it cuts on.
The envelope filter is also known as an auto-wah.  It functions sonically like a wah-wah pedal but uses the strength of the signal to control the sweep of the frequency.  Typically, control knobs allows the player to set the amount of wah to interact with picking, so that the guitarist can dynamically control the effect without using a rocker to engage the filtering.
if you wish to use your computer as an "effects pedal", I recommend IK Multimedia's Amplitube 3 - it has an extensive array of effects and amplifiers with all kinds of crazy and fun tones to mess around with. Theres a ton of effects, so I recommend you check it out. It is a bit pricey though ($199 for the standard edition). If I were you, I would download the Amplitube CustomShop, which is basically a free demo version of the full software.

The benefits of owning a combo amp and one or more powered speakers is that a bassist can bring just the combo amp to recording sessions or small venue gigs, but bring the combo amp and the additional powered speaker(s) to large venue shows to add more stage volume. Another benefit of having a combo amp and additional powered speakers is that the bassist could leave the additional powered speakers in the rehearsal space (or, if playing as a house band for a club, on the venue's stage), and only carry the combo amp back and forth from her home to rehearsals or shows, saving time and energy.
Let me tell you about the vintage look at why it is favored among so many musicians and aestheticians around the world. Well, I won’t be able to tell you much about the vintage look in this short text, but what I can tell you is the fact that some of the best looking items out there, and best sounding, are entirely vintage. Well the Vox MINI3G2CL Battery Powered Modeling Amp is one of the vintage looking but entirely modern technology employing amps that produce a great sound while looking positively scrumptious. This small amp avoids the problem of weak low tones that so many other amp have by incorporating a bass boost technology into its construction. As a result we get a small, portable amp with a handsome look and an incredibly well rounded sound, with expressive lows and expressive high both present. And the price point relative to some of the other options on this list makes it a required purchase, unless something else catches your eye that is.

The electric guitar setup routine is as important to your sound as any component on your instrument. In addition, if you learn how to setup your guitar correctly you can save some money by not running down to the local guitar shop, and paying them to do it. I want to preface that I am not an expert on the building of guitars. I did not go to the "Fender/Gibson school of Luthier excellence". I am however someone that's built a dozen electric guitars, and have setup everyone of them. Additionally I've setup probably fifty more guitars, including acoustics, for friends, and friends of friends, who found out I've got some practical experience in the matter.


There’s such a broad range of potential guitar and amp tones out there that it’s impossible to say “this works, but this doesn’t.” As a rule of thumb, though, go into the recording experience with the knowledge that the guitar parts that work live with a lashing of overdrive (natural cranked-amp gain or pedal generated) will often work better in the recorded mix with somewhat less gain and saturation. Heavily overdriven amps tend to swamp the mix, getting in the way of other crucial instruments, and sounding surprisingly muddy and washed-out as a result. Tightening one’s tone frequently brings back the punch and drive they seek from the part in the first place, and helps the guitars sit better with whatever else is going on in the arrangement. For instances of this, listen closely to a handful of guitar parts in classic-rock recordings that we tend to think of as examples of “heavy guitar tone” – Angus and Malcolm Young with AC/DC, Paul Kossoff with Free, Pete Townshend with The Who – and you’re likely to hear that they’re actually cleaner than you recalled. Then, when you get bogged down in an effort to record a satisfactory tone, consider cleaning it up at the amp or using a smaller amp.
Each brand has its own distinctions, benefits, drawbacks, and niche which it appeals to. Most guitar players are loyal to one particular brand for one reason or another. Even the style and image associated with the instrument comes into play heavily, here. For example, consider the image cultivated by Jimi Hendrix and his Fender Stratocaster. Not only did he expand the realm of tones that everyone thought the guitar was capable of, he made this particular model his own. It’s an iconic guitar that will always be associated with Hendrix and the blues.

In terms of tone, a smaller dreadnought body will be slightly lacking in projecting the low-end frequencies. That doesn't matter here thanks to being an acoustic electric. With that said, the trebles and mids give away its origin, tone-wise. Play a few chords and you'll immediately hear that classic 'Taylor sound' even from a lower mid-range guitar like this one.

For quite some times now, many musicians have been making use of the distinctive sound and look of Koa wood construction on instruments. Designed to meet the taste of Hawaiian culture and tradition, the Koa wood on the ESP LTD EC-1000 is native to Hawaiian island, boasting a remarkable history and well-deserve popularity for its recognizable natural reddish and grain pattern eliciting a well-balanced sound while adding tone brightness without affecting the guitar’s warmth.
G&L is the evolution of Fender guitars, no doubt, is Leo Fender expressed by itself, amazing axe, nice sound, in tune, good wood, my ASAT SPECIAL have bird's eye wood on fretboard that looks and feels amazing, the MFD's pickups rocks! nice playability, nice sound, I'll keep mine a lot of a time, it must be on top 10, underrated guitar in my opinion
Effects Pedals are electronic devices that modify the tone, pitch, or sound of an electric guitar. Effects can be housed in effects pedals, guitar amplifiers, guitar amplifier simulation software, and rackmount preamplifiers or processors. Electronic effects and signal processing form an important part of the electric guitar tone used in many genres, such as rock, pop, blues, and metal. All these are inserted into the signal path between an electric instrument and the amplifier. They modify the signal coming from the instrument, adding "effects" that change the way it sounds in order to add interest, create more impact or create aural soundscapes.

Turning our attention to the main controls on the front, it actually doesn’t look as intimidating to use as some owners of it make it out to be. Yes, you can get lost in tweaking and tinkering with amp models and effects until you’re blue in the face - but we actually find the interface to be nice and uncluttered, with all the footswitches and knobs nicely spaced out. On the top left there’s a small screen with some knobs surrounding it, and this is where the majority of your tweaking and editing will take place. Across the top are seven knobs which are meant to replicate what you would find on your amp. If you’re interested in the amp modeling part of the POD HD500X, you’ll appreciate having things like DRIVE, BASS, and PRESENCE immediately available. Two footswitches on the far left of the unit are responsible for up/down menu navigation, eight switches labeled FS1 to FS8 are assignable to individual effects, and finally there are two switches dedicated to the Looper function, and Tap Tempo/Tuner. You can also clearly see an expression pedal built-in on the right of the unit.
Actually, company founder Leo Fender's first business was repairing tube circuitry equipment including radios, phonograph players, and home music amplifiers. He noticed the growing popularity of amplifiers for home music systems and branched out into selling music records and renting out PA systems he had designed from his repair shop. Then he got even more involved in music by making and selling Hawaiian lap steel guitars containing a proprietary pickup system which he bundled with his own newly designed amplifiers in 1945. The following year he changed the company name from Fender’s Repair Service to Fender Electric Instruments Company.
Modulation stompboxes like our BF-3 Flanger should be after the tone-producing effects like distortion, wah, etc. so they can process and modify the tone built by the pedals before it. If you put it before the distortion, then you are distorting the sound of the flanger. Maybe that’s what you’re after, but in general, put the BF-3 and other modulation effects after the tone-shaping (and noise–producing) pedals. And then there are the ambience effects: delay and reverb. As we discussed earlier, reverb—and sometimes delay, depending on the space—is the last thing that happens before the sound reaches your ears in a physical space, so these go last. Delaying reverb can sound muddy, so it’s usually better to have the reverb after the delay.
Two and one half steps down from Drop D. This tuning is most often used by death metal or deathcore musicians, such as Suicide Silence or Whitechapel (both use seven-string guitars and tune down the seventh string a full step). Utilized by bands like Nile, Motograter, Thrice, Filter (on the songs "Columind" and "The Missing" from The Amalgamut and "Drug Boy" and "The Trouble with Angels" from the album of the same name), Dead by April, RED, Ill Niño (on Dead New World) and occasionally Slipknot, Crowbar, Amon Amarth, Five Finger Death Punch, and Parkway Drive. Trapt uses this tuning on their songs "Hollow Man" and "Waiting".
Muddy Waters is obviously one of the most recognized and influential blues artists of this century. When his name is mentioned phrases like "slide guitar" and "electric Chicago blues" are associated with it, but what about "wah-wah" and "psychedelic"? For a small period in history, Muddy Waters' image became one of a psychedelic icon and if there weren't records still around from then, most people would doubt it had ever happened. The sixties were a strange time for music and musicians- none felt stranger than musicians from the previous decade trying to stay afloat then. Many times in music, established artists will try to expand upon their work and take a chance with something different. They should at least be praised and encouraged when they try to experiment with their sound. If music were condemned to always following a strict guideline of rules, it would be pretty boring. Music should be allowed to grow and explore new territories because everyone can agree that it's not exciting if it's always predictable.

Since 1982, Dusty Strings Music Store has been a gathering place for instrument players and music lovers. Come explore new, used, rare, and vintage acoustic guitars, electric guitars and pedals, mandolins, ukuleles, banjos, harps, hammered dulcimers, and accessories -- all within reach and ready for you to play! We are an authorized warranty repair shop for both Martin Guitars and Taylor Guitars and carry such builders as Martin, Taylor, Collings, Goodall, Deering, OME, Weber, National, Fano, Nash, Silvertone, G&L, Tone King, Vox, and more. Our school offers private lessons, group lessons, concerts, and special events. Come play music!
Now I know the image above will give some people fits. Just the idea of doing a gig without your favorite amp roaring behind you is enough to send people to their sheds, grabbing pitchforks and lighting torches. This article is about why some guitarists choose to go direct at gigs. Going direct doesn’t replace the traditional guitar/pedals/amp formula that has powered popular music for over 60 years. Bass players and acoustic guitarists have gone direct for years, and technology is catching up to the ears of electric guitarists. Of course, no one is trying to tell every guitarist to do this, but it does seem to have merit in certain situations. Those situations are exactly what we will be talking about here. 

MIDI connectivity has also been included, allowing you to take control of your existing synth or sampler with ease. In addition, the Helix features a 6.2 inch 800x480-pixel LCD display for easy editing, customisable scribble strips above the 12 capacitive-sensing footswitches and an expression pedal that can actually be used to edit parameters of a pedal so you don’t have to bend down and start twiddling knobs. Best of all, you can even integrate existing hardware and effects pedals in to your Helix and control them through the unit. We could talk about how this is one of the kings of the multi-effects world all day, but just watch the video below and see for yourself!
Who are you to state that Taylor guitars are among the best in the world? Are you from California? I don't and many other don't feel that way. Taylor just does not have the sound of other fine acoustical guitars. I'm not putting Taylor down. It's a well built acoustic but I don't quite like the sound of them. That's a biased and very bold statement you made about Taylor and it's not true. There are so many great acoustic guitar builders around this planet that do build superb guitars. Please, lets not put a Californian Company biasedly on top of everything on the planet. Can we do this please? I apologize for this email but what you stated is so unfair for all of the others guitar companies that build outstanding guitars, worldwide.
Looks awesome. Great tone. Had A LOT of fret buzz out of the box (EADG strings from 7th-11th fret). Got it set up to try to eliminate buzzing...only way the guitar tech could seem to get rid of it was by raising the action quite a bit, so now it's much higher than I like...bummer. No buzzing and sounds great, but the playability is definitely not what I was hoping for considering the price.
{"eVar4":"used: guitars","eVar5":"used: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars: raven","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"used","prop18":"skucondition|0||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] used: guitars","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"condition","prop11":"used","prop5":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[gc] used","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] used"}
Just bought a Martin D-18GE beautiful sunburst from Franklin Guitar today and was absolutely blown away by the hospitality, friendly atmosphere and knowledge I was met with. I've never written a revie...w before but this place is so good it deserves praise and recognition! I would recommend anyone who wants to buy any level of guitar with all ranges of experience to go check out Franklin Guitar! From beginners to professionals, this little place has what your looking for and will no doubt be a joyful experience. Thanks Pat! See More

Tags: 335 harness 335 wiring harness ES335 harness Firebird Harness Gibson Firebird Harness Guitar wiring Guitar wiring boards Guitar Wiring Harness Guitar Wiring Harness UK Guitar Wiring Harnesses Guitar Wiring Harnesses UK Guitar wiring loom Handwired Harness Home of Tone Home of Tone Blog Home of Tone harness Home of Tone Harnesses Home of Tone pre-Wired Les Paul Harness Les Paul Harnesses Pre-Wire Harness Pre-Wired Guitar harnesses Pre-Wired Harness Pre-Wired harness UK Pre-Wired Harnesses Pre-Wired Home of Tone harnesses Sg Harness Strat Harness Stratocaster Harness Stratocaster Harnesses Tele Harness telecaster Harness
Built-in mics aren’t necessarily the budget option as they can be seen on some high-end guitars. They’re extremely helpful when you need volume but not so much where the acoustics of your setting, say in a concert hall, carries sound projection for you. However, the internal mic can raise problems for the performer as they’re prone to producing unwanted feedback. Multi-blend pickup and preamp systems allow you the flexibility to switching out from the mic when it proves to be problematic. However, if you’re going to install one yourself, look for one with a high feedback resistance of exceptional quality.

A 6 stringed right handed electric guitar that mostly comes in black color. It has its body made of bass wood and fret board made of rosewood with 22 frets. The dimension of the guitar is 9 x 9 x 3 cm  that is easy to handle. The model is quite affordable with prices ranging from around INR 9,071. Its beauty makes it have the required curb appeal for stage performances and give motivation in studio. More information can be found on the link that follows.


From its humble beginnings as an experiment in resonance to the flagship image of rock and roll, the electric guitar has taken many forms over the years. All of them have their advantages — and their disadvantages. Every manufacturer has tried their own take on some of the different body styles, which include hollow body, semi-hollow body, fully solid body electric, and even acoustic-electrics. Here, we will take a look at what exactly those terms mean, and what to look for in each.
I personally don't like the shape of the Valkyrie...it just looks odd to me. Try a few Epi's...some are pretty nice. Stay away from the G310s...I suspect they may be made of balsa wood..and the Specials. But the G400s, the customs and the Tony Iommis, all of which I have played, have been pretty decent in terms of fit, finish and sound. I'd really love to play a Prophecy at some point...they look pretty rad.
Solder the electronics. The pickups you purchased should come with a schematic that shows exactly how to connect these to the controls and to the input for the guitar cord. Follow this schematic, using an ordinary electronics soldering iron to complete the job. Wrap any wiring connections with electrical tape, unless the manufacturer’s instructions suggest another method.
Bass amp speaker cabinets are typically more rigidly constructed, with thicker wood and more heavy bracing than those for non-bass amplification. They usually include tuned bass reflex ports or vents cut into the cabinet, for increased efficiency at low frequencies and improved bass sound. Preamplifier sections have equalization controls that are designed for the deeper frequency range of bass instruments, which extend down to 41 Hz or below. Bass amplifiers are more likely to be designed with heat sinks and/or cooling fans than regular guitar amplifiers, due to the high power demands of bass amplification. They are also more commonly equipped with audio compression or limiter circuitry to prevent overloading the power amplifier and to protect the speakers from damage due to unintended clipping in the power amp.
@Michele – Thanks for checking out our blog! 🙂 If you are going to be using both multi-effect units in your setup, you will need to decide which of these has a better compressor that you will be using. If you like the PEU5’s Compressor and Overdrive, I would place it near the beginning of the chain in front of your existing MojoMojo overdrive. This way, you can use the RP100A’s Delay and EQ within the effects loop of your amp. But keep in mind, there is no wrong way to set this up. I encourage you to place them in different locations of your signal chain to find what sounds best for you.
If you prefer the Linux platform, then Guitarix is your best free guitar effects solution. It is a free, full featured guitar amp and effects software. Aside from its impressive amp modeling capabilities, Guitarix has 25 equally impressive effects modules. Effects include a noise gate, modulation effects like flanger and phaser and it even has weird stuff like auto-wah. Guitarix's low latency audio engine ensures respectable audio, which is said to give you not more than 10 milli seconds of delay. This is a simple yet effective guitar effects software, unfortunately it is only available for Linux users.
That’s why it’s incredibly important that once you work through your first method book you should start seriously considering finding a teacher to further your education. A teacher can help give you the tools that you’ll need to continually advance on your instrument, which in turn will ensure that it will be a lifelong source of entertainment and enrichment.

From what I've been able to find out (as a proud owner of a mint W-415 'Dove' model acoustic), Lyle guitars are actually Gibson seconds, that for whatever reason didn't pass muster to be sold as a Gibson (bad finish, scuff, imperfection in the wood, etc.). The Lyle company was out of Portland, OR (I believe) and was started by former Gibson employees who would fix the flawed Gibsons and resell them under the Lyle name. Made in Japan was because Gibsons were made in Japan at the time(?). A damn fine instrument; considered rare now, I guess. I don't ever want to get rid of mine!

To answer this question, all you need to do is close your eyes and focus on what is currently going on around you. Just about every sound you hear, whether you are at home or on a busy street, is packed with some dose of reverb. In nature, sound reflects off of multiple objects and surfaces across various distances. Both our ears and our brains are used to reverb by default. That is one of the reasons why even an artificial reverb effect tends to make a track more enjoyable.


Slot Peghead vs. Solid Peghead (steel string models): Most models converted from a 12 fret slot peghead to a 14 fret solid peghead around 1934 (except the OM series, which went 14 fret in 1929/1930 and the style 17 and 18 models which were available in 14 fret style in 1932). Basically if the guitar has a 14 fret neck, it will have a solid peghead. If it has a 12 fret neck, it will have a slot peghead. Note there were some post-WW2 gut string and classical models (i.e. 0-16NY) and some post-WW2 special order steel string guitars (i.e. 1967-1993 D-18S) which always have a slotted peghead.
The main thing to keep in mind regarding vintage guitars: A guitar is worth what somebody will pay for it. There aren’t necessarily rational reasons behind the value of a particular model. Rarity is only really relevant if the guitar in question is part of a group of guitars that are lusted after by many collectors, and many of those collectors are also considering investment potential, so those guitars will never be played and may end up in museums in Europe or Asia. In other words, Rarity means nothing without demand. A rare crappy guitar is still a crappy guitar and if nobody wants it, it’s just firewood. Condition counts for more.
The SG started out as a lighter alternative to the Les Paul - which Les didn't like and eventually opted out of. But what seemed like a failure turned out into a success story because many rock and metal guitar players loved the SG's sharp look, faster neck and comfortable upper fret reach. These days, the SG continues to dominate in the realm of rock and metal with modern production models like the Epiphone SG Special, which is meant to be as affordable as possible for future rock stars to learn on.
As you'd expect, the most important decision to make with multi effects pedals is the choice of which effects, specifically, you want in them. The Electro-Harmonix Epitome Multi-Effects Guitar Pedal, for instance, is a veritable buffet of effects including flanger, chorus, reverb, pitch-shifting and more. But if you're looking for an expression pedal, you'll probably be more interested in a unit like the Vox StompLab IIG Modeling Guitar Effect Processor, which has one of those built in. Both of these multi effects pedals are top sellers, which comes as no surprise considering the versatility they bring to the table.

I'd never heard of this brand but was recently in a store in North Carolina looking for a nylon string guitar. The salesman asked me if I was "open minded" and if I'd be receptive to trying a brand that I probably had never heard of. He handed me a really pretty instrument with a very different looking headstock. I immediately figured he was showing me a very expensive instrument. I asked how much it cost, but he didn't answer. He simply replied "Try it, then let me know what you think." I had no idea how much this guitar would cost, and honestly I hate guessing games, but the guitar was really beautiful. I played several classical guitars there that day. A Yamaha, a Cordoba and an Alvarez, but the Merida was unquestionably the best sounding (and looking).


The Myth: Most amp manufacturers were conservative from a previous generation with a background of country, jazz and religious music. They were horrified by the anti-religious, drug driven, sex crazed rock musos of the 60s’ diving their amps at full power into hard distortion for sustain. When these amps were first designed in the 50s, it was inconceivable they would be used in this way.

The intervals between the notes of a chromatic scale are listed in a table, in which only the emboldened intervals are discussed in this article's section on fundamental chords; those intervals and other seventh-intervals are discussed in the section on intermediate chords. The unison and octave intervals have perfect consonance. Octave intervals were popularized by the jazz playing of Wes Montgomery. The perfect-fifth interval is highly consonant, which means that the successive playing of the two notes from the perfect fifth sounds harmonious.


One user summarizes market sentiment nicely by saying that the Yamaha THR10C is a phenomenal amplifier. Many of the commendations point to its great balance of sonic versatility and portability as its main strength, while others are pleased with its sound quality. Even experts are amazed by how it sounds, including Nick Guppy of Music Radar who commends it by saying: "While there are many small modelling amps around today, few of them look or sound as good as the THR." Build quality, USB recording convenience and the ability to run on batteries are also well received.

In August ’68, Ovation added three more models – the Hurricane 12-string and the Typhoon I and II basses, all with chrome hardware. The K-1120 Hurricane was a Tornado with the extra strings, advertised as offering a “harpsichordian” effect. This lasted only a year and was gone by ’69. The initial Typhoon basses had slightly smaller bodies than the guitars, with stubbier, more flared horns. These lasted only a year until ’69, when the body styling changed to that of the Gibson-style guitars. The K-1140 Typhoon I bass had one Schaller pickup and a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The K-1240 Typhoon II was a two-pickup model with a three-way select. This was also called the Williwaw (“mountain wind”) in some Ovation literature, but it was never really called that. The Typhoon I was only available in the stubby body and was discontinued in ’69. The Typhoon II changed model number in March ’70, becoming the K-1222. This model made it until June ’72.
Every skilled worker needs to look after their tools and musicians are no exception. Sure, wear and tear is normal—especially when you play your instrument often—but a little T.L.C. will ensure your musical gear continues to look, play and sound amazing for years. At Guitar Center Repairs, you'll find a dedicated team of certified musicians who take pride in helping you reach your highest level of playing potential. Make no mistake, your music maker is in the best of hands at GC Repairs. When it comes to looking after your musical equipment, certain things should be left to professionals—pickup installation, wiring customization and structural repair, to name a few. Mind you, there are tasks that every guitarist can take care of at home, including regular polishing and restringing. Of course, not everyone has the time to continually look after their instrument and bringing it to Guitar Center is a great way to save yourself time and ensure that the job gets done right. With that being said, GC's services go well beyond cleaning and string changing. For those of you who own a stringed instrument and find the action is higher than it once was, a truss rod adjustment is definitely in order. Or, maybe you want to personalize the look and sound of your guitar—in which case, an expert will be more than happy to swipe out your pickups for a new set, replace the pickguard or perform any other task to give you an axe that’s entirely your own. Honestly, your best bet is to browse this entire section and see what else is offered in the way of repairs, maintenance and modifications. Who knows, maybe your local GC is having a free guitar setup day, so feel free to have a look around this page or take a swing by the store in your area. Our friendly and knowledgeable staff is always happy to speak with other local musicians and setting up a quick appointment for your instrument will do wonders for your musical enjoyment. From nut and bridge replacements to even amp electronic upgrades, Guitar Center Repairs has you covered.
Unlike Andrew, before Rocksmith 2014 Carl had never played anything other than a toy-guitar controller. The lessons made it easy to learn the basics—from just holding the instrument properly, to playing basic notes and fingering techniques—all without the pressure of a human guitar instructor's waning patience. Since this was my first experience playing a real guitar, I was eager to learn and didn't mind that the notes scroll horizontally across the screen instead of Guitar Hero and Rock Band's vertical scrolling.
And “tear” into them so like to do! My most recent “nightmare” was with such a simple thing as a fret “grind and polish” totally gone haywire! This particular repairman was nice enough, but broke so many things on my guitar just as a result of doing a fret job; he had it for another month after, and still could correct his mistakes! I final had to have the guitar literally “rescued” by the actual craftsman who made the guitar so it could finally be set straight again! It turned out that much as I had suspected, the repair guy wanted to see what made my guitar “tick”, so he unnecessarily tore it apart, but couldn’t properly put it back together again! He even broke 2 pickups by turning them too tightly as he lowered them!! Very costly errors, to be sure!
O.K. These are my first impressions of this guitar kit, my first, right out of the box. About me: I own about a dozen guitars, both acoustic and electric, including 6 string and basses. I know a little about construction, as I have been studying, and have been wanting to build my own guitar for some time now. Building from scratch seemed a little optimistic so I elected to go with this kit after studying the Internet for days. I wanted a chance for a great result with my mediocre woodworking skills. Kit arrived quickly and undamaged, good packaging and the components were bagged nicely.
It’s important to remember that these setups are not set rules that must be followed.  You can get a variety of unique sounds by placing your effects in unorthodox locations.  It’s common to run into that special sound that came about as a ‘happy accident’ when setting up your effects.  Using these suggestions, you can build up your own pedalboard to suit your individual taste.
Certain guitar brands are renowned and respected worldwide, and you don't have to be a player to be aware of them. Companies like Fender, Gibson, Epiphone, Ibanez, Yamaha and many others have built a solid reputation for providing exceptionally crafted guitars. In fact, these names are consistently endorsed by the greatest players of all time. However, you'll find more than enough guitar brands from lesser known manufacturers as well; these smaller companies take enormous pride in offering models of equally extraordinary playability, tone and construction.
Beatles guitarist George Harrison bought a 425 during a brief visit to the USA in 1963.[7] In February 1964, while in New York City, F.C. Hall of Rickenbacker met with the band and their manager, and gave Harrison a model 360/12 (the second electric twelve-string built by Rickenbacker).[7] This instrument became a key part of the Beatles’ sound on their LP A Hard Day’s Night and other Beatles songs through late 1964. Harrison played this guitar sporadically throughout the remainder of his life.
Last but by no means least, we have one of the most powerful effects and guitar processors ever created – the Line 6 Helix Guitar Effects Processor Floorboard. When this was released, the guitar world really had to take notice as this was more than just a multi-effects unit, but a complete collection of effects, amps, speaker cabs and microphones to provide users with every sound they’re ever likely to need.
Ihave a 12 string dorado. I found a guitar that was sold for $299. It's a 12 string acoustic, Gretsch, 1971. Seems like the right period. The problem is that it is called doraldo. One letter out. Rosewood fret board, dot inlays. Exactly the same as mine but different name. Maybe it could be the same? Go to http://www.rabbithillmusic.9cy.com/id2.htm
Drop A in D standard variation - A-G-C-F-a-D: Used by Mastodon on most of their first album (Remission) and on some songs on other albums. Also utilized by Periphery on the song "Zyglrox" as well as "Alpha" and "The Bad Thing." Also used on occasion by Black Label Society, who previously tuned it a half-step up, which Alter Bridge also utilizes on some of their songs such as "Broken Wings", "Come to Life", "I Know it Hurts", "Still Remains", "Breath Again", and "All Hope is Gone." Creed, Architects, and Sevendust all use this tuning tuned a half-step down on their songs "Bread of Shame", "Early Grave", and "Home" and "Chop" respectively, with the latter also tuning down a full step for the songs "Death Dance" and "Not Today". Danish industrial metal band Raunchy used this tuning tuned one and a half-step down (F#-E-A-D-f#-B) on the song "Dim the Lights and Run" from the album A Discord Electric. Wage War also utilize this tuning one whole step down for songs like "The River" and "Spineless" off their album Blueprints.
Two new 325s were created for Lennon and were shipped to him while The Beatles were in Miami Beach, Florida, on the same 1964 visit to the US: a one-off custom 12-string 325 model and an updated six-string model with modified electronics and vibrato. He used this newer 6-string model on The Beatles’ sequentially “second” appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show.[7]
Unfortunately it’s during this critical time that a lot of people get discouraged and may even give up on playing altogether. The first 6 months of learning guitar are critical, statistics show that if someone can still be playing at 6 months they will be much more likely to go on to play guitar for life, so the first 6 months are actually the most important time.
Many guitarists with instruments that have more than one pickup spend most of their time on the bridge unit. Using a variety of pickup positions when recording will thin or fatten the sound as required, but also help free up space when it comes to the mixing stage. Think of a recorded mix as a layer cake; too much density in one frequency range will cause a headache for the mixing engineer.

Once you are satisfied that the curve of the neck is in the acceptable range, check the string height at nut. Depress each string at the third fret and look back towards the nut to see how the string sits over the first fret. The string should neither be sitting on the first fret nor far enough above that you can see a gap thicker than a sheet of paper. This is a very subtle point to reach and you need proper nut files to set it. This setting is crucial both for achieving proper playing height up the neck, and for achieving proper intonation. If it is too high here, you are going to end up setting the action lower at the saddle than it really ought to be, resulting in buzzing ( the string will measure out "correct" at the 12th fret yet actually be inclining down as it progresses towards the bridge saddles). Additionally, a string set too high at the nut will likely play noticeably sharp at the first and other lower fret positions.
Reverb is still the most commonly installed effect in amps, but there are some amplifiers that go overboard, to the point that they outdo even multi-effects units. Unfortunately, even those with the most number of effects allow for limited simultaneous use, so no, you can't put 10 virtual pedals together in your practice amp. Also don't expect the quality of built-in effects to match that of boutique pedals, but they can be a great addition to an amp if used sparingly and for appropriate songs.
The Salamander Grand (Yamaha C5) has by nature so many velocity samples that it already has a great expressive sound. I have normalised the samples and re-attenuated them to suit sf2 format and simplified it by leaving out some pedal noises and other non-critical sounds. Cut-off frequencies have been adjusted for extra expression and using Wavosaur I have removed the gaps at the front of the samples to greatly reduce latency.
Its not exactly the same as an amplifier, but you can come close, or you can use the effects, looping capabilities and other features of the app to create new sounds that aren’t at all like what you would get from an amplifier. Many pro audio manufacturers sell foot pedals that feature amp modeling too - Boss, Digitech, TC Electronics, Roland just to name a few.
For a long time Yamaha were regarded as one of the best producers of student guitars but their reputation didn't go far beyond that. And it's true that they make excellent guitars for beginners, I am one of the many who originally learned to play on their student nylon string C40. BTW I'm one of those guitarists who thoroughly recommend initially learning to play on a nylon string guitar.
Students and expert alike describe this guitar as a fun instrument, and goes further by commenting that it has exceeded their expectations. From its fast action playability to the quality of the finish, the Epiphone SGSpecial continues to rake in compliments. Several people even said that it comes surprisingly close to the feel and sound of a Gibson SG.

What is it about the Japanese and the Ventures? I mean, I cut my teeth with the Ventures. They were the perfect band to learn guitar from. The Ventures took songs with often complex harmonic structures—like the wonderful Johnny Smith classic—and stripped them down to their basic melodies, gave them a simple rock groove, and played them clean. I had the sheet music to Smith’s song, but there was no way in you know where I was gong to play off that. But follow along with the Ventures’ single? You bet!
Last fall, Ubisoft released a new version. But Rocksmith 2014 is considered a replacement rather than an update: The company is trying to rebrand the franchise not as a game but as a teaching tool. The box bears a fat label proclaiming "The fastest way to learn guitar," and Ubisoft launched an ad campaign promising that Rocksmith 2014 could teach prospective shredders to play guitar or bass in just 60 days.

I believe that the best electric guitar amp for beginners is a straightforward combo amp, represented by the amps on this list. Avoid the bells and whistles of the fancier, feature-rich combo amps until you’re confident you have a solid set of playing chops. Then you can either move up to a modeling amp, or start adding effects pedals to your rig. The great thing about all the amps profiled above is that they provide a solid base for what ever effects you want to add to the mix later on down the road.
At the end of the day, sustain is just a fancy way of saying the length of time a note will remain audible after you pluck it. Sustain is mostly dependent on how much the body and wood of your guitar can resonate sound. Typically, solid-body guitars are the go-to source of sustain, but many pedals and amps are built with the purpose of increasing the effect. Some people prefer long sustain for certain genres; others simply are too lazy to want to pluck the string again.
This setup is the same as the first one above, however, the volume pedal has been placed near the end of the chain right before the delay and reverb effects.  This allows you to have full control of the volume of your signal right before the delay and reverb effects. This is useful for fading in a fully overdriven signal without cleaning up the signal at the lower range of the sweep.
I started by consulting with an old friend, Ken Korman, guitarist of the New Orleans band The O-Pines and a serious aficionado of guitars both expensive and cheap. He gave me some good ideas of what kinds of guitars had hit the market in the last few years and a few models we should consider considering. A walk through January’s National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Los Angeles gave me further insight.

{"product":{"id":"L20582","stock":"backorderable","price":"899.00","name":"Slash Firebird Limited-Edition Electric Guitar","download":false,"sku_id":"L20582000001000","checksum":"565047124900","rep_id":"site1prodL20582","sku_rep_id":"site1skuL20582000001000"},"category":"Electric Guitars","pageName":"product_detail","subcategory":"Solid Body Electric Guitars","dept":"Guitars"}

These two articles show us how me can manipulate coil winding direction, electrical phase, and magnetic polarity to achieve hum-cancellation between two coils. Having this knowledge allows us to create hum-cancelling combinations of coils over and above than just using humbuckers. A good example is using a RWRP pickup in the middle position of a Strat.


In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.

A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance or they can be pre-recorded. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops. The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape loop effects are still used by some studios who want a vintage sound. Digital loop effects recreate this effect using an electronic memory.

Rickenbacker is another famous American brand created in 1931 to build Hawaiian guitars, called "Frying pans" due to their typical shape. The brand incorporated guitars to its catalog a bit later. The models created by Roger Rossmeisl (Combo 4000 guitar, 4000 bass), a former Gibson collaborator and future Fender man in the 1950's, enjoyed a lot of success and became the brand's most typical designs. The 360, 370, 620, 660, and 4003 models can be connected to a Rick-O-Sound unit (a box with two mono outs) via a stereo 1/4" jack, which allows the two or three pickups to feed different amps. Most instruments have a dual truss rod and a varnished rosewood fretboard. Their distinctive jangle and chime emphasizes high frequencies, giving pretty good results with clean sounds. The Beatles, and especially John Lennon, often played Rickenbacker guitars at the dawn of their careers. Tom Petty, The Jam and R.E.M. are also Rickebacker users.
In general, the typical situation is that HSH gives me options of cleaner/thinner/clearer tones which aren't as achievable with HH (even with volume and tone pots in use!). These are options I use very frequently, and I'd feel pretty restricted with HH! Though of course, this isn't the case for everyone. Indeed, I'm quite fascinated at the variety of tones Ron Thal and Andy Timmons get from the overly-simple SH set up they prefer!
Best Answer:  first off, there are tuning knobs on the end of the neck of the guitar(the neck is the long piece protruding from the body of the guitar) they control the pitch of the strings. When you tune a guitar you want the first string(or the smallest string) to be tuned to the note e.The other strings going up should be the notes b,g,d,a,e. You only need to tune the guitar whenever it gets out of tune. The knobs on the body of the guitar are volume control for each pickup,master tone control, and master volume.The controls differ from each guitar , but they usually follow something like that.Lastly, on a Les Paul there is a switch on the upper part of the body that controls which pickup is being used.-(the pickup selector). A pickup is a magnet that collects sound from the strings and lets it be amplified through a amp.A good amp costs anywhere from 50 to 100 dollars. Good luck on your guitar.
When looking at the list above, it may be a bit overwhelming to see 50+ guitar riff song suggestions. You may not know where to start depending on your skill level. Below, is a short list of 5 songs you should start out with and learn the main riffs of as a beginner guitarist as well as 5 songs you can start with as an intermediate guitarist. Once you’ve learned these, feel free to head back up to the list above and start learning others as you wish.

Guitar strap: If you intend to stand up while playing on guitar during live shows (and most people do), then you need to practice in the same position like when you’re playing live. Your muscles and hands are in a completely different position when you’re sitting down and when you’re standing, and that’s why you MUST get a strap right from the start and practice standing up, as well as sitting down. Price: $10 – $15 should do the trick.
There’s a lot of knowledge here to digest, so the best advice anyone can give you is not to sweat it too much. You aren’t going to become a pedal encyclopedia overnight, and even if you could, you’d be missing out on the fun experience of trial and error that comes with figuring out your first pedals. The truth is that some of the most distinctive guitar and bass effects ever recorded have been the result of artists experimenting with effects units they’d never used before – especially in the 1960s, when pedals were brand-new to everyone.
Another tone control we almost all come in contact with is the amplifier tone stack, as sketched out in Figure 3. A sequence of evolution at Fender led up to the 1957 Bassman becoming the prototype for most amplifiers’ Treble/Bass/Mids control knobs. Marshall and Vox used a similar system. The amplifier “tone stack” is just that – a stack of two or three potentiometers which provide treble, bass, and sometimes midrange controls.
Living Colour’s Vernon Reid agrees but also speaks to a larger shift. He remembers being inspired when he heard Santana on the radio. “There was a culture of guitar playing, and music was central,” adds Reid, 58. “A record would come out and you would hear about that record, and you would make the journey. There was a certain investment in time and resources.”
Silvertone was the “musical” brand for the Sears, Roebuck & Company, beginning nearly a century ago. The big boom was ukuleles in the ’teens and twenties. The first Silvertone product was a hand-cranked phonograph introduced in 1915. Silvertone radios were introduced in the early 1920s. Silvertone guitars appeared in the 1930s, with electric 6-strings appearing in the early ’40s
Fender California Coast Series acoustic guitars are already being used across multiple musical genres by top alternative, indie, punk and grunge artists/bands, such as: Culture Abuse, The Regrettes and Dear Boy, as well as singer-songwriter Aaron Lee Tasjan and guitarist Angela Petrilli – accompanying each on their musical journey toward exceptional artistry.

As their categorical name suggests, extended chords indeed extend seventh chords by stacking one or more additional third-intervals, successively constructing ninth, eleventh, and finally thirteenth chords; thirteenth chords contain all seven notes of the diatonic scale. In closed position, extended chords contain dissonant intervals or may sound supersaturated, particularly thirteenth chords with their seven notes. Consequently, extended chords are often played with the omission of one or more tones, especially the fifth and often the third,[92][93] as already noted for seventh chords; similarly, eleventh chords often omit the ninth, and thirteenth chords the ninth or eleventh. Often, the third is raised an octave, mimicking its position in the root's sequence of harmonics.[92]


The Supro brand name was introduced by the National-Dobro Corporation to sell its less expensive electric instruments. The first Supro Spanish and Hawaiian guitars appeared in 1936, and the brand would thrive until the bankruptcy of Valco in 1968. (The modern Supro line of amps bears no relationship to the original brand name). By the end of the 1930s, a pattern was established that would last for the next 30 years: Supro guitars and amps would generally be more affordable than their closest National counterparts, but built to similar quality and sometimes incorporating features not found in any National. Supro instruments were sold through a much less exclusive network of dealers than National, and as a result they have acquired a name recognition that surpasses their “superior” siblings.
While you're doing your strumming and picking lay that part of your hand on the strings by the bridge of your guitar. This will mute or partially silence the strings. On an electric guitar going through an amp, this can become a percussion instrument. The trick is to use it for a percussion effect and then raise that hand up when you want to let the strings rings er.. ring.

Acoustic guitar body sizes and styles differ between manufacturers. The C.F. Martin Company has been at the forefront of setting trends in body styles and sizes, and many companies have followed suit with their standards as a solid foundation,and altering their designs to creat custom sizes and styles. The following describes some of the common acoustic guitar body sizes and styles, and shares a little bit about the sound and tone profiles.   These profiles do not follow Martins standards to a tee, but do exhibit some of the most commonly used acoustic guitar body sizes and styles used, many having been influenced by the Martin Guitar Company.
yeah, i used to play the vht straight up sometimes. that amp was tonal sweetness, and had a tank reverb. if i dime it, i can get away with playing alot of stuff on the ac4. but i like having a little chorus for certain things, and i do a couple of songs that i would like to have a rotary pedal for, and although i'm not big on reverb, i don't mind using a touch of delay in place of it. if i did have a wah, i'd use it as a tone knob. oh, and i want a harmonizer. specifically, the eventide pitchfactor.
The numbers back him up. In the past decade, electric guitar sales have plummeted, from about 1.5 million sold annually to just over 1 million. The two biggest companies, Gibson and Fender, are in debt, and a third, PRS Guitars, had to cut staff and expand production of cheaper guitars. In April, Moody’s downgraded Guitar Center, the largest chain retailer, as it faces $1.6 billion in debt. And at Sweetwater.com, the online retailer, a brand-new, interest-free Fender can be had for as little as $8 a month.
The Sweetwater Used Gear Marketplace is a lot like Craigslist or eBay, only it's exclusively for gear, and it's 100% free — there are absolutely no charges or fees involved. Buying or selling, you'll be interacting directly with other musicians and audio enthusiasts, so we've included some tips below to help navigate your transactions. Learn More | Safe Shopping Tips
These pedals are different, but are both based on the same idea. Pitch shifters shift the whole pitch of your guitar up or down by a set amount (often an octave), giving you a higher or lower tone than would normally be possible. Jack white uses a Whammy pitch shifter in the solo for Seven Nation Army, which has a foot pedal that rocks back and forth (similar to a wah pedal) allowing you to go up and down a full octave or more smoothly and quickly.
Now, if you are an electric player who doesn’t like using any pedals, that’s perfectly fine. Just be honest about the reasons. If you just like the sound of your guitar and your amp, cool. If you just want to keep things simple, I understand. That’s your preference, and it doesn’t make you better in any way than someone else who does. If you’ve been a genuine listener of music, you’ve seen and heard players who’ve blown their audiences away on un-amplified classical guitars, and players who blow us away with lots of pedals on their boards.
1976 Fender Stratocaster, Some changed parts to include,pickguard, tuners,possibly knobs. Original factory natural finish, fret wear, plays but will need a refret at some point,Comes with a non original black tolex hard shell case. No backplate or tremolo arm. Overseas clients PM me for accurate shipping quotes as free shipping is only to a lower 48 US address. Trades may be considered.      SEE MORE HERE .
The Ovation Guitar Company founded by Charles Kaman based in the USA. The company primarily manufactures nylon-string acoustic guitars & steel-string acoustic guitars.These are the kind of electric guitars that are ideal for a recording in a studio and also great for stage performance. Their design incorporates, a wood top with a rounded, synthetic bowl shape instead of the traditional back and sides. CE44-RR is one of the most popular series of acoustic guitars produced by this brand. This is an expensive brand of guitars whose starting price is 31,555 INR approximately.
It’s also worth noting that Fender guitars are typically available with a few different pickup combinations. I’d especially recommend checking out a HSS Stratocaster for rock music. The humbucker in the bridge position gives you a thicker, hotter sound, but you still have all that great Strat tone in the from the neck and middle pickups. I’ve played a Standard HSS Strat for over a decade and it’s one of my favorite guitars.
The sounds of the electric guitar made it to outer space. In 1977, both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were launched into space with remnants of international life and culture onboard. On each vessel was a gold-plated phonograph record with 115 sounds and images curated by a team led by astronomer Carl Sagan. Along with selections that included the likes of Bach and Beethoven, Sagan decided to throw in – however controversial it was at the time – Johnny B Goode by Chuck Berry, an American rock’n’roll anthem defined by its rollicking electric guitar lick.

It has been said that Barney never played his signature Kays. On the contrary... Barney Kessel has been photographed in concert with the Kay K8700 Jazz Special on multiple occasions, has made appearances at Waldo's Jazz Club on the television classic "Johnny Staccato - Television's Jazz Detective" and has been confirmed by son Dan (who also recorded with the Artist on several famous recordings) to have used the Artist to record countless rock, pop, r&b and blues hits with the most popular performers of the early '60s.
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you are looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
It's not subjective. When you're setting up a guitar you measure the height of the strings, typically you're at about 4/64" for the high E and 5/64" for the low E. You can go above or below the recommendation but if you go too low you can start to get a bit of fret buzz. How low you can go is not a function so much of what guitar you own, but how level your frets are and your neck relief. Most good guitars can be set up to play "fast". Obviously they don't get faster when you paint them fluorescent orange, or make the headstock pointy.
For subtle modulation just set every knob at about 11 o'clock. You'll get a thin, shimmering layer over your acoustic guitar's tone that doesn't drown out the natural resonance of the instrument. The pedal doesn't boost your signal or add any kind of volume. All you'll hear is a clear, simple effect. Additionally, the CH-1's two stereo outputs allow you to easily split your signal between two amplification sources. Simply plug your primary source into output A (mono) and the secondary source into output B.
The FX325A is one of the most popular Yamaha acoustic electric guitars especially due to its quality sound and affordable price. This model is suited for both beginners and experienced musicians. With a spruce top and Nato back and sides, this full-size dreadnought is both rich-sounding and durable, able to offer years of enriching musical experiences.
Which brings us to this 1985 DT-250. While it sports the tail notch, the shape is a little more sleek and diminutive than the comparable Dean ML. The lower front bout is extended to be almost symmetrical with the diagonally opposite bass wing. The treble-side lower bout is shortened, giving the whole guitar a tasteful offset-X shape… X Series. To add dimension to the shape, Fuji Gen Gakki added “crystal cuts” to the edges, basically code for angled bevels.
Digital reverbs, like their sibling delays, offer more power and a greater variety of settings. And in addition to doing some approximations of spring reverb sounds, digital units usually offer more “lifelike” reverberation as heard in anything from an empty room to a large concert hall, if you want to add a synthesized “natural” room sound to your signal rather than merely replicate the classic sproing of springs. A few pedals do this very well, but most such devices are rack units that are best used in an amp’s FX loop, and are beyond the scope of this article. For all the power of digital reverbs, however, there are plenty of guitarists who just don’t warm to them, and the tube-driven, analog, spring reverb effect remains hands-down the favorite for guitar.
A passive pickup doesn’t produce a very strong signal, which can result in a small amount of volume and an anemic tone. However, the signal can either be boosted at the p.a., your amp, or the most versatile option' via an Acoustic Preamp. Active pickups don’t require any external technology to boost, though they do require a battery, but some people still use acoustic preamps for the tone shaping and DI benefits..
well it does not effect the strings electronically. however. each pickup depending on its position on the guitar is designed to pick up a specific range of tones. the pickup closes to the neck is meant to pick up the bass range whereas the one closest to the bridge is meant to pick up the treble(higher) end of the tonal spectrum. all that aside when you actually move the switch it might have a reverberation throughout your guitar because the switch is just really hard or stiff. it might need to be broken in no worries there.
In my opinion, I don't think this guitar is quite worthy of all of the rave reviews here, based on the thin sound. I bought this because my Zager needs to go in for new frets and I have to wait until May to get it worked on, and wanted to get something inexpensive to use in the meantime. This is a beautiful instrument, no doubt. The finish is stunning, it's very nicely made and ready to play out of the box, so on that level I would give it 5 stars. But soundwise, for me I'd say 2 and half stars. The bottom end is nowhere to be found. I tried to switch to the same strings I am using on my other guitar and it's no different. This guitar has about the same dimensions as my Zager, but nowhere near the same bass response. It'll do fine as
Editor’s Note: My previous top choice, the Yamaha APX500iii, is now replaced with a newer and better model, the Yamaha APX600. What make’s it better, you ask? Well, there were some complaints regarding the previous model for having a lack of bass response and a “bland” sound when unplugged. Yamaha addresses this issue by changing the guitar’s bracing pattern, thus improving it’s overall sound response, making the APX600 a good choice for an acoustic-electric guitar. I suggest you go check this bad boy out.
{ "thumbImageID": "Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Midnight-Sapphire/J25053000005000", "defaultDisplayName": "Epiphone Sheraton-II PRO Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Midnight Sapphire", "sku": "sku:site51500000240440", "price": "699.00", "regularPrice": "699.00", "msrpPrice": "1,165.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Midnight-Sapphire-1500000240440.gc", "skuImageId": "Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Midnight-Sapphire/J25053000005000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Preorder", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Midnight-Sapphire/J25053000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Natural", "sku": "sku:site51435592256803", "price": "699.00", "regularPrice": "699.00", "msrpPrice": "1,165.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Natural-1435592256803.gc", "skuImageId": "Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Natural/J25053000003000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Natural/J25053000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Vintage Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51435592256787", "price": "699.00", "regularPrice": "699.00", "msrpPrice": "1,165.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst-1435592256787.gc", "skuImageId": "Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst/J25053000004000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst/J25053000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Ebony", "sku": "sku:site51435592256739", "price": "549.99", "regularPrice": "699.00", "msrpPrice": "1,165.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Ebony-1435592256739.gc", "skuImageId": "Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Ebony/J25053000002000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Ebony/J25053000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Wine Red", "sku": "sku:site51435592256723", "price": "699.00", "regularPrice": "699.00", "msrpPrice": "1,165.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Wine-Red-1435592256723.gc", "skuImageId": "Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Wine-Red/J25053000001000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Sheraton-II-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Wine-Red/J25053000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Choosing guitar strings is like choosing lenses and frames for your glasses.  There is a right strength of lens for you and when you switch frames it may take some adjusting to get used to.  This analogy is referring to the bridge height, nuts, and truss rod tension.  Do take your time to experiment but once you settle it's best to keep using the same gauges so you can dodge the lengthy set-up process from happening again.

For our purposes, I’ll break pedals down into four overarching categories: 1) Boost, Compression, Distortion, and Fuzz; 2) Modulation; 3) Echo and Delay; and 4) Filtering and EQ-Based effects, and this series will focus on individual types that come within each of those larger categories (for example, Modulation includes many quite different effects, such as chorus, vibrato, phasing, and so on). This is not to say that some manufacturers or other writers couldn’t categorize things differently, and certainly a few examples below could be safely lifted out of the heading I have stuck them in and accurately described by another category. It doesn’t matter all that much. These headings are mainly a means of breaking down the sonic results of the enormously varied range of pedals that exists out there, and taking a brief look at what makes them tick.
Pots generally come in two types: 500k or 250k. K refers to 1000 ohms and is a measure of resistance, which is the amount of resistance the signal from your pickup receives before being passed to your output. As a result, increasing or decreasing the amount of resistance your output receives via your volume pot affects the overall volume of your guitar.
{"id": "L20582", "categoryId":"site5AAG", "name":"Slash Firebird Limited-Edition Electric Guitar", "pageUrl":"/Epiphone/Slash-Firebird-Limited-Edition-Electric-Guitar.gc", "thumbnailUrl":"https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Slash-Firebird-Limited-Edition-Electric-Guitar-Trans-Black/L20582000001000-00-180x180.jpg", "hasFeatures":"0", "isAccessory":"0", "message":"", "value":"899.00", "priceMin":"899.00", "priceMax":"899.00", "msrp":"1,499.00", "productVisibilityMSRP":"1", "restockPrice":"", "openBoxPrice":"", "clearancePrice":"", "isPlatinum":"0", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"0", "brand":"Epiphone", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/brand/gc/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"0.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"0", "reviewHowManyReviews":"0", "usedOrNew":"new", "discontinued":"0", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"1", "accessoryCategories":"site5LFMIC,site5LAAA,site5HBA", "stickerText": "Top Seller", "isVintage": "0", "outletonly": "0", "checksum":"565047124900", "priceVisibility": "1", "itemType": "New"}
Not sure I would recommend this for someone over 11 or 12 who is genuinely serious about learning, I probably would have skipped ahead to something larger. But if you are looking for a "toy" that really could inspire a child to develop a talent, this guitar is an ideal choice. One word of caution... the amp/guitar connectors are standard size so there is nothing stopping one from connecting it straight to a much more robust megawatt amp! For the price, five stars easy.
Power amps are rated in volts and generally come in .7V, 1V, and 1.25V. Most preamps don’t produce strong enough output to power a 1.25V. Most manufacturers don’t rate the average output of their preamp which makes things even harder in determining compatibility. What you can look for is the “line level“, “dBu”, or “dBv” information when researching this aspect of your acoustic electric guitar.
Death By Audio Reverberation Machine Spring type Reverb/synthetic atmosphere creator with Altitude control that allows the reverb to distort. Also has a light/dark switch to control color of the reverb. Pedal was used in a smoke free studio, never gigged and has no velco on bottom. Pedal has small speckled blemishes in paint next to volume knob. This has no effect on function. Pedal is in perfect working order. This is a great pedal for people who want to add more texture to their sound. Ive used it on synths, drum machines and samples- handles any source without discretion. The only reason for letting it go is that i have too many spring type reverbs. Thanks for looking .
While it definitely looks unique with its four sharp edges and sculpted cutaways, this guitar follows conventional super strat design, starting with a basswood body that is joined to a maple neck. For its price, its quite surprising to find that this guitar features a neck through design, which is normally only found on more expensive electric guitars. The 25.5" scale neck is topped by a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard with a nut width of 1.65", providing a familiar shred friendly feel. Giving this guitar its metal friendly voice are two LH-150 Humbuckers that are hot enough for mean high gain metal tones.
While Epiphone doesn’t quite stack up to Gibson’s deep tone and crystal clear sound, there’s still plenty for guitarists to love about the brand’s offerings. Considering the difference in price, Epiphone delivers a pretty solid approximation of the Gibson tone, which will likely be enough to win over players who just can’t bring themselves to shell out for a true Les Paul. Between the sound quality and their near indistinguishability to the real thing, it’s no surprise Epiphone is ranked so highly among fans of the guitar.
Since 1994 The Music Zoo has been a trusted source for musicians around the world. We've located guitars for Slash, sold guitars for Steve Miller, held performances by major artists like Steve Vai, built thousands of customer relationships, and helped countless enthusiasts find just the right instrument. Today we look forward to finding your next guitar!
In late 1929, Martin built a prototype batch of six OM guitars. The very first of these had pyramid bridges and no pickguard. Martin soon realized that with the vigorous strumming required in a band setting, a pickguard would be required. Hence all OMs after the prototype batch had a small teardrop-shaped pickguard. The new OMs were not highly sucessful. They sold, but not as well as Martin had hoped. In 1933 the OM designation was dropped and was now called the "000" model. But infact the 1933 "000" models were the same as the 1933 "OM" models, retaining the OM body style and 14 fret neck. Then in 1934 the standard 000 models were modified to the shorter 24.9" scale (for unknown reasons, as the 12 fret 000 body had a 25.6" scale length its inception in 1902 to its demise in 1931). Yet the OM's longer scale was a major factor in the OM's tone. The strings on an OM must be tuned to a higher tension to get concert pitch. This extra tension translates into more drive on the top, hence providing more volume and tone. The OM's scalloped braces and a small maple bridgeplate give the OM a great sound. Although these features were common to other Martin models of the time, the OM's top brace under the fingerboard was missing. This design is unique to OMs making the top very lightly braced. This does lead to some problems with cracks in the upper bout along the side of the fingerboard, but it also contributes to the great sound of the OM models.
Hybrid bass amplifier heads typically pair a tube preamplifier with a solid-state power amplifier. This provides the player with the best elements of both amplifier technology. The tube preamp gives the player the ability to obtain tube amplifier tone, which tube enthusiasts state is "warmer" than a solid state (transistor) preamp. As well, tube users state that tube preamps have a more pleasing-sounding, natural tone when the preamp's volume is pushed up so high that the bass signal becomes overdriven; in contrast, a solid state preamp that is pushed to the point of signal "clipping" can be harsh-sounding. Some hybrid amp heads have a bypass switch, so that the tube preamp can be bypassed, if the tube breaks or develops a technical problem. The tube preamplified signal in a hybrid amplifier head is then sent to a solid state power amplifier. Compared with tube power amps, solid state power amplifiers are more reliable, require less maintenance, less fragile and lighter in weight. A hybrid tube preamp/solid state power amp thus provides a bass player with the benefits of both technologies' strengths: tube preamp tone and solid state reliability for the power amp.
i have a grand total of 1 pedal. it's an overdrive pedal that i only use when playing heavier songs. Other than that, i tend to play just guitar and amp. My amp has reverb and i tend to set that at about 1/3 the way round. Does that count as effects? My settings are set just on the edge of break up so i get a nice clean tone, but when i hit it harder, it gives a little crunch.

TRUE. Tommy can be good but I find he has a lot of filler and some overly fluffy tunes sometimes. It makes it sound like he’s trying too hard to play it with as many different chords as possible before finally landing the first note. (which is usually late). and for clapton below me I could agree but I think Jimmy Page’s playing is just as good but he’s more reckless. he’s reckless for good reason though, it’s like he’s transfering his feeling to it like Jimi Hendrix would but Page’s guitar sounds like your heart wanting to rip out of your chest to claim your biggest desire once and for all. The kind of vibe when you finally realize your in love after a LONG time of dullness. Jimi is groovy, and Clapton likes to serenade seeming like an old gentle man from any age.
Buying an electric guitar is a very personal process, with many things to consider before you make your final choice. It’s not just a case of picking something with a nice color – you are usually parting with a substantial chunk of hard-earned cash, ranging anywhere from $100 to $2000 – or more – for some guitars, and therefore patience is required to find something that really suits you.
I have a Decca that my uncle gave to my dad and he gave to me (I think, he's never really asked for it back since he doesn't play). It's in rough condition, has stripped and rusted screws with a lot of connection issues. But I love the shape, I love the pickguard, I love the all out retro look of it. Any idea on if I should spruce it up with some new screws and seeing what I can do to fix the wiring? And if so, how do I get the cash for such project?
Most of the modern electric guitars are provided with several tones and volume controlling circuits which helps in controlling the string vibration and thus the electrical charge produced. These adjustments are mainly done with the help of knobs provided on the neck of the guitar. Thus, the more the number of electrical circuits, the better the guitar can be adjusted for different sounds.
It’s interesting to note that luthier Steve Klein introduced a guitar that got a lot of press in the early ’80s with a body virtually identical to the Ovation Breadwinner. According to Charles’ son (and future president of Kaman Corporation), Bill Kaman, Jr., Ovation considered “pointing this out” (i.e., legal action), but given its bad track record with solidbodies, figured it wasn’t worth the effort.
One other thing to note is during the 1960's there was a lot of consolidation in the Chicago guitar manufacturers. In the 1940's National and Dobro merged to form Valco. One of Valco's sub-brand's was Supro which sold guitars under the Sears moniker Silvertone but they also manufactured guitars for Montgomery Wards as the "Airline" brand (Jack White of the White Stripes plays an Airline "Layfayette" reso-glas guitar) and there were a few other house brands too. In 1968 the conglomerate Valco closed it's doors. Also in 1968 Danelectro was shut down by MCA which had purchased it in 1966. Kay also went out of business and the remains were bought by Teisco. The only major brand that survived the 1960's to continue making these amazing guitars through the early 1970's was Harmony. We believe that's because they were the largest of all guitar manufacturers in the 1960's.
Two new models that would eventually become mainstays joined the Teisco line in ’65. Theye were two double cuts with slightly more flared horns, in a sort of tulip shape. Both had a single, wide, chrome-covered pickup with poles exposed along one edge. This was similar to the old MJ-1 but by ’65 would become the new SM series. Both had bolt-on necks with bound rosewood fretboards and the top-edge rectangular inlays. The E-100 had a bridge/tailpiece assembly, volume and tone on a small pickguard, and one of the elongated Strat-style heads. The ET-100 had a platform vibrato. As a sign of things to come, the Teisco Del Rey ET-100 had a regular Strat-style headstock, the first to appear on Teiscos, as far as I’m aware.
Daron Malakian (b. 1975) is the lead guitarist for System of a Down. During the System of a Down era, Daron played IC200's and IC300's on stage. During the Toxicity era, Malakian played a variation of the Ibanez Iceman ICX, with custom artwork designed by his father, then a special edition "DMM1" was released by Ibanez. The DMM1 featured more artwork by Malakian's father, Vartan Malakian (b. 1947). After using Gibson guitars for 5 years, Daron switched back to Ibanez and began using an Iceman again.

In the present scenario many brands are providing the better quality Guitars and serving their customers the best services. Nowadays music industry is demanding better performances. For performing the best people are switching one to other brands. The brands are competing with each others to maintain their selves in to the top 10 chart. So please strike down to your strings for the right notes.
{ "thumbImageID": "C-1-Platinum-Electric-Guitar-Satin-Transparent-Midnight-Blue/H96103000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Schecter Guitar Research C-1 Platinum Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Satin Transparent Midnight Blue", "sku": "sku:site51500000239535", "price": "449.99", "regularPrice": "549.99", "msrpPrice": "699.02", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Schecter-Guitar-Research/C-1-Platinum-Electric-Guitar-Satin-Transparent-Midnight-Blue-1500000239535.gc", "skuImageId": "C-1-Platinum-Electric-Guitar-Satin-Transparent-Midnight-Blue/H96103000002000", "brandName": "Schecter Guitar Research", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/C-1-Platinum-Electric-Guitar-Satin-Transparent-Midnight-Blue/H96103000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Translucent Black", "sku": "sku:site51364222300326", "price": "449.99", "regularPrice": "549.99", "msrpPrice": "799.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Schecter-Guitar-Research/C-1-Platinum-Electric-Guitar-Translucent-Black-1364222300326.gc", "skuImageId": "C-1-Platinum-Electric-Guitar-Translucent-Black/H96103000001000", "brandName": "Schecter Guitar Research", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/C-1-Platinum-Electric-Guitar-Translucent-Black/H96103000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
×