Which brings us to this 1985 DT-250. While it sports the tail notch, the shape is a little more sleek and diminutive than the comparable Dean ML. The lower front bout is extended to be almost symmetrical with the diagonally opposite bass wing. The treble-side lower bout is shortened, giving the whole guitar a tasteful offset-X shape… X Series. To add dimension to the shape, Fuji Gen Gakki added “crystal cuts” to the edges, basically code for angled bevels.
That is true, but without the many fine guitarists of today, who will inspire the gifted musicians of tomorrow. Musicians are artists and it would be quite dull if they all copied each other and sounded the same wouldn’t it? Whether we like it or not the world keeps on spinning regardless of what we want, think or do. Enjoy the gifts that are shared today, because we’re not guaranteed a minute more.
Anytime you hear a screaming or raunchy sounding harmonic by way of loads of gain come jumping out of your speakers, it’s likely a result of pinch harmonics. Pinch harmonics follow the same basic idea of harmonics, except this time the contact is made with the skin of your pick hand thumb right after picking a note. Where you do this determines the pitch of the harmonic.
It seems strange that we’ve come so far into an article about acoustic guitars without mentioning the ‘other’ big name in this world; Taylor. The American company has been duking it out with Martin since 1974 for the title of top dog in the world of acoustic guitars, and has come up with a few unique iterations of its own along the way. Nowadays, you could point to the GS Mini and Big Baby as examples of Taylor leading the way in acoustic guitar innovation, but back in the day it was the Grand Auditorium style which really put them on the map.
The effect of amplifier coloration can be emulated using a parametric EQ, where you'll probably find you need to add some upper mid-range boost to get the same brightness as from an amp. Note that, if you're using a software amp modelling plug-in, you'll still get the best results if you feed your guitar via a high-impedance DI box — plugging it straight into a soundcard's line input is likely to result in a drop in level and may even affect the sustain and high end of the guitar sound due to the pickups being loaded by the impedance of the input circuitry. This does not apply to active pickup systems which, in effect, function as a combination of pickup and DI box.
Unlike Andrew, before Rocksmith 2014 Carl had never played anything other than a toy-guitar controller. The lessons made it easy to learn the basics—from just holding the instrument properly, to playing basic notes and fingering techniques—all without the pressure of a human guitar instructor's waning patience. Since this was my first experience playing a real guitar, I was eager to learn and didn't mind that the notes scroll horizontally across the screen instead of Guitar Hero and Rock Band's vertical scrolling.

As early as 1924 or so, Lloyd Loar had experimented with amplifying acoustic instruments, though it would not be until the ’30s that his efforts would pan out (without great commercial success). He was undoubtedly ahead of his time. The only amplifier technology available to Loar was primitive radio amplification, hardly adequate for cutting through the horn section. As the ’20s progressed, Hollywood invented “talkies,” and huge valve amplifiers were developed to fill theaters (the music trade press at the time repeatedly published essays assuring musician readers that talkies would have absolutely no effect on the jobs of theater organists!). Part of this technological development included the invention of more and more tubes and the improvement of older designs, which increased the possibilities for instrumental amplification.


Compressors – The role of these pedals is to lift up quiet sounds and rein in loud sounds, compressing the dynamic range of your signal – that is, the difference between the quietest and loudest sounds. They work wonders for songs with a blend of quiet and loud parts, since they let you play hard without busting eardrums, and the soft sections won’t be drowned out by ringing ears. Compressors also have the nice side effect of increasing sustain, letting your notes sound out longer before dropping off.
Epiphone Zakk Wylde Les Paul Custom Plus Bullseye Solidbody Electric Guitar at a Glance: Loaded with Zakk's blazing-hot custom EMG active humbuckers Totally solid mahogany body and hard maple neck deliver freakish sustain Premium hardware put this Les Paul in a class all of its own Loaded with Zakk's blazing-hot custom EMG active humbuckers Turn up the heat with a pair of the most outrageously amp ...
For any venue, it's important to bring along the right amp. A huge amp in a tiny club is not only overkill; it's also extra setup work that you can avoid altogether with a smaller combo amp. On the flipside, a little amp in a big theatre could mean that some of the audience won't even hear you. Take your time deciding what the best option is for you.
Recently I was in the market for a low watt 1x12 amp. My local music store had a good selection. I grouped an old Vox AC15, Fender Deluxe, Orange, and a PV around me. I used a PRS Custom 22 to try them out. After about an hour I decided on the Fender. The sales guy suggested I try one more amp. It was an Egater Rebel 20 head with an Egnater 1x12 cab. My reaction was instant! If you have not played one of these you owe it to yourself to check them out! I bought it and also a Rebel 30 1x12 Combo a few weeks later! They SING!
A very stylish black guitar by ENCORE with a great 'Humbucker' pickup.......The simplicity of this instrument makes it a joy to play and It sounds as good as it looks! Used....but in great condition and showing only minimal signs of use (no scratches, chips or dings) and is in full working order. The scale is full length (not 3/4 or 7/8)...but the body size is smaller and lighter than a typical stratocaster (see image for comparison), which makes this guitar perfect for a younger / smaller person or anybody who might like a very robust but lighter instrument. All reasonable offers considered.
Reamping was originally invented as a creative tool. Instead of spending hours crafting the perfect guitar tone before hitting record, the dry signal from a DI is recorded and later “reamped”, saving time and letting the guitarist focus on nailing the performance. This allows the engineer to send the recorded dry signal through guitar amps or tone shaping devices during post production, eliminating the need for the guitarist to be present.
I went to work for Southland Musical Merchandise Corporation on August 1, 1972. The company had been formerly owned by a very honest man named Harry Greenberg. Earlier in 1972 he sold out to Onsite Energy Systems and everything changed from "let's make the best product at the best price" to "let's see how high we can make our profit margin - to hell with quality".

Again, it's a matter of personal preference and style. Many people prefer to learn on acoustic guitars, but the strings are much tougher which causes fatigue to learning fingertips. The strings produce a buzzing effect as they are hard. Harder strings mean that learning fingers will find it hard to play bar chords. On the other hand, electric guitars offer comfort while holding down chords as the width of the neck is shorter than that of an acoustic guitar. The strings on an electric guitar are softer which makes means you can practice longer without your fingers getting sore. The habit of playing with light strings from the beginning can trouble in near future as acoustic guitars are also needed in various music production situations. And don't forget, you'll need to pick up an amp and so on to play your electric guitar.

The best place to start is with a small tube amp. This kind of amp is far less forgiving, leaving you nowhere to hide. It sounds counter-intuitive, I know. You’re looking for the best choice and here I am telling you one that will make things more difficult. But think of it as tough love – forcing you to confront your technique and learn the right way to play a chord or scale progression.
Look, as far as we know, our asymmetrically coiffed party pal has never held a guitar in his life. But no contemporary musician has a more primal understanding of adrenaline-pumping, pulse-raising, chest-caving bulldozer riffs than dubstep mosh ambassador Skrillex. Somewhere between the unfiltered piston-pumps of nü-metal and the twinkling emocore melodies that weaned him is a gaping sarlacc of yawping melodies and buzzsaw edges. The bass drop to “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites” might just be this generation’s “Smoke on the Water” — look no further than the obscene number of “Skrillex guitar cover” videos on YouTube!

As one of the best electric guitars under 200 dollars, the instrument utilizes an agathis body, a bolt-on maple neck, a sonokeling neck, and a classic rosewood fingerboard with 22 frets and white dot inlays. The electronic section features a peculiar combination of one humbucker and two single pickups, allowing the guitar to cover plenty of sonic ground.
000-15: Base model of the upper end Martin Guitar line. All mahogany orsapele construction. ‘A Frame’ “X” top bracing, 14 frets clear, Optional model 000-15S 12 frets clear. All -16 and -16 series 000 instruments have long scales (25.4″) and 1-11/16″ nut widths, in contrast to the -18, -28, and -45 series, which have the ‘traditional’ 24.9″ 000 scale, retaining the 1-11/16″ nut width.
Tube amplifiers are the original amplifier and still seen as the best way to amplify an electric guitar – and for good reason! Despite impressive advances in amplification technology, nothing beats the natural sound of a vacuum tube that has been pushed to its very limit. In fact, for many guitarists it’s either tube or nothing, as the volume, vibe and fluid sound profile of these amps is extremely hard to replicate. One model we really like is the Hughes & Kettner TubeMeister TM18H, which has killer looks, delivers a delightful tube tone, has switchable wattages, and doesn’t break the bank.

In 2005, Gibson issued three Pete Townshend signature edition Les Paul Deluxe guitars, based on Townshend’s heavily customised “#1” Wine Red 1976 Les Paul Deluxe, “#3” Gold top 1976, and “#9” Cherry Sunburst 1976. These guitars were modified by Alan Rogan and used extensively on stage and in the studio with The Who. In addition to the two mini-humbuckers the guitar carried, Rogan modified Townshend’s originals with a DiMarzio humbucker in the middle. Toggle switches located behind the guitar’s tailpiece turned the pickup on and off and added volume boost. The control knobs were wired for volume, one for each pickup and a master volume. The reissues differed from Townshend’s originals in that the reissues had an inlay at the first fret while the originals did not.
Many guitar and bass bodies are made from Mahogany. There are 49 types of Mahogany, but many are practically extinct because of the wood’s popularity for furniture and musical instruments, and the types used today are not the same as the Mahogany used in guitars in the 1940s or 1950s. Mahogany gives a warm timbre with a lot of bottom end. Les Paul type guitars often combine a mahogany body with a maple top for a total that is balanced overall.
Established over a century ago as a piano and reed organ builder, Yamaha has since expanded into building other musical equipment and even went on to successfully expand into other industries. But in all this success, Yamaha continues to stay true to their musical roots, producing highly rated instruments, amps and other gear. While they are not primarily a guitar amplifier builder, Yamaha's extensive reach and resources give them an almost unfair advantage over the competition, as exemplified by the success of their THR line of desktop guitar amplifiers. This line of portable amps combines Yamaha's penchant for student friendly features and modern studio functions that many guitarists appreciate, ultimately securing Yamaha a special spot on this list.
Guitar Neck wood Fingerboard Blanks Electric guitar wood Burl Poplar 1pc Walnut Spalted Apple Burl poplar Spalted Maple Olive Spalted Walnut Burl Elm African Mahogany body wood Red Willow 1pc body blanks Plum Red Willow 2pc body blanks Spalted Birch Pear Mulberry Maple Acoustic / Classic guitar wood Flute and Oud blanks Pool Cue wood blanks & Wood Turning Gallery Sold examples Custom Wood Products Binding wood NEW! Gun Stock Blanks
Pedals. I have a basic rule when it comes to overdrives, distortions, and fuzzes: When I engage them, I want the volume to either stay the same or increase a bit, so I’m “pushing” the amp with the pedal. Because drives compress the sound, they can tend to seem louder overall when you turn them on, but actually they might be reducing the overall peak level. I don’t want to diminish the natural output level coming out of my guitar, and I don’t want my guitar tone to vanish in the mix when I hit a pedal. As I mentioned earlier, I often run the tone control quite low on drive pedals, which I feel keeps them sounding warm and natural.
Subtlety: You don't always have to make longer echo or delay effects obvious in the mix for them to be effective. Once you've set up the delay times and panned them to suit your song, try dropping the delay levels until you scarcely notice them during most of the mix (listening on headphones often helps set the most suitable level). This generally results in intriguing little ripples of repeats that you notice at the end of verses or during pauses, that add interest and low-level detail to the mix. Martin Walker

Though he was influenced by everyone from B.B. King to Muddy Waters to Chuck Berry and Bob Dylan, Hendrix’s complete artistic vision included elements of blues, funk, rock, psychedelia and utter chaos. His frequent use of effects like the wah and Octavia pedal, pioneering studio effects like “backward” guitar and flanging, and use of controlled feedback and the tremolo bar added another dimension to his music.


Epiphone began in Manhattan in 1903 when Anastasios Stathopoulo set up shop (not as Epiphone). When Anastasios died of cancer in 1915 his son Epaminondas (Epi) took over the business. Epiphone and Gibson had an on-going rivalry first in banjos and then in archtop guitars. Gibson finally acquired Epiphone in 1957. Although Epiphone guitars continued to be made in America for a time after the acquisition (often in the same factory, side-by-side with similar Gibson models), Epiphone is now a Gibson brand for overseas, imported lower cost guitars, though many are based on Gibson designs.
Compared to, say, an Epiphone Dot, the Coupe offers a ‘woodier,’ more acoustic timbre. “Sparkly,” “bell-like” and “jangly” are descriptors often associated with the guitar and its stock pair of P-90s, and cranking the gain up elicits more a sizzle than roar. Be careful with the distortion, though—without a center block like those you’ll find on semi-hollows, the Coupe is still fairly susceptible to feedback.
This little-known company is responsible for the St. George badge. This particular badge was made from 1963-1967. It also produced the rare Shiro guitar. It is possible that the company may also be responsible for the Pleasant guitar badge after 1966. This company may have been a small offshoot of Aria Guitar Company, founded by Shiro Arai, but that has not been verified as of today.
Overall length is 28 1/2 in. (72.4 cm.), 10 in. (25.4 cm.) width, and 1 5/8 in. (4.1 cm.) in depth, measured at side of rim. Scale length is 15 1/4 in. (387 mm.). Width of nut is 1 3/4 in. (44 mm.). All original and complete, and quite clean overall; there are a few small dings to the finish and some light checking-almost inevitable on the Eko-made Vox instruments. The only notable finish marring is one spot where a superglue repair to a cracked pickguard corner left a bit of residue behind. A very nice little player, with an awful lot of chime! Excellent - Condition.

Most of Peter, Paul and Mary’s work had splendid fingerstyle guitar work. My favorite is “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”. Paul Stookey also had some fine acoustic work going solo with stuff like “Sebastian” and “The Wedding Song”. “The Wedding Song” was supposedly “must learn” stuff for aspiring acoustic players in the 70’s (so they could play at their friends’ weddings).
Fortunately I did some research, performed some trial and error experimentation on my own semi-hollow (a very nice Epiphone Dot) and found what I consider to be the best way to wire up a hollow body guitar. You won’t need any uncommon tools or equipment – just a wrench set (or an adjustable wrench), plenty of wire, a pair of needle-nose pliers, a soldering iron, and a bit of patience. I’ve included plenty of pics to help illustrate each step.

I say from 0 to 360 degrees because that’s the simplest way to envision the “full circle” of the phase relationship, and in reality you can’t walk further around anything than a full circle. Unless you’re a phase shifter. For these pedals, designers talk in terms of a continual shifting of the phase relationship from 0 to, in theory, infinity, depending upon how many shifting stages the circuit contains. The phase shifts by 180 degrees for each stage, so for the typical simple phaser with four stages, we’re talking from 0 to 720 degrees, with three peaks and two notches along the way. Phasers with six, eight and even ten stages have been built for use with guitar. But for many, the simple four-stage circuit is most appealing.
What would happen if four former Marshall employees got together? Well in this particular case, they formed Blackstar! Their product range includes hand-wired amps (the Artisan series) as well as products featuring different digital technologies (the ID:series). Plus, we have them to thank for the existence of the ISF system, a control that allows to switch gradually between American and British sound. In spite of the company's young life (it was founded in 2004), the brand already has many artists associated to its name like Silenoz (Dimmu Borgir) and James Dean Bradfield (Manic Street Preachers).
Here’s an interesting (they’re all interesting to me!!!) guitar that shows the evolution of Matsumoku made guitars.  Even the earliest solid body electrics that came out of the Matsumoku plant were made of solid wood and displayed really good wood craftsmanship!  Lots of start up companies went to Matsumoku in the early days because the plant had proper wood drying facilities (if the wood wasn’t dried properly, the guitars often became seriously messed up during the import trip across the ocean).
Like many others, Frenchman Patrice Vigier started with a guitar repair shop before establishing his own company in 1980 in order to introduce his first instruments from the Arpege series. The trapezoidal, neck-through body construction is reinforced by a metallic sublayer. One of the models has a metal fretless fretboard, electronic supply by accumulator and a locking string-through body bridge. The Excalibur series was born in 1991 and features a bolt-on neck and a Floyd Rose tremolo system. Available in different variations, it remains the brand's signature up to this day. Vigier instruments are entirely made in France following a quality-oriented philosophy. Among the artists playing Vigier guitars are Gary Moore and Bumblefoot.
Enter exhibit A: A late 60’s KENT short scale variation on the very popular (then and now) “Beatle” violin shaped bass. As you can see from the photos, this isn’t your average violin bass. While many, from the classic Hofner that Paul McCartney turned a few kids on to, to the Teisco and Black Jack Japanese models, didn’t stray far from the violin shape, this Kent takes a few attractive and stylish liberties with the standard template.
Often the names and appearances of these pedals will give you a clue as to what types of sounds they produce. Otherwise it's a good idea to look at interviews and endorsements to learn which distortion stompboxes your guitar heroes are using. Also, be sure to check out our videos and audio clips to get a sense of each distortion pedal’s capabilities.
The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.
I recently bought my first tube amp, the Marshall DSL40C, which has amazing sound for the money, but the reverb that came on it is virtually non-existent. So I started looking at reverb pedals.....who in their right mind would pay over $100 for an effects pedal that does one thing like a (Fender reverb or Hall of Fame or Holy Grail)? Then I cam across the Zoom Chorus/Delay/Reverb and almost bought it for $119 but then this popped up. With the nearly 5 star average review, I thought I would spend the extra $80 and try it out. WOW am I glad I did. Not only do I now have a great sounding reverb, but I have every other effect you can ever imagine (phaser, tremolo, chorus, delay, overdrive, distortion, filters, etc....the list goes on and on and on.
• Brute force game : Offers the same realistic engine that can be found in STRUMMED ACOUSTIC 1 and 2 – ideal for chord accompaniment. It also contains riffs and a new game mode by picking Picking: just play a chord for creating very convincing arpeggio patterns. Reproduction of these new types of patterns should be completely familiar to users of STRUMMED ACOUSTIC.
Fender released the first successful solidbody electric guitar, the Broadcaster, in 1950. (Remember, the original Esquires were problematic.) Gibson produced the first Les Paul 24 months later. And a mere six years after that, a small run of sunburst Les Pauls flowed out of Gibson’s Kalamazoo, Michigan factory. Originally just another instrument, those Les Pauls now occupy a mythic status in the minds of guitarists and collectors everywhere. The instruments, along with a small handful of Fender Stratocasters and examples from one or two other manufacturers from roughly the same era, represent the Holy Grail in guitar tones.
Schecter Guitar Research is a company that has really established themselves as one of the best guitar brands out there in recent years. Many of their guitars are focused on the heavy metal market, but players of any genre can find a Schecter that meets their needs. With superb craftsmanship and high-end appointments you’d expect to find on much more expensive guitars, they are also among the best values in the guitar world.
I have a shecter omen extreme 7 and found that the factor strings they put on were nice for my small fingers. I had to replace because the factor set in general needed some tweaking and they changed all the strings. Now i don't really like the strings they put on. Too small. All they had listed for the strings were 24X jumbo strings. What string set should i buy since i play Ambient, soft, but also djent metal.

:::I just bought one of these guitars at an auction. In Oregon U.S.A. It is a plank, with sunburst finish, 3 chrome toaster style pickups with one cover missing. The varnish has cracks in it like every other old Vox I have seen that date to the sixties or earlier. It has a white pick guard with 3 chrome knurled knobs and an old style switch that turns (not a flip switch) but is missing the knob that I assume is chrome like the 3 volume knobs. I haven't put strings on the guitar yet so I don't know if they are all volume or 1 volume and 2 tone. The roller/tremolo has VOX stamped in big letters and under that it says PAT.APP.FOR in smaller capitol letters. It has a plastic cover plate on the back that is stamped, Made In England. The neck is 19 fret with a fret just under the nut that has no use, as the string would never touch it and the neck is attached with a metal plate. Tuners are a single strap with gears steel not brass with plastic knobs. Just under the tuners on the back the headstock are the numbers 64523. A green VOX decal along with Shadow JMI Dartford Kent on the front. I was suprised to find this guitar, as I had never seen or heard of it before. I can't wait to play it and see how it stacks up to all the other VOX guitars I have and have played. Wish I could find out more about it but this is as close as I have come, so far.
I was thinking about my personal favorite and it’s just too hard to choose only one. There are too many brilliant creations and all unique in their own way. I love the simplicity of “highway to hell”, the beautiful, mysterious, wah wah riff of “Voodoo child”, I have a weak spot for almost every guitar riff by John Frusciante or Slash and not to mention the zillion riffs that aren’t even on the list. Thank god it never stops.
That said, however, the volume knob can help you conjure a variety of tonal characteristics that can come in handy provided you play with dynamics. Using a volume knob in this context can allow such cool maneuvers as having different tones for verses and choruses, or for various styles of music. To get a handle on how your guitar’s volume dial or dials can affect tone, plug in and fire up your amp until it’s growling with overdrive. Start with your guitar’s volume pot at 10 and begin rolling the dial back in increments. As you go, you’ll hear not only a decrease in loudness, but your sound will clean up and experience variations in its harmonic characteristics.
TC Electronic has literally changed the game with their new polyphonic tuner technology that lets you tune all of your strings at once, no matter what tuning you're using. This is the only logical choice when it comes to pedals, although if you're interested in other formats such as headstock tuners and rackmount options, check out our reviews of the best guitar tuners on the market.

It all added up to a cartoonish minimalism that struck a vital cultural nerve when the Ramones burst out of Manhattan’s Lower East Side CBGB scene in the mid Seventies. They were the perfect antidote to the bloated self-indulgence of Seventies arena rock and the tendency—a hangover from the hippie era—for rock and rock musicians to take themselves way too seriously. The Ramones were passionate about rock, without ever being pompous.
Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II, Aria Diamond, Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Cimar, Cortez (electrics only), Columbus, Conrad, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage,V entura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn, Westbury, Westminster, Westone
This is a nice improvement on the ME-70, which I owned previously, except for one thing: plastic expression pedal. That's why it got 4 stars from me. The ME-70 had a metal pedal, and it was substantially larger. This plastic pedal does not have the same feel. Feels chintzy. I was expecting similar quality but in that one regard the quality is inferior to the previous version.
And “tear” into them so like to do! My most recent “nightmare” was with such a simple thing as a fret “grind and polish” totally gone haywire! This particular repairman was nice enough, but broke so many things on my guitar just as a result of doing a fret job; he had it for another month after, and still could correct his mistakes! I final had to have the guitar literally “rescued” by the actual craftsman who made the guitar so it could finally be set straight again! It turned out that much as I had suspected, the repair guy wanted to see what made my guitar “tick”, so he unnecessarily tore it apart, but couldn’t properly put it back together again! He even broke 2 pickups by turning them too tightly as he lowered them!! Very costly errors, to be sure!
In May 1965 Keith Richards used a Gibson Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone to record "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[24] The song's success greatly boosted sales of the device, and all available stock sold out by the end of 1965.[25] Other early fuzzboxes include the Mosrite FuzzRITE and Arbiter Group Fuzz Face used by Jimi Hendrix,[26] the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi used by Hendrix and Carlos Santana,[27] and the Vox Tone Bender used by Paul McCartney to play fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" and other Beatles recordings.[28]
There are two basic tremolo circuits found in classic amps; power tube tremolo and photocell tremolo. They produce basically the same effect, a fluctuation in volume. For the best definitions I have come across I’ll borrow from the Strymon website: “Power Tube Tremolo utilized the LFO signal to directly influence the power tube bias of the amplifier’s push-pull output stage. The power tubes are biased into lower and higher idle currents, creating the fluctuating gain that produces the tremolo effect. The effects of crossover distortion at low tremolo volumes, increased power tube harmonic distortion at maximum tremolo volumes, as well as the influence of power-supply sag, all add up to the boggy and dirty nature of this tremolo circuit.”
The name Epiphone stands above all for very good, less expensive alternatives to the unfortunately always quite expensive Gibson guitars. Gibson tries to offer good alternatives to their Gibson branded Instruments through its subsidiary Epiphone. Les Paul, SG, Explorer and other models. Todays Epiphone program includes electrical, half- and full-resonance guitars, basses, acoustic and electro-acoustic instruments, banjos and mandolins. Epiphone stands on the one hand for innovative ideas in guitar manufacturing and on the other for successful replicas of instrument classics that are affordable for everyone. 

The MG30 is a good place to start. A reliable and lightweight transistor amp, loud enough for jamming and with straight-forward features, it’s especially good for beginners to understand how amps work (e.g. figuring out what the “mids” are on the EQ). Along with a headphones output and aux input (to play along to songs) it also has a useful effects bank with a choice of chorus, phase, flanger or delay, plus two types of reverb!
For the younger children in the 4-8-year-old range, a scale length of about 22.7 inches is a good fit. Although some electrics come in scale lengths down to 22.2 inches, the extra length will keep your child from outgrowing the guitar too soon. For comparison, adult full-size guitars such as the Fender Stratocaster have a scale length of 25.75 inches while Gibson Guitars are an inch shorter. So if you are confused that what to buy for your new learner or the little one, you can go with the product that fits perfectly in your requirements.
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In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers did not have any tone controls. Tone controls on early guitar amplifiers were very simple and provided a great deal of treble boost, but the limited controls, the loudspeakers used, and the low power of the amplifiers (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. This made these early amplifier/speaker systems a poor way for upright bass players to amplify the sound of their instruments.
Jump up ^ The Guitar (From The Renaissance To The Present Day) by Harvey Turnbull (Third Impression 1978) - Publisher: Batsford (ISBN 0-7134-3251-9) - p113 (Chapter 3 - The Twentieth Century) - "Segovia's visits to South America also inspired new music. The Mexican composer Manuel Ponce (1882–1948) responded by producing a greater number of extended works than Turina and Torroba had achieved."

This is a similar model to the one we just talked about. However it’s a more basic version. Aside from a different finish and several other factors, it’s the same guitar. Tone-wise, everything is on point and you can dial in a variety of great tone colors. S series is definitely one of my favorite. I have a lot of hands-on time with them, and they are on my list of favorites.
So frustrating!!!! That guy Dino!!!! Guitar exists in other type of music beside rock you meatheads!! Turn off Vh1′ top 100 countdown and try exploring some other types of music. If you play guitar and you think rock is the only style to be played…then I’m very sorry but you probably are absolutely terrible at the guitar. Hate to break it to you but compared to people like Django Rheinhardt and Chet Atkins….Eddie Van Halen and Steve Vai bloooooowwwwwww!!!!!!

Volume pedals are volume potientiometers set into a rocking foot treadle, so that the volume of the bass guitar can be changed by the foot. Compression pedals affect the dynamics (volume levels) of a bass signal by subtly increasing the volume of quiet notes and reducing the volume of loud notes, which smooths out or "compresses" the overall sound. Limiters, which are similar to compressors, prevent the upper volume levels (peaks) of notes from getting too loud, which can damage speakers. Noise gates remove hums and hisses that occur with distortion pedals, vintage pedals, and some electric basses.

I disagree. Through the years I've owned many amps and many pedals, and played with numerous setups to get different sounds. My absolute favorite setup and sound I have had is my Les Paul straight through my JCM900. At most, I'll add a wah in there. That is my ideal setup. I've played many different styles over the years, and used many techniques. My playing has evolved as I went along, and started taking pedals out of the mix. I think pedals are a great thing, and if you want to use them, you should.
Phaser: A phaser or "phase shifter" creates a slight rippling effect—amplifying some aspects of the tone while diminishing others—by splitting an audio signal in two and altering the phase of one portion. Three well-known examples of phaser are the two handed tapping part on the Van Halen instrumental "Eruption" and the keyboard parts on Billy Joel's "Just the Way You Are" and Paul Simon's "Slip Slidin' Away".[77]
At this point you should have the pots, switch, and jack out of the guitar with the pickup wires still connected. You can either de-solder the pickup wires or use wire cutters to clip them off. If you’re replacing the pickups as part of your re-wiring, you can do this now (I did not in the example photographed here). Just feed the leads of the new pickups back through the holes in the pickup cavities.
As a long time player conveying the skill, craft and passion of this art, which is as much as a science, players of ANY and every instrument can unanimously agree that there are no “best” players. Some have great moments that were captured and regurgitated in the media time and a get which put them in a permanent vista. This is greatness? Hardly. I’ve seen A LOT of players, some included in the article and the majority chanted by the readers on this board screw things up beyond repair–some during the opening of their first song of the performance. OUCH that hurts…but it happens. Some completely lost track with what they were doing during a show casing of their solo work…oops. Yep it happens, like sometimes happens to singers who forget their lines–it doesn’t matter that they have written the song they were performing. Yea, we hear about this stuff every now and then, however at the end of the day, this doesn’t matter. The truth is, people hear only what they want to hear and will by their very disposition, ignore the negatives and embrace the positives of their work–alas this is why this supportive listeners are called FANS.
I kind of think what I do is like producing with my feet because I do a lot of that in my own shows. Particularly when I'm playing guitar with other bands, I'm always changing reverb [settings] and modulation types and the very sorts of things that [maybe no one else realizes what's going on], but it keeps me interested. I think because I come from a time before that was possible, it's a magical thing for me.
I’ve been keeping track of completed Ebay sales since I started looking at Kents, and have come up with a few average sale prices. The way I figure an average is by first tossing out the highest and lowest sales. If I am left with fewer than three sales I don’t bother. That’s too small a sampling to be worthwhile, otherwise I take the average of the rest. The table below will only be updated when there is a sale that results in a change, so if the table looks like it might be dated, it’s probably because there haven’t been any sales that affected the numbers. Availability of Kent guitars on Ebay seems to ebb and flow.
Fuzz – A dynamic distortion effect that sounds just like the name. Fuzz was originally created by putting a pinhole or cut in the speaker of an amplifier. Original fuzz pedals use a transistor-based circuit to create the sound. Compared to distortion, fuzz is more raw, abrasive and doesn’t compress the tone. These pedals typically perform best at the front of your effects chain into a clean amplifier.

The electric guitar is a staple in the music industry. Over the last several decades, the use of the best electric guitar has evolved across many music genres. The electric guitar has made grand entrances in the likes of Rock, Pop, Hip Hop, and more. Today, it is considered one of the most essential instruments in pushing musical creativity forward. Whether you are a beginner or an expert electric guitar player, the variety of sounds and distinct musical styles will surely take any music genius to the next level. We’ve reviewed electric guitars & compiled a guide on how you can best spend your money on the perfect electric guitar.
The Hal Leonard Bagpipe Method is designed for anyone just learning to play the Great Highland bagpipes. This comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide serves as an introduction to the bagpipe chanter. The accompanying DVD includes video lessons with demonstrations of all the examples in the book! Lessons include: the practice chanter, the Great Highland Bagpipe scale, bagpipe notation, proper technique, grace-noting, embellishments, playing and practice tips, traditional tunes, buying a bagpipe, and much more!.
Launched in the late 1990s the SE models are manufactured in South Korea by a third-party company (World Musical Instruments) then shipped to re-sellers and dealers in the United States. This is a major part of the cost-cutting technique, in addition to a more flat (as opposed to carved) body shape and cheaper pickups/electronics. So be advised, I’m not telling you that you’re getting a $2000 guitar for $600.
Before we wade in, please note that National Dobro and subsequently Valco, more than most other manufacturers, were notorious for putting together guitars with parts left around. This, combined with the fact that they routinely used components (especially bodies) provided by other manufacturers, means that you are likely to find instruments with details inconsistent with catalog descriptions, and they may just be Kosher.
This Charvel is the signature model for Guthrie Govan, widely regarded as one of the finest guitarists around. Its caramelized ash body model is also up there with the finest bolt-ons we’ve ever played. The neck is extremely tight-fitting and held in place with four screws, each recessed into the contoured heel. Like any HSH set up you have huge choice on exactly how you wire it - this is no different. While the outer positions select the full humbuckers, position two voices bridge (slug single coil only) and the middle single coil; position three gives us bridge and neck (both slug single coils); position four offers the screw single coil of the neck pickup with the middle pickup. A ‘secret’ two-way mini toggle that simulates a coil-split via an old-school passive filter (a 0.1 microfarad capacitor). In many ways this feels more like high performance rifle, not a guitar. It gives off a tuned-to-perfection vibe that’s like an instrument you’ve owned for a while, gigged, modified and tweaked. Which in reality is exactly what it is only Charvel and Guthrie Govan have done it for us. But don’t dismiss this as a virtuoso rock shredder axe. Yes, if your technique is up to it, you won’t have a problem there and using just the bridge pickup you’ll probably have all you need: big and ballsy, a hint of a cocked wah-like high end it’s certainly in the JB area. But it’s offset by a pokey PAF-like neck voice, tube-y and soupy but far from one dimensional. If that was it, we’d be smiling. But there’s plenty more... Guthrie Govan’s vision for an all round workhouse that’ll stand up to the rigours of professional touring is superbly realised in this signature. Every detail is wonderfully considered. It’s not a cheap date, but it’s an astonishing guitar: a player’s tool of the highest calibre.
Also included was the GP, an equal double-cutaway model with a mahogany body, flamed maple carved top, glued-in neck, fine-tune bridge and stop tailpiece. The only models I’ve seen, which were also advertised, had twin humbuckers and conventional electronics. One source refers to a GP-1, which by nomenclature would suggest a single humbucker, but it’s not known if this ever actually existed. Also, it’s not clear if the GPs came in parts or fully assembled.
Description: Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Floyd Rose Speedloader - Bridge Construction: Maple - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: ESP Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Dimarzio Crunchlab 7/LiquiFire 7 - String Instrument Finish: See-Thru Black

• How to check frets: The easiest and quickest way to make sure a guitar’s frets are in good shape is to look straight down the neck of a guitar, from body to headstock. If the frets are at different heights (improper installation is the culprit here with new guitars) or askew, there are problems. They should look uniform and exhibit as little denting or wear as tolerable. 

“You can also think of it as what the signal path in a studio situation would be if you were to plug your guitar directly into the input of your amplifier, and process that sound through outboard effects. You’re not going to have your echo first before going into your distortion boxes—unless you’re looking for a specific sound—because you want the echoes to die out naturally, and not with your distorted sound.”
As musicians, we have a staggering amount of information available to us that can help us hone our craft. The hard part is deciding which resources are valuable and which resources aren’t. We’ve all ordered a book off of Amazon that we thought was going to take our playing to the next level only to find out that we could have gotten just as much out of a five minute Google search. Well, not all books are created equal, and you’ve probably not been looking at the right ones.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 55mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - # of Strings: 8 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Fixed - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: IBZ-8 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, White

The enormous world of electric guitars can seem daunting to navigate. While there is no best or worst guitar, there are guitars that have been ingrained into our collective headspace. There are also guitars that have pushed boundaries and become staples of the modern musical landscape. Putting aside the latest in guitar tech or rare vintage gems, let’s take a look at models that have time and time again satisfied and inspired players of all tastes and from all walks of life. Here are five of the most popular electric guitars in the world.


The process for recording sound from a guitar amp might seem simple; you have your amp and a mic to capture it, stick mic in front of amp, press “record,” and play. Done! The truth is, though, that even when using the same guitar and amp with the same settings captured by the same mic, the results can vary greatly depending on where you place that mic. Add the variables of different mics and multiple mic placements on one speaker cab, and your sonic possibilities expand exponentially. The elephant lumbering into the room at this point in the game is the fact that more and more people are recording direct to interface using digital amp simulators, or DI’ing and applying an amp plug-in in the digital-audio workstation (DAW). These facilities have improved tremendously in recent years, but the majority of professional guitarists and professional studios still mic actual amps to record the most dynamic guitar-based music being made today, so we’ll stick with honing these old-school skills.
The primary starting point for information about Martin guitars is, of course, Martin Guitars: A History by Mike Longworth, one-time pearl inlaying ace and former company historian (4 Maples Press, Minisink Hills, PA). Longworth’s book chronicles the company’s history in very personal terms and provides wonderfully rich detail about Martin’s many guitars through the ages. It should be an essential part of any Martin lover’s library.
Among the most common rookie amp buyer mistakes is buying a big amp that's too heavy to gig with, or going the opposite and buying one that's too small. If you're gigging at different places and you don't have a roadie, then consider going with a smaller amp that has DI output so you can go straight to PA with your tone intact. In big venues where big amps are a must, some opt for amp heads because the separated head and speaker cabinet are lighter on their own, although you'll have to move more pieces.
The guitar player who makes his guitar sound anything but a guitar. Helicopter rudders, disc scratching, and his use of the kill switch for staccato like guitar riffs has made him probably the most innovative guitar player of our time. He is a guitarist who can take feedback, and ground hum from his own body into coherent music. Be it Rage Against The Machine, or Audioslave you can always see Morello’s signature licks shining through.
Music man make the best regular production (i.E. non custom shop) guitars on the planet. Nobody else comes close. This is the quality that everybody else should be reaching for. The fit and finish and playing comfort are second to none. And the oil finish on the necks is to die for! These guys don't just churn out minor variations on the same 60-year old theme, they actually innovate, they challenge, they dare. Wonderful new designs, made for real players. The results are outstanding. Roasted maple and all-rosewood necks, new chambering and tonewood construction ideas. They are so far ahead of the game it makes you wonder why the rest of the industry stays so stagnant. Music Man are the only guitars I will buy now. I'm so proud to support them!
People didn’t like the Les Paul Trio at first. With a thrice-weekly performance slot on NBC’s Fred Waring’s radio program, The Chesterfield Hour, listeners often wrote in to complain about the “strange and unpleasant sound of the newfangled electric guitar Les Paul was playing”. In the late 1930s, there were many demands to fire him; today, the Les Paul guitar brand is an essential part of pop culture, and Paul himself is both in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the National Inventors Hall of Fame.
By the turn of the century, new-metal grinders and post-grunge plodders had given loud guitars a bad reputation. Then Jack White hit the reset button. With each savage riff, he reconnected hard rock and roots music and showed that a blues-based band could escape what he calls "note-pushing Stratocaster white-blues bullshit." And he didn't let his analog leanings prevent him from ingenious use of a DigiTech Whammy pedal – the secret behind the faux-bass thunder of "Seven Nation Army" and the screaming leads of songs like "Ball and Biscuit."
Measure the height of the strings at the twelfth fret. For most playing styles, the height between the bottom of the low "E" string and the top of the twelfth fret should be a hair over 2/32". The High "E" string should be set at 2/32". The other strings should gradually flow between these measurements. This is where I would start, but the player's style (particularly their right-hand attack), as well as string gauge, scale length and individual neck nuances may necessitate deviation from these numbers.
Make sure it feels comfortable, especially the fretboard and body. Make sure there are no buzzing notes and that the frets are flat and even. Avoid electric guitars with whammy bars as they may be too difficult to tune for beginner guitar players and make the guitar more expensive (maybe one on the next electric guitar you buy). The tuning heads should be easy to tune and stay in place, and try playing the guitar through an amplifier to check for a good sound quality (hopefully no humming or buzzing).
: But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
The MG-100 has so many features, its hard to name them all. But, here we can list: 13 classic amp models via NUX's TS/AC technology, vintage 3-band passive EQ modeling for every amp model, 6-band graphic EQ designed specifically for electric guitar (120hz,250hz,750hz,1.6khz,3.2khz,6.4khz), 11 cabinet models, seamless and quick preset switching , loop sounds can be played with drum machine, rhythm beat synchronously. The aux in jack makes it easy to practice along with MP3, CDs and other inputs. Large color TFT LCD panel (160 x128), graphic interface making the overall operation easy and intuitive. A total of 72 presets, 36 factory + 36 user presets.
My interests are in the Kents with the script logo on the headstock, body, and pickups. The headstock is Gibson-ish with tuners on both sides. The pickup nearest the neck is tilted, regardless of how many pickups are on the guitar. One model, the 742 has four pickups with switches, volume and tone knobs for each. Overkill, to say the least, and I have read somewhere that they don’t sound very good. However, I have seen some youtube video where a 742 sounds pretty good in live performance. A lot of the sound comes from a proper setup and the hands of a skilled player. Hopefully I’ll be able to find out for myself someday. Regardless, the 742 is one funky-looking guitar.
Naturally, if a seller can get more money by calling what they have a “lawsuit guitar”, they’re going to do it. Unfortunately, some writers who should know better have taken to using the term for any old Japanese lookalikes, copys, knockoffs, etc, of (mostly) American guitars. Some sellers are using terms like “lawsuit era” or “pre-lawsuit” which don’t mean anything at all.
Starting to learn on an electric guitar can be much easier as compared to an acoustic guitar. Electric guitars chords are easier to hold down as the width of the neck is shorter. The strings on the electric guitars are softer than those of acoustic guitars, which is easier on your fingertips if you're just starting out. They can be slightly more expensive than acoustic guitars, especially because other gear is needed to support your playing (i.e. amps, cables, and so on). It's all a matter of personal preference, but here are some of our top choices.
The Les Paul body style actually encompasses a few different designs: solid, solid-arched, and solid-chambered. Solid Les Pauls are made from a solid piece of wood, with some having a significantly arched top and a maple cap and some lacking a curved top and the maple cap. Chambered Les Pauls are arched, but the inside of the body is chambered, so there are a few cavities underneath the top.

As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.

While there are some obvious quality gaps, they do appear to be closing as time passes on. The hardware used on Epiphone is getting better, and the presence of the new ProBucker Pickups helps to elevate the brand to new heights. The fact of the matter is, while Epiphone is viewed as just being a cost friendly alternative to Gibson, guitar players gravitate to the brand anyways for its own special sound. While it may use the same Specs as a Gibson, they are far from equal guitars, including in the sound department (4).
The body of the guitar is usually made of wood; different types of woods are used by different manufacturers, and there is ongoing debate concerning which is best. Typical woods include maple, mahogany, swamp ash and alder for quality guitars, and plywood or pine for cheaper, less durable guitars. While the type of wood used in the solid body of an electric guitar will noticeably affect the sound it produces, the quality of the sound is most affected by the pickups which convert the vibration of the strings into an electrical signal, as well as the amplifier that's used to shape and model such signal. We could go on and on dissecting the technical aspects of electric guitars, and yet never get close to that which makes that music unique: it's soul. That's something that can be clearly felt and experienced by players and listeners alike, but which all the while can hardly be put into words. Enjoy the electric guitar music loops!
The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.

alright i think we all need to stop hating on john mayer. I don't think that he really would even call himself one of the best guitarists of all time, he's obviously not far enough into his career to be criticized about this stuff. But i love him, and he eventually will make it on this list. Oh, and for all you who say he sucks and whatever, if he is so bad then why has he played with so many of the people who actually should deserve to be on this list?
Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved sruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, unbound elevated tortoise pickguard, style 28 type multiple bound top and back with white outer layer, zipper zigzag backstripe, trapeze tail piece, rosewood fingerboard, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, nickel plated parts, sunburst top finish.

View tab notation as a representation of the guitar's strings. A tab is usually written using six horizontal lines, each corresponding with a string on the guitar. The bottom line represents the lowest, thickest string, while the top string represents the highest, thinnest string. For standard tunings, this means that the lines will represent, from the bottom up, the low E, A, D, G, B and high E strings.
To make the OM more suitable for banjo players, the neck was made narrower and less V-shaped than previous Martins. The fingerboard was narrowed from the then-standard 1 7/8" to 1 3/4" at the nut. In addition to make the OM more banjo-like and to give it a distinctive look, banjo style tuning pegs were used. To do these, the headstock had to be made solid, instead of slotted. Previously Martin headstocks had all been slotted with tuners attached to the side mounted on a single plate for three tuners. No single-unit guitar tuners were available, so banjo pegs were a natural.
Actually, company founder Leo Fender's first business was repairing tube circuitry equipment including radios, phonograph players, and home music amplifiers. He noticed the growing popularity of amplifiers for home music systems and branched out into selling music records and renting out PA systems he had designed from his repair shop. Then he got even more involved in music by making and selling Hawaiian lap steel guitars containing a proprietary pickup system which he bundled with his own newly designed amplifiers in 1945. The following year he changed the company name from Fender’s Repair Service to Fender Electric Instruments Company.

Fawned over by hard rock-loving guitarists the world over, Marshall is one of the few amplification brands that really needs no introduction. And if you’re looking for aggressive, overdriven rock – this amp is one of the best beginner’s options. What makes this one really special, however, is the sheer number of sound-shaping options it gives you – thanks to its ability to model a whopping 14 MST preamps, 4 MST power amps, and 8 MST speaker cabinets. That’s 448 possible combinations, if you’re keeping score. You can even connect it to your computer via USB or use it as a Bluetooth speaker. If versatility is your top concern (it probably should be), look no further.


One reason why the sound changes in different parts of a given room is that sound reflecting from room boundaries reaches your recording microphone later than the sound travelling directly from the amp, causing phase cancellation — in effect a series of peaks and dips in the recorded frequency response, the spacing of which is related to the delay between the direct and reflected sounds. Keith Olsen suggests lifting and/or tilting the amp to minimise the effects of phase cancellation. "Leo Fender put those legs on the sides of a Fender Twin, and he did it so the guy in the orchestra could actually hear it when he was playing soft. But the other reason is that when you put a mic up against an amp tilted that way... you don't get phase-cancellation problems off the floor and wall. Let's take it one step farther. Let's lift that speaker cabinet off the floor and put it up on something that is stable enough to be able to give the speakers a platform to work from, but where... the reflected sound is going to be so far down in volume to the direct, it's of no real consequence... All these things start adding together into mic technique, stuff that you learn over years."
Guitar Tuners lets you tune your guitar in seconds for free using a microphone so that you guarantee the perfect pitch of your instrument every time. Just play a note, and Guitar Tuners will display which note you''re playing, and how close you are to having that note in tune. The needle on this Guitar Tuner will turn blue you have an exact match. Just play each note on your guitar (E, A, D, G, B, E) or other musical instrument, and get in tune !
There were also a number of guitars that featured the same headstock style as the 700-800 models that featured symetrical hollow or semi-hollow bodies similar to some of the Gibsons. Gibson aficionados refer to the bodies as having "Mickey Mouse ears". One model had a deep jazz guitar-style body. They all had what appear to be humbucker pickups, some black and some plated. The Kent name only appeared on the headstocks.
What does all this have to do with guitars? Crudely speaking, the metal strings of an electric guitar are a bit like dynamos: they make electricity when you move them. Under the strings, there are electricity-generating devices called pickups. Each one consists of one or more magnets with hundreds or thousands of coils of very thin wire wrapped around them. The magnets generate a magnetic field all around them that passes up through the strings. As a result, the metal strings become partially magnetized and, when they vibrate, make a very small electric current flow through the wire pickup coils. The pickups are hooked up to an electrical circuit and amplifier, which boosts the small electric current and sends it on to a loudspeaker, making the familiar electric guitar sound. Usually, the amplifier and loudspeaker are built into a single unit called an "amp."
Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.
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In launching the AZ series, the goal was not to merely create a completely new guitar model, but to sculpt a great guitar that can foster the potential of the modern ?third phase' while maintaining traditional elements. Even though Ibanez is thought of as a modern guitar brand, it has decades of accumulated knowledge and a history of pushing the boundaries. The AZ series carries with it all of the hallmarks of these tried and tested Ibanez qualities. The harmonic balance between bridge and ...
For better or worse, by 1982 the taste for natural-finished, neck-through guitars with lots of switches and active electronics had begun to move on. On the horizon were the brief affair with weird-shaped “heavy metal” guitars and the impending first Strat-mania and the rise of Superstrats which would pretty much define the remainder of the decade. 1982, and the 18 and 28 Series, marked the end of Martin’s direct manufacture of electric solidbody guitars.
Petros Guitars are an elite customized acoustic guitar luthier, formed by the Petros brothers, Bruce and Matt Petros, based in Kaukauna, Wisconsin. They are noted for their exceptionally high quality craftsmanship and often make guitars similar in appearance to Spanish Baroque guitars with the design, making both steel and nylon string hand-made guitars. Bruce began making guitars in 1972, and in 2000 he was joined by his brother to form the Petros company.[
Many guitarists with instruments that have more than one pickup spend most of their time on the bridge unit. Using a variety of pickup positions when recording will thin or fatten the sound as required, but also help free up space when it comes to the mixing stage. Think of a recorded mix as a layer cake; too much density in one frequency range will cause a headache for the mixing engineer.
Capacitors are typically used as filters to control tone. In most cases, they are used to filter out very high frequencies before being sent to ground (the output jack) which controls the warmth of your guitar’s tone. Capacitors vary greatly and come in a range of materials from ceramic, film, paper and electrolytic (mainly used with active pickups).
This fuzz sounds great! Different from a standard fuzzface or tonebender sound, and much more musical in my opinion. Not buzzy at all, very smooth. It is not one of those over-the-top fuzz sounds. It's more of a fuzzy overdrive. But really the amount and quality of the fuzz is highly dependent on the transistors. Q1 seems to effect the amount of output, and Q2 changes the character of the fuzz. I tried many combinations and ended up using 2N2222's for both (BC109's also sounded great!). One other ... full review
Overdrive, and its noisier cousin distortion, are effects used to ‘push’ your guitar’s signal before it reachers your amplifier. Most amplifiers have some degree of drive capability built into them so you’re most likely familiar with what they sound like. Overdrive is what pushes a clean sound to break up slightly, giving it a warmer, thicker sound. This is perfect for blues and rock playing. It also serves to add more sustain to your playing, meaning notes ring out for longer. In addition to giving a noticeable boost to your volume. Distortion is effectively a more extreme version of overdrive, in that it takes the signal you’re feeding it and makes it all degrees of nasty. You’ll typically hear distortion used in heavier guitar styles like metal and punk. Here, a liberal dollop of dirt is required to give the sound its thicker characteristic.
That said, however, the volume knob can help you conjure a variety of tonal characteristics that can come in handy provided you play with dynamics. Using a volume knob in this context can allow such cool maneuvers as having different tones for verses and choruses, or for various styles of music. To get a handle on how your guitar’s volume dial or dials can affect tone, plug in and fire up your amp until it’s growling with overdrive. Start with your guitar’s volume pot at 10 and begin rolling the dial back in increments. As you go, you’ll hear not only a decrease in loudness, but your sound will clean up and experience variations in its harmonic characteristics.
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Another way of creating a huge sound is to split the signal from the guitar – most easily achieved via a stompbox with stereo outputs – and send it to two or more amps. All sorts of combinations of sound can be achieved, especially when panning techniques are employed. Of course, each amp can also be multi-mic’d if desired, and some truly three-dimensional results can be obtained. Different effects can be applied to the various amps, while using combinations of clean and dirty amp sounds can be really effective for delivering overdrive with definition, or grit and
3) Sound when not plugged in is surprisingly good for a little guitar. Of course, if you're expecting acoustic sound like a jumbo or parlor you will be disappointed because that's impossible for a 3/4 size guitar to match the acoustic sound of larger guitars. However, for a 3/4 size guitar in this price range, it's as good as it gets and I will put this little guitar up against any 3/4 for acoustic sound in this price range.
This is where the roads came back together. Kaman continued to play guitar during his building of the helicopter business. He kept his guitars hanging on the wall, instead of in the case, so he could grab one if he felt like playing. As a result he ended up with lots of cracked backs, including one on a favorite Martin. Charles traveled down to Nazareth to get the guitar repaired and Fred Martin gave him a factory tour.

This is a great opportunity to start working with a digital multimeter (DMM). Track down an inexpensive DMM and make sure it has a continuity function, preferably with an audible connection indicator. You can then trace how switches work by connecting the individual lugs to your DMM and seeing which are connected, and then switching to the other position and taking the same measurement again. The beep that sounds when you’ve made a connection is a great help when you’re taking these measurements.
2.  Cracked peg head.  Customer “fixed” with mystery glue and a wood screw.  Result:  Peg head and neck shaft not aligned. Fix: If the peg head can be re-broken you may be able to re-align the neck and re-glue (if it was glued with aliphatic glue you won’t be able to as the glue will not stick to itself).  The joint may have to be resurfaced and new wood may have to be inserted, possibly a spline as well.
Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
The first great thing about this guitar is its amazing look. It has a Paulownia body with the metallic blue finish and a bolt-on construction. It comes with a dean vintage tremolo bridge which works quite well compared to others. One more advantage of this product is its cost. It is one of the most affordable electric guitars out there. It has a three-way toggle dual dean humbuckers which give you great volume and tone controls.
Their 200-series is reasonably priced, and a great value for a Taylor guitar. They also make the Baby and Big Baby, and the GS Mini—smaller-bodied guitars perfect for intermediate players and beginners with a few extra bucks in their pockets.These are awesome acoustic guitars with a big sound. They might be small, but veteran guitar players love them for the tone and portability.
Maple » Maple is usually used for sides and backs, because its low response rate and internal damping doesn't add coloration to the natural tone of the top wood. It produces a “dry” sound that emphasizes high-end tones. Its lower resonance makes it great for live settings, especially with a band, because it can still be heard through a mix of instruments with less feedback.
Guitars are constructed from different wood types—from mahogany to rosewood, basswood to maple, and more—all of which changes with temperature and humidity, affecting the sound quality thereof. Although guitars original setups are likely to change as they move a long distance from the producer to the Sellers’s point of contact, electric guitars are the highly adjustable piece of types of equipment, and a setup can make a whole difference.
Beginning in 1960 with the T-60 solidbody, Teisco began to use the elongated “Strat” six-in-line headstock. This lasted through 1963. In 1963, the squarish Strat headstock appeared with the GB-1 solidbody bass. This seems to have lasted through 1965, but only on selected models, and with several subtle variations, including a slightly more rounded version. In 1964, probably later in the season, most of the Teisco solidbody line acquired a new hooked Strat-style headstock with four-and-two tuners on the guitars and three-and-one on the basses. This had the little hook at the throat like a Strat, and a larger hook on the tip, almost like a Woody Woodpecker plume.
Although there are now several digital guitar recording preamps which model amps and cabs, the Roland VG88's split pickup system allows you also to experiment with modelled guitars and pickups.Digital noise removal plug-ins (again best used before delay effects are added), produce even fewer side-effects and so may be the best option when recording into a computer-based system. However, you can often achieve a worthwhile improvement using simple low-pass filters — before I moved over to working almost exclusively on the computer, I often used the side-chain high-cut filter in my Drawmer DS201 gate to remove hiss from guitar tracks. The sharper the filter, the less the wanted sound will be affected, so a plug-in with an 18 or even 24dB/octave slope should be even more effective than the 12dB/octave filters the Drawmer uses. The trick when setting them up is to pick the lowest shelving frequency that doesn't materially change the original sound, other than to take the edge off the hiss. Using filters in this way also helps reduce finger noise and squeaking on acoustic guitar parts and can even help disguise moderate clipping distortion caused by recording at too high a level.
The Les Paul Triumph bass, like the Les Paul Recording guitar was first shipped in 1971, but was based on a slightly older model, the 1969 Les Paul Bass. Functionally, these basses were very similar, although the Triumph did offer low and high impedance operation, without the need for a transformer cable. This owners manual details the basses specifications, suggests a string set, recommended action, and suggests a series of tonal settings for rock, country and solo bass playing.
A DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) on/on switch has two channels (poles), each having three lugs. This is like having two SPDT switches in one. It’s the standard configuration for most push/ pull or push/push pots, and you can use it for almost all mods, including the seven-sound mod (if you leave one pole unconnected), coil-splitting a humbucker, out-of-phase mods (by adding some jumper wires from pole 1 to pole 2), a direct-through mod, and countless others. Let’s see what’s going on here.
The E-28 guitar now sported a two-octave fingerboard and a Schaller adjustable bridge/tailpiece assembly, in chrome. Pickups were twin active humbuckers specially designed for Martin by Seymour Duncan. The straplocking system was also by Schaller, as were the tuners. Controls included two volumes for each pickup plus a master volume and master tone (all with black knobs sort of like those found on Rickenbackers), a three-way select, a phase switch and an active circuit bypass switch. The headstock had an ebony veneer. The cover on the control cavity was made of black Boltaron.
Guitar Center Fort Worth provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Fort Worth area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Fort Worth can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
We make our Tone Bars / Ferrule Blocks (tone slugs) out of 360 brass and use them on most all of our string through custom guitars. You will notice an enhancement in sustain and beauty.  The ones sold here are not polished. Go to shawwoodshop.com to purchase slugs that are polished. Please ask any questions you might have about the Slug. I offer quantity discounts.
The guitar this model is probably closest to, in spirit and purpose, is not the Gibson Les Pauls but, rather, to the old Gibson Melody Maker guitars from the 60s. That said, this is a hell of lot more guitar for the money than any Melody Maker ever was, and adjusted for inflation, relative to what a Melody Maker would have cost you in 1968, for example, it is almost like Epiphone paying you to play it.
If you haven’t heard Colin Hay’s acoustic version of “Overkill” from his solo album ‘Man @ Work’, you haven’t really heard this song. This has been my favorite acoustic guitar song for some time now. I like the mainstream version, but this one blows it away. For a taste, try listening to it as a sample on iTunes or amazon. BTW, if you decide to download it, DO NOT get the much shorter edited version off of the ‘Scrubs’ soundtrack.

A volume pedal does the same thing a volume knob on a guitar, but it allows you to control the volume with your foot. It is not a boost, it just allows you to sweep between zero output and the full output capacity of your instrument. Many guitarists use a volume pedal, also sometimes referred to as an expression pedal, to create pedal steel-like swells, where a note or chord is played, then the volume is slowly and smoothly raised. Volume pedals can also be used as a boost effect, by simply playing at less than full volume, then stepping on the pedal to go to full volume momentarily when you need the extra boost. Volume pedals can make a standard electric guitar sound like a pedal steel when used with a well-practiced foot technique.They can also be an important pedal to have in your toolbox when playing in a band with multiple guitars.
SG style guitars are synonymous with hard rock thanks to guitarists such as Angus Young of AC/DC and Tommy Iommi of Black Sabbath. As a result, most customers interested in SG guitar kits are looking to play hard rock and heavier styles of music in general. But limiting the SG to one specific style of music really doesn’t do justice to the versatility of the instrument.
Decide between mic recording or using a direct box (DI). Recording the sound of your electric guitar by miking your amp is a great way to simulate studio quality sound. However, this will require expensive equipment, like a quality amp, microphone, and potentially sound dampening equipment or material. On the other hand, you can plug your guitar right into a DI to record your guitar.[1]
Lastly, but not leastly, Univox offered a super amp head, the C Group, or UX Series, available with either a guitar or bass cabinet. These were promoted with a flyer that sported a muscular black model with naked torso looking for all the world like Isaac Hayes, the man behind the popular movie Shaft. The UX actually consisted of a UX-1501 Amplifier head and either a UX-1516 speaker cabinet for guitar use or a UX-1512 cabinet for bass. The amp was a mean two-channel S.O.B. with blue vinyl and handles. It was set up for lead guitar, bass or PA use, with two guitar inputs, two bass inputs and two mixer inputs. Its 140 watts were obtained with eight tubes – four 6550s, two 12AU7s and two 12AX7s. It had two volume and a master gain controls plus bass, middle, treble and presence controls. Power on and separate standby switches. Four speaker output jacks. The coolest feature was a “tunneling circuit” that allowed, near as we can tell, blending of channels, which meant you could pump up the bass on one and hyper the treble on the other, and combine them. For a little extra punch, you could throw a hi-boost switch, too. The UX-1516 guitar cabinet was a 150-watter. For bass, the UX-1512 was a 200-watt Reflex Speaker Cabinet. Cost for the guitar outfit was $1,400, for the bass outfit $1,450.
One of the most important attributes of boost pedals is their transparency. In other words, they need to able to boost the signal without changing the signal itself. As easy as it sounds, achieving good transparency is pretty hard and not many pedals are capable of doing so. With that said, a good booster pedal is a pretty powerful tool in the right hands.
In 1966 Vox introduced the revolutionary but problematic GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. The instrument's trigger mechanism required a specially-wired plectrum that completed circuit connections to each fret, resulting in a very wide and unwieldy neck. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, though this never panned out. According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative. The instrument never became popular, but it was a precursor to the modern guitar synthesizer.

This study proposes a systematic approach for modelling and three-axis CNC milling of solid wood parts used in stringed electric musical instruments, mainly in electric guitars and basses, through CAD/CAM technology. Design and manufacturing philosophy undertakes particular characteristics of tonal woods, so as to produce high-quality resonant musical instrument parts with high accuracy. To do so, it is crucial to identify design features and to apply the appropriate machining strategies and parameter values based on obtained knowledge, as these have a great impact on both the acoustic characteristics of the parts and on the total appearance of the instrument, thus making it more appealing in a competitive market. Customization of musical instruments is well received among professional musicians who wish to stand out during their performance, as well as to own an instrument of uniquely original shape and sonic properties. Keeping custom instruments cost reasonable is a challenge, unless the overall production is systematic and modular. The proposed approach was developed and tested on a custom solid electric guitar, which was then finished and assembled with off-the-shelf components to form a great looking and sounding electric guitar.
Some solid-bodied guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul Supreme, the PRS Singlecut or the Fender Telecaster Thinline, among others, are built with hollows in the body. These hollows are designed specifically not to interfere with the critical bridge and string anchor point on the solid body. The motivation for this can be to reduce weight, to achieve a semi-hollow tone, or both.
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